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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Development of a 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model is established based on MODTRAN4. Moreover, the methods of calculating the ratio of atmospheric transmission, path radiation and single scattering solar radiation are presented. This 3D model is running by ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, atmospheric radiative transfer model, infrared radiation

Zhifeng Lu; Ge Li; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

An Iterative Radiative Transfer Code For Ocean-Atmosphere Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the details of an iterative radiative transfer code for computing the intensity and degree of polarization of diffuse radiation in models of the ocean-atmosphere system. The present code neglects the upwelling radiation from below the ...

Ziauddin Ahmad; Robert S. Fraser

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Partially Cloudy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation treatment of the broken-cloud problem is presented, based upon various stochastic models of the equation of radiative transfer that consider the clouds and clear sky as a two-component mixture. These models, recently introduced in the ...

F. Malvagi; R. N. Byrne; G. C. Pomraning; R. C. J. Somerville

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Spectrally Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These “spectrally invariant relationships” are the consequence of wavelength ...

A. Marshak; Y. Knyazikhin; J. C. Chiu; W. J. Wiscombe

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Application of the adjoint method in atmospheric radiative transfer calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transfer of solar radiation through a standard mid-latitude summer atmosphere including different amounts of aerosols (from clear to hazy) has been computed. The discrete-ordinates (S/sub N/) method, which has been developed to a high degree of computational efficiency and accuracy primarily for nuclear radiation shielding applications, is employed in a forward as well as adjoint mode. In the adjoint mode the result of a transfer calculation is an importance function (adjoint intensity) which allows the calculation of transmitted fluxes, or other radiative responses, for any arbitrary source distribution. The theory of the adjoint method is outlined in detail and physical interpretations are developed for the adjoint intensity. If, for example, the downward directed solar flux at ground level, F/sub lambda/ (z = 0), is desired for N different solar zenith angles, a regular (forward) radiative transfer calculation must be repeated for each solar zenith angle. In contrast, only 1 adjoint transfer calculation gives F/sub lambda/ (z = 0) for all solar zenith angles in a hazy aerosol atmosphere, for 1 wavelength interval, in 2.3 seconds on a CDC-7600 computer. A total of 155 altitude zones were employed between 0 and 70 km, and the convergence criterion for the ratio of fluxes from successive iterations was set at 2 x 10/sup -3/. Our results demonstrate not only the applicability of the highly efficient modern S/sub N/ codes, but indicate also conceptual and computational advantages when the adjoint formulation of the radiative transfer equation is used.

Gerstl, S.A.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Two-Dimensional Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Atmospheres: The Spherical Harmonic Spatial Grid Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new two-dimensional monochromatic method that computes the transfer of solar or thermal radiation through atmospheres with arbitrary optical properties is described. The model discretizes the radiative transfer equation by expanding the angular ...

K. Franklin Evans

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Radiative Transfer System Using the Analytic Four-Stream Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere–ocean radiative transfer model based on the analytic four-stream approximation has been developed. It is shown that this radiation model is computationally efficient and at the same time can achieve acceptable accuracy for ...

Wei-Liang Lee; K. N. Liou

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

9

Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Distribution for Shortwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The full-spectrum correlated k-distribution (FSCK) method, originally developed for applications in combustion systems, is adapted for use in shortwave atmospheric radiative transfer. By weighting k distributions by the solar source function, the ...

Daniel T. Pawlak; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Michael F. Modest; Jason N. S. Cole

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

On the Correlated k-Distribution Method for Radiative Transfer in Nonhomogeneous Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlated k-distribution method for radiative transfer in nonhomogeneous atmospheres is discussed in terms of the physical and mathematical conditions under which this method is valid. Two correlated conditions are necessary and sufficient ...

Qiang Fu; K. N. Liou

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castaño, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part I: Spatial Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Monte Carlo–based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model of high spectral and spatial resolution is presented. It is used to investigate the difference in broadband solar radiation absorption, top-of-the-atmosphere upwelling, and ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Analytic Green’s Function for Radiative Transfer in Plane-Parallel Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green’s function is a widely used approach for boundary value problems. In problems related to radiative transfer, Green’s function has been found to be useful in land, ocean, and atmosphere remote sensing. It is also a key element in higher ...

Yi Qin; Michael A. Box

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Method for Longwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Using an Effective Planck Function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlated-k-distribution (CKD) method is widely used in the radiative transfer schemes of atmospheric models; it involves dividing the spectrum into a number of bands and then reordering the gaseous absorption coefficients within each one. ...

Robin J. Hogan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

TAU: A 1D radiative transfer code for transmission spectroscopy of extrasolar planet atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The TAU code is a 1D line-by-line radiative transfer code, which is generally applicable for modelling transmission spectra of close-in extrasolar planets. The inputs are the assumed pressure-temperature profile of the planetary atmosphere, the continuum absorption coefficients and the absorption cross-sections for the trace molecular absorbers present in the model, as well as the fundamental system parameters taken from the published literature. The program then calculates the optical path through the planetary atmosphere of the radiation from the host star, and quantifies the absorption due to the modelled composition in a transmission spectrum of transit depth as a function of wavelength. The code is written in C++, parallelised using OpenMP, and is available for public download and use from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/exoplanets/.

Hollis, M D J; Tinetti, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

On the application of the MODTRAN4 atmospheric radiative transfer code to optical remote sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantification of atmospheric effects on the solar radiation measured by a spaceborne or airborne optical sensor is required for some key tasks in remote sensing, such as atmospheric correction, simulation of realistic scenarios or retrieval of atmospheric ...

Luis Guanter; Rudolf Richter; Hermann Kaufmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thin cirrus cloud thermal infrared radiative transfer model has been developed for application to cloudy satellite data assimilation. This radiation model was constructed by combining the Optical Path Transmittance (OPTRAN) model, developed for ...

Qing Yue; K. N. Liou; S. C. Ou; B. H. Kahn; P. Yang; G. G. Mace

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

19

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Discrete Ordinate, Multiple Scattering, Radiative Transfer Model of the Venus Atmosphere from 0.1 to 260 ?m  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe a new radiative transfer model of the Venus atmosphere (RTM) that includes optical properties from nine gases and four cloud modes between 0.1 and 260 ?m. A multiple-stream discrete ordinate flux solver is used to calculate ...

Christopher Lee; Mark Ian Richardson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Parameterization of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Part I: Validity of Simple Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines a radiation parameterization method for deriving broadband fluxes that is currently being implemented in a number of global and regional atmospheric models. The rationale for the use of the 2-stream method as a way of solving ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Philip M. Gabriel; Philip T. Partain

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method for Three-Dimensional Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new algorithm for modeling radiative transfer in inhomogeneous three-dimensional media is described. The spherical harmonics discrete ordinate method uses a spherical harmonic angular representation to reduce memory use and time computing the ...

K. Franklin Evans

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A New Look at the Discrete Ordinate Method for Radiative Transfer Calculations in Anisotropically Scattering Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The difficulties inherent in the conventional numerical implementation of the discrete ordinate method (following Chandrasekhar's prescription) for solving the radiative transfer equation are discussed. A matrix formulation is developed to ...

Knut Stamnes; Roy A. Swanson

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Assessing 1D Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to assess the performance of 1D solar radiative transfer codes that are used currently both for research and in weather and climate models. Emphasis is on interpretation and handling of unresolved clouds. ...

H. W. Barker; G. L. Stephens; P. T. Partain; J. W. Bergman; B. Bonnel; K. Campana; E. E. Clothiaux; S. Clough; S. Cusack; J. Delamere; J. Edwards; K. F. Evans; Y. Fouquart; S. Freidenreich; V. Galin; Y. Hou; S. Kato; J. Li; E. Mlawer; J.-J. Morcrette; W. O'Hirok; P. Räisänen; V. Ramaswamy; B. Ritter; E. Rozanov; M. Schlesinger; K. Shibata; P. Sporyshev; Z. Sun; M. Wendisch; N. Wood; F. Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

26

Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty: Pyrgeometers Compared to an Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, and Radiative Transfer Model Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Because atmospheric longwave radiation is one of the most fundamental elements of an expected climate change, there has been a strong interest in improving measurements and model calculations in recent years. Important questions are how reliable and consistent are atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations and what are the uncertainties? The First International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison, which was held at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Souther Great Plains site in Oklahoma, answers these questions at least for midlatitude summer conditions and reflects the state of the art for atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations. The 15 participating pyrgeometers were all calibration-traced standard instruments chosen from a broad international community. Two new chopped pyrgeometers also took part in the comparison. And absolute sky-scanning radiometer (ASR), which includes a pyroelectric detector and a reference blackbody source, was used for the first time as a reference standard instrument to field calibrate pyrgeometers during clear-sky nighttime measurements. Owner-provided and uniformly determined blackbody calibration factors were compared. Remarkable improvements and higher pyrgeometer precision were achieved with field calibration factors. Results of nighttime and daytime pyrgeometer precision and absolute uncertainty are presented for eight consecutive days of measurements, during which period downward longwave irradiance varied between 260 and 420 W m-2. Comparisons between pyrgeometers and the absolute ASR, the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, and radiative transfer models LBLRTM and MODTRAN show a surprisingly good agreement of <2 W m-2 for nighttime atmospheric longwave irradiance measurements and calculations.

Philipona, J. R.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Stoffel, T.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Reda, I.; Stifter, Armin; Wendling, Peter; Wood, Norm; Clough, Shepard A.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Anderson, Gail; Revercomb, Henry E.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part II: Spectral Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a two-part paper, the spectral response of the interaction between gases, cloud droplets, and solar radiation is investigated using a Monte Carlo-based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model with a spectral ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

29

Parameterizations for Water Vapor IR Radiative Transfer in Both the Middle and Lower Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor contributes a maximum of 1°C/day to the middle atmospheric thermal infrared (IR) cooling. This magnitude is small but not negligible. Because of the small amount of mass involved and the extremely narrow molecular absorption lines at ...

Ming-Dah Chou; William L. Ridgway; Michael M-H. Yan

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

THE I3RC: Bringing Together the Most Advanced Radiative Transfer Tools for Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of clouds with solar and terrestrial radiation is one of the most important topics of climate research. In recent years it has been recognized that only a full three-dimensional (3D) treatment of this interaction can provide ...

Robert F. Cahalan; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Alexander Marshak; K. Franklin Evans; Anthony B. Davis; Robert Pincus; Ken H. Yetzer; Bernhard Mayer; Roger Davies; Thomas P. Ackerman; Howard W. Barker; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Robert G. Ellingson; Michael J. Garay; Evgueni Kassianov; Stefan Kinne; Andreas Macke; William O'Hirok; Philip T. Partain; Sergei M. Prigarin; Alexei N. Rublev; Graeme L. Stephens; Frederic Szczap; Ezra E. Takara; Támas Várnai; Guoyong Wen; Tatiana B. Zhuravleva

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over ...

X. Xiang; E. A. Smith; C. G. Justus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Two-Stream Approximations to Radiative Transfer in Planetary Atmospheres: A Unified Description of Existing Methods and a New Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing two-stream approximations to radiative transfer theory for particulate media are shown to be represented by identical forms of coupled differential equations if the intensity is replaced by integrals of the intensity over hemispheres. ...

W. E. Meador; W. R. Weaver

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

34

Four-Stream Isosector Approximation for Solar Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For radiative transfer in a thin atmosphere, an analytical four-stream isosector approximation for solar radiative transfer is presented. This approximation method is based on the assumption of four spherical sectors of isotropic intensities. ...

J. Li; J. S. Dobbie

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Infrared Radiative Properties Of the Maritime Antarctic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The longwave radiation environment of the Antarctic Peninsula and Southern Ocean has been investigated using radiometric Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements of atmospheric emission in conjunction with detailed radiative transfer ...

Dan Lubin

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) Pilot Experiment at NYC" - Michael Reynolds, BNL 17:30 "EML Pilot Studies for the Urban Atmospheric Observatory" - Hsi-Na (Sam) Lee, EML 17:40 "A...

37

A General Strategy for Physics-Based Model Validation Illustrated with Earthquake Phenomenology, Atmospheric Radiative Transfer, and Computational Fluid Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation is often defined as the process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world from the perspective of its intended uses. Validation is crucial as industries and governments depend increasingly on predictions by computer models to justify their decisions. In this article, we survey the model validation literature and propose to formulate validation as an iterative construction process that mimics the process occurring implicitly in the minds of scientists. We thus offer a formal representation of the progressive build-up of trust in the model, and thereby replace incapacitating claims on the impossibility of validating a given model by an adaptive process of constructive approximation. This approach is better adapted to the fuzzy, coarse-grained nature of validation. Our procedure factors in the degree of redundancy versus novelty of the experiments used for validation as well as the degree to which the model predicts the observations. We illustrate the new methodology first with the maturation of Quantum Mechanics as the arguably best established physics theory and then with several concrete examples drawn from some of our primary scientific interests: a cellular automaton model for earthquakes, an anomalous diffusion model for solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere, and a computational fluid dynamics code for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. This article is an augmented version of Sornette et al. [2007] that appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2007 (doi: 10.1073/pnas.0611677104), with an electronic supplement at URL http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/0611677104/DC1. Sornette et al. [2007] is also available in preprint form at physics/0511219.

Didier Sornette; Anthony B. Davis; James R. Kamm; Kayo Ide

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Influence of Radiative Transfer on the Mass and Heat Budgets of Ice Crystals Failing in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical study was carried out to investigate the effect of radiative heating and cooling on the mass and heat budgets of an ice crystal. Equations describing the radiative budget of an ice crystal were derived and particle absorption ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attenuation of solar radiation by the atmosphere between the heliostat and receiver of a Central Receiver solar energy system has been computed for a number of atmospheric conditions and tower-heliostat distances. The most important atmospheric variable is found to be the atmospheric aerosol content. No dependence of atmospheric water vapor is found and only a weak dependence on solar zenith angle. For a 500 m heliostat-tower distance two to four percent reductions are expected under typical desert conditions (50 to 120 km visibility). The reduction is approximately linear with heliostat-tower distance. A representative value of the attenuation coefficient is 0.051 km/sup -1/.

Randall, C.M.

1977-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advances in Radiative Transfer Modeling in Support of Satellite Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of fast and accurate radiative transfer models for clear atmospheric conditions has enabled direct assimilation of clear-sky radiances from satellites in numerical weather prediction models. In this article, fast radiative transfer ...

Fuzhong Weng

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility...

42

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

43

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

44

A Radiation Fog Model with a Detailed Treatment of the Interaction between Radiative Transfer and Fog Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional radiation fog model is presented which includes a detailed description of the interaction between atmospheric radiative transfer and the microphysical structure of the fog. Aerosol particles and activated cloud droplets are ...

A. Bott; U. Sievers; W. Zdunkowski

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

Ackerman, T

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer on Low-Level Cyclogenesis M. J. Leach and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina Introduction Many investigators have documented the role that thermodynamic forcing due to radiative flux divergence plays in the enhancement or generation of circulation. Most of these studies involve large-scale systems (e.g., Slingo et al. 1988), small-scale systems such as thunderstorms (Chen and Cotton 1988), and squall lines (Chin, submitted). The generation of circulation on large scales results from the creation of divergence in the upper troposphere and the maintenance of low-level potentially unstable air, and the maintenance of baroclinicity throughout

47

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

48

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Title Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Salamanca, Francisco, Shaheen R. Tonse, Surabi Menon, Vishal Garg, Krishna P. Singh, Manish Naja, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 4 Abstract We evaluate differences in clear-sky upwelling shortwave radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere in response to increasing the albedo of roof surfaces in an area of India with moderately high aerosol loading. Treated (painted white) and untreated (unpainted) roofs on two buildings in northeast India were analyzed on five cloudless days using radiometric imagery from the IKONOS satellite. Comparison of a radiative transfer model (RRTMG) and radiometric satellite observations shows good agreement (R2 = 0.927). Results show a mean increase of ~50 W m-2 outgoing at the top of the atmosphere for each 0.1 increase of the albedo at the time of the observations and a strong dependence on atmospheric transmissivity.

49

AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

Robinson, Tyler D. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Catling, David C., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program DOESC-ARM...

51

COMPARING THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEMES ON CONVECTION SIMULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.

Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

N-Stream Approximations to Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Schuster's two-stream approximation is first derived from Chandrasekhar's radiative transfer equation, and then generalized to an arbitrary number of streams. The resulting technique for solving the transfer equation that is similar to the ...

Charles Acquista; Frederick House; James Jafolla

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Temporal Variations of Land Surface Microwave Emissivities over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface microwave emissivities are important geophysical parameters for atmospheric, hydrological, and biospheric studies. This study estimates land surface microwave emissivity using an atmospheric microwave radiative transfer model and a ...

Bing Lin; Patrick Minnis

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Field Experiment for Measurement of the Radiative Characteristics of a Hazy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two-and three-dimensional solutions to the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. A field experiment was conducted to test this theory. in the experiment the upward radiance was measured above ...

Y. J. Kaufman; T. W. Brakke; E. Eloranta

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

57

Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

58

Simple Radiative Transfer Methods for Calculating Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes in Inhomogeneous Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of cloud fraction as a means of incorporating horizontal cloud inhomogeneity in radiative transfer calculations is widespread in the atmospheric science community. This study addresses some issues pertaining to the use of cloud fraction ...

P. M. Gabriel; K. F. Evans

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Successive-Order-of-Interaction Radiative Transfer Model. Part II: Model Performance and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models for scattering atmospheres that are accurate yet computationally efficient are required for many applications, such as data assimilation in numerical weather prediction. The successive-order-of-interaction (SOI) model is ...

Christopher W. O’Dell; Andrew K. Heidinger; Thomas Greenwald; Peter Bauer; Ralf Bennartz

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Systematic Study of Longwave Radiative Heating and Cooling within Valleys and Basins Using a Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo code for the physically correct tracing of photons in cloudy atmospheres (MYSTIC) three-dimensional radiative transfer model was used in a parametric study to determine the strength of longwave radiative heating and cooling in ...

Sebastian W. Hoch; C. David Whiteman; Bernhard Mayer

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Spectral Reflectance and Atmospheric Energetics in Cirrus-like Clouds. Part II: Applications of a Fourier-Riccati Approach to Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major sources of uncertainty in climate studies is the detection of cirrus clouds and characterization of their radiative properties. Combinations of water vapor absorption channels (e.g., 1.38 µm), ice-water absorption channels (e.g., ...

Si-Chee Tsay; Philip M. Gabriel; Michael D. King; Graeme L. Stephens

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Radiative Heat Transfer between Neighboring Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The near-field interaction between two neighboring particles is known to produce enhanced radiative heat transfer. We advance in the understanding of this phenomenon by including the full electromagnetic particle response, heat exchange with the environment, and important radiative corrections both in the distance dependence of the fields and in the particle absorption coefficients. We find that crossed terms of electric and magnetic interactions dominate the transfer rate between gold and SiC particles, whereas radiative corrections reduce it by several orders of magnitude even at small separations. Radiation away from the dimer can be strongly suppressed or enhanced at low and high temperatures, respectively. These effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in nanostructured environments.

Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier Garcia de Abajo

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Structure of the Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate water vapor transport in an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium, a simplified dynamical convection model (DCM) was constructed that explicitly models moist convection and longwave radiation in a gray atmosphere. In the ...

Yoshiharu Iwasa; Yutaka Abe; Hiroshi Tanaka

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Rainfall and Radiative Heating Rates from TOGA COARE Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heat and moisture budgets are used to determine rainfall and radiative heating rates over the western Pacific warm pool during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Results are ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

67

Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections C. Hannay and R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. F. Evans Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds in the atmosphere are finite in extent and variable in every direction and in time. Long data sets from ground-based profilers, such as lidars or cloud radars, could provide a very valuable set of observations to characterize this variability. We may ask how well such profiling instruments can represent the cloud structure as measured by the magnitude of the three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer effect. The 3D radiative transfer effect is the difference between the domain average broadband solar surface

68

Implementing the Delta-Four-Stream Approximation for Solar Radiation Computations in an Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper quantification of the solar radiation budget and its transfer within the atmosphere is of utmost importance in climate modeling. The delta-four-stream (DFS) approximation has been demonstrated to offer a more accurate computational method ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Simulated Climatology of Spectrally Decomposed Atmospheric Infrared Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation experiment is conducted to inquire into the mean climate state and likely trends in atmospheric infrared radiation spectra. Upwelling and downwelling spectra at five vertical levels from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) ...

Yi Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Multimode Radiative Transfer in Finite Optical Media. I: Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a new method for solving the transfer of radiation within a laterally finite optical medium. A new radiative transfer equation, based on a multimode approach, is developed which includes the explicit effects of the sides ...

Rudolph W. Preisendorfer; Graeme L. Stephens

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

An Accurate and Efficient Radiation Algorithm for Middle Atmosphere Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate, efficient, and user-friendly radiation algorithm is developed for calculating net radiative heating rate in middle atmosphere models. The Curtis matrix interpolation scheme originally developed by Zhu is adopted with explicit ...

Xun Zhu

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

73

Retrieval of Sea Surface Temperature from Space, Based on Modeling of Infrared Radiative Transfer: Capabilities and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval (estimation) of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from space-based infrared observations is increasingly performed using retrieval coefficients derived from radiative transfer simulations of top-of-atmosphere brightness temperatures (...

Christopher J. Merchant; Pierre Le Borgne

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Gastropod Fast Radiative Transfer Model for Advanced Infrared Sounders and Characterization of Its Errors for Radiance Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal aspects of the development of Gastropod, a fixed-pressure-grid fast radiative transfer model for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), are described. Performance of the forward and gradient operators is characterized, and the impact ...

V. Sherlock; A. Collard; S. Hannon; R. Saunders

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

76

Boundary conditions for NLTE polarized radiative transfer with incident radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized NLTE radiative transfer in the presence of scattering in spectral lines and/or in continua may be cast in a so-called reduced form for six reduced components of the radiation field. In this formalism the six components of the reduced source function are angle-independent quantities. It thus reduces drastically the storage requirement of numerical codes. This approach encounters a fundamental problem when the medium is illuminated by a polarized incident radiation, because there is a priori no way of relating the known (and measurable) Stokes parameters of the incident radiation to boundary conditions for the reduced equations. The origin of this problem is that there is no unique way of deriving the radiation reduced components from its Stokes parameters (only the inverse operation is clearly defined). The method proposed here aims at enabling to work with arbitrary incident radiation field (polarized or unpolarized). In previous works an ad-hoc treatment of the boundary conditions, applying to case...

Faurobert, Marianne; Atanackovic, Olga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modeling radiative transfer in photobioreactors for algal growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of radiative transfer within an air-lift photobioreactor (PBR) are demonstrated by coupling it to the fluid hydrodynamics and employing wavelength dependant properties for the participating media. The radiative properties of the algal media ... Keywords: CFD, Computer simulation, Photobioreactor, Radiation transfer

Zachary C. Wheaton; Gautham Krishnamoorthy

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

80

Net Exchange Reformulation of Radiative Transfer in the CO2 15-?m Band on Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The net exchange formulation (NEF) is an alternative to the usual radiative transfer formulation. It was proposed by two authors in 1967, but until now, this formulation has been used only in a very few cases for atmospheric studies. The aim of ...

Jean-Louis Dufresne; Richard Fournier; Christophe Hourdin; Frédéric Hourdin

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for GCM Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for General Circulation Model Applications M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Y.-T. Hou National Centers for Environmental Prediction Camp Springs, Maryland Introduction The k-distribution shortwave radiation model developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, RRTM_SW_V2.4 (Clough et al. 2004), utilizes the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model, DISORT, for scattering calculations and 16 g-points in each of its 16 spectral bands. DISORT provides agreement with line-by-line flux calculations to within 1 Wm

82

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA Project in Brazil (Abstract):  This work describes the cross validation between two different...

83

Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

84

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Radars: Operational Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has supported the development of several millimeter-wavelength radars for the study of clouds. This effort has culminated in ...

Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Brooks E. Martner; Thomas P. Ackerman; Gerald G. Mace; Taneil Uttal; James H. Mather; Kevin B. Widener; Mark A. Miller; Daniel J. Rodriguez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Absorption of Solar Radiation by Atmospheric O4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopic measurements of the atmospheric solar radiation attenuation reveal that the near ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared absorption of the oxygen collision complex (O2)2, thus far omitted from models, is important for the direct heating ...

Klaus Pfeilsticker; Frank Erle; Ulrich Platt

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radiative Heating and Cooling Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the limitations to the accurate calculation of radiative heating and cooling rates in the stratosphere and mesosphere has been the lack of accurate data on the atmospheric temperature and composition. Data from the LIMS experiment on ...

John C. Gille; Lawrence V. Lyjak

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Surface Albedo Estimates from Nimbus-7 ERB Data and a Two-Stream Approximation of the Radiative Transfer Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar zenith angle-dependent surface albedo is determined by equating top of the atmosphere (TOA) albedo evaluated from Nimbus-7 data with TOA albedo predicted by a two-layer, two-stream radiative transfer model of the atmosphere. Results are ...

Howard W. Barker; John A. Davies

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effects of mesoscale surface inhomogeneities on atmospheric boundary layer transfer  

SciTech Connect

Defining the nature of turbulent transfer over horizontally inhomogeneous surfaces remains one of the challenges in meteorology. Because the transfer of energy and momentum through the atmospheric boundary layer forms part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models (GCMs), the problem is important. Over the last two decades, advances in sensor and computer technology wave made good point measurements of turbulent fluxes fairly routine. A fundamental question with respect to climate models, however, is how such point measurements are related to average fluxes over the area of a GCM grid box. In this paper we will use data from the field program to depict the evolution of the boundary layer over adjacent, sharply contrasting surface types on two separate occasions. We will then use simple scaling based on the observations to argue that sub-gridscale motions would often be likely to significantly alter the estimates and resulting parameterizations of GCM-scale surface fluxes in the region.

Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Central U.S. Atmospheric Water and Energy Budgets Adjusted for Diurnal Sampling Biases Using Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water and energy budgets of the atmospheric column over the Mississippi River basin are estimated using 18 yr (1976–93) of twice-daily radiosonde observations, top-of-atmosphere net radiation estimates from the Earth Radiation Budget ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Guido D. Salvucci; Dara Entekhabi

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Semi-implicit time integration for PN thermal radiative transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implicit time integration involving the solution of large systems of equations is the current paradigm for time-dependent radiative transfer. In this paper we present a semi-implicit, linear discontinuous Galerkin method for the spherical harmonics (P"N) ... Keywords: Asymptotic diffusion limit, Discontinuous Galerkin, PN approximation, Thermal radiative transfer

Ryan G. McClarren; Thomas M. Evans; Robert B. Lowrie; Jeffery D. Densmore

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Present and Future Computing Requirements Radiative Transfer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiative shock (e.g., ensman 1994) gas temperature radiation temperature Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) non-equilibrium (NLTE) CaII microphysics 1GB atomic data...

92

Improved Atmospheric Solar Radiation Budget Pyranometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar radiation budget is investigated with seven pyranometers. Three of these instruments have horizontally aligned sensors. The sensors of the remaining four instruments are vertically aligned in such a way that their normals point to the ...

Gottfried Hänel; Karin Kastner

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Background Starting from a very simple stochastic cloud model by Mullamaa et al. (1972), several different stochastic models have been developed to describe radiative transfer regime in single-layer broken clouds (Kargin 1984; Titov 1990; Malvagi and Pomraning 1992; Barker et al. 1992; Malvagi et al. 1993; Kargin and Prigarin 1994; Prigarin and Titov 1996; Marshak et al. 1998; Prigarin et al. 1998, 2001; Evans et al. 1999, 2001). Recently Kassianov (2003a) generalized the Titov's (1990) stochastic model

94

Solar Radiative Transfer for Wind-Sheared Cumulus Cloud Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo method of photon transport was used to simulate solar radiative transfer for cumulus-like cloud forms (and cloud fields) possessing structural characteristics similar to those induced by wind shear. Using regular infinite arrays ...

Howard W. Barker

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

An Improved Microwave Radiative Transfer Model for Tropical Oceanic Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparation for the launch of TRMM, new algorithms must be created that take advantage of the combined data from radar and microwave radiometers that will be on board the satellite. A microwave radiative transfer algorithm with a one-...

Jeffrey R. Tesmer; Thomas T. Wilheit

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multiple Scattering Parameterization in Thermal Infrared Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic formulation of various radiative transfer parameterizations is presented, including the absorption approximation (AA), ?-two-stream approximation (D2S), ?-four-stream approximation (D4S), and ?-two- and four-stream combination ...

Qiang Fu; K. N. Liou; M. C. Cribb; T. P. Charlock; A. Grossman

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Radiative Transfer in Cloud Fields with Random Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical results are given to estimate the importance of effects associated with the stochastic geometry of cloud fields. These results show the important of treating radiative transfer in broken clouds as a statistical problem. In the case of ...

Vladimir E. Zuev; Georgii A. Titov

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Community Radiative Transfer Model for Stratospheric Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better use the Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) data for reanalysis and climate studies, issues associated with the fast radiative transfer (RT) model for SSU have recently been revisited and the results have been implemented into the ...

Yong Chen; Yong Han; Quanhua Liu; Paul Van Delst; Fuzhong Weng

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Scaling Group of the Radiative Transfer Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the equation of radiative transfer is invariant under a group of simultaneous transformations of the scale (i.e., the optical thickness) and the phase function. In this way, we provide a unified explanation of various empirical ...

Bruce H. J. McKellar; Michael A. Box

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effective Diameter in Radiation Transfer: General Definition, Applications, and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of an effective radius for radiation transfer calculations in water clouds has been common for many years, the export of this concept to ice clouds has been fraught with uncertainty, due to the nonspherical shapes of ice ...

David L. Mitchell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer  

SciTech Connect

Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An Indirect Effect of Ice Nuclei on Atmospheric Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with observed large-scale forcing is used to study how ice nuclei (IN) affect the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In all the numerical experiments carried out, the cloud ice ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Minghua Zhang; Arthur Y. Hou; Shaocheng Xie; Stephen Lang; Xiaowen Li; David O’C. Starr; Xiaofan Li; Joanne Simpson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations S. Kato Center for Atmospheric Sciences Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction Recent development of remote sensing instruments by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM?) Program provides information of spatial and temporal variability of cloud structures. However it is not clear what cloud properties are required to express complicated cloud fields in a realistic way and how to use them in a relatively simple one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer model to compute the domain averaged irradiance. To address this issue, a simple shortwave radiative transfer model that can treat the vertical cloud optical property correlation is developed. The model is based on the gamma-weighted

105

Enhanced radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates in the framework of the scattering theory. We predict an enhancement of the heat transfer as we increase the depth of the corrugations while keeping the distance of closest approach fixed. We interpret this effect in terms of the evolution of plasmonic and guided modes as a function of the grating's geometry.

R. Guérout; J. Lussange; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -P. Hugonin; D. A. R. Dalvit; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radiative Forcing of Climate By Ice-Age Atmospheric Dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During glacial periods, dust deposition rates and inferred atmospheric concentrations were globally much higher than present. According to recent model results, the large enhancement of atmospheric dust content at the last glacial maximum (LGM) can be explained only if increases in the potential dust source areas are taken into account. Such increases are to be expected, due to e#ects of low precipitation and low atmospheric (CO 2 ) on plant growth. Here the modelled three-dimensional dust fields from Mahowald et al. and modelled seasonally varying surface-albedo fields derived in a parallel manner, are used to quantify the mean radiative forcing due to modern (non-anthropogenic) and LGM dust. The e#ect of mineralogical provenance on the radiative properties of the dust is taken into account, as is the range of optical properties associated with uncertainties about the mixing state of the dust particles. The high-latitude (poleward of 45#) mean change in forcing (LGM minus modern) is estimated to be small (--0.9 to +0.2 W m ), especially when compared to nearly --20 W m due to reflection from the extended ice sheets. Although the net e#ect of dust over ice sheets is a positive forcing (warming), much of the simulated high-latitude dust was not over the ice sheets, but over unglaciated regions close to the expanded dust source region in central Asia. In the tropics the change in forcing is estimated to be overall negative, and of similarly large magnitude (--2.2 to --3.2 W m ) to the radiative cooling e#ect of low atmospheric (CO 2 ). Thus, the largest long-term climatic e#ect of the LGM dust is likely to have been a cooling of the tropics. Low tropical sea-surface temperatures, low atmospheric (CO 2 ) and high atmospheric dust loading may be mutually reinforcin...

T. Claquin; C. Roelandt; K.E. Kohfeld; S.P. Harrison; I. Tegen; I.C. Prentice; Y. Balkanski; Prentice Æ Y. Balkanski; G. Bergametti; Æ N. Mahowald; Æ M. Schulz; M. Schulz; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; C. Roelandt; C. Roelandt; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; G. Bergametti; H. Rodhe; Æ H. Rodhe; M. Hansson; M. Hansson; N. Mahowald; N. Mahowald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Interactions between Vegetation and Climate: Radiative and Physiological Effects of Doubled Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and physiological effects of doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on climate are investigated using a coupled biosphere–atmosphere model. Five 30-yr climate simulations, designed to assess the radiative and physiological effects ...

L. Bounoua; G. J. Collatz; P. J. Sellers; D. A. Randall; D. A. Dazlich; S. O. Los; J. A. Berry; I. Fung; C. J. Tucker; C. B. Field; T. G. Jensen

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Accounting for Unresolved Clouds in a 1D Infrared Radiative Transfer Model. Part I: Solution for Radiative Transfer, Including Cloud Scattering and Overlap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various aspects of infrared radiative transfer through clouds are investigated. First, three solutions to the IR radiative transfer equation are presented and assessed, each corresponding to a different approximation for the Planck function. It ...

J. Li

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Warming and Methane--Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as ''greenhouse gases.'' These gases include water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoro-carbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Greenhouse gases can absorb outgoing infrared (heat) radiation and re-emit it back to Earth, warming the surface. Thus, these gases act like the glass of a greenhouse enclosure, trapping infrared radiation inside and warming the space. One of the more important greenhouse gases is the naturally occurring hydrocarbon methane. Methane, a primary component of natural gas, is the second most important contributor to the greenhouse effect (after carbon dioxide). Natural sources of methane include wetlands, fossil sources, termites, oceans, fresh-waters, and non-wetland soils. Methane is also produced by human-related (or anthropogenic) activities such as fossil fuel production, coal mining, rice cultivation, biomass burning, water treatment facilities, waste management operations and landfills, and domesticated livestock operations (Figure 1). These anthropogenic activities account for approximately 70% of the methane emissions to the atmosphere. Methane is removed naturally from the atmosphere in three ways. These methods, commonly referred to as sinks, are oxidation by chemical reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl ion, oxidation within the stratosphere, and microbial uptake by soils. In spite of their important role in removing excess methane from the atmosphere, the sinks cannot keep up with global methane production. Methane concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by 145% since 1800. Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world population growth, pointing to anthropogenic sources as the cause (Figure 2). Increases in the methane concentration reduce Earth's natural cooling efficiency by trapping more of the outgoing terrestrial infrared radiation, increasing the near-surface temperature.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

112

Pioneering remote sensing in the USSR. 1. Radiation transfer in the optical wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a review is presented of the pioneering space research carried out under the leadership of Professor K. Ya. Kondratyev and with his direct participation. Some of his work concerned with radiation transfer in the atmosphere and with remote ...

T. A. Sushkevich

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA Project in Brazil Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This work describes the cross validation between two different core radiation transfer models that will be applied during the SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Assessment): the BRAZIL-SR, and the SUNY-Albany. The model cross validation was performed by using two reference sites in Brazil: at Caicó (06°28'01"S - 037°05'05"W,175.8 m), and Florianópolis (27°34'18"S - 048°31'42"W, 10 m), Satellite data were collected by INPE-CPTEC for GOES-8, that also provides for its quality assessment, sectoring, storing and distribution to the participating teams. In this work we show the first results of this cross-validation along with some discussions on model deviations

114

Handbook of radiative heat transfer in high-temperature gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work offers both an original method for calculating optical properties of low-temperature plasma at elevated densities ... and an effective new means for calculating radiative heat transfer in hot gases and plasma with arbitrary temperature and pressure distributions. These methods allow for automatic accounting of all details of the plasma spectrum, including the line structure. This volume contains radiant transfer in problems of heat transfer; integration over frequency; methods of partial characteristics; method of effective populations; calculation of partial characteristics; appendix: tabular data.

Soloukhin, R.I.; Golovnev, I.F.; Zamurayev, V.P.; Katsnelson, S.S.; Kovalskaya, G.A.; Sevastyanenko, V.G.; Soloukhin, R.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Programmatic Background and Design of the Cloud and Radiation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a major new program of atmospheric measurement and modeling. The program is intended to improve the understanding of processes that affect ...

Gerald M. Stokes; Stephen E. Schwartz

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Advantages of a Topographically Controlled Runoff Simulation in a Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two methods to incorporate subgrid variability in soil moisture and runoff production into soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models are compared: 1) the variable infiltration capacity model approach (VIC), and 2) a modified “TOPMODEL” ...

Kirsten Warrach; Marc Stieglitz; Heinz-Theo Mengelkamp; Ehrhard Raschke

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Choosing an Approximation to the Equation of Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the accuracy of the PL, approximation to the equation of radiative transfer in the presence of scattering/absorbing clouds of various optical thicknesses. We find that very accurate net fluxes can be obtained with the P1, (two-stream) ...

James A. Fillmore; Alan H. Karp

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A mesoscopic description of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a formulation of the nanoscale radiative heat transfer (RHT) using concepts of mesoscopic physics. We introduce the analog of the Sharvin conductance using the quantum of thermal conductance. The formalism provides a convenient framework to analyse the physics of RHT at the nanoscale. Finally, we propose a RHT experiment in the regime of quantized conductance.

Svend-Age Biehs; Emmanuel Rousseau; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted the Department to accelerate the research to improve predictions of climate change. The emphasis is on

120

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

122

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

123

Incorporating the Effects of 3D Radiative Transfer in the Presence of Clouds into Two-Stream Multilayer Radiation Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new method for representing the important effects of horizontal radiation transport through cloud sides in two-stream radiation schemes. Ordinarily, the radiative transfer equations are discretized separately for the clear ...

Robin J. Hogan; Jonathan K. P. Shonk

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Data systems for science integration within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was developed by the US Department of Energy to support the goals and mission of the US Global Change Research Program. The purpose of the ARM program is to improve the predictive capabilities of General Circulation Models (GCMs) in their treatment of clouds and radiative transfer effects. Three experimental testbeds were designed for the deployment of instruments to collect atmospheric data used to drive the GCMs. Each site, known as a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART), consists of a highly available, redundant data system for the collection of data from a variety of instrumentation. The first CART site was deployed in April 1992 in the Southern Great Plains (SGP), Lamont, Oklahoma, with the other two sites to follow in early 1996 in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and in 1997 on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA). Approximately 1.5 GB of data are transferred per day via the Internet from the CART sites, and external data sources to the ARM Experiment Center (EC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington. The Experimental Center is central to the ARM data path and provides for the collection, processing, analysis and delivery of ARM data. Data from the CART sites from a variety of instrumentation, observational systems and from external data sources are transferred to the Experiment Center. The EC processes these data streams on a continuous basis to provide derived data products to the ARM Science Team in near real-time while maintaining a three-month running archive of data.

Gracio, D.K.; Hatfield, L.D.; Yates, K.R.; Voyles, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tichler, J.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cederwall, R.T.; Laufersweiler, M.J.; Leach, M.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Singley, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001.  

SciTech Connect

Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.5-1.0 F since the late 19th century. The 20th century's 10 warmest years all occurred in the last 15 years of the century, with 1998 being the warmest year of record. The global mean surface temperature is measured by a network of temperature-sensing instruments distributed around the world, including ships, ocean buoys, and weather stations on land. The data from this network are retrieved and analyzed by various organizations, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization. Worldwide temperature records date back to 1860. To reconstruct Earth's temperature history before 1860, scientists use limited temperature records, along with proxy indicators such as tree rings, pollen records, and analysis of air frozen in ancient ice. The solar energy received from the sun drives Earth's weather and climate. Some of this energy is reflected and filtered by the atmosphere, but most is absorbed by Earth's surface. The absorbed solar radiation warms the surface and is re-radiated as heat energy into the atmosphere. Some atmospheric gases, called greenhouse gases, trap some of the re-emitted heat, keeping the surface temperature regulated and suitable for sustaining life. Although the greenhouse effect is natural, some evidence indicates that human activities are producing increased levels of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Scientists believe that the combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. According to the EPA, the burning of fossil fuels for cars and trucks, the heating of homes and businesses, and the operation of power plants account for approximately 98% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. The increase of greenhouse gases will, theoretically, enhance the greenhouse effect by trapping more of the heat energy emitted by Earth's surface, thus increasing the surface temperatures on a global scale. Scientists expect that the global average surface temperature could rise 1-4.5 F in the next 50 years and as much as 10 F in the next century. Global warming could potentially have harmful effects on human health, water resources, forests, agriculture, wildlife, and coastal areas. A few degrees of warming might lead to more frequent and severe heat waves, worsened air pollution with adverse effects on human respiratory health, and wider spread of tropical disease such as malaria. The world's hydrologic cycle might be affected by an increase in evaporation and, thus, in precipitation. An increase in evaporation will increase atmospheric water vapor, a significant natural greenhouse gas. The increase in water vapor might further enhance the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect. This is known as a positive feedback. The increase in water vapor could also change the amount of clouds present in the atmosphere, which could reduce temperatures in a negative feedback. Many interrelated factors affect the global climate and are responsible for climate change. Predicting the outcome of the interactions among the many factors is not easy, but it must be addressed. The ARM Program is taking a lead in this effort by collecting vast amounts of data whose analysis will improve our forecasting models for both daily weather and long-term climate. For more information on the ARM Program, please visit our web site at www.arm.gov.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.5-1.0 F since the late 19th century. The 20th century's 10 warmest years all occurred in the last 15 years of the century, with 1998 being the warmest year of record. The global mean surface temperature is measured by a network of temperature-sensing instruments distributed around the world, including ships, ocean buoys, and weather stations on land. The data from this network are retrieved and analyzed by various organizations, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization. Worldwide temperature records date back to 1860. To reconstruct Earth's temperature history before 1860, scientists use limited temperature records, along with proxy indicators such as tree rings, pollen records, and analysis of air frozen in ancient ice. The solar energy received from the sun drives Earth's weather and climate. Some of this energy is reflected and filtered by the atmosphere, but most is absorbed by Earth's surface. The absorbed solar radiation warms the surface and is re-radiated as heat energy into the atmosphere. Some atmospheric gases, called greenhouse gases, trap some of the re-emitted heat, keeping the surface temperature regulated and suitable for sustaining life. Although the greenhouse effect is natural, some evidence indicates that human activities are producing increased levels of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Scientists believe that the combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. According to the EPA, the burning of fossil fuels for cars and trucks, the heating of homes and businesses, and the operation of power plants account for approximately 98% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. The increase of greenhouse gases will, theoretically, enhance the greenhouse effect by trapping more of the heat energy emitted by Earth's surface, thus increasing the surface temperatures on a global scale. Scientists expect that the global average surface temperature could rise 1-4.5 F in the next 50 years and as much as 10 F in the next century. Global warming could potentially have harmful effects on human health, water resources, forests, agriculture, wildlife, and coastal areas. A few degrees of warming might lead to more frequent and severe heat waves, worsened air pollution with adverse effects on human respiratory health, and wider spread of tropical disease such as malaria. The world's hydrologic cycle might be affected by an increase in evaporation and, thus, in precipitation. An increase in evaporation will increase atmospheric water vapor, a significant natural greenhouse gas. The increase in water vapor might further enhance the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect. This is known as a positive feedback. The increase in water vapor could also change the amount of clouds present in the atmosphere, which could reduce temperatures in a negative feedback. Many interrelated factors affect the global climate and are responsible for climate change. Predicting the outcome of the interactions among the many factors is not easy, but it must be addressed. The ARM Program is taking a lead in this effort by collecting vast amounts of data whose analysis will improve our forecasting models for both daily weather and long-term climate. For more information on the ARM Program, please visit our web site at www.arm.gov.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

Dana E. Veron

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Instantaneous Wavelet Energetic Transfers between Atmospheric Blocking and Local Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wavelet energetics technique, based on best-shift orthonormal wavelet analysis (OWA) of an instantaneous synoptic map, is constructed for diagnosing nonlinear kinetic energy (KE) transfers in five observed blocking cases. At least 90% of ...

Aimé Fournier

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Scalable photon monte carlo algorithms and software for the solution of radiative heat transfer problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative heat transfer plays a central role in many combustion and engineering applications. Because of its highly nonlinear and nonlocal nature, the computational cost can be extremely high to model radiative heat transfer effects accurately. In this ...

Ivana Veljkovic; Paul E. Plassmann

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Adjustment to Radiative Forcing in a Simple Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study calculates the adjustment to radiative forcing in a simple model of a mixed layer ocean coupled to the overlying atmosphere. One application of the model is to calculate how dust aerosols perturb the temperature of the atmosphere and ...

R. L. Miller

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Atmospheric Circulation Trends, 1950–2000: The Relative Roles of Sea Surface Temperature Forcing and Direct Atmospheric Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles of direct atmospheric radiative forcing (due to observed changes in well-mixed greenhouse gases, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, sulfate and volcanic aerosols, and solar output) and observed sea surface temperature (SST) ...

Clara Deser; Adam S. Phillips

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ISES- 2003 ISES- 2003 CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL Enio B. Pereira, Fernando R. Martins 1 Brazilian Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, 12245-970, SP, Brazil Phone + 55 12 39456741, Fax + 55 12 39456810, enio@dge.inpe.br Samuel L. Abreu, Hans Georg Beyer, Sergio Colle, and Solar Energy Laboratory - LABSOLAR - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina -UFSC, Florianopolis, 88040-900, (SC), Brazil, Richard Perez The University at Albany (SUNY), ASRC-CESTM, Albany, 12203 (NY), USA Abstract - This work describes the cross validation between two different core radiation transfer models that will be applied during the SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Assessment): the BRAZIL-SR, and the

133

Documentation for the intergalactic radiative transfer code IGMtransfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes the publically available numerical code "IGMtransfer", capable of performing intergalactic radiative transfer (RT) of light in the vicinity of the Lyman alpha (Lya) line. Calculating the RT in a (possibly adaptively refined) grid of cells resulting from a cosmological simulation, the code returns 1) a "transmission function", showing how the intergalactic medium (IGM) affects the Lya line at a given redshift, and 2) the "average transmission" of the IGM, making it useful for studying the results of reionization simulations.

Laursen, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

An Improved Parameterization for Estimating Effective Atmospheric Emissivity for Use in Calculating Daytime Downwelling Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved parameterization is presented for estimating effective atmospheric emissivity for use in calculating downwelling longwave radiation based on temperature, humidity, pressure, and solar radiation observations. The first improvement is ...

Todd M. Crawford; Claude E. Duchon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radiative Effects of Airborne Dust on Regional Energy Budgets at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of dust on the radiative energy budget at the top of the atmosphere were investigated using model calculations and measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Estimates of the dust optical depth were made from ...

Steven A. Ackerman; Hyosang Chung

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Parameterization of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Part II: Selection Rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes simple, computationally efficient methods of calculating 2-stream broadband fluxes and heating rates in the shortwave and longwave for multilayered media. The method, herein referred to as selection rules, is used in ...

Philip M. Gabriel; Philip T. Partain; Graeme L. Stephens

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Coniferous Canopy Characterized by Airborne Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation beneath a forest canopy can have large spatial variations, but this is frequently neglected in radiative transfer models for large-scale applications. To explicitly model spatial variations in subcanopy radiation, maps of canopy ...

Richard Essery; Peter Bunting; Aled Rowlands; Nick Rutter; Janet Hardy; Rae Melloh; Tim Link; Danny Marks; John Pomeroy

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study concerned with different modes of heal transfer in fibrous and cellulose insulating material is presented. A series of experiments were conducted using an attic simulator to determine the effects of ventilation on attic heat transfer, and the effect of infrared radiation on the thermal conductivity of the insulation system and on attic heat transfer. All the tests were performed at steady state conditions by controlling the roof deck temperature. Calculations are performed for insulation thicknesses between 1 inch (2.54cm) and 6.0 inches (15.24cm) and roof deck temperatures between 145°F (62.78°C) and 100°F (36.78°C). The temperature profiles within the insulation were measured by placing thermocouples at various levels within the insulation. The profiles for the cellulose insulation are linear. The profiles within the glass fiber insulation are non-linear due to the effect of infrared radiation. Also heat fluxes were measured through different insulation thicknesses and for different roof temperatures. It was found that a radiant barrier such as aluminum foil can reduce the heat flux significantly. Experimental results were compared to a Three-Region approximate solution developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The model was in good agreement with experimental results.

Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation in Cloudy Atmospheres: A 20 cm?1 Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral of solar radiation in typical water clouds is determined using a radiative transfer model based on LOWTRAN transmission functions at a 20 cm?1 resolution and Monte Carlo simulations of photon pathlength distributions. Relative ...

Roger Davies; William L. Ridgway; Kyung-Eak Kim

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Radiative Transfer Modeling and Remote Sensing Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Shephard, Mark Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, Eli...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: • Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. • Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. • Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. • Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. • Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. • Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. • Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Near-field radiative heat transfer for structured surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply an analytical approach for determining the near-field radiative heat transfer between a metallic nanosphere and a planar semi-infinite medium with some given surface structure. This approach is based on a perturbative expansion, and evaluated to first order in the surface profile. With the help of numerical results obtained for some simple model geometries we discuss typical signatures that should be obtainable with a near-field scanning thermal microscope operated in either constant-height or constant-distance mode.

Svend-Age Biehs; Oliver Huth; Felix Rüting

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Influences of atmospheric conditions and air mass on the ratio of ultraviolet to total solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

The technology to detoxify hazardous wastes using ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation is being investigated by the DOE/SERI Solar Thermal Technology Program. One of the elements of the technology evaluation is the assessment and characterization of UV solar radiation resources available for detoxification processes. This report describes the major atmospheric variables that determine the amount of UV solar radiation at the earth's surface, and how the ratio of UV-to-total solar radiation varies with atmospheric conditions. These ratios are calculated from broadband and spectral solar radiation measurements acquired at SERI, and obtained from the literature on modeled and measured UV solar radiation. The following sections discuss the atmospheric effects on UV solar radiation and provide UV-to-total solar radiation ratios from published studies, as well as measured values from SERI's data. A summary and conclusions are also given.

Riordan, C.J.; Hulstrom, R.L.; Myers, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Airtight container for the transfer of atmosphere-sensitive materials into vacuum-operated characterization instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and operation of a simple airtight container devised to facilitate the transfer of atmosphere-sensitive samples from a glovebox to the vacuum chamber of an analytical instrument such as a scanning electron microscope. The use of this device for characterizing the microstructure of highly hygroscopic strontium iodide ceramics by scanning electron microscopy is illustrated as an application example.

Gaume, Romain M. [CREOL, the College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-2700 (United States); Joubert, Lydia-Marie [Cell Sciences Imaging Facility, Beckman Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

A 3-D multiband closure for radiation and neutron transfer moment models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive a 3D multi-band moment model and its associated closure for radiation and neutron transfer. The new closure is analytical and nonlinear but very simple. Its derivation is based on the maximum entropy closure and assumes a Wien shape for the ... Keywords: Maximum entropy closure, Moment models, Multi-band models, Multi-bin models, Neutron transfer, ODF, Radiative transfer

J. -F. Ripoll; A. A. Wray

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Improved Simulation of Clear-Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer in the CCC-GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of mean July clear-sky solar radiation in the Canadian Climate Centre second-generation general circulation model (CCC-GCMII) was analyzed by comparing top of the atmosphere (TOA) net fluxes with earth radiation budget experiment (...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium. Part I: Maximum Work and Frictional Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The entropy budget of an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium is analyzed here. The differential heating of the atmosphere, resulting from surface heat fluxes and tropospheric radiative cooling, corresponds to a net entropy sink. In ...

Olivier Pauluis; Isaac M. Held

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Anthropogenic NO2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthropogenic NO Anthropogenic NO 2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing A. N. Rublev Institution of Molecular Physics Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russia N Chubarova Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University Moscow, Russia G. Gorchakov Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction The work summarizes the different methodical aspects, firstly, the use of atmosphere optical depths presented in Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for NO 2 column retrievals, and, secondly, its radiative forcing calculated as difference between integral solar fluxes absorbed in the atmosphere with and without NO 2 under given air mass or the sun zenith angle.

150

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Properties from AIRS and MODIS Observations Based on a Fast High-Spectral-Resolution Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally efficient high-spectral-resolution cloudy-sky radiative transfer model (HRTM) in the thermal infrared region (700–1300 cm?1, 0.1 cm?1 spectral resolution) is advanced for simulating the upwelling radiance at the top of atmosphere ...

Chenxi Wang; Ping Yang; Steven Platnick; Andrew K. Heidinger; Bryan A. Baum; Thomas Greenwald; Zhibo Zhang; Robert E. Holz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Implied Dynamic Feedback of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated Cloud Fields D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman,...

152

Radiative Transfer in Cirrus Clouds. Part IV: On Cloud Geometry, Inhomogeneity, and Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of cloud geometry and inhomogeneity on the radiative properties of cirrus clouds are investigated by using the successive orders of scattering (SOS) approach for radiative transfer. This approach is an integral solution method that em ...

K. N. Liou; N. Rao

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Radiative Transfer through Arbitrarily Shaped Optical Media. Part I: A General Method of Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general transform method is presented for studying problems of radiative transfer through absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media exposed to arbitrary radiation conditions on its boundaries. The method permits quite arbitrary ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis within Three-Dimensional Clouds Subjected to Solar and Sky Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional radiative heat transfer analysis of an arbitrary-shaped modeled cloud subjected to solar and sky irradiation has been performed. The Radiation Element Method by Ray Emission Model (REM2) was used for numerical simulation. ...

Toru Nishikawa; Shigenao Maruyama; Seigo Sakai

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Polarized radiance fields under a dynamic ocean surface: a three-dimensional radiative transfer solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hybrid matrix operator, Monte Carlo (HMOMC) method previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1063-1071 (2008)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001063] is improved by neglecting higher-order terms in the coupling of the matrix operators and by introducing a dual grid scheme. The computational efficiency for solving the vector radiative transfer equation in a full 3D coupled atmosphere-surface-ocean system is substantially improved, and, thus, large-scale simulations of the radiance distribution become feasible. The improved method is applied to the computation of the polarized radiance field under realistic surface waves simulated by the power spectral density method. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first time that the polarized radiance field under a dynamic ocean surface and the underwater image of an object above such an ocean surface have been reported.

You Yu; Zhai Pengwang; Kattawar, George W.; Yang Ping

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Validation of the ARchived CERES Surface and Atmosphere Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rutledge, T. P. Charlock, N. G. Loeb, and S. Kato, 2001: Atmospheric corrections using MODTRAN for TOA and surface BRDF characteristics from high resolution spectroradiometeric...

157

Radiation Budget Parameters at the Top of the Earth's Atmosphere from METEOSAT Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to derive radiation budget parameters (albedo and emitted longwave flux) at the top of the atmosphere from the three-band METEOSAT images. Model calculations are used to correct for the anisotropic radiance ...

Marianne Gube

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Signal Postprocessing and Reflectivity Calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915-MHz Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has recently initiated a new research avenue toward a better characterization of the transition from cloud to precipitation. Dual-wavelength techniques applied to millimeter-...

Frédéric Tridon; Alessandro Battaglia; Pavlos Kollias; Edward Luke; Christopher R. Williams

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: An Evaluation of Signal Processing and Sampling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several specific locations within different climatological regimes. These vertically pointing cloud ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce A. Albrecht; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Mark A. Miller; Karen L. Johnson; Kenneth P. Moran

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Toward Optimal Closure of the Earth's Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite recent improvements in satellite instrument calibration and the algorithms used to determine reflected solar (SW) and emitted thermal (LW) top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes, a sizeable imbalance persists in the average global net ...

Norman G. Loeb; Bruce A. Wielicki; David R. Doelling; G. Louis Smith; Dennis F. Keyes; Seiji Kato; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Takmeng Wong

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Shear Excitation of Atmospheric Gravity Waves. Part II: Nonlinear Radiation from a Free Shear Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the efficiency and characteristics of two mechanisms that have been proposed to account for the excitation of radiating gravity waves by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities at a free shear layer in a stratified atmosphere. ...

David C. Fritts

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part 1: Tuning.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbed physics configurations of the HadAM3 atmospheric model driven with observed sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea ice were tuned to outgoing radiation observations using a Gauss-Newton line-search optimisation algorithm to adjust the ...

Simon F. B. Tett; Michael J. Mineter; Coralia Cartis; Daniel J. Rowlands; Ping Liu

163

Simulation of the Diurnal Cycle of Outgoing Longwave Radiation with an Atmospheric GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from an integration of the U.K. Meteorological Office 11-Layer Atmospheric General Circulation Model, with emphasis on the simulation of the diurnal cycle of the outgoing longwave radiation. The model reproduces many of the ...

A. Slingo; R. C. Wilderspin; S. J. Brentnall

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth’s radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show retrievals of the aerosol properties from spectrally resolved solar measurements, the simulated and observed radiative fluxes at the surface, and outline factors that control the magnitude and variability of aerosol and radiative properties [8].

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

Analytical Delta-Four-Stream Doubling–Adding Method for Radiative Transfer Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although single-layer solutions have been obtained for the ?-four-stream discrete ordinates method (DOM) in radiative transfer, a four-stream doubling–adding method (4DA) is lacking, which enables us to calculate the radiative transfer through a ...

Feng Zhang; Zhongping Shen; Jiangnan Li; Xiuji Zhou; Leiming Ma

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W/m 2 .µm) f (?T ) Blackbody radiation function I ? SpectralW/m 2 .sr.µm) I b,? Blackbody radiation intensity (W/m 2 .can be treated as blackbody radiation at temperature T sur .

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effects of Atmospheric Absorption of Incoming Radiation on the Radiation Limit of the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limit of the planetary radiation (longwave radiation) of a planet with oceans on its surface is determined by various mechanisms called “radiation limits,” which can be classified as the Komabayashi–Ingersoll limit and the radiation limit of ...

Hiroyuki Kurokawa; Taishi Nakamoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Test plan for validation of the radiative transfer equation.  

SciTech Connect

As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide soot volume fraction/temperature data and heat flux (intensity) data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. In addition, a complete set of boundary condition measurements will be taken to allow full fire predictions for validation of the entire fire model. The experiments will be performed with a lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuel fire in the fully turbulent scale range (2 m diameter).

Ricks, Allen Joseph; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Jernigan, Dann A.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Parameterization of Outgoing Infrared Radiation Derived from Detailed Radiative Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art radiative transfer models can calculate outgoing infrared (IR) irradiance at the top of the atmosphere (F) to an accuracy suitable for climate modeling given the proper atmospheric profiles of temperature and absorbing gases and ...

Starley L. Thompson; Stephen G. Warren

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

Jerry Y. Harrington

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Surface Solar Radiation Model for Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical solar radiation model based on standard meteorological data was revised for clouds using data from the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). Climatic-mean transmittance functions were revised for low and convective clouds ...

Marshall A. Atwater; John T. Ball

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Theory of Equilibrium Temperatures in Radiative-Turbulent Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a thermodynamic model for the determination of the temperature profile based on the balance of radiative and turbulent fluxes. In the context of a one-dimensional case, we show that the temperature field is governed by a first-...

Kuo-Nan Liou; Szu-Cheng S. Ou

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modeling the Global Solar Radiation on the Earth’s Surface Using Atmospheric Deterministic and Intelligent Data-Driven Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three methods for analyzing and modeling the global shortwave radiation reaching the earth’s surface are presented in this study. Solar radiation is a very important input for many aspects of climatology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and ...

M. Santamouris; G. Mihalakakou; B. Psiloglou; G. Eftaxias; D. N. Asimakopoulos

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Revised Cloud Overlap Scheme for Fast Microwave Radiative Transfer in Rain and Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assimilation of cloud- and precipitation-affected observations into weather forecasting systems requires very fast calculations of radiative transfer in the presence of multiple scattering. At the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

Alan J. Geer; Peter Bauer; Christopher W. O’Dell

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Near-field thermal radiation transfer controlled by plasmons in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that thermally excited plasmon-polariton modes can strongly mediate, enhance, and tune the near-field radiation transfer between two closely separated graphene sheets. The dependence of near-field heat exchange ...

Ilic, Ognjen

176

A 3-D Canopy Radiative Transfer Model for Global Climate Modeling: Description, Validation and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of solar radiative transfer at the land surface is important to energy, water and carbon balance, especially for vegetated areas. Currently the most commonly used two-stream model considers the Plant Functional Types (PFTs) within a ...

Hua Yuan; Robert E. Dickinson; Yongjiu Dai; Muhammad J. Shaikh; Liming Zhou; Wei Shangguan; Duoying Ji

177

Multiresolution Analysis of Radiative Transfer through Inhomogeneous Media. Part II: Validation and New Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multiresolution radiative transfer equations of Part I of this paper are solved numerically for the case of inhomogeneous model clouds using Meyer’s basis functions. After analyzing the properties of Meyer’s connection coefficients and ...

Nicolas Ferlay; Harumi Isaka; Philip Gabriel; Albert Benassi

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Entrainment-Mixing and Radiative Transfer Simulation in Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general circulation models, clouds are parameterized and radiative transfer calculations are performed using the plane-parallel approximation over the cloudy fraction of each model grid. The albedo bias resulting from the plane-parallel ...

Frédérick Chosson; Jean-Louis Brenguier; Lothar Schüller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fluctuating-surface-current formulation of radiative heat transfer for arbitrary geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a fluctuating-surface-current formulation of radiative heat transfer, applicable to arbitrary geometries in both the near and far field, that directly exploits efficient and sophisticated techniques from the ...

Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

180

Trace formulas for nonequilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation, and heat transfer for arbitrary objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer, and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal nonequilibrium. The results can be expressed ...

Bimonte, Giuseppe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Fourier–Riccati Approach to Radiative Transfer. Part I: Foundations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional equation of radiative transfer is formally solved using a Fourier-Riccati approach while calculations are performed on cloudy media embedded in a two-dimensional space. An extension to Stephens’ work, this study addresses ...

P. M. Gabriel; S-C. Tsay; G. L. Stephens

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Improved Radiative Transfer Calculations from Information Provided by Bulk Microphysical Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk microphysical schemes are providing increasingly detailed information of hydrometeor profiles both within and below clouds. This information can be used to improve radiative transfer calculations with little increase in computation time. In ...

J. C. Petch

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Radiative Transfer on a Linear Lattice: Application to Anisotropic Ice Crystal Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of radiative transfer in a horizontally infinite cloud layer possessing anisotropy with respect to volume extinction and other single-scattering properties was solved using the method of discrete space theory. The model was applied to ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Aircraft Observations of the Vertical Structure of Stratiform Precipitation Relevant to Microwave Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval of rainfall intensity over the oceans from passive microwave observations is based on a radiative transfer model. Direct rainfall observations of oceanic rainfall are virtually nonexistent making validation of the retrievals ...

A. T. C. Chang; A. Barnes; M. Glass; R. Kakar; T. T. Wilheit

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Radiative Transfer through Arbitrarily Shaped Optical Media. Part II. Group Theory and Simple Closures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a formulation of the radiative transfer equation which allows for the distinction between various groups of spatial scales of variation that comprise the radiance field. Such a formulation provides a convenient means for ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

An alternative Monte Carlo approach to the thermal radiative transfer problem  

SciTech Connect

The usual Monte Carlo approach to the thermal radiative transfer problem is to view Monte Carlo as a solution technique for the nonlinear thermal radiative transfer equations. The equations contain time derivatives which are approximated by introducing small time steps. An alternative approach avoids time steps by using Monte Carlo to directly sample the time at which the next event occurs. That is, the time is advanced on a natural event-by-event basis rather than by introducing an artificial time step.

Booth, Thomas E., E-mail: teb@lanl.go [Mail Stop A143, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

Report of a workshop on the impact of chemicals on the radiative transfer imbalance  

SciTech Connect

This workshop delineates the significant factors, possessed by any chemical, that may directly or indirectly affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere. Atmospheric physics research has already given information on direct and indirect effects. An example of direct effect is the cumulative infrared greenhouse effect of several trace gases, some of which are anthropogenic, and the short wave radiative effects of unactivated aerosol particles in clouds. Examples of indirect effects are those of aerosols as they change cloud droplet size distributions and hence albedo and radiative properties, and as found in observations of albedo and absorption anomalies in clouds, and cloud modification by urban pollution. 26 references.

DeLuisi, J.J. (ed.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The multiple absorption coefficient zonal method (MACZM), an efficient computational approach for the analysis of radiative heat transfer in multidimensional inhomogeneous nongray media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Radiative Heat Transfer, the P-3 Approximation”, AIAAMedia”, Journal of Heat Transfer, Vol. 109, No. 3 (1987),Media”, Numerical Heat Transfer, Part B, Fundamentals, Vol.

Yuen, W W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Simulating 3-D Radiative Transfer Effects over the Sierra Nevada Mountains using WRF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A surface solar radiation parameterization based on deviations between 3-D and conventional plane-parallel radiative transfer models has been incorporated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to understand the solar insolation over mountain/snow areas and to investigate the impact of the spatial and temporal distribution and variation of surface solar fluxes on land-surface processes. Using the Sierra-Nevada in the western United States as a testbed, we show that mountain effect could produce up to ?50 to + 50Wm?2 deviations in the surface solar fluxes over the mountain areas, resulting in a temperature increase of up to 1 °C on the sunny side. Upward surface sensible and latent heat fluxes are modulated accordingly to compensate for the change in surface solar fluxes. Snow water equivalent and surface albedo both show decreases on the sunny side of the mountains, indicating more snowmelt and hence reduced snow albedo associated with more solar insolation due to mountain effect. Soil moisture increases on the sunny side of the mountains due to enhanced snowmelt, while decreases on the shaded side. Substantial differences are found in the morning hours from 8-10 a.m. and in the afternoon around 3-5 p.m., while differences around noon and in the early morning and late afternoon are comparatively smaller. Variation in the surface energy balance can also affect atmospheric processes, such as cloud fields, through the modulation of vertical thermal structure. Negative changes of up to ?40 gm?2 are found in the cloud water path, associated with reductions in the surface insolation over the cloud region. The day-averaged deviations in the surface solar flux are positive over the mountain areas and negative in the valleys, with a range between ?12~12Wm?2. Changes in sensible and latent heat fluxes and surface skin temperature follow the solar insolation pattern. Differences in the domain-averaged diurnal variation over the Sierras show that the mountain area receives more solar insolation during early morning and late afternoon, resulting in enhanced upward sensible heat and latent heat fluxes from the surface and a corresponding increase in surface skin temperature. During the middle of the day, however, the surface insolation and heat fluxes show negative changes, indicating a cooling effect. Hence overall, the diurnal variations of surface temperature and surface fluxes in the Sierra-Nevada are reduced through the interactions of radiative transfer and mountains. The hourly differences of the surface solar insolation in higher elevated regions, however, show smaller magnitude in negative changes during the middle of the day and possibly more solar fluxes received during the whole day.

Gu, Yu; Liou, K. N.; Lee, W- L.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction The shape of the diurnal cycle of atmospheric downwelling radiation is an important climatic feature of cloud-radiation interactions and atmospheric properties. Adequate characterization of this diurnal cycle is critical for accurate determination of monthly and seasonal radiation budgets from a limited data sampling. This is especially important for establishing the optimal sampling and temporal interpolation schemes employed in satellite radiation budget missions, such as Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB), and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System

191

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Tropical Convection and the Energy Balance at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data are used in conjunction with a radiative transfer model to estimate the effect of various cloud types on the top-of-atmosphere radiation ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; Leslie A. Moy; Qiang Fu

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Change in regime and transfer function models of global solar radiation in Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the models for global solar radiation in Kuwait is based on removing the annual periodicity and seasonal variation. The first methodology used here is the change in regime technique that relies on dividing the observations into two ... Keywords: ARMA model, Harmonic analysis, Solar radiation, Transfer function

S. A. Al-Awadhi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model: Optimization and Evaluation of Simulated Radiative Fluxes and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work continues the presentation and evaluation of the Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM), focusing on the model’s ability to represent radiation and precipitation. OLAM is a new, state-of-the-art earth system model, capable of user-specified ...

David Medvigy; Robert L. Walko; Martin J. Otte; Roni Avissar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Defining Top-of-the-Atmosphere Flux Reference Level for Earth Radiation Budget Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To estimate the earth's radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from satellite-measured radiances, it is necessary to account for the finite geometry of the earth and recognize that the earth is a solid body surrounded by a ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Bruce A. Wielicki

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Can Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part II: Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of perturbed-physics simulations of version 3 of the Hadley Centre Atmosphere Model (HadAM3) were compared with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) estimates of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and reflected ...

Simon F. B. Tett; Daniel J. Rowlands; Michael J. Mineter; Coralia Cartis

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Radiative Damping Revisited: Parameterization of Damping Rate in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative damping rates of temperature perturbations are calculated by CO2 and O3 Curtis matrices extending from the surface to 120 km in the earth's atmosphere with the eigenvalue and scale-dependent Newtonian cooling methods at 0.5 km of ...

Xun Zhu

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Trace formulae for non-equilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation and heat transfer for arbitrary objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal non-equilibrium. The results can be expressed as basis-independent trace formulae in terms of the scattering operators of the individual objects. We prove that heat radiation of a single object is positive, and that heat transfer (for two arbitrary passive objects) is from the hotter to a colder body. The heat transferred is also symmetric, exactly reversed if the two temperatures are exchanged. Introducing partial wave-expansions, we transform the results for radiation, transfer and forces into traces of matrices that can be evaluated in any basis, analogous to the equilibrium Casimir force. The method is illustrated by (re)deriving the heat radiation of a plate, a sphere and a cylinder. We analyze the radiation of a sphere for different materials, emphasizing that a simplification often employed for metallic nano-spheres is typically invalid. We derive asymptotic formulae for heat transfer and non-equilibrium interactions for the cases of a sphere in front a plate and for two spheres, extending previous results. As an example, we show that a hot nano-sphere can levitate above a plate with the repulsive non-equilibrium force overcoming gravity -- an effect that is not due to radiation pressure.

Matthias Krüger; Giuseppe Bimonte; Thorsten Emig; Mehran Kardar

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Non-linear Evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in a Radiation Supported Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-linear regime of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a radiation supported atmosphere, consisting of two uniform fluids with different densities, is studied numerically. We perform simulations using our recently developed numerical algorithm for multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics based on a variable Eddington tensor as implemented in Athena, focusing on the regime where scattering opacity greatly exceeds absorption opacity. We find that the radiation field can reduce the growth and mixing rate of RTI, but this reduction is only significant when radiation pressure significantly exceeds gas pressure. Small scale structures are also suppressed in this case. In the non-linear regime, dense fingers sink faster than rarefied bubbles can rise, leading to asymmetric structures about the interface. By comparing the calculations that use a variable Eddington tensor (VET) versus the Eddington approximation, we demonstrate that anisotropy in the radiation field can affect the non-linear development of RTI...

Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

An Evaluation of Two Models for Estimation of the Roughness Height for Heat Transfer between the Land Surface and the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roughness height for heat transfer is a crucial parameter in estimation of heat transfer between the land surface and the atmosphere. Although many empirical formulations have been proposed over the past few decades, the uncertainties associated ...

Z. Su; T. Schmugge; W. P. Kustas; W. J. Massman

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Multimode Radiative Transfer in Finite Optical Media. II: Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends the theoretical developments of Part I to illustrate the power of the method in solving multiple scattering problems with sources that result from i) the single scatter of a collimated beam of solar radiation that is directly ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Rudolph W. Preisendorfer

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Graciosa Island, Azores  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From May 2009 through December 2010, the ARM Mobile Facility is obtaining data from a location near the airport on Graciosa Island to support the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign. Led by principal investigator Robert Wood, scientists involved in the campaign will use data from the AMF to study processes controlling the radiative properties and microphysics of marine boundary layer clouds, a high priority science question. Marine boundary layer clouds are particularly important in the global climate system, not only as passive modulators of solar energy, but as interactive systems that influence and modulate sea surface temperature and the strength of the trade winds on seasonal-interannual timescales. Their microphysical properties are important, strongly sensitive to manmade aerosol, and poorly understood, especially over remote oceans. Data from the prolonged AMF deployment will result in the first climatology of detailed vertical structure of cloud and precipitation properties of low clouds at a remote subtropical marine site.[Copied and edited from http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/grw/

Wood, Robert (PI)

205

Original article: Comparison of numerical models in radiative heat transfer with application to circuit-breaker simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different modeling approaches for the numerical computation of the radiation energy exchange in the context of the simulation of high-voltage circuit breakers are investigated. These are the basic Radiative Transfer Equation method and the P1 model ... Keywords: CFD modeling, Circuit breakers, Finite volume discretization, P1 model, Radiative heat transfer

Matthieu Melot; Jean-Yves TréPanier; Ricardo Camarero; Eddy Petro

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Radiative component and combined heat transfer in the thermal calculation of finned tube banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more exact calculation of combined heat transfer in the case of finned tube banks (e.g., in the convective section of a furnace), the radiative heat transfer cannot be neglected. A new method for relatively simple calculation of total heat flux (convection + radiation + conduction in fins) is fully compatible with that for bare tube banks/bundles developed earlier. It is based on the method of radiative coefficients. However, the resulting value of heat flux must be corrected due to fin thickness and especially due to the fin radiative influence. For this purpose the so-called multiplicator of heat flux was introduced. The applicability of this methods has been demonstrated on a tubular fired heater convective section. A developed computer program based on the method has also been used for an analysis of the influence of selected parameters to show the share of radiation on the total heat flux.

Stehlik, P. [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering] [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Full-Time, Eye-Safe Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Observation at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Sites: Instruments and Data Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric radiative forcing, surface radiation budget, and top-of-the-atmosphere radiance interpretation involve knowledge of the vertical height structure of overlying cloud and aerosol layers. During the last decade, the U.S. Department of ...

James R. Campbell; Dennis L. Hlavka; Ellsworth J. Welton; Connor J. Flynn; David D. Turner; James D. Spinhirne; V. Stanley Scott III; I. H. Hwang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cross-Validation of SWERA's Core Radiative Transfer Models - Partial Report  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cross-Validation of SWERA's Core Radiative Transfer Models - Partial Report Cross-Validation of SWERA's Core Radiative Transfer Models - Partial Report Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This partial report describes the results obtained by two of the core radiative transfer models adopted in the SWERA Project for global horizontal solar irradiation during the cross-validation step. They are BRASIL-SR and SUNY-ALBANY models (Martins, 2001; Stuhlmann et al. 1990; Perez et al., 2002). The results from other two other core models, NREL and DLR, are not yet available. The HELIOSAT was included as a reference model at this stage. The HELIOSAT model is widely employed for solar energy assessment in Europe and is well know by the solar energy community worldwide (Beyer et al., 1996; Cano et al., 1986). (Purpose): SWERA solar cross-validation study

209

Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

Gleckler, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Randall, D.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Boer, G. [Canadian Climate Centre, Victoria (Canada)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time M. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Recent work in this area by Charles Wade (1987) lays out the groundwork for monitoring data quality for projects with large networks of instruments such as the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Wade generated objectively analyzed fields of meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind) and then compared the objectively analyzed value at the sensor location with the value produced by the sensor. Wade used a Barne's objective analysis scheme to produce objective data values for a given meteorological variable (q) in two- dimensional space. The objectively analyzed value should

211

Doubling–Adding Method for Delta-Four-Stream Spherical Harmonic Expansion Approximation in Radiative Transfer Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though the single-layer solutions have been found for the ?-four-stream spherical harmonic expansion method (SHM) in radiative transfer, there is lack of a corresponding doubling–adding method (4SDA), which enables the calculation of radiative ...

Feng Zhang; Jiangnan Li

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

paNTICA: A Fast 3D Radiative Transfer Scheme to Calculate Surface Solar Irradiance for NWP and LES Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resolution of numerical weather prediction models is constantly increasing, making it necessary to consider three-dimensional radiative transfer effects such as cloud shadows cast into neighboring grid cells and thus affecting radiative ...

Ulrike Wissmeier; Robert Buras; Bernhard Mayer

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM II AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE IN A CONFINED GEOMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. X. Francois-:- "Heat Transfer Properties in a VerticalK. T - Tb (K) Fig. 4 . Heat transfer at the lambda point.B. The difference in the heat transfer characteristics on

Warren, R.P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Parallel Jacobian-free Newton Krylov solution of the discrete ordinates method with flux limiters for 3D radiative transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study introduces a parallel Jacobian-free Newton Krylov (JFNK) general minimal residual (GMRES) solution for the discretized radiative transfer equation (RTE) in 3D, absorbing, emitting and scattering media. For the angular and spatial discretization ... Keywords: Collimated radiation, Discrete ordinates method (DOM) SN, Electromagnetic radiation, Flux limiters, General Minimal Residual (GMRES), Gram-Schmidt, Householder, Jacobian free Newton-Krylov (JFNK), Parallel MPI, Radiative transfer equation (RTE), TVD, Threads

William F. Godoy; Xu Liu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Effects of Reflection by Natural Surfaces on the Radiation Emerging from the Top of the Earth's Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation emerging from the top of the earth's atmosphere is affected by the reflection characteristics of the underlying surface. Laboratory-gathered bidirectional reflectance data were used to characterize the reflection matrix for three ...

Bruce W. Fitch

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Simple Method to Compute the Change in Earth-Atmosphere Radiative Balance Due to a Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple three-layer model of the earth-atmosphere system, including the ground, troposphere and stratosphere, with their interactions, is developed. The model permits the radiative characteristics of both the troposphere and stratosphere to be ...

J. Lenoble; D. Tanre; P. Y. Deschamps; M. Herman

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Impact of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Surface-Atmosphere System: Interfacing Measurements and Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two datasets have been combined to demonstrate how the availability of more comprehensive datasets could serve to elucidate the shortwave radiative impact of clouds on both the atmospheric column and the surface. These datasets consist of two ...

Robert D. Cess; Seth Nemesure; Ellsworth G. Dutton; John J. Deluisi; Gerald L. Potter; Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Relationships between Net Radiation at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere Derived from a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the net radiation at the surface and the top of the atmosphere in the UCLA general circulation model are investigated. These suggest that it may be possible to formulate statistical models from limited observations ...

Bryan C. Weare

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part I: Simultaneous Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-inferred short-term climate variability and atmospheric teleconnections are studied using seven years (1974–81) of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) data from NOAA polar orbiters. This study utilizes composite, partition-of-variance and ...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Application of an Artificial Neural Network Simulation for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from CERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) provides top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux estimates from shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiance measurements by applying empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) for scene ...

Konstantin Loukachine; Norman G. Loeb

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: Second-Generation Sampling Strategies, Processing, and Cloud Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars in several climatologically distinct regions. The digital signal processors for these radars were recently upgraded and ...

Pavlos Kollias; Mark A. Miller; Edward P. Luke; Karen L. Johnson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Kevin B. Widener; Bruce A. Albrecht

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Observational Characterization of the Downward Atmospheric Longwave Radiation at the Surface in the City of São Paulo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the seasonal and diurnal variations of downward longwave atmospheric irradiance (LW) at the surface in São Paulo, Brazil, using 5-min-averaged values of LW, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation observed ...

Eduardo Barbaro; Amauri P. Oliveira; Jacyra Soares; Georgia Codato; Maurício J. Ferreira; Primož Mlakar; Marija Z. Božnar; João F. Escobedo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part II: Lagged Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a sequel to Part I of this study, lagged relationships in atmospheric teleconnections associated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are investigated using Lagged Cross Correlations (LCC). The feasibility of extratropical seasonal-to-...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Radiative Transfer Of CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} Plasma Arc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Any physical modelling of a circuit-breaker arc therefore requires an understanding of the radiated energy which is taken into account in the form of a net coefficient. The evaluation of the net emission coefficient is performed by the knowledge of the chemical plasma composition and the resolution of the radiative transfer equation. In this paper, the total radiation which escapes from a CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} plasma is calculated in the temperature range between 5000 and 30000K on the assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium and we have studied the nitrogen effect in the hydrocarbon plasmas.

Benallal, R. [Theoretical physics Laboratory, Physics Department of University Aboubekr Belkaied Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Liani, B. [Science Faculty, Hassiba Benbouali University, Chlef 02000 (Algeria)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

A hybrid transport-diffusion method for Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo particle-transport simulations in diffusive media. If standard Monte Carlo is used in such media, particle histories will consist of many small steps, resulting ... Keywords: Hybrid transport-diffusion, Monte Carlo, Radiative transfer

Jeffery D. Densmore; Todd J. Urbatsch; Thomas M. Evans; Michael W. Buksas

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radiative Transfer to Space through a Precipitating Cloud at Multiple Microwave Frequencies. Part I: Model Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a two-part study we investigate the impact of time-dependent cloud microphysical structure on the transfer to space of passive microwave radiation at several frequencies across the EHF and lower SHF portions of the microwave spectrum in order ...

Alberto Mugnai; Eric A. Smith

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Computation of the Stratospheric Diabatic Circulation Using an Accurate Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global diabatic circulation is computed for the months of January, April, July and October over the altitude region 100 to 0.1 mb using an accurate troposphere-stratosphere radiative transfer model, SBUV and SME ozone data, and NMC ...

Joan E. Rosenfield; Mark R. Schoeberl; Marvin A. Geller

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Physically Based Satellite Retrieval of Precipitation Using a 3D Passive Microwave Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precipitation retrieval algorithm based on the application of a 3D radiative transfer model to a hybrid physical-stochastic 3D cloud model is described. The cloud model uses a statistical rainfall clustering scheme to generate 3D cloud ...

J. L. Haferman; E. N. Anagnostou; D. Tsintikidis; W. F. Krajewski; T. F. Smith

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Toward the Influence of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Earth?Atmosphere System Estimated from Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of cloudiness on the shortwave radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and, as a residual, for the atmosphere itself. The data used for this study are derived ...

M. Rieland; R. Stuhlmann

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Explicit-implicit difference scheme for the joint solution of the radiative transfer and energy equations by the splitting method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-order accurate explicit and implicit conservative predictor-corrector schemes are presented for the radiative transfer and energy equations in the multigroup kinetic approximation solved together by applying the splitting method with respect to ... Keywords: difference splitting schemes, radiative transfer equations

N. Ya. Moiseev

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Intercomparison of Radiation Transfer Models Representing Direct Shortwave Forcing by Sulfate Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study has been conducted, involving 15 models by 12 groups, to compare modeled forcing (change in shortwave radiation budget) due to sulfate aerosol for a wide range of values of particle radius, optical depth, surface albedo, and solar zenith angle (SZA). The models included high- and low-spectral resolution models, incorporating a variety of radiative transfer approximations, as well as a line-by-line model. The normalized forcings (forcing per sulfate column burden) obtained with the radiative transfer models were examined and the differences characterized. All models simulate forcings of comparable amplitude and exhibit a similar dependence on input parameters. As expected for a non-light-absorbing aerosol, forcings were negative (cooling influence), except at high surface albedo combined with low SZA. The relative standard deviation of the zenith-angle-average normalized broadband forcing for 15 models was 8% for particle radius near the maximum in magnitude of this forcing (ca....

Sulfate Aerosols; Stephen E Schwartz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

An Accurate Radiative Heating and Cooling Algorithm for Use in a Dynamical Model of the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared radiative heating and cooling algorithm designed to be used with dynamical models of the middle atmosphere is described. A Curtis matrix is used to compute cooling by the 15 and 10 ?m bands of carbon dioxide. Escape of radiation to ...

W. M. Wehrbein; C. B. Leovy

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling Ultraviolet Radiation at the Earth's Surface. Part I: The Sensitivity of Ultraviolet Irradiances to Atmospheric Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model is employed for the prediction of surface UV irradiances. A wide-ranging sensitivity study is undertaken to show how changes to the model input parameters aged UV irradiances at the surface. The ...

Piers M. De F. Forster

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

235

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

236

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

238

CHAPARRAL: A library for solving large enclosure radiation heat transfer problems  

SciTech Connect

Large, three-dimensional enclosure radiation beat transfer problems place a heavy demand on computing resources such as computational cycles, memory requirements, disk I/O, and disk space usage. This is primarily due to the computational and memory requirements associated with the view factor calculation and subsequent access of the view factor matrix during solution of the radiosity matrix equation. This is a fundamental problem that constrains Sandia`s current modeling capabilities. Reducing the computational and memory requirements for calculating and manipulating view factors would enable an analyst to increase the level of detail at which a body could be modeled and would have a major impact on many programs at Sandia such as weapon and transportation safety programs, component survivability programs, energy programs, and material processing programs. CHAPARRAL is a library package written to address these problems and is specifically tailored towards the efficient solution of extremely large three-dimensional enclosure radiation heat transfer problems.

Glass, M.W.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Thermal heat radiation, near-field energy density and near-field radiative heat transfer of coated materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal radiation and thermal near-field energy density of a metal-coated semi-infinite body for different substrates. We show that the surface polariton coupling within the metal coating leads to an enhancement of the TM-mode part of the thermal near-field energy density when a polar substrate is used. In this case the result obtained for a free standing metal film is retrieved. In contrast, in the case of a metal substrate there is no enhancement in the TM-mode part, as can also be explained within the framework of surface plasmon coupling within the coating. Finally, we discuss the influence of the enhanced thermal energy density on the near-field radiative heat transfer between a simple semi-infinite and a coated semi-infinite body for different material combinations.

Biehs, Svend-Age

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermal heat radiation, near-field energy density and near-field radiative heat transfer of coated materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal radiation and thermal near-field energy density of a metal-coated semi-infinite body for different substrates. We show that the surface polariton coupling within the metal coating leads to an enhancement of the TM-mode part of the thermal near-field energy density when a polar substrate is used. In this case the result obtained for a free standing metal film is retrieved. In contrast, in the case of a metal substrate there is no enhancement in the TM-mode part, as can also be explained within the framework of surface plasmon coupling within the coating. Finally, we discuss the influence of the enhanced thermal energy density on the near-field radiative heat transfer between a simple semi-infinite and a coated semi-infinite body for different material combinations.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Achermann, Marc (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

242

Radiative equilibrium in Monte Carlo radiative transfer using frequency distribution adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo method is a powerful tool for performing radiative equilibrium calculations, even in complex geometries. The main drawback of the standard Monte Carlo radiative equilibrium methods is that they require iteration, which makes them numerically very demanding. Bjorkman & Wood recently proposed a frequency distribution adjustment scheme, which allows radiative equilibrium Monte Carlo calculations to be performed without iteration, by choosing the frequency of each re-emitted photon such that it corrects for the incorrect spectrum of the previously re-emitted photons. Although the method appears to yield correct results, we argue that its theoretical basis is not completely transparent, and that it is not completely clear whether this technique is an exact rigorous method, or whether it is just a good and convenient approximation. We critically study the general problem of how an already sampled distribution can be adjusted to a new distribution by adding data points sampled from an adjustment distribution. We show that this adjustment is not always possible, and that it depends on the shape of the original and desired distributions, as well as on the relative number of data points that can be added. Applying this theorem to radiative equilibrium Monte Carlo calculations, we provide a firm theoretical basis for the frequency distribution adjustment method of Bjorkman & Wood, and we demonstrate that this method provides the correct frequency distribution through the additional requirement of radiative equilibrium. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this approach, and show that it can easily be combined with the presence of additional heating sources and the concept of photon weighting. However, the method may fail if small dust grains are included... (abridged)

Maarten Baes; Dimitris Stamatellos; Jonathan I. Davies; Anthony P. Whitworth; Sabina Sabatini; Sarah Roberts; Suzanne M. Linder; Rhodri Evans

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluation of the Surface Radiation Budget in the Atmospheric Component of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partitioning of the earth radiation budget (ERB) between its atmosphere and surface components is of crucial interest in climate studies as it has a significant role in the oceanic and atmospheric general circulation. An analysis of the ...

A. Bodas-Salcedo; M. A. Ringer; A. Jones

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Thermal correction to the Casimir force, radiative heat transfer, and an experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low-temperature asymptotic expressions for the Casimir interaction between two real metals described by Leontovich surface impedance are obtained in the framework of thermal quantum field theory. It is shown that the Casimir entropy computed using the impedance of infrared optics vanishes in the limit of zero temperature. By contrast, the Casimir entropy computed using the impedance of the Drude model attains at zero temperature a positive value which depends on the parameters of a system, i.e., the Nernst heat theorem is violated. Thus, the impedance of infrared optics withstands the thermodynamic test, whereas the impedance of the Drude model does not. We also perform a phenomenological analysis of the thermal Casimir force and of the radiative heat transfer through a vacuum gap between real metal plates. The characterization of a metal by means of the Leontovich impedance of the Drude model is shown to be inconsistent with experiment at separations of a few hundred nanometers. A modification of the impedance of infrared optics is suggested taking into account relaxation processes. The power of radiative heat transfer predicted from this impedance is several times less than previous predictions due to different contributions from the transverse electric evanescent waves. The physical meaning of low frequencies in the Lifshitz formula is discussed. It is concluded that new measurements of radiative heat transfer are required to find out the adequate description of a metal in the theory of electromagnetic fluctuations.

V. B. Bezerra; G. Bimonte; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; C. Romero

2007-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Heat transfer performance of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat transfer and absorption characteristics of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation are theoretically investigated. Since the heat loss ratio of the infrared radiation has maximum at moderate energy flux, the heat absorption efficiency will first increase and then decrease with the incident energy flux. The local absorption efficiency will increase with the flow velocity, while the wall temperature drops quickly. Because of the unilateral concentrated solar radiation and different incident angle, the heat transfer is uneven along the circumference. Near the perpendicularly incident region, the wall temperature and absorption efficiency slowly approaches to the maximum, while the absorption efficiency sharply drops near the parallelly incident region. The calculation results show that the heat transfer parameters calculated from the average incident energy flux have a good agreement with the average values of the circumference under different boundary conditions. For the whole pipe with coating of Pyromark, the absorption efficiency of the main region is above 85%, and only the absorption efficiency near the parallelly incident region is below 80%. In general, the absorption efficiency of the whole pipe increases with flow velocity rising and pipe length decreasing, and it approaches to the maximum at optimal concentrated solar flux. (author)

Jianfeng, Lu; Jing, Ding [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jianping, Yang [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of the Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Solar Radiation Absorption due to Water Vapor: Advanced Broadband Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate parameterizations for calculating solar radiation absorption in the atmospheric column due to water vapor lines and continuum are proposed for use in broadband shortwave radiative transfer codes. The error in the absorption values is ...

Tatiana A. Tarasova; Boris A. Fomin

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

COLLAPSE OF MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH RADIATION TRANSFER: FORMATION OF MASSIVE STARS BY ACCRETION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most early radiative transfer calculations of protostellar collapse have suggested an upper limit of approx40 M{sub sun} for the final stellar mass before radiation pressure can exceed the star's gravitational pull and halt the accretion. Here we perform further collapse calculations, using frequency-dependent radiation transfer coupled to a frequency-dependent dust model that includes amorphous carbon particles, silicates, and ice-coated silicates. The models start from pressure-bounded, logatropic spheres of mass between 5 M{sub sun} and 150 M{sub sun} with an initial nonsingular density profile. We find that in a logatrope the infall is never reversed by the radiative forces on the dust and that stars with masses approx>100 M{sub sun} may form by continued accretion. Compared to previous models that start the collapse with a rho propor to r{sup -2} density configuration, our calculations result in higher accretion times and lower average accretion rates with peak values of approx5.8 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The radii and bolometric luminosities of the produced massive stars (approx>90 M{sub sun}) are in good agreement with the figures reported for detected stars with initial masses in excess of 100 M{sub sun}. The spectral energy distribution from the stellar photosphere reproduces the observed fluxes for hot molecular cores with peaks of emission from mid- to near-infrared.

Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Daza-Montero, Judith [Centro de Fisica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones CientIficas, IVIC, Apartado 21827, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); De Felice, Fernando [Dipartimento di Fisica 'G. Galilei', Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8 35131 Padova (Italy)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Modeling near-field radiative heat transfer from sharp objects using a general three-dimensional numerical scattering technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a general numerical method to calculate the nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer between a plate and compact objects of arbitrary shapes, making the first accurate theoretical predictions for the total heat ...

McCauley, Alexander Patrick

249

An Assessment of the Parameterization of Subgrid-Scale Cloud Effects on Radiative Transfer. Part II: Horizontal Inhomogeneity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of horizontal inhomogeneity in radiative transfer through cloud fields is investigated within the context of the two-stream approximation. Spatial correlations between cloud optical properties and the radiance field are introduced in the ...

Norman B. Wood; Philip M. Gabriel; Graeme L. Stephens

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Global Calibration of the GEOS-5 L-Band Microwave Radiative Transfer Model over Nonfrozen Land Using SMOS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zero-order (tau-omega) microwave radiative transfer model (RTM) is coupled to the Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) catchment land surface model in preparation for the future assimilation of global brightness temperatures (Tb) ...

Gabriëlle J. M. De Lannoy; Rolf H. Reichle; Valentijn R. N. Pauwels

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Microweve Radiative Transfer through Clouds Composed of Realistically Shaped Ice Crystals. Part II. Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of polarized microwave radiative transfer modeling of cirrus clouds containing five different particle shoes and 18 Gamma size distributions. Upwelling brightness temperatures for tropical and midlatitude winter ...

K. Franklin Evans; Graeme L. Stephens

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Computational Cost and Accuracy in Calculating Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer: Results for New Implementations of Monte Carlo and SHDOM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the tradeoffs between computational cost and accuracy for two new state-of-the-art codes for computing three-dimensional radiative transfer: a community Monte Carlo model and a parallel implementation of the Spherical ...

Robert Pincus; K. Franklin Evans

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of a second-generation regional climate model (RegCM2). Part I: Boundary-layer and radiative transfer processes  

SciTech Connect

During the last few years the development of a second-generation regional climate modeling system (RegCM2) has been completed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Based upon the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Pennsylvania State University Mesoscale Model (MM4), RegCM2 includes improved formulations of boundary layer, radiative transfer, surface physics, cumulus convection, and time integration technique, which make it more physically comprehensive and more computationally efficient than the previous regional climate model version. This paper discusses a number of month-long simulations over the European region that were conducted to test the new RegCM2 boundary-layer parameterization (the scheme developed by Holtsag et al.) and radiative transfer formulation [the package developed for the NCAR Community Climate Model 2 (CCM2)]. Both schemes significantly affect the model precipitation, temperature, moisture, and cloudiness climatology, leading to overall more realistic results, while they do not substantially modify the model performance in simulating the aggregated characteristics of synoptic patterns. Description of the convective processes and procedures of boundary condition assimilation included in RegCM2 is presented in companion paper by Giorgi et al. 26 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Giorgi, F.; Marinucci, M.R.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program’s first water vapor intensive observation period (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This ...

D. D. Turner; J. E. M. Goldsmith

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Monte Carlo simulation of radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces using cell-to-cell photon transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiation heat transfer in an array of fixed discrete surfaces is an important problem that is particularly difficult to analyze because of the nonhomogeneous and anisotropic optical properties involved. This article presents an efficient Monte Carlo method for evaluating radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces. This Monte Carlo model has been optimized to take advantage of the regular arrangement of surfaces often encountered in these arrays. Monte Carlo model predictions have been compared with analytical and experimental results.

Drost, M.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Welty, J.R. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Reflectivity of the Atmosphere-Inhomogeneous Surfaces System: Laboratory Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two- and three-dimensional solutions of the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. Such solutions have not been verified experimentally. A laboratory experiment simulates such a system to test ...

Yuri Mekler; Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program: An Overview P. A. Crowley Environmental Sciences Division U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. J. Vitko, Jr. Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction for leased UA V operation over the next year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the existing Gnat 750-45, with its 7-8 km ceiling, as well as the planned FY93 demonstration of two 20 km capable UA Vs-the Perseus- B and the Raptor. Thus the funding of some initial flights and the availability of leased UAVs will enable us to start up the ARM-UAV program. Additional funding will be required to continue this program. Interim Science Team This paper and the one that follows describe the start-up

259

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

260

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Proceedings of the sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1996 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held at San Antonio, Texas. The history and status of the ARM program at the time of the meeting helps to put these papers in context. The basic themes have not changed. First, from its beginning, the Program has attempted to respond to the most critical scientific issues facing the US Global Change Research Program. Second, the Program has been strongly coupled to other agency and international programs. More specifically, the Program reflects an unprecedented collaboration among agencies of the federal research community, among the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) national laboratories, and between DOE`s research program and related international programs, such as Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Next, ARM has always attempted to make the most judicious use of its resources by collaborating and leveraging existing assets and has managed to maintain an aggressive schedule despite budgets that have been much smaller than planned. Finally, the Program has attracted some of the very best scientific talent in the climate research community and has, as a result, been productive scientifically.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects, i.e., the interactions of aerosols with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN), constitute the largest uncertainty in climate forcing and projection. Previous IPCC reported aerosol indirect forcing is negative, which does not account for aerosol-convective cloud interactions because the complex processes involved are poorly understood and represented in climate models. Here we report that aerosol indirect effect on deep convective cloud systems can lead to enhanced regional convergence and a strong top-of atmosphere (TOA) warming. Aerosol invigoration effect on convection can result in a strong radiative warming in the atmosphere (+5.6 W m-2) due to strong night-time warming, a lofted latent heating, and a reduced diurnal temperature difference, all of which could remarkably impact regional circulation and modify weather systems. We further elucidated how aerosols change convective intensity, diabatic heating, and regional circulation under different environmental conditions and concluded that wind shear and cloud base temperature play key roles in determining the significance of aerosol invigoration effect for convective systems.

Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

An Ultralight Aircraft as Platform for Research in the Lower Troposphere: System Performance and First Results from Radiation Transfer Studies in Stratiform Aerosol Layers and Broken Cloud Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultraviolet actinic radiation flux governing the photochemical reactions in the atmosphere is dependent on the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols and reflective surfaces of ground and clouds. Theoretical models exist for horizontal ...

Wolfgang Junkermann

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Microwave radiative transfer in the mixed-phase regions of tropical rainfall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current physically-based Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) algorithms for estimating oceanic rain use a very simplified hydrometeor profile that ignores the mixed-phase regions (Wilheit et al., 1977). However, to estimate hydrometeor profiles more reasonably in the tropical precipitation regions, understanding of the brightness temperature (Tb) variations in the mixed-phase regions is essential. Further, establishing physical assumptions for microwave radiative transfer in the mixed-phase regions is necessary for quantifying and minimizing the uncertainties in the rainfall retrieval. Consequently, the objective of this study was to quantify uncertainties and to achieve a solid basis for improvement of the current rainfall retrieval, which is based on an RTM. To accomplish this, we examined data taken by the Convair-580 aircraft during the KWAJEX (Kwajalein Experiment). In order to calculate radiative transfer, the AMMR (Airborne Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer) data were combined with radiosonde data and aircraft microphysics data. Analyses were performed for the stratiform and convective rainfall regions respectively. In stratiform precipitation with a bright band, the main concern was to examine the needed physical assumptions for describing the abrupt change of Tb just below the freezing level. In the case of convective precipitation, the focus was to investigate the effective additional rain layer thickness corresponding to the super-cooled water layer above the freezing level. From the results, it was required to assume the bright-band (around 1/2 km below the FL) as having 2 times the absorption as the rain below to explain the Tb variation due to the phase change of hydrometeors. On the other hand, in the case of convective rainfall, it was suggested that approximately from 1/4km to 3km of super-cooled layer thickness should be considered to describe the additional hydrometeor layer due to the strong updrafts in the convective regions.

Jin, Kyoung-Wook

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radiative heat transfer between two dielectric nanogratings in the scattering approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of radiative heat transfer between dielectric nanogratings in the scattering approach. As a comparision with these exact results, we also evaluate the domain of validity of Derjaguin's Proximity Approximation (PA). We consider a system of two corrugated silica plates with various grating geometries, separation distances, and lateral displacement of the plates with respect to one another. Numerical computations show that while the PA is a good approximation for aligned gratings, it cannot be used when the gratings are laterally displaced. We illustrate this by a thermal modulator device for nanosystems based on such a displacement.

J. Lussange; R. Guérout; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Effect of Changes in Cloud Amount on the Net Radiation at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the opposing albedo and greenhouse effects of clouds, the possibility exists that the net radiation at the top of the earth-atmosphere system is, in the mean, insensitive to changes in cloud amount. If so, this would have important ...

George Ohring; Philip Clapp

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A multi-sensor approach for assessing the impacts of ultraviolet-absorbing aerosols on top of atmosphere radiative fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year (June 2006-May 2007) of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes are used with Ozone Monitoring Instrument-Aerosol Index (OMI-AI) data to assess the direct radiative ...

Thomas A. Jones; Sundar A. Christopher

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)  

SciTech Connect

Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES  

SciTech Connect

The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

Smith, A

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Implementation of a simplified approach to radiative transfer in general relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe in detail the implementation of a simplified approach to radiative transfer in general relativity by means of the well-known neutrino leakage scheme (NLS). In particular, we carry out an extensive investigation of the properties and limitations of the NLS for isolated relativistic stars to a level of detail that has not been discussed before in a general-relativistic context. Although the numerous tests considered here are rather idealized, they provide a well-controlled environment in which to understand the relationship between the matter dynamics and the neutrino emission, which is important in order to model the neutrino signals from more complicated scenarios, such as binary neutron-star mergers. When considering nonrotating hot neutron stars we confirm earlier results of one-dimensional simulations, but also present novel results about the equilibrium properties and on how the cooling affects the stability of these configurations. In our idealized but controlled setup, we can then show that deviations from the thermal and weak-interaction equilibrium affect the stability of these models to radial perturbations, leading models that are stable in the absence of radiative losses, to a gravitational collapse to a black hole when neutrinos are instead radiated.

Filippo Galeazzi; Wolfgang Kastaun; Luciano Rezzolla; José A. Font

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

The CERES/ARM/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) for the Retrieval of Radiative Fluxes with Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES/...

Thomas P. Charlock; Timothy L. Alberta

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Contributions of Several Absorption Bands to Stratospheric Radiative Dissipation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A narrowband (5 cm?1) radiation transfer scheme has been used to calculate scale-dependent radiative dissipation rates for finite-amplitude temperature disturbances. Eight bands of five atmospheric trace gases have been examined. As previously ...

Gerd Breßer; Steven Pawson

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Role of Radiation and Other Renascent Subfields in Atmospheric Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizons of atmospheric science are undergoing a considerable expansion as a result of intense interest in problems of climate. This has caused somewhat of a renaissance in hitherto-neglected subfields of atmospheric science. Focusing on ...

W. J. Wiscombe; V. Ramanathan

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Angular Distribution of UV-B Sky Radiance under Cloudy Conditions: A Comparison of Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations Using a Fractal Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, global warming concerns have focused attention on cloud radiative forcing and its accurate encapsulation in radiative transfer measurement and modeling programs. At present, this process is constrained by the dynamic movement and ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Kurt Fienberg; Manuel Nunez

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radiative transfer in plane-parallel media and Cauchy integral equations III. The finite case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We come back to the Cauchy integral equations occurring in radiative transfer problems posed in finite, plane-parallel media with light scattering taken as monochromatic and isotropic. Their solution is calculated following the classical scheme where a Cauchy integral equation is reduced to a couple of Fredholm integral equations. It is expressed in terms of two auxiliary functions $\\zeta_+$ and $\\zeta_-$ we introduce in this paper. These functions show remarkable analytical properties in the complex plane. They satisfy a simple algebraic relation which generalizes the factorization relation of semi-infinite media. They are regular in the domain of the Fredholm integral equations they satisfy, and thus can be computed accurately. As an illustration, the X- and Y-functions are calculated in the whole complex plane, together with the extension in this plane of the so-called Sobouti's functions.

B. Rutily; L. Chevallier; J. Bergeat

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Thermal-radiation heat-transfer model for degraded cores. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

One consequence of the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant is a realization by the nuclear power technical community that there is a need for calculational tools that can be used to analyze the TMI-2 accident and to investigate hypothetical situations involving degraded light-water reactor (LWR) cores. As a result, there are now several ongoing modeling and code development efforts in the United States among which is the development of the MIMAS (Multifield Integrated Meltdown Analysis System code) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper describes a thermal-radiation heat-transfer model for LWR degraded cores that has been developed for the MIMAS code.

Tomkins, J.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing Based Approach  

SciTech Connect

For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent- and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required {approx}100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only {approx}2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) - a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Fillippi, Anthony [Texas A& M University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing-Based Approach  

SciTech Connect

Abstract For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent-and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required ~100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only ~2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Filippi, Anthony M [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45º×0.4º in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is ?1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60?138°E & Eq. ?45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving ?2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3’s anthropogenic aerosol forcing is much smaller than the present study’s estimate at the surface, and is outside of what the INDOEX findings can support.

Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Three-dimensional dust radiative-transfer models: The Pinwheel Nebula of WR104  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present radiative-transfer modelling of the dusty spiral Pinwheel Nebula observed around the Wolf-Rayet/OB-star binary WR104. The models are based on the three-dimensional radiative-transfer code TORUS, modified to include an adaptive mesh that allows us to adequately resolve both the inner spiral turns (sub-AU scales) and the outer regions of the nebula (distances of 10^4 AU from the central source). The spiral model provides a good fit to both the spectral energy distribution and Keck aperture masking interferometry, reproducing both the maximum entropy recovered images and the visibility curves. We deduce a dust creation rate of 8+-1 x 10^{-7} solar masses per year, corresponding to approximately 2% by mass of the carbon produced by the Wolf-Rayet star. Simultaneous modelling of the imaging and spectral data enables us to constrain both the opening-angle of the wind-wind collision interface and the dust grain size. We conclude that the dust grains in the inner part of the Pinwheel nebula are small (~100A), in agreement with theoretical predictions, although we cannot rule out the presence of larger grains (~1 micron) further from the central binary. The opening angle of the wind-wind collision interface appears to be about 40 degrees, in broad agreement with the wind parameters estimated for the central binary. We discuss the success and deficiencies of the model, and the likely benefits of applying similar techniques to the more the more complex nebulae observed around other WR/O star binaries.

Tim J Harries; John D Monnier; Neil H Symington; Ryuichi Kurosawa

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

O Star X-ray Line Profiles Explained by Radiation Transfer in Inhomogeneous Stellar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly adopted that X-rays from O stars are produced deep inside the stellar wind, and transported outwards through the bulk of the expanding matter which attenuates the radiation and affects the shape of emission line profiles. The ability of Chandra and XMM-Newton to resolve these lines spectroscopically provided a stringent test for the theory of X-ray production. It turned out that none of the existing models was able to reproduce the observations consistently. The major caveat of these models was the underlying assumption of a smooth stellar wind. Motivated by the various observational evidence that the stellar winds are in fact structured, we present a 2-D model of a stochastic, inhomogeneous wind. The X-ray radiative transfer is derived for such media. It is shown that profiles from a clumped wind differ drastically from those predicted by conventional homogeneous models. We review the up-to-date observations of X-ray line profiles from stellar winds and present line fits obtained from the inhomogeneous wind model. The necessity to account for inhomogeneities in calculating the X-ray transport in massive star winds, including for HMXB is highlighted.

L. M. Oskinova; A. Feldmeier; W. -R. Hamann

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part II: Impact on Cloudiness, the Earth's Radiation Budget, and the General Circulation of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prognostic equation for the mass of condensate associated with large-scale cloudiness introduces a direct coupling between the atmospheric moisture budget and the radiation budget through interactive cloud amounts and cloud optical properties. ...

Laura D. Fowler; David A. Randall

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.

1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

290

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Surface Irradiances Consistent with CERES-Derived Top-of-Atmosphere Shortwave and Longwave Irradiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimate of surface irradiance on a global scale is possible through radiative transfer calculations using satellite-retrieved surface, cloud, and aerosol properties as input. Computed top-of-atmosphere (TOA) irradiances, however, do not ...

Seiji Kato; Norman G. Loeb; Fred G. Rose; David R. Doelling; David A. Rutan; Thomas E. Caldwell; Lisan Yu; Robert A. Weller

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fast Two-Stream Method for Computing Diurnal-Mean Actinic Flux in Vertically Inhomogeneous Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a derivation of the two-stream daytime-mean equations of radiative flux transfer, a method for computing the daytime-mean actinic fluxes in the absorbing and scattering vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere is suggested. The method applies ...

V. V. Filyushkin; S. Madronich; G. P. Brasseur; I. V. Petropavlovskikh

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Validation of a UV to RF High Spectral Resolution Atmospheric Boundary Layer Characterization Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the capability of the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) model to accurately characterize the meteorological parameters and radiative transfer effects of the atmospheric boundary layer with surface ...

Steven T. Fiorino; Robb M. Randall; Michelle F. Via; Jarred L. Burley

294

Impact of Changes to the Radiation Transfer Parameterizations Plus Cloud Optical. Properties in the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation package, shown to correct most of the systematic errors of the operational ECMWF radiation scheme, has been extensively tested in the ECMWF forecast model. Improvements in the clear-sky fluxes and radiative heating/cooling rate ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Absorption of Visible Radiation by Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Fog and Cloud Water Residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light absorption by samples of atmospheric aerosol particles as a function of size was studied using the integrating sphere method. In addition, the optical properties of fog and cloud-water residues were determined. The samples were taken at two ...

Karl Andre; Ralph Dlugi; Gottfried Schnatz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Using the Radiative Kernel Technique to Calculate Climate Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models differ in their responses to imposed forcings, such as increased greenhouse gas concentrations, due to different climate feedback strengths. Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) are separated into two components: ...

Karen M. Shell; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Christine A. Shields

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) ...

Kenneth Sassen; Jennifer M. Comstock

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recently developed approach to climate modeling, called the multiscale modeling framework (MMF), a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) is embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), replacing traditional ...

Mikhail Ovtchinnikov; Thomas Ackerman; Roger Marchand; Marat Khairoutdinov

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

3-D Radiative Transfer Modeling of Structured Winds in Massive Hot Stars with Wind3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop 3-D models of the structured winds of massive hot stars with the Wind3D radiative transfer (RT) code. We investigate the physical properties of large-scale structures observed in the wind of the B-type supergiant HD 64760 with detailed line profile fits to Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) and rotational modulations observed with IUE in Si IV {\\lambda}1395. We develop parameterized input models Wind3D with large-scale equatorial wind density- and velocity-structures, or so-called `Co-rotating Interaction Regions' (CIRs) and `Rotational Modulation Regions' (RMRs). The parameterized models offer important advantages for high-performance RT calculations over ab-initio hydrodynamic input models. The acceleration of the input model calculations permits us to simulate and investigate a wide variety of physical conditions in the extended winds of massive hot stars. The new modeling method is very flexible for constraining the dynamic and geometric wind properties of RMRs in HD 64760. We compute that t...

Lobel, A; Blomme, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds in the Infrared Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-scattering radiative transfer model is employed to evaluate the 11 ?m and the broad-band infrared (IR) fluxes, cooling rates and emittances in model cirrus clouds for a number of standard vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station in the Tropical Western Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of clouds and radiation is a particularly difficult issue in the study of climate change. Clouds have a large impact on the earth's radiation budget but the range of spatial and temporal scales and the complexity of the physical ...

J. H. Mather; T. P. Ackerman; W. E. Clements; F. J. Barnes; M. D. Ivey; L. D. Hatfield; R. M. Reynolds

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

Sisterson, D. L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the global investigation of optically thin cirrus cloud optical thickness (tau) and microphysical properties, such as, effective particle size (D_(eff)) and ice crystal habits (shapes), based on the global satellite observations and fast radiative transfer models (RTMs). In the first part, we develop two computationally efficient RTMs simulating satellite observations under cloudy-sky conditions in the visible/shortwave infrared (VIS/SWIR) and thermal inferred (IR) spectral regions, respectively. To mitigate the computational burden associated with absorption, thermal emission and multiple scattering, we generate pre-computed lookup tables (LUTs) using two rigorous models, i.e., the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) and the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT). The second part introduces two methods (i.e., VIS/SWIR- and IR-based methods) to retrieve tau and D_(eff) from satellite observations in corresponding spectral regions of the two RTMs. We discuss the advantages and weakness of the two methods by estimating the impacts from different error sources on the retrievals through sensitivity studies. Finally, we develop a new method to infer the scattering phase functions of optically thin cirrus clouds in a water vapor absorption channel (1.38-µm). We estimate the ice crystal habits and surface structures by comparing the inferred scattering phase functions and numerically simulated phase functions calculated using idealized habits.

Wang, Chenxi

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Polarization of Thermal Microwave Atmospheric Radiation Due to Scattering by Ice Particles in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polarization difference ?Tb between the vertical and horizontal components of thermal radiation emitted by clouds was studied using 37- and 85-GHz radiometers. The measurements were conducted during the Alliance Icing Research Project in ...

A. V. Troitsky; A. M. Osharin; A. V. Korolev; J. W. Strapp

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Parameterization of Scale-Dependent Radiative Damping Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the radiative damping of slowly modulated sinusoidal wave disturbances is presented. It is shown that it is possible to incorporate scale-dependent effects in a manner no more difficult than that used in the usual “Newtonian ...

Stephen B. Fels

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Hadley Circulations in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium in an Axially Symmetric Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hadley circulations in radiative–convective equilibrium are investigated using an idealistic axially symmetric model. Calculations show that the distribution of temperature in the Hadley cell is controlled by the moist process; the vertical ...

Masaki Satoh

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparison of Energy Source Estimates Derived from Atmospheric Circulation Data with Satellite Measurements of Net Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distributions of the net sources of atmospheric dry and latent energy are evaluated by the residual technique using the reanalyzed ECMWF FGGE level IIIb data for February and July 1979. Their sum (i.e., the residual estimate of the source of ...

Carl Fortelius; Eero Holopainen

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Vertical Profiles of Aerosol and Radiation and the Influence of a Temperature Inversion: Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an airborne experiment performed near Mönchengladbach (Germany) in November 1993 are reported. Besides meteorological data, vertical profiles of aerosol properties (number concentration, size distribution) and radiation (...

M. Wendisch; S. Mertes; A. Ruggaber; T. Nakajima

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model. Part II: Impacts on In-Canopy Latent Heat Flux over a Winter Wheat Field Determined by Detailed Calculation of Canopy Radiation Transmission and Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the validation and sensitivity analysis of an atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and a radiation scheme for the transmission ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Using a Parameterization of a Radiative Transfer Model to Build High-Resolution Maps of Typical Clear-Sky UV Index in Catalonia, Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To perform a climatic analysis of the annual UV index (UVI) variations in Catalonia, Spain (northeast of the Iberian Peninsula), a new simple parameterization scheme is presented based on a multilayer radiative transfer model. The ...

Jordi Badosa; Josep-Abel González; Josep Calbó; Michiel van Weele; Richard L. McKenzie

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Radiative Heating Rates for Saharan Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined longwave and shortwave radiative transfer model was used to determine effects of Saharan dust on the radiative fluxes and heating/cooling rates in the atmosphere. Cases are treated for cloud-free and overcast conditions over the ocean ...

Toby N. Carlson; Stanley G. Benjamin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Influence of the Inclusion of Soil Freezing on Simulations by a Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactions between the soil, biosphere, and atmosphere (ISBA) land surface parameterization scheme has been modified to include soil ice. The liquid water equivalent volumetric ice content is modeled using two reservoirs within the soil: a ...

A. Boone; V. Masson; T. Meyers; J. Noilhan

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

PNNL: FCSD: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change: Programs &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs & Facilities Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and ARM Climate Research Facility ARM Aerial Facility Environmental...

314

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the generation of monsoons. Because the dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways...

315

Turbulent Transfer Coefficients and Calculation of Air Temperature inside Tall Grass Canopies in Land–Atmosphere Schemes for Environmental Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for estimating profiles of turbulent transfer coefficients inside a vegetation canopy and their use in calculating the air temperature inside tall grass canopies in land surface schemes for environmental modeling is presented. The ...

D. T. Mihailovic; K. Alapaty; B. Lalic; I. Arsenic; B. Rajkovic; S. Malinovic

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A scattering approach to Casimir forces and radiative heat transfer for nanostructured surfaces out of thermal equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an exact method for computing Casimir forces and the power of radiative heat transfer between two arbitrary nanostructured surfaces out of thermal equilibrium. The method is based on a generalization of the scattering approach recently used in investigations on the Casimir effect. Analogously to the equilibrium case, we find that also out of thermal equilibrium the shape and composition of the surfaces enter only through their scattering matrices. The expressions derived provide exact results in terms of the scattering matrices of the intervening surfaces.

Giuseppe Bimonte

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

SOAR Data: Data from Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR)1999 through 2001  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

SOAR is a global network of research and volunteer ships that carry global change instrumentation. The primary emphasis for SOAR is solar and IR radiation but some ships cary ceilometers, meteorological instruments, and related equipment. All data are collected in a central data collection computer and the flexible data collection software can be adapted to any other user instrumentation. Currently SOAR is installed pas permanent instrumentation on four ships operating in the western Pacific, eastern tropical Pacific, West Indies, and an oceanographic ship that operates around the world. In addition, six other system are used on cruises of opportunity. [Taken from SOAR homepage at http://www.gim.bnl.gov/soar/index.html

318

Infrared Cooling in Cloudy Atmospheres: Precision of Grid Point Selection for Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrared layer temperature change in a cloudy atmosphere normally shows warming at the base of the cloud and intense cooling at the top of the cloud. In a model that uses broad-band radiative transfer to calculate atmospheric temperature ...

L. P. Stearns

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Micrometeorological Modeling of Radiative and Convective Effects with a Building-Resolving Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many micrometeorological studies with computational fluid dynamics, building-resolving models usually assume a neutral atmosphere. Nevertheless, urban radiative transfers play an important role because of their influence on the energy budget. ...

Yongfeng Qu; Maya Milliez; Luc Musson-Genon; Bertrand Carissimo

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Use of Cloud Reflectance Functions with Satellite Data for Surface Radiation Budget Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an overcast atmosphere above an ocean surface has been calculated as a function of wavelength using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer model. This plane-parallel BRDF appears ...

Dan Lubin; Paul G. Weber

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Four-Stream Spherical Harmonic Expansion Approximation for Solar Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a four-stream extension of the ?-Eddington approximation by considering the higher-order spherical harmonic expansion in radiative intensity. By using the orthogonality relation of the spherical harmonic functions, the ...

J. Li; V. Ramaswamy

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Effect of Spatial Organization on Solar Radiative Transfer in Three-Dimensional Idealized Stratocumulus Cloud Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To relate the error associated with 1D radiative calculations to the geometrical scales of cloud organization and/or in-cloud optical inhomogeneities, a new idealized methodology, based on a Fourier statistical technique, has been developed. ...

F. Di Giuseppe; A. M. Tompkins

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Oxy-fuel combustion of coal and biomass, the effect on radiative and convective heat transfer and burnout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on results of co-firing coal and biomass under oxy-fuel combustion conditions on the RWEn 0.5 MWt Combustion Test Facility (CTF). Results are presented of radiative and convective heat transfer and burnout measurements. Two coals were fired: a South African coal and a Russian Coal under air and oxy-fuel firing conditions. The two coals were also co-fired with Shea Meal at a co-firing mass fraction of 20%. Shea Meal was also co-fired at a mass fraction of 40% and sawdust at 20% with the Russian Coal. An IFRF Aerodynamically Air Staged Burner (AASB) was used. The thermal input was maintained at 0.5 MWt for all conditions studied. The test matrix comprised of varying the Recycle Ratio (RR) between 65% and 75% and furnace exit O{sub 2} was maintained at 3%. Carbon-in-ash samples for burnout determination were also taken. Results show that the highest peak radiative heat flux and highest flame luminosity corresponded to the lowest recycle ratio. The effect of co-firing of biomass resulted in lower radiative heat fluxes for corresponding recycle ratios. Furthermore, the highest levels of radiative heat flux corresponded to the lowest convective heat flux. Results are compared to air firing and the air equivalent radiative and convective heat fluxes are fuel type dependent. Reasons for these differences are discussed in the main text. Burnout improves with biomass co-firing under both air and oxy-fuel firing conditions and burnout is also seen to improve under oxy-fuel firing conditions compared to air. (author)

Smart, John P.; Patel, Rajeshriben; Riley, Gerry S. [RWEnpower, Windmill Hill Business Park, Whitehill Way, Swindon, Wiltshire SN5 6PB, England (United Kingdom)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

3D Lya radiation transfer. II. Fitting the Lyman break galaxy MS 1512-cB58 and implications for Lya emission in high-z starbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using our 3D Lya radiation transfer code, we compute the radiation transfer of Lya and UV continuum photons including dust. Observational constraints on the neutral gas (column density, kinematics, etc.) are taken from other analysis of this object. RESULTS: The observed Lya profile of MS 1512--cB58 is reproduced for the first time taking radiation transfer and all observational constraints into account. The observed absorption profile is found to result naturally from the observed amount of dust and the relatively high HI column density. Radiation transfer effects and suppresion by dust transform a strong intrinsic Lya emission with EW(Lya)>~ 60 Ang into the observed faint superposed Lya emission peak. We propose that the vast majority of LBGs have intrinsically EW(Lya)~60-80 Ang or larger, and that the main physical parameter responsible for the observed variety of Lya strengths and profiles in LBGs is N_H and the accompanying variation of the dust content. Observed EW(Lya) distributions, Lya luminosity functions, and related quantities must therefore be corrected for radiation transfer and dust effects. The implications from our scenario on the duty-cycle of Lya emitters are also discussed.

Daniel Schaerer; Anne Verhamme

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Heat Exchange Between Ocean and Atmosphere in the Eastern North Pacific for 1961-71  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Exchange Between Ocean and Atmosphere in the Eastern North Pacific for 1961-71 N. E. CLARK, L of total heat exchange and departuresfroma long-term mean; 2)long-term monthly mean valuesof the total heat exchange, incom- ing solar radiation, effectiveback radiation, and evaporative and sensible heat transfer

326

Clear Skies S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. A. Clough S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by- line mode! then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. consistent with downlooking data taken with the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) (Smith et al. 1983) from 20 km and with simultaneous data taken

327

Author's personal copy Radiation transfer in photobiological carbon dioxide fixation and fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Department, Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 204 E. Dean Keeton Street, Austin, TX 78705, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 26 April 2011 Received a c t Solar radiation is the energy source driving the metabolic activity of microorganisms able

Pilon, Laurent

328

Optimum Low Thrust Elliptic Orbit Transfer using Numerical Averaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

perturbations due to solar radiation pressure, atmospheric47 7.1 Solar Radiation98 A.3.1 Solar Radiation

Tarzi, Zahi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Determination of Clear-Sky Radiative Flux Profiles, Heating Rates, and Optical Depths Using Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles as a Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report results obtained using an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV) as an experimental platform for atmospheric radiative transfer research. These are the first ever climate measurements made from a UAV and represent a ...

Francisco P. J. Valero; Shelly K. Pope; Robert G. Ellingson; Anthony W. Strawa; John Vitko Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radiative and Dynamical Forcing of the Surface and Atmospheric Temperature Anomalies Associated with the Northern Annular Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the basis of the total energy balance within an atmosphere–surface column, an attribution analysis is conducted for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) atmospheric and surface temperature response to the northern annular mode (NAM) in boreal winter. ...

Yi Deng; Tae-Won Park; Ming Cai

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols over Global Oceans from Merged CERES and MODIS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA) is defined as the difference between radiative fluxes in the absence and presence of aerosols. In this study, the direct radiative effect of aerosols is estimated for 46 months (March 2000–December ...

Norman G. Loeb; Natividad Manalo-Smith

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Radiative transfer in plane-parallel media and Cauchy integral equations II. The H-function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the central part of this paper, we revisit the classical study of the H-function defined as the unique solution, regular in the right complex half-plane, of a Cauchy integral equation. We take advantage of our work on the N-function published in the first article of this series. The H-function is then used to solve a class of Cauchy integral equations occurring in transfer problems posed in plane-parallel media. We obtain a concise expression of the unique solution analytic in the right complex half-plane, then modified with the help of the residue theorem for numerical calculations.

B. Rutily; J. Bergeat; L. Chevallier

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

An Algorithm for the Constraining of Radiative Transfer Calculations to CERES-Observed Broadband Top-of-Atmosphere Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA’s Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) project is responsible for operation and data processing of observations from scanning radiometers on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Terra, Aqua, and Suomi National ...

Fred G. Rose; David A. Rutan; Thomas Charlock; G. Louis Smith; Seiji Kato

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Suppressing nonphysical overheating with a modified implicit Monte Carlo method for time-dependent radiative transfer  

SciTech Connect

In this note we develop a robust implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) algorithm based on more accurately updating the linearized equilibrium radiation energy density. The method does not introduce oscillations in the solution and has the same limit as {Delta}t{yields}{infinity} as the standard Fleck and Cummings IMC method. Moreover, the approach we introduce can be trivially added to current implementations of IMC by changing the definition of the Fleck factor. Using this new method we develop an adaptive scheme that uses either standard IMC or the modified method basing the adaptation on a zero-dimensional problem solved in each cell. Numerical results demonstrate that the new method alleviates both the nonphysical overheating that occurs in standard IMC when the time step is large and significantly diminishes the statistical noise in the solution.

Mcclarren, Ryan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatsch, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U r r b b a a n n A A t t m m o o s s p p h h e e r r i i c c O O b b s s e e r r v v a a t t o o r r y y ( ( U U A A O O ) ) F F i i r r s s t t P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p - - A A t t t t e e n n d d e e e e s s 2 2 7 7 - - 2 2 8 8 J J a a n n u u a a r r y y , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 ****************************************************************** Sean Ahearn Hunter College North Bldg., 10 th Floor New York City, NY sca@everest.hunter.cuny.edu (W) 212-772-5327 Robert Bornstein San Jose State University Dept. of Meteorology San Jose, CA 951920-0104 pblmodel@hotmail.com (W) 408-924-5205 (F) 408-924-5191 David Brown Argonne National Lab 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 dbrown@anl.gov (W) 608-442-1249 Michael Brown LANL, Drop Point 19S, SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road Group D4-MS F604 Los Alamos, NM 87545 mbrown@lanl.gov (W) 505- 667-1788

336

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

337

Effect of infrared transparency on the heat transfer through windows: a clarification of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

The various radiative, convective, and conductive components of the net heat transfer are calculated and illustrated for various infrared transparencies of covers such as would be used in architectural, greenhouse, or solar collector windows. It is shown that in the limiting cases of infrared opacity and infrared transparency the relative contributions of the three modes of heat transfer are altered, but all contribute significantly. The radiation shielding arguments pertain to the analogous greenhouse effect in the atmosphere.

Silverstein, S.D.

1976-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part I: Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) investigates the critical role that clouds and aerosols play in modulating the radiative energy flow within the Earth–atmosphere system. CERES builds upon the foundation laid by previous ...

Norman G. Loeb; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Seiji Kato; Walter F. Miller; Shashi K. Gupta; Patrick Minnis; Bruce A. Wielicki

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated from empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper ...

Norman G. Loeb; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Bruce A. Wielicki; David F. Young

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument due to uncertainties in radiance-to-flux conversion from CERES Terra angular distribution models (ADMs) are evaluated ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; David R. Doelling

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

342

Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium. Part II: Latent Heat Transport and Moist Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In moist convection, atmospheric motions transport water vapor from the earth's surface to the regions where condensation occurs. This transport is associated with three other aspects of convection: the latent heat transport, the expansion work ...

Olivier Pauluis; Isaac M. Held

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Equilibrium Response of an Atmosphere–Mixed Layer Ocean Model to Different Radiative Forcing Agents: Global and Zonal Mean Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium response to various forcing agents, including CO2, solar irradiance, tropospheric ozone, black carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, and volcanic aerosols, is investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a ...

Masakazu Yoshimori; Anthony J. Broccoli

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Practical Atmospheric Correction Algorithms for a Multi-Spectral Sensor From the Visible Through the Thermal Spectral Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deriving information about the Earth's surface requires atmospheric corrections of the measured top-of-the-atmosphere radiances. One possible path is to use atmospheric radiative transfer codes to predict how the radiance leaving the ground is affected by the scattering and attenuation. In practice the atmosphere is usually not well known and thus it is necessary to use more practical methods. The authors will describe how to find dark surfaces, estimate the atmospheric optical depth, estimate path radiance and identify thick clouds using thresholds on reflectance and NDVI and columnar water vapor. The authors describe a simple method to correct a visible channel contaminated by a thin cirrus clouds.

Borel, C.C.; Villeneuve, P.V.; Clodium, W.B.; Szymenski, J.J.; Davis, A.B.

1999-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Mountain Forces and the Atmospheric Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although mountains are generally thought to exert forces on the atmosphere, the related transfers of energy between earth and atmosphere are not represented in standard energy equations of the atmosphere. It is shown that the axial rotation of the ...

Joseph Egger

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Technical Sessions Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 Introduction The availability of a rapid highly accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model is essential to meet the objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The model must be capable of computing radiance at spectral intervals consistent with the monochromatic spectral variation of the atmospheric molecular absorption. The resolution of the spectrometers to be deployed at the ARM sites, 0.1 cm-1 and less, will provide an important assessment of our capability to perform radiative transfer calculations in the multiply scattered environment. A second important application forthe high-accuracy high-resolution model is to provide parameterizations and validations for

347

Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols in Idealized Simulations of Convective–Radiative Quasi Equilibrium. Part II: Double-Moment Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective–radiative quasi equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the ...

Wojciech W. Grabowski; Hugh Morrison

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A GRID OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR ATMOSPHERE MODELS OF SOLAR METALLICITY. I. GENERAL PROPERTIES, GRANULATION, AND ATMOSPHERIC EXPANSION  

SciTech Connect

Present grids of stellar atmosphere models are the workhorses in interpreting stellar observations and determining their fundamental parameters. These models rely on greatly simplified models of convection, however, lending less predictive power to such models of late-type stars. We present a grid of improved and more reliable stellar atmosphere models of late-type stars, based on deep, three-dimensional (3D), convective, stellar atmosphere simulations. This grid is to be used in general for interpreting observations and improving stellar and asteroseismic modeling. We solve the Navier Stokes equations in 3D and concurrent with the radiative transfer equation, for a range of atmospheric parameters, covering most of stellar evolution with convection at the surface. We emphasize the use of the best available atomic physics for quantitative predictions and comparisons with observations. We present granulation size, convective expansion of the acoustic cavity, and asymptotic adiabat as functions of atmospheric parameters.

Trampedach, Regner [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Asplund, Martin; Collet, Remo [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Nordlund, Ake [Astronomical Observatory/Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Stein, Robert F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

3D atmospheric modeling based on MODTRAN4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All the factors of atmospheric environment that influence the transmission of infrared radiation were analyzed in detail in the paper. Taking horizontally varying atmospheric property into consideration, a 3D model of atmospheric transmission of infrared ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, infrared radiation, model, path radiation, ratio of atmospheric transmission, simulation, single scatter solar radiation

Ge Li; Zhifeng Lu; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiative Transfer Simulations Using Mesoscale Cloud Model Outputs: Comparisons with Passive Microwave and Infrared Satellite Observations for Midlatitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real midlatitude meteorological cases are simulated over western Europe with the cloud mesoscale model Méso-NH, and the outputs are used to calculate brightness temperatures at microwave frequencies with the Atmospheric Transmission at Microwave (...

Ingo Meirold-Mautner; Catherine Prigent; Eric Defer; Juan R. Pardo; Jean-Pierre Chaboureau; Jean-Pierre Pinty; Mario Mech; Susanne Crewell

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Regularizing the Satellite Temperature-Retrieval Problem through Singular-Value Decomposition of the Radiative Transfer Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is derived for retrieving atmospheric temperature profiles from satellite-measured spectral radiance that appears, in first tests, to effectively circumvent certain difficulties of other well-known and implemented methods. In ...

Owen E. Thompson

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A 10-year climatology of solar radiation for the Great Barrier Reef: implications for recent mass coral bleaching events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-year solar radiation climatology is developed for the Great Barrier Reef region using data from the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS). The method uses a look-up table based on the STREAMER radiative transfer model for a tropical atmosphere. ...

Itsara Masiri; Manuel Nunez; Evan Weller

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Effect of Realistic Radiative Transfer on Potential Vorticity Structures, Including the Influence of Background Shear and Strain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified version of the radiation scheme of Shine is used to investigate the decay of small-scale potential vorticity structures characteristic of those observed in the lower and middle stratosphere. Following Fels, effective thermal damping ...

P. H. Haynes; W. E. Ward

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

356

Technical assessment of the prevention of micro-fouling on OTEC heat-transfer surfaces through the use of ultraviolet radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce or eliminate biofouling by microorganisms it has been suggested that the seawater entering the heat exchanger be sterilized (or at least sanitized) by uv radiation at 253.7 nm. The feasibility of applying this technology to OTEC is examined. Trivial calculations based on the Lambert-Beer equation and reasonable assumptions about seawater quality and the intensity of irradiation obtainable from a uv lamp suggest seawater may be transparent enough to a collimated beam of uv light to deliver effective germicidal doses to nearly 150 cm under some conditions. However, the practical limit on the depth of effective radiation from commercial lamps is severely restricted by many factors including the natural divergence of light, absorption and scattering in the media, intensity of radiation from the light source and so forth. Even under very favorable conditions a common design allowing uv light to penetrate 30 cm of water would have to permit the water at that distance to be in contact with the light for 20 seconds or so to deliver the germicidal effect of high quality sanitization but not necessarily sterilization. Macro-fouling, which may be more severe than micro-fouling, will not be affected by uv radiation (presuming an absence of symbiotic relationships). Parasitic power required for uv sources may be prohibitive under unfavorable conditions (i.e., unexpectedly high absorptivities of seawater, or excessive turbidity) or the absence of an industrial effort to scale up present uv equipment appropriate to OTEC needs. This latter event is unlikely for it appears that present uv lamps can be adapted to OTEC needs without major technological advancement. Power and cost estimates for uv installation and operation vary widely depending on the number of lamps needed for the OTEC configuration and the intensity of uv radiation actually required to prevent biofouling of heat transfer systems in OTEC designs.

Garrigan, G. A.; Schmitt, R. P.; Ciccone, V. J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARM maintains three major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. In 2007 the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. See the COPS home at https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/spp-iop/index.htm and the QPF homepage at http://www.meteo.uni-bonn.de/projekte/SPPMeteo/ Information obtained during COPS will not only aid regional weather forecasts to help protect people and land, but will also help scientists determine how clouds affect the climate in complex terrain around the world. Because of its relevance to society, COPS has been endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. [Taken from http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/blackforest/] A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading. The URL to go directly to the ARM Archive, bypassing the information pages, is http://www.archive.arm.gov/ The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

358

Heat transfer in freeboard region of fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect

This research involved the study of heat transfer and fluid mechanic characteristics around a horizontal tube in the freeboard region of fluidized beds. Heat transfer coefficients were experimetnally measured for different bed temperatures, particle sizes, gas flow rates, and tube elevations in the freeboard region of air fluidized beds at atmospheric pressure. Local heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly with angular position around the tube. Average heat transfer coefficients were found to decrease with increasing freeboard tube elevation and approach the values for gas convection plus radiation for any given gas velocity. For a fixed tube elevation, heat transfer coefficients generally increased with increasing gas velocity and with high particle entrainment they can approach the magnitudes found for immersed tubes. Heat transfer coefficients were also found to increase with increasing bed temperature. It was concluded that this increase is partly due to increase of radiative heat transfer and partly due to change of thermal properties of the fluidizing gas and particles. To investigate the fluid mechanic behavior of gas and particles around a freeboard tube, transient particle tube contacts were measured with a special capacitance probe in room temperature experiments. The results indicated that the tube surface experiences alternating dense and lean phase contacts. Quantitative information for local characteristics was obtained from the capacitance signals and used to develop a phenomenological model for prediction of the heat transfer coefficients around freeboard tubes. The packet renewal theory was modified to account for the dense phase heat transfer and a new model was suggested for the lean phase heat transfer. Finally, an empirical freeboard heat transfer correlation was developed from functional analysis of the freeboard heat transfer data using nondimensional groups representing gas velocity and tube elevation.

Biyikli, S.; Tuzla, K.; Chen, J.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Evaluation of Model-Predicted Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation and Cloud Parameters over Africa with Observations from GERB and SEVIRI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compared the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model version 2 (RACMO) with satellite data by simultaneously looking at cloud properties and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes. This study used cloud properties retrieved from Spinning Enhanced ...

Wouter Greuell; Erik van Meijgaard; Nicolas Clerbaux; Jan Fokke Meirink

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A faster algorithm for smoothed particle hydrodynamics with radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new, faster implicit algorithm for solving the radiation hydrodynamics equations in the flux-limited diffusion approximation for smoothed particle hydrodynamics. This improves on the method elucidated in Whitehouse & Bate by using a Gauss-Seidel iterative method rather than iterating over the exchange of energy between pairs of particles. The new algorithm is typically many thousands of times faster than the old one, which will enable more complex problems to be solved. The new algorithm is tested using the same tests performed by Turner & Stone for ZEUS-2D, and repeated by Whitehouse & Bate.

Stuart C. Whitehouse; Matthew R. Bate; Joe J. Monaghan

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Engineering Model of Liquid Storage Utility Tank for Heat Transfer Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The utility or chemical storage tank requires special engineering attention and heat transfer analysis because the tank content is very sensitive to temperature and surrounding environment such as atmospheric or outside air, humidity, and solar radiation heat. A simplified heat transfer model was developed to calculate the liquid content temperature of utility storage tank. The content of the utility storage tanks can be water or any other chemical liquid. An engineering model of liquid storage tank for heat transfer analysis and temperature calculations are presented and discussed in the examples of Tanks No. 1 containing oxalic acid and No. 2 containing sodium tetraphenylborate solution.

Kwon, K.C.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Handbook of heat transfer fundamentals  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is on the fundamentals of heat transfer. It provides coverage on conduction, convection, and radiation and on thermophysical properties of materials.

Rohsenow, W.M.; Hartnett, J.P.; Ganic, E.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights  

THE LLNL TECHNOLOGY COMPANY PRODUCTS Partnering Today: Technology Transfer Highlights 10 Ametek-Ortec: High-precision Radiation Detectors ORTEC, a unit of AMETEK, is ...

364

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

365

Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption technique to retrieve columnar water vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential absorption techniques are suitable to retrieve the total column water vapor contents from imaging spectroscopy data. A technique called Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption (APDA) is derived directly from simplified radiative transfer equations. It combines a partial atmospheric correction with a differential absorption technique. The atmospheric path radiance term is iteratively corrected during the retrieval of water vapor. This improves the results especially over low background albedos. The error of the method for various ground reflectance spectra is below 7% for most of the spectra. The channel combinations for two test cases are then defined, using a quantitative procedure, which is based on MODTRAN simulations and the image itself. An error analysis indicates that the influence of aerosols and channel calibration is minimal. The APDA technique is then applied to two AVIRIS images acquired in 1991 and 1995. The accuracy of the measured water vapor columns is within a range of {+-}5% compared to ground truth radiosonde data.

Schlaepfer, D.; Itten, K.I. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography] [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography; Borel, C.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Keller, J. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Estimation and Model Validation of Surface Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing Using TOGA COARE Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) radiation measurements in the western Pacific warm pool are used to estimate surface solar radiation budgets and to validate radiation model ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Wenzhong Zhao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Heat and moisture transfer through clothing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.Convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients for2008. Study of heat and moisture transfer within multi-layer

Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis of Broadband Solar Radiation and Albedo over the Ocean Surface at COVE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere–ocean radiative transfer model has been applied to analyze a full year of broadband solar irradiances (up and down) measured over an ocean site 25 km east of the coast of Virginia in the Atlantic. The coupled model treats ...

Zhonghai Jin; Thomas P. Charlock; Ken Rutledge

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth's surface. BNL is actively...

370

Estimating the Meridional Energy Transports in the Atmosphere and Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The poleward energy transports in the atmosphere–ocean system are estimated for the annual mean and the four seasons based on satellite measurements of the net radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, atmospheric transports of energy at ...

B. C. Carissimo; A. H. Oort; T. H. Vonder Haar

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environment University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews, J. A. Ogren, P. J. Sheridan, and J. M. Harris Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado P. K. Quinn Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington Abstract The uncertainties associated with assumptions of generic aerosol properties in radiative transfer codes are unknown, which means that these uncertainties are frequently invoked when models and

372

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Radiative forcing for changes in tropospheric O{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have evaluated the radiative forcing for assumed changes in tropospheric O{sub 3} in the 500-1650 cm{sup {minus}1} wavenumber range. The radiative forcing calculations were performed as a function of latitude as well as for a globally and seasonally averaged model atmosphere, both in a clear sky approximation and in a model containing a representative cloud distribution. The scenarios involved radiative forcing calculations for O{sub 3} at normal atmospheric abundance and at a tropospheric abundance depleted by 25 ppbv, at each altitude, for all northern hemisphere latitudes. Normal abundances of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O were included in the calculations. The IR radiative forcing was calculated using a correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model. The tropospheric radiative forcing values are compared to the IPCC formulae for ozone tropospheric forcing as well as other published values to determine the validity of the correlated k-distribution approach to the radiative forcing calculations. The results for the global average atmosphere show agreement with previous results to the order of 10 percent. We conclude that the O{sub 3} forcing is linear in the background abundance and that the radiative forcing for ozone for the globally averaged atmosphere and the latitude averaged radiative forcing in the clear sky approximation are in agreement to within 10 percent. For the case of an atmosphere in which the tropospheric ozone has been depleted by 25 ppbv at all altitudes in the northern hemisphere, the mid latitude zone contributes {approximately}50 percent of the forcing, tropic zone contributes {approximately}37 percent of the forcing and the polar zone contributes {approximately}13 percent of the total forcing.

Grossman, A.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Grant, K.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hybrid Radiator-Cooling System  

Technology Development & Commercialization Current Challenges Coolant radiators in highway trucks are designed to transfer maximum heat at a ...

375

Development of a Second-Generation Regional Climate Model (RegCM2). Part I: Boundary-Layer and Radiative Transfer Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last few years the development of a second-generation regional climate modeling system (RegCM2) has been completed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Based upon the National Center for Atmospheric Research-...

Filippo Giorgi; Maria Rosaria Marinucci; Gary T. Bates

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Response of the Middle Atmosphere to CO2 Doubling: Results from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) has been used to examine the middle atmosphere response to CO2 doubling. The radiative-photochemical response induced by doubling CO2 alone and the response produced by changes in prescribed SSTs are ...

V. I. Fomichev; A. I. Jonsson; J. de Grandpré; S. R. Beagley; C. McLandress; K. Semeniuk; T. G. Shepherd

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J.-F. Louis J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The main purpose of the ARM program is to provide the necessary data to develop, test and validate the parameterization of clouds and of their interactions with the radiation field, and the computation of radiative transfer in climate models. For the most part, however, the ARM observations will be imperfect, incomplete, redundant, indirect, and unrepresentative. This is unavoidable, despite the best efforts at equipping the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site with the best instruments. To understand these limitations, we must consider the structure of a climate model and the observation constraints. The basic prognostic variables of any climate mode! are atmospheric temperature, horizontal wind components

378

High Precision Long-Term Monitoring of Radiatively Active and Related Trace Gases at Surface Sites and from Aircraft in the Southern Hemisphere Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routine high precision measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, and CO2 stable isotopes are conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia). Of particular relevance to global monitoring of ...

R. J. Francey; L. P. Steele; R. L. Langenfelds; B. C. Pak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

New Approach to Calculation of Atmospheric Model Physics: Accurate and Fast Neural Network Emulation of Longwave Radiation in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach based on a synergetic combination of statistical/machine learning and deterministic modeling within atmospheric models is presented. The approach uses neural networks as a statistical or machine learning technique for an accurate ...

Vladimir M. Krasnopolsky; Michael S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Dmitry V. Chalikov

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a major initiative -- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCMs under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. In 1990, the authors proposed to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems connected with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem -- longwave radiation. In particular, their long-term research goals are to: develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations, assess the impact of the longwave radiative forcing in a GCM, determine the sensitivity of a GCM to the radiative model used in it, and determine how the longwave radiative forcing contributes relatively when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and expansion.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cloud Geometry Effects on Atmospheric Solar Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3D broadband solar radiative transfer scheme is formulated by integrating a Monte Carlo photon transport algorithm with the Fu–Liou radiation model. It is applied to fields of tropical mesoscale convective clouds and subtropical marine boundary ...

Qiang Fu; M. C. Cribb; H. W. Barker; S. K. Krueger; A. Grossman

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Colorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through the MODTRAN radiation transfer code to simulate theoretical target transmittances at various

384

Modeling radiation characteristics of semitransparent media containing bubbles or particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and heat, mass, and radiation transfer,” Journal of Non-Sacadura, J. F. , “Thermal radiation properties of dispersedG. , and Viskanta, R. , “Radiation characteristics of glass

Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Baillis, Dominique; Pilon, Laurent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Numerical Solution of the Expanding Stellar Atmosphere Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss numerical methods and algorithms for the solution of NLTE stellar atmosphere problems involving expanding atmospheres, e.g., found in novae, supernovae and stellar winds. We show how a scheme of nested iterations can be used to reduce the high dimension of the problem to a number of problems with smaller dimensions. As examples of these sub-problems, we discuss the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation for relativistically expanding media with spherical symmetry, the solution of the multi-level non-LTE statistical equilibrium problem for extremely large model atoms, and our temperature correction procedure. Although modern iteration schemes are very efficient, parallel algorithms are essential in making large scale calculations feasible, therefore we discuss some parallelization schemes that we have developed.

Hauschildt, P H

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Numerical Solution of the Expanding Stellar Atmosphere Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss numerical methods and algorithms for the solution of NLTE stellar atmosphere problems involving expanding atmospheres, e.g., found in novae, supernovae and stellar winds. We show how a scheme of nested iterations can be used to reduce the high dimension of the problem to a number of problems with smaller dimensions. As examples of these sub-problems, we discuss the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation for relativistically expanding media with spherical symmetry, the solution of the multi-level non-LTE statistical equilibrium problem for extremely large model atoms, and our temperature correction procedure. Although modern iteration schemes are very efficient, parallel algorithms are essential in making large scale calculations feasible, therefore we discuss some parallelization schemes that we have developed.

P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

387

Short-Term Basin-Scale Streamflow Forecasting Using Large-Scale Coupled Atmospheric–Oceanic Circulation and Local Outgoing Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the use of large-scale circulation patterns (El Niño–Southern Oscillation and the equatorial Indian Ocean Oscillation), local outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and previous streamflow information for short-term (weekly) ...

Rajib Maity; S. S. Kashid

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bands Campaign (RHUBC) D. Turner and E. Mlawer RHUBC Breakout Session 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting 13 March, 2008 Norfolk, Virginia Motivation * Radiative heating/cooling in the mid-troposphere modulate the vertical motions of the atmosphere - This heating/cooling occurs primarily in water vapor absorption bands that are opaque at the surface * Approximately 40% of the OLR comes from the far-IR * Until recently, the observational tools were not available to evaluate the accuracy of the far-IR radiative transfer models - Spectrally resolved far-IR radiances, accurate PWV * Need to validate both clear sky (WV) absorption and cirrus scattering properties in these normally opaque bands Scientific Objectives * Conduct clear sky radiative closure studies in order to reduce uncertainties

389

Plasma wake field XUV radiation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

Prono, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM); Jones, Michael E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

391

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

392

The Earth's radiation budget and its relation to atmospheric hydrology 3. Comparison of observations over the oceans with a GCM  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a study that seeks to examine a very limited set of interactions between the hydrological cycle and the radiative processes that take place on Earth and attempt to test how well these interactions are simulated by a general circulation model. Two broad types of tests of the model are introduced in this paper. The first focuses on comparing various sensitivity relationships established by the model with those observed on Earth. The specific relationships examined in this paper include the sensitivities of column-integrated water vapor, the clear sky greenhouse effect, cloud albedo, and cloud radiative forcing to sea surface temperature. The second type of test focuses on comparison of simulated and observed seasonal cycles of the greenhouse effect and cloud radiative forcing. The main results of this study suggest that the model studied, which the authors take to be representative of the current generation of global climate models, is able to simulate some aspects of the observed sensitivities fairly well. Qualitative successes of the simulations include realistic variations of column vapor with sea surface temperature, the clear sky greenhouse parameter and its variation with both column vapor and sea surface temperature, and cloud longwave radiative forcing with sea surface temperature, as well as the seasonal changes of the greenhouse effect and the cloud radiative forcing. However, there exist many serious quantitative differences between the model and the observations. These include problems in the simulations of the column vapor in the tropics and an excessively strong clear-sky greenhouse effect in the mid-latitudes. Significant differences between the simulated and the observed radiative properties of clouds include the overprediction of the longwave cloud radiative forcing over warm tropical oceans and a significant underestimate of the cloud reflection in mid-latitudes during the summer season. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Stephens, G.L.; Randall, D.A.; Wittmeyer, I.L.; Dazlich, D.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)); Tjemkes, S. (State University, Utrecht (Netherlands))

1993-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dispersed-Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer Data near Spacer Grids in a Rod Bundle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Radiation Effects and Their Relationship to Geological Repository / Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow

Graydon L. Yoder; Jr.; David G. Morris; Charles B. Mullins; Larry J. Ott

394

Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

Kurs, André

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve...

396

Tech Transfer  

Tech Transfer The Industrial Partnerships Office is improving tech transfer processes with our very own Yellow Belt. Several of the Lab's process ...

397

Radiation intensity of lignite-fired oxy-fuel flames  

SciTech Connect

The radiative heat transfer in oxy-fuel flames is compared to corresponding conditions in air-fuel flames during combustion of lignite in the Chalmers 100 kW oxy-fuel test facility. In the oxy-fuel cases the flue-gas recycle rate was varied, so that, in principle, the same stoichiometry was kept in all cases, whereas the oxygen fraction in the recycled flue-gas mixture ranged from 25 to 29 vol.%. Radial profiles of gas concentration, temperature and total radiation intensity were measured in the furnace. The temperature, and thereby the total radiation intensity of the oxy-fuel flames, increases with decreasing flue-gas recycle rate. The ratio of gas and total radiation intensities increases under oxy-fuel conditions compared to air-firing. However, when radiation overlap between gas and particles is considered the ratios for air-firing and oxy-fuel conditions become more similar, since the gas-particle overlap is increased in the CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere. A large fraction of the radiation in these lignite flames is emitted by particles whose radiation was not significantly influenced by oxy-fuel operation. Therefore, an increment of gas radiation due to higher CO{sub 2} concentration is not evident because of the background of particle radiation, and, the total radiation intensities are similar during oxy-fuel and air-fuel operation as long as the temperature distributions are similar. (author)

Andersson, Klas; Johansson, Robert; Hjaertstam, Stefan; Johnsson, Filip; Leckner, Bo [Department of Energy and Environment, Division of Energy Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE - 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Measurement and modeling of shortwave irradiance components in cloud-free atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

Atmosphere scatters and absorbs incident solar radiation modifying its spectral content and decreasing its intensity at the surface. It is very useful to classify the earth-atmospheric solar radiation into several components--direct solar surface irradiance (E{sub direct}), diffuse-sky downward surface irradiance (E{sub diffuse}), total surface irradiance, and upwelling flux at the surface and at the top-of-the atmosphere. E{sub direct} depends only on the extinction properties of the atmosphere without regard to details of extinction, namely scattering or absorption; furthermore it can be accurately measured to high accuracy (0.3%) with the aid of an active cavity radiometer (ACR). E{sub diffuse} has relatively larger uncertainties both in its measurement using shaded pyranometers and in model estimates, owing to the difficulty in accurately characterizing pyranometers and in measuring model inputs such as surface reflectance, aerosol single scattering albedo, and phase function. Radiative transfer model simulations of the above surface radiation components in cloud-free skies using measured atmospheric properties show that while E{sub direct} estimates are closer to measurements, E{sub diffuse} is overestimated by an amount larger than the combined uncertainties in model inputs and measurements, illustrating a fundamental gap in the understanding of the magnitude of atmospheric absorption in cloud-free skies. The excess continuum type absorption required to reduce the E{sub diffuse} model overestimate ({approximately}3--8% absorptance) would significantly impact climate prediction and remote sensing. It is not clear at present what the source for this continuum absorption is. Here issues related to measurements and modeling of the surface irradiance components are discussed.

Halthore, R.N.

1999-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

399

Radiation Budgets in the Western Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usefulness of the radiances measured by operational satellites in deriving radiation budgets is demonstrated by comparing the model calculations with the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) fluxes. The radiation budgets in the atmosphere ...

Mino-Dah Chou

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resolved Radiative Transfer Model: MODTRAN……….131 APMEXModerate Imaging Spectroradiometer MODTRAN MODerate spectralprovide by MODTRAN…………………………………………………………………………133 Table 4.2

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE/EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Atmospheric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARMCART), North Slope of Alaska and...

402

Atmospheric Solar Heating Rate in the Water Vapor Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmosphere is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Applied heat transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

Ganapathy, V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Numerical Study of Climatic Oscillations Using a Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Primitive Equation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere-ocean primitive equation model is developed. It is a free-dimensional general circulation model, with two layers in the atmosphere and two layers in the ocean and includes solar radiation, longwave radiation, sensible heating,...

Xiong-Shan Chen

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Near-Continuous Profiling of Temperature, Moisture, and Atmospheric Stability Using the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) has funded the development and installation of five ground-based atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) systems at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ...

W. F. Feltz; W. L. Smith; H. B. Howell; R. O. Knuteson; H. Woolf; H. E. Revercomb

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The 27–28 October 1986 FIRF IFO Cirrus Case Study: Comparison of Radiative Transfer Theory with Observations by Satellite and Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of cirrus and altocumulus clouds during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment (FIRE) are compared to theoretical models of cloud radiative properties. Three tests are performed. First, ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; J.T. Suttles; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Ronald M. Welch; James D. Spinhirne; Man-Li C. Wu; David O'C. Starr; Lindsay Parker; Robert F. Arduini

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Transferring Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transferring Data Transferring Data to and from NERSC Yushu Yao 1 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Overview 2 * Structure of NERSC Systems and Disks * Data Transfer Nodes * Transfer Data from/to NERSC - scp/sftp - bbcp - GridFTP * Sharing Data Within NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Systems and Disks 3 System Hopper Franklin Carver Euclid Data Transfer Node PDSF Global Home ($HOME) Global Scratch ($GSCRATCH) Project Directory Local Non-shared Scratch Data transfer nodes can access most of the disks, suggested for transferring data in/out NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Data Transfer Nodes * Two Servers Available Now: - dtn01.nersc.gov and dtn02.nersc.gov - Accessible by all NERSC users * Designed to Transfer Data: - High speed connection to HPSS and NGF (Global Home, Project, and Global Scratch) - High speed ethernet to wide area network

409

Seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect: The role of changes in atmospheric temperatures and humidities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of the factors which control the seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect, based on satellite observations and radiative transfer simulations. The satellite observations include the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and the total column moisture content derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager. The simulations were performed with the SAMSON system described in an earlier paper, using atmospheric temperatures and humidities from operational analyses produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. At low latitudes, the magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is dominated by the strong thermodynamic link between the total column moisture content of the atmosphere and sea surface temperatures, with minimal seasonal variations. In contrast, at middle to high latitudes there are strong seasonal variations, the clear-sky greenhouse effect being largest in winter and smallest in summer. These variations cannot be explained by the seasonal cycle in the total column moisture content, as this is largest in summer and smallest in winter. The variations are controlled instead by the seasonal changes in atmospheric temperatures. The colder atmosphere in winter enhances the temperature differential between the atmosphere and the sea surface, leading to a larger greenhouse effect despite the lower moisture contents. The magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is thus controlled by atmospheric humidity at low latitudes, but by atmospheric temperature at middle and high latitudes. These controls are illustrated by results from sensitivity experiments with SAMSON and are interpreted in terms of a simple model.

Webb, M.J.; Slingo, A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stephens, G.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

24/11/2010 10:22AGU: Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance to middle atmosphere ozone chemistry Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/ja/ja1011/2010JA015599/2010JA015599.xml  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24/11/2010 10:22AGU: Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance to middle atmosphere ozone chemistry Craig J. Rodger Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory, University of Oulu, Sodankylä, Finland Geomagnetic storms triggered

Ulich, Thomas

411

Network simulation solutions for laminar radiating dissipative magneto-gas dynamic heat transfer over a wedge in non-Darcian porous regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the steady-state, magnetohydrodynamic, optically thick, dissipative gas boundary layer flow and heat transfer past a non-isothermal porous wedge embedded in a scattering, homogenous, isotropic Darcy-Forchheimer porous medium, with significant ... Keywords: Boundary layers, Hartmann number, Joule heating, Magneto-gas dynamics, Network simulation

JoaquíN Zueco; O. Anwar BéG

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Atmospheric Temperature Measurement Biases on the Antarctic Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of atmospheric temperature made on the Antarctic Plateau with thermistors housed in naturally (wind) ventilated radiation shields are shown to be significantly warm biased by solar radiation. High incoming solar flux and high surface ...

Christophe Genthon; Delphine Six; Vincent Favier; Matthew Lazzara; Linda Keller

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Observed Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on the Surface Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols scatter and potentially absorb incoming solar radiation, thereby reducing the total amount of radiation reaching the surface and increasing the fraction that is diffuse. The partitioning of incoming energy at the surface into ...

Allison L. Steiner; Dori Mermelstein; Susan J. Cheng; Tracy E. Twine; Andrew Oliphant

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Observed impact of atmospheric aerosols on the surface energy budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols scatter and potentially absorb incoming solar radiation, thereby reducing the total amount of radiation reaching the surface and increasing the fraction that is diffuse. The partitioning of incoming energy at the surface into ...

Allison L. Steiner; Dori Mermelstein; Susan J. Cheng; Tracy E. Twine; Andrew Oliphant

415

Technology Transfer  

A new search feature has been implemented, which allows searching of technology transfer information across the Department of Energy Laboratories.

416

The Role of Relative Humidity in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following conditions are derived for the existence of a radiation limit of tropospheric origin in a nongray atmosphere, extending the work on a gray atmosphere by Nakajima et al.: 1) the atmosphere must become sufficiently optically thick, ...

Masahiro Sugiyama; Peter H. Stone; Kerry A. Emanuel

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters P. J. Ricchiazzi and C. Gautier University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Recent studies of clear-sky radiation indicate that current radiative transfer (RT) models underestimate atmospheric absorption when standard aerosol properties are used. This so-called clear-sky anomaly is manifested in predicted levels of diffuse radiation significantly below those observed at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and other sites in the continental United States (e.g., Halthore et al. 1998 GRL). Other observations at pristine sites do not show a discrepancy (Barnard and Powell 2001, 2001; Kato et al. 1997; Halthore 1998). These results may indicate that the clear-sky anomaly is only observed at sites

418

A Study of Persistence in the Land–Atmosphere System Using a General Circulation Model and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistence in the land–atmosphere system simulated with the National Center for Atmosphere Research Community Climate Model Version 2 (CCM2) coupled with the Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) is examined. BATS simulates various ...

Yongqiang Liu; Roni Avissar

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds: hyperspectral radiative transfer modeling, analysis of uncertainties in in-situ cloud extinction measurements and intercomparison of cirrus retrievals from a-train instruments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three parts, each devoted to a particular issue of significant importance for satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In the first part, we develop and present a fast infrared radiative transfer model on the basis of the adding-doubling principle. The model aims to facilitate the radiative transfer computations involved in hyperspectral remote sensing applications. The model is applicable to a variety of cloud conditions, including vertically inhomogeneous or multilayered clouds. It is shown that for hyperspectral applications the model is two order-of-magnitude faster than the well-known discrete ordinate transfer (DISORT) model, while maintains a similar accuracy. The second part is devoted to the investigation of uncertainties in the FSSP (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe) measurement of cloud extinction by small ice particles. First, the single-scattering properties of small ice particles in cirrus clouds are derived and compared to those of equivalent spheres according to various definitions. It is found that, although small ice particles in cirrus clouds are often “quasi-spherical”, their scattering phase functions and asymmetry factors are significant different from those of ice spheres. Such differences may lead to substantial underestimation of cloud extinction in FSSP measurement, if small ice particles are assumed to be spheres. In the third part, we present a comparison of cirrus cloud optical thickness retrievals from two important instruments, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) and POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth’s Reflection), on board NASA’s A-train satellite constellation. The comparison reveals a large difference. Several possible reasons are discussed. It is found that much of the difference is attributable to the difference between the MODIS and POLDER retrieval algorithm in the assumption of cirrus cloud bulk scattering properties. Potential implications of the difference for climate studies are investigated. An important finding is that the use of an unrealistic cirrus bulk scattering model might introduce artificial seasonal variation of cirrus optical thickness and shortwave radiative forcing into the retrieval.

Zhang, Zhibo

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An Earth Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Model. Part II: Radiation with Clouds Included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget studies. The model consists of the upward radiative transfer parameterization of Thompson and Warren, the cloud cover model of Sherr et al., and a ...

Shi-Keng Yang; G. Louis Smith; Fred L. Bartman

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Two-Dimensional Radiation-Turbulence Climate Model. I: Sensitivity to Cirrus Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the thermodynamic energy balance between radiation and vertical plus horizontal dynamic transports, a two-dimensional radiation-turbulence climate model is developed. This model consists of a broadband solar and IR radiation transfer ...

Szu-Cheng S. Ou; Kuo-Nan Liou

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Entropy in Climate Models. Part I: Vertical Structure of Atmospheric Entropy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical atmospheric entropy structure has been investigated using one-dimensional radiative–convective models. A method for evaluating radiation entropy is proposed. In the models, the entropy radiation is dealt with in a way parallel to the ...

J. Li; Petr Chýlek; G. B. Lesins

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM's). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM's under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM's to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Seasonal Cycle of Atmospheric Heating and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the heating of the atmosphere is divided into a component due to direct solar absorption in the atmosphere and a component due to the flux of energy from the surface to the atmosphere via latent, sensible, and radiative heat ...

Aaron Donohoe; David S. Battisti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Selective radiative cooling with MgO and/or LiF layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selective radiation cooling material which is absorptive only in the 8 to 13 microns wavelength range is accomplished by placing ceramic magnesium oxide and/or polycrystalline lithium fluoride on an infrared-reflective substrate. The reflecting substrate may be a metallic coating, foil or sheet, such as aluminum, which reflects all atmospheric radiation from 0.3 to 8 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride being nonabsorptive at those wavelengths. <10% of submicron voids in the material is permissible in which case the MgO and/or LiF layer is diffusely scattering, but still nonabsorbing, in the wavelength range of 0.3 to 8 microns. At wavelengths from 8 to 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride radiate power through the ''window'' in the atmosphere, and thus remove heat from the reflecting sheet of material and the attached object to be cooled. At wavelengths longer than 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride reflects the atmospheric radiation back into the atmosphere. This high reflectance is only obtained if the surface is sufficiently smooth: roughness on a scale of 1 micron is permissible but roughness on a scale of 10 microns is not. An infrared-transmitting cover or shield is mounted in spaced relationship to the material to reduce convective heat transfer. If this is utilized in direct sunlight, the infrared transmitting cover or shield should be opaque in the solar spectrum of 0.3 to 3 microns.

Berdahl, P.H.

1984-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

427

Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

Johnson, D.C.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Reduced Radiation Grid for the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A specific interface between the radiation transfer calculations and the rest of the ECMWF model was introduced in 2003, potentially providing substantial economy in computer time by reducing the spatial resolution at which radiation transfer is ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette; George Mozdzynski; Martin Leutbecher

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Radiation Budget of the Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between precipitation and radiative heating on intraseasonal time scales in the Tropics using collocated top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiative flux measurements from special field program data [...

Jia-Lin Lin; Brian E. Mapes

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

NREL

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

Direct and Indirect Shortwave Radiative Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea salt aerosols play a dual role in affecting the atmospheric radiative balance. Directly, sea salt particles scatter the incoming solar radiation and absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei, sea salt ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Water Vapor from Backscattered Sunlight in Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The “differential absorption technique” is used to derive columnar water vapor contents above clouds. Radiative transfer simulations were carried out for two different spectral channels, one channel within the ???–water water absorption band and ...

P. Albert; R. Bennartz; J. Fischer

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

NREL Improves Window Heat Transfer Calculations (Fact Sheet)...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and interior radiation. The most significant errors were found in detailed window heat transfer algorithms due to implementation problems. The results show a decrease in...

436

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2010, DOESC-ARM-10-029 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

437

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2011, DOESC-ARM-11-022 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

438

Modeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica Buildings Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for convective and radiative heat transfer yielded a twofoldModeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica “of California. MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN ROOMS IN THE

Wetter, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

440

Estimates for Infrared Transfer in Finite Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper and lower bounds are computed for the infrared radiance within a cloud of finite size. The bounds are established by an iterative procedure, analogous to the iterative solution of the radiative transfer equation, except that at every ...

D. M. O'Brien

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wave-Driven Wind Jets in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between ocean surface waves and the overlying wind leads to a transfer of momentum across the air–sea interface. Atmospheric and oceanic models typically allow for momentum transfer to be directed only downward, from the ...

Kirsty E. Hanley; Stephen E. Belcher

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Final Scientific/Technical Report Grant title: Use of ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction This is a collaborative project with the NASA GSFC project of Dr. A. Marshak and W. Wiscombe (PIs). This report covers BU activities from February 2011 to June 2011 and BU "Â?no-cost extension" activities from June 2011 to June 2012. This report summarizes results that complement a final technical report submitted by the PIs in 2011.  

SciTech Connect

Main results are summarized for work in these areas: spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer; spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths; seasonal changes in leaf area of Amazon forests from leaf flushing and abscission; and Cloud droplet size and liquid water path retrievals from zenith radiance measurements.

Knyazikhin, Y

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 16 March 1991--15 March 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM`s). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM`s under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM`s to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Vibrational energy transfer in a diesel engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paths of vibrational energy transfer in a diesel engine were investigated in order to obtain insight into ways of reducing this transfer to the exterior surfaces and thereby reduce the radiated noise. The engine was tested in a nonrunning condition with simulated internal forces in order to study the different transfer paths separately. Vibration response measurements were made of individual engine components and lumped?parameter models were developed to simulate this response. These models were then used to determine component design changes that would reduce the energy transfer. Two design changes were implemented in the engine and a reduction of the energy transfer was achieved as predicted.

R. G. DeJong; R. H. Lyon

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

446

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Characterizing Bystander...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To order to investigate these variables for low-linear transfer (LET) radiation, an electron microbeam irradiation system has been developed. An electron source provides a beam...

447

Radiative Effects of Cloud-Type Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative flux changes induced by the occurrence of different cloud types are investigated using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud data and a refined radiative transfer model from National Aeronautics and Space ...

Ting Chen; William B. Rossow; Yuanchong Zhang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Surface Radiation in the Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly surface radiative fluxes in the tropical Pacific between January 1970 and February 1978 have been calculated using a radiative transfer package which includes detailed treatments of the molecular and droplet absorptions and of the surface ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Technology Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Deployment SBIR/STTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer USEFUL LINKS Contract Opportunities: FBO.gov FedConnect.net Grant Opportunities DOE Organization Chart Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Licensing Guide and Sample License The Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG), made up of representatives from each DOE Laboratory and Facility, recently created a Licensing Guide and Sample License [762-KB PDF]. The Guide will serve to provide a general understanding of typical contract terms and provisions to help reduce both

450

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

451

Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo Estimation from Angular Distribution Models Using Scene Identification from Satellite Cloud Property Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation of earth radiation budget satellite instruments will routinely merge estimates of global top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes with cloud properties. This information will offer many new opportunities for validating radiative ...

Norman G. Loeb; Frédéric Parol; Jean-Claude Buriez; Claudine Vanbauce

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Regional Climate Change in East Asia Simulated by an Interactive Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional coupled soil–vegetation–atmosphere model is used to study changes and interactions between climate and the ecosystem in East Asia due to increased atmospheric CO2. The largest simulated climate changes are due to the radiative ...

Ming Chen; David Pollard; Eric J. Barron

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Estimating Meridional Energy Transports by the Atmospheric and Oceanic General Circulations Using Boundary Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual-mean meridional energy transport in the atmosphere–ocean system (total transport) is estimated using 4-yr mean net radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) calculated from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology ...

Y-C. Zhang; W. B. Rossow

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

W.-C. Wang X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York 100 Fuller Road Albany, NY 12205 We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation...

455

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes details, validation, and sensitivity analysis of a new atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and radiation schemes for the ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Ice–Ice Collisions: An Ice Multiplication Process in Atmospheric Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice in atmospheric clouds undergoes complex physical processes, interacting especially with radiation, which leads to serious impacts on global climate. After their primary production, atmospheric ice crystals multiply extensively by secondary ...

J.-I. Yano; V. T. J. Phillips

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Radiation The objectives of this Lecture;Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Atmospheric Effects on Incoming Solar Radiation of this energy is lost to space. The third process in the atmosphere that modifies incoming solar radiation

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

458

Nonequilibrium Electromagnetic Fluctuations: Heat Transfer and Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Casimir force between arbitrary objects in equilibrium is related to scattering from individual bodies. We extend this approach to heat transfer and Casimir forces in nonequilibrium cases where each body, and the environment, is at a different temperature. The formalism tracks the radiation from each body and its scatterings by the other objects. We discuss the radiation from a cylinder, emphasizing its polarized nature, and obtain the heat transfer between a sphere and a plate, demonstrating the validity of proximity transfer approximation at close separations and arbitrary temperatures.

Krueger, Matthias; Kardar, Mehran [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Emig, Thorsten [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, CNRS UMR 8626, Ba circumflex timent 100, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay cedex (France)

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

459

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

404-NOV. 1, 2000 404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Technology Transfer Commer- cialization Act of 2000''. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds that- (1) the importance of linking our unparalleled network of over 700 Federal laboratories and our Nation's universities with United States industry continues to hold great promise

460

Electron Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Pierre Kennepohl1,2 and Edward Solomon1* 1Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Electron transfer, or the act of moving an electron from one place to another, is amongst the simplest of chemical processes, yet certainly one of the most critical. The process of efficiently and controllably moving electrons around is one of the primary regulation mechanisms in biology. Without stringent control of electrons in living organisms, life could simply not exist. For example, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation (to name but two of the most well-known biochemical activities) are driven by electron transfer processes. It is unsurprising, therefore, that much effort has been placed on understanding the fundamental principles that control and define the simple act of adding and/or removing electrons from chemical species.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric radiative transfer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A fourth-order symplectic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for light scattering and a 3D Monte Carlo code for radiative transfer in scattering systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is applied to light scattering computations, the far fields can be obtained by either a volume integration method, or a surface integration method. In the first study, we investigate the errors associated with the two near-to-far field transform methods. For a scatterer with a small refractive index, the surface approach is more accurate than its volume counterpart for computing the phase functions and extinction efficiencies; however, the volume integral approach is more accurate for computing other scattering matrix elements. If a large refractive index is involved, the results computed from the volume integration method become less accurate, whereas the surface method still retains the same order of accuracy as in the situation of a small refractive index. In my second study, a fourth order symplectic FDTD method is applied to the problem of light scattering by small particles. The total-field/ scattered-field (TF/SF) technique is generalized for providing the incident wave source conditions in the symplectic FDTD (SFDTD) scheme. Numerical examples demonstrate that the fourthorder symplectic FDTD scheme substantially improves the precision of the near field calculation. The major shortcoming of the fourth-order SFDTD scheme is that it requires more computer CPU time than the conventional second-order FDTD scheme if the same grid size is used. My third study is on multiple scattering theory. We develop a 3D Monte Carlo code for the solving vector radiative transfer equation, which is the equation governing the radiation field in a multiple scattering medium. The impulse-response relation for a plane-parallel scattering medium is studied using our 3D Monte Carlo code. For a collimated light beam source, the angular radiance distribution has a dark region as the detector moves away from the incident point. The dark region is gradually filled as multiple scattering increases. We have also studied the effects of the finite size of clouds. Extending the finite size of clouds to infinite layers leads to underestimating the reflected radiance in the multiple scattering region, especially for scattering angles around 90 degrees. The results have important applications in the field of remote sensing.

Zhai, Pengwang

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

463

Atmospheric Modes of Variability in a Changing Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the atmospheric circulation to an enhanced radiative greenhouse gas forcing in a transient integration with a coupled global climate model is investigated. The spatial patterns of the leading modes of Northern Hemisphere ...

Jenny Brandefelt

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen trifluoride (NF[subscript 3]) has potential to make a growing contribution to the Earth’s radiative budget; however, our understanding of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited. Based on a ...

Ivy, Diane J.

465

Further Studies of the Circulation of the Venus Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have extended our previous calculations of zonally averaged temperature, circulation, and eddy source requirements for the Venus atmosphere to include the region from the surface to 95 km, using a Curtis matrix method for the radiation ...

Arthur Y. Hou; Richard M. Goody

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Radiation Energy Budget Studies Using Collocated AVHRR and ERBE Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the energy balance at the top of the atmosphere are specified as a function of atmospheric and surface properties using observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVURR) and the Earth Radiation budget Experiment (...

Steven A. Ackerman; Toshiro Inoue

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Runaway Greenhouse Effect in a Semigray Radiative–Convective Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of the nongray absorption (i.e., atmospheric opacity varying with wavelength) on the possible upper bound of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) emitted by a planetary atmosphere have been examined. This analysis is based on the ...

T. Pujol; G. R. North

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Heat Budget of Tropical Ocean and Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat budget estimates for the global tropics are derived from recent calculations of the oceanic heat budget and satellite measurements of net radiation at the top of the atmosphere. Annual mean heat export from the zone 30°N–30°S amounts to 101 ...

Stefan Hastenrath

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ulyanov Street, Nizhny Novgorod 603950, Russia I. Y. Dodin and N. J particles could not travel faster than light. Hence, the final energy is estimated from Eq. 52 as a -1 Research through Grant No. 08-02-01209-a and the NNSA under the SSAA Program through DOE Research un- der

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

470

Statistical Description of Radiation Transfer in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistical characteristics of simulated cloud fields constructed based on Poisson point fluxes are studied. The input parameters of mathematical models of cloudiness include the cloud fraction and the mean horizontal size of clouds ...

Georgi A. Titov

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

NETL: Technology Transfer - History of Technology Transfer  

History of Technology Transfer Technology transfer differs from providing services or products (e.g., acquisition) and financial assistance (e.g., ...

472

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

473

A Study on the “Runaway Greenhouse Effect” with a One-Dimensional Radiative–Convective Equilibrium Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple one-dimensional radiative–convective equilibrium model is used to investigate the relationship between the surface temperature and the outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The model atmosphere has a gray infrared ...

Shinichi Nakajima; Yoshi-Yuki Hayashi; Yutaka Abe

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Radiation Budget of the West African Sahel and Its Controls: A Perspective from Observations and Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous measurements of the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cross-atmosphere radiation flux divergence over the West African Sahel were made during the year 2006 using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and ...

Mark A. Miller; Virendra P. Ghate; Robert K. Zahn

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Comprehensive Radiation Scheme for Numerical Weather Prediction Models with Potential Applications in Climate Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive scheme for the parameterization of radiative transfer in numerical weather Prediction (NWP) models has been developed. The scheme is based on the solution of the ?-two-stream version of the radiative transfer equation ...

Bodo Ritter; Jean-Francois Geleyn

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

478

Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations  

SciTech Connect

Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Radiative Energy Budget in the Cloudy and Hazy Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation model is constructed that includes radiative interactions with atmospheric gases as well as parameterized treatments of scattering and absorption/emission by cloud droplets and haze particles. A unified treatment of solar and ...

Si-Chee Tsay; Knut Stamnes; Kolf Jayaweera

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part I: Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) provides coincident global cloud and aerosol properties together with reflected solar, emitted terrestrial longwave, and infrared window radiative fluxes. These data are needed to improve the ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Intermodal transfer of spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the international standardization of containerized cargo handling in ports around the world, maritime shipment handling is particularly uniform. Thus, handier exposure parameters will be relatively constant for ship-truck and ship-rail transfers at ports throughout the world. Inspectors' doses are expected to vary because of jurisdictional considerations. The results of this study should be applicable to truck-to-rail transfers. A study of the movement of spent fuel casks through ports, including the loading and unloading of containers from cargo vessels, afforded an opportunity to estimate the radiation doses to those individuals handling the spent fuels with doses to the public along subsequent transportation routes of the fuel. A number of states require redundant inspections and for escorts over long distances on highways; thus handlers, inspectors, escort personnel, and others who are not normally classified as radiation workers may sustain doses high enough to warrant concern about occupational safety. This paper addresses the question of radiation safety for these workers. Data were obtained during, observation of the offloading of reactor spent fuel (research reactor spent fuel, in this instance) which included estimates of exposure times and distances for handlers, inspectors and other workers during offloading and overnight storage. Exposure times and distance were also for other workers, including crane operators, scale operators, security personnel and truck drivers. RADTRAN calculational models and parameter values then facilitated estimation of the dose to workers during incident-free ship-to-truck transfer of spent fuel.

Neuhauser, K.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Weiner, R.F. (Western Washington Univ., Bellingham, WA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

484

The Incorporation of Atmospheric Variability into DIRSIG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. BNL-63555 CLOSURE EXPERIMENT ­ MODTRAN-3 PREDICTION than calibration uncertainty may be important. The radiative transfer model MODTRAN-3 is used the MODTRAN-3 predicted value with the direct-normal short-wave irradiance measured by a calibrated

Salvaggio, Carl

485

Handbook of heat transfer fundamentals (2nd edition)  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in heat transfer are discussed, providing data and methodology to solve a wide range of heat transfer problems. The topics considered include: basic concepts of heat transfer, mathematical methods, thermophysical properties, conduction, numerical methods in heat transfer, natural convection, and internal duct flow and external flows in forced convection. Also addressed are: rarefied gases, electric and magnetic fields, condensation, boiling, two-phase flow, and radiation.

Rohsenow, W.M.; Hartnett, J.P.; Ganic, E.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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