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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Inference of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Moisture and Temperature Structure Using Airborne Lidar and Infrared Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for retrieving near-surface moisture and profiles of mixing ratio and potential temperature through the depth of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) using airborne lidar and multichannel infrared radiometer data is ...

Stephen P. Palm; Denise Hagan; Geary Schwemmer; S. H. Melfi

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research  

SciTech Connect

Observational data are of fundamental importance for advances in climate and atmospheric research. Advances in atmospheric science are being made not only through the use of ground-based and space-based observations, but also through the use of in-situ and remote sensing observations acquired on instrumented aircraft. In order for us to enhance our knowledge of atmospheric processes, it is imperative that efforts be made to improve our understanding of the operating characteristics of current instrumentation and of the caveats and uncertainties in data acquired by current probes, as well as to develop improved observing methodologies for acquisition of airborne data.

McFarquhar, Greg; Schmid, Beat; Korolev, Alexei; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Turner, David D.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

Turbulent Mixing Processes in Atmospheric Bores and Solitary Waves Deduced from Profiling Systems and Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Families of solitary waves (“solitons”) associated with two atmospheric bores on the same day were observed by an unprecedented number of ground-based and airborne profiling systems during the International H2O Project (IHOP). In addition, a very ...

Steven E. Koch; Wayne Feltz; Frédéric Fabry; Mariusz Pagowski; Bart Geerts; Kristopher M. Bedka; David O. Miller; James W. Wilson

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

High-Resolution Atmospheric Sensing of Multiple Atmospheric Variables Using the DataHawk Small Airborne Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DataHawk small airborne measurement system provides in situ atmospheric measurement capabilities for documenting scales as small as 1 m and can access reasonably large volumes in and above the atmospheric boundary layer at low cost. The design ...

Dale A. Lawrence; Ben B. Balsley

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High-Resolution Atmospheric Sensing of Multiple Atmospheric Variables Using the DataHawk Small Airborne Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DataHawk small airborne measurement system provides in-situ atmospheric measurement capabilities for documenting scales as small as 1 m and can access reasonably large volumes in and above the atmospheric boundary layer at low cost. The design ...

Dale A. Lawrence; Ben B. Balsley

6

SAFIRE-A: Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere Using Far-Infrared Emission/Airborne  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument named SAFIRE-A (Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far-Infrared Emission/Airborne), which can operate on high-altitude platforms, has been developed for the study of the atmospheric composition through limb-scanning emission ...

Bruno Carli; Peter A. R. Ade; Ugo Cortesi; Paul Dickinson; Michele Epifani; Fred C. Gannaway; Alessandro Gignoli; Corneli Keim; Clare Lee; Claude Meny; Jean Leotin; Francesco Mencaraglia; Alexander G. Murray; Ira G. Nolt; Marco Ridolfi

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Comparison of Mixing Depths Observed by Ground-Based Wind Profilers and an Airborne Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare the mixing depths in the daytime convective boundary layers that were observed remotely by wind profilers and an airborne lidar during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study. The comparison is used to determine whether the mixing ...

A. B. White; C. J. Senff; R. M. Banta

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

An Airborne Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer for Cloud, Precipitation, and Atmospheric Water Vapor Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-channel airborne total-power Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) was recently built to provide measurements of atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and precipitation. The instrument is a cross-track scanner that has a 3-dB beamwidth of 3.5°...

P. Racette; R. F. Adler; J. R. Wang; A. J. Gasiewski; D. M. Jakson; D. S. Zacharias

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Airborne, Wind-Profiling, Coherent-Detection Lidar System: Overview and Preliminary Flight Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first airborne wind measurements of a pulsed, 2-micron solid-state, high-energy, wind-profiling lidar system for airborne measurements are presented. The laser pulse energy is the highest to date in an eyesafe airborne wind lidar system. This ...

Michael J. Kavaya; Jeffrey Y. Beyon; Grady J. Koch; Mulugeta Petros; Paul J. Petzar; Upendra N. Singh; Bo C. Trieu; Jirong Yu

10

Profiling Atmospheric Water Vapor by Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended Kaiman-Bucy filter ...

J. R. Wang; J. L. King; T. T. Wilheit; G. Szejwach; L. H. Gesell; R. A. Nieman; D. S. Niver; B. M. Krupp; J. A. Gagliano

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Height Correction of Atmospheric Motion Vectors Using Airborne Lidar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainties in the height assignment of atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) are the main contributor to the total AMV wind error, and these uncertainties introduce errors that can be horizontally correlated over several hundred kilometers. As a ...

Martin Weissmann; Kathrin Folger; Heiner Lange

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Development and Application of a Compact, Tunable, Solid-State Airborne Ozone Lidar System for Boundary Layer Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory/Chemical Sciences Division (NOAA/ESRL/CSD) has developed a versatile, airborne lidar system for measuring ozone and aerosols in the boundary layer and lower free ...

R. J. Alvarez II; C. J. Senff; A. O. Langford; A. M. Weickmann; D. C. Law; J. L. Machol; D. A. Merritt; R. D. Marchbanks; S. P. Sandberg; W. A. Brewer; R. M. Hardesty; R. M. Banta

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Intercomparison of Single-Frequency Methods for Retrieving a Vertical Rain Profile from Airborne or Spaceborne Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews several single-frequency rain profiling methods for an airborne or spaceborne radar. The authors describe the different methods from a unified point of view starting from the basic differential equation. This ...

Toshio Iguchi; Robert Meneghini

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Combining Microwave Radiometer and Wind Profiler Radar Measurements for High-Resolution Atmospheric Humidity Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-consistent remote sensing physical method to retrieve atmospheric humidity high-resolution profiles by synergetic use of a microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) and wind profiler radar (WPR) is illustrated. The proposed technique is based ...

Laura Bianco; Domenico Cimini; Frank S. Marzano; Randolph Ware

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Numerical Method for Synthesizing Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical technique is described for synthesizing realistic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles. The method uses an ensemble of radiosonde measurements collected at a site of interest. Erroneous profiles are removed by comparing their ...

Maia S. Tatarskaia; Richard J. Lataitis; B. Boba Stankov; Viatcheslav V. Tatarskii

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Compositing Approach for Preserving Significant Features in Atmospheric Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composite profiles of thermodynamic and kinematic variables are prepared to represent the characteristics of the environment within which a particular atmospheric phenomenon occurs. During the averaging process, it is desirable to retain the ...

Rodger A. Brown

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

GAPEX: A Ground-Based Atmospheric Profiling Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the week 29 October–4 November 1988, a Ground-based Atmospheric Profiling Experiment (GAPEX) was conducted at Denver Stapleton International Airport. The objective of GAPEX was to acquire and analyze atomspheric-temperature and moisture-...

W. L. Smith; H. E. Rvercomb; H. B. Howell; H. M. Woolf; R. O. Knuteson; R. G. Decker; M. J. Lynch; E. R. Westwater; R. G. Strauch; K. P. Moran; B. Stankov; M. J. Falls; J. Jordan; M. Jacobsen; W. F. Dabberdt; R. McBeth; G. Albright; C. Paneitz; G. Wright; P. T. May; M. T. Decker

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Profiling atmospheric aerosols | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a number of instruments that use low power lasers (the instrument is called Micropulse Lidar, MPL) to measure the turbidity of the atmosphere above the ground. For the first time,...

19

Analytic Representations of Standard Atmosphere Temperature Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytic functions which approximate six commonly used standard temperature profiles (the AFGL set, and the 1976 U.S. Standard) are described. These provide a uniform way of rounding off the sharp corners of the original models, and have been ...

Stephen B. Fels

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mixing layer (ML) heights inferred from radiosondes, wind profilers, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler (MTP), and in-situ aircraft data were compared during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study in the Houston area. The comparisons and resulting good agreement between the separate instruments allowed for the spatial and temporal evolution of the ML height distribution to be determined across the Houston area on September 1, 2000. A benchmark method was created for determining ML heights from radiosonde data. The ML heights determined using this method were compared to ML heights determined using wind profiler data. The airborne lidar and MTP heights were also compared to the wind profiler heights. This was the first time the MTP was used for estimating ML heights. Because of this, the MTP heights were also compared to the ML heights determined by in-situ aircraft data. There was good agreement between the ML estimates when the instruments were co-located. The comparisons between the benchmark method and the wind profilers were independent of the quality of the profiler heights. The statistics for lidar and the wind profilers were better for the inland profiler comparisons. Even so, the results for coastal profilers were similar to the other comparisons. The results between the MTP and the wind profilers were comparable with the results found between the other instruments, and better, in that the statistics were similar for the both the inland and coastal profilers. The results between the MTP and in-situ aircraft data provided additional support for the use of MTP for determining ML heights. The combination of the inland and coastal wind profilers with the airborne instruments provided adequate information for the spatial and temporal evolution of the ML height to be determined across the Houston area on September 1, 2000. By analyzing the ML height distribution, major features were evident. These features included the shallow ML heights associated with the marine air from Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, and the sharp gradient of increasing ML heights north of Houston associated with the variation in the inversion depth found on this day.

Smith, Christina Lynn

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Estimating forest structural characteristics with airborne lidar scanning and a near-real time profiling laser systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) directly measures canopy vertical structures, and provides an effective remote sensing solution to accurate and spatiallyexplicit mapping of forest characteristics, such as canopy height and Leaf Area Index. However, many factors, such as large data volume and high costs for data acquisition, precludes the operational and practical use of most currently available LiDARs for frequent and large-scale mapping. At the same time, a growing need is arising for realtime remote sensing platforms, e.g., to provide timely information for urgent applications. This study aims to develop an airborne profiling LiDAR system, featured with on-the-fly data processing, for near real- or real- time forest inventory. The development of such a system involves implementing the on-board data processing and analysis as well as building useful regression-based models to relate LiDAR measurements with forest biophysical parameters. This work established a paradigm for an on-the-fly airborne profiling LiDAR system to inventory regional forest resources in real- or near real- time. The system was developed based on an existing portable airborne laser system (PALS) that has been previously assembled at NASA by Dr. Ross Nelson. Key issues in automating PALS as an on-the-fly system were addressed, including the design of an archetype for the system workflow, the development of efficient and robust algorithms for automatic data processing and analysis, the development of effective regression models to predict forest biophysical parameters from LiDAR measurements, and the implementation of an integrated software package to incorporate all the above development. This work exploited the untouched potential of airborne laser profilers for realtime forest inventory, and therefore, documented an initial step toward developing airborne-laser-based, on-the-fly, real-time, forest inventory systems. Results from this work demonstrated the utility and effectiveness of airborne scanning or profiling laser systems for remotely measuring various forest structural attributes at a range of scales, i.e., from individual tree, plot, stand and up to regional levels. The system not only provides a regional assessment tool, one that can be used to repeatedly, remotely measure hundreds or thousands of square kilometers with little/no analyst interaction or interpretation, but also serves as a paradigm for future efforts in building more advanced airborne laser systems such as real-time laser scanners.

Zhao, Kaiguang

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Airborne Measurements of Wave Growth for Stable and Unstable Atmospheres in Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a joint program combining airborne laser profilometer and Waverider buoy measurements of synoptic wave conditions in Lake Michigan during the passage of an intense cold front. Measurements were made both before ...

Paul C. Liu; Duncan B. Ross

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The NPOESS Airborne Sounding Testbed Interferometer—Remotely Sensed Surface and Atmospheric Conditions during CLAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS), the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I), flying aboard the high-altitude ...

W. L. Smith Sr.; D. K. Zhou; A. M. Larar; S. A. Mango; H. B. Howell; R. O. Knuteson; H. E. Revercomb; W. L. Smith Jr.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Design and development of an airborne microwave radiometer for atmospheric sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite-based passive microwave remote sensing is a valuable tool for global weather monitoring and prediction. This thesis presents the design and development of a low-cost airborne weather sensing instrument to ...

Scarito, Michael P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

An Objective Method for Deriving Atmospheric Structure from Airborne Lidar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelet analysis is applied to airborne infrared lidar data to obtain an objective determination of boundaries in aerosol backscatter that are associated with boundary layer structure. This technique allows high-resolution spatial variability of ...

K. J. Davis; N. Gamage; C. R. Hagelberg; C. Kiemle; D. H. Lenschow; P. P. Sullivan

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

GPS/INS navigation precision and its effect on airborne radio occultation retrieval accuracy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne radio occultation (RO) system has been developed to retrieve atmospheric profiles of refractivity, moisture, and temperature. The long-term objective of such a system is deployment on commercial aircraft to increase the quantity of moisture ... Keywords: Airborne radio occultation, GPS/INS precision, Retrieval accuracy

Paytsar Muradyan; Jennifer S. Haase; Feiqin Xie; James L. Garrison; Justin Voo

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability: Real-Time Modeling of Airborne Hazardous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a centralized federal project for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time. Since ARAC began making assessments in 1974, the ...

Thomas J. Sullivan; James S. Ellis; Connee S. Foster; Kevin T. Foster; Ronald L. Baskett; John S. Nasstrom; Walter W. Schalk III

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Experimental Validation of Wind Profiling Performed by the Airborne 10-?m Heterodyne Doppler Lidar WIND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The airborne Wind Infrared Doppler Lidar (WIND) has been developed through French–German cooperation. The system is based on a pulsed 10.6-?m laser transmitter, a heterodyne receiver, and a conical scanning device. To the authors' knowledge, it ...

Oliver Reitebuch; Christian Werner; Ines Leike; Patricia Delville; Pierre H. Flamant; Alexander Cress; Dirk Engelbart

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Radiative Effects of Airborne Dust on Regional Energy Budgets at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of dust on the radiative energy budget at the top of the atmosphere were investigated using model calculations and measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Estimates of the dust optical depth were made from ...

Steven A. Ackerman; Hyosang Chung

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Airborne Doppler Radar Data Analysis Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Airborne Doppler Radar Data Analysis Workshop, sponsored by the Atmospheric Technology Division (ATD) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was the first to focus on analyzing airborne Doppler radar data. The workshop (held ...

Wen-Chau Lee; Frank D. Marks; Craig Walther

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Introductory Remarks: ARM AVP Workshop on Advances in Airborne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advances in Airborne Instrumentation Warren Wiscombe ARM Chief Scientist Brookhaven National Lab ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement...

32

Clustering a Global Field of Atmospheric Profiles by Mixture Decomposition of Copulas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work focuses on the clustering of a large dataset of atmospheric vertical profiles of temperature and humidity in order to model a priori information for the problem of retrieving atmospheric variables from satellite observations. Here, each ...

Mathieu Vrac; Alain Chédin; Edwin Diday

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Volume-Imaging Radar Wind Profiler for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the turbulent eddy profiler (TEP), a volume-imaging, UHF radar wind profiler designed for clear-air measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer on scales comparable to grid cell sizes of large eddy simulation models. TEP ...

James B. Mead; Geoffrey Hopcraft; Stephen J. Frasier; Brian D. Pollard; Christopher D. Cherry; Daniel H. Schaubert; Robert E. McIntosh

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Diabatic Divergence Profiles in Western Pacific Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating in the atmosphere can be expressed as diabatic divergence ?d, which is nearly equal to the actual horizontal divergence ? in tropical convection. High-quality ? profile measurements from airborne Doppler radar “purls” in ten mesoscale ...

Brian E. Mapes; Robert A. Houze Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne tracking sunphotometer, mounted on the outside top surface of an aircraft has been developed to provide unrestricted viewing of the Sun. This instrument will substantially increase the data that scientists can gather for atmospheric ...

Tak Matsumoto; Philip Russell; Cesar Mina; William Van Ark; Victor Banta

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Latent Heat Flux Profiles from Collocated Airborne Water Vapor and Wind Lidars during IHOP_2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Latent heat flux profiles in the convective boundary layer (CBL) are obtained for the first time with the combination of the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and the NOAA high ...

C. Kiemle; G. Ehret; A. Fix; M. Wirth; G. Poberaj; W. A. Brewer; R. M. Hardesty; C. Senff; M. A. LeMone

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy Spectra, Altitude Profiles and Charge Ratios of Atmospheric Muons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of air shower muons made during atmospheric ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+ / mu- is presented as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c. The differential mu- momentum spectra are presented between 0.3 and about 50 GeV/c at atmospheric depths between 13 and 960 g/cm^2. We compare our measurements with other recent data and with Monte Carlo calculations of the same type as those used in predicting atmospheric neutrino fluxes. We find that our measured mu- fluxes are smaller than the predictions by as much as 70% at shallow atmospheric depths, by about 20% at the depth of shower maximum, and are in good agreement with the predictions at greater depths. We explore the consequences of this on the question of atmospheric neutrino production.

S. Coutu; J. J. Beatty; M. A. DuVernois; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; A. Labrador; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; C. Chaput; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; S. L. Nutter; G. A. deNolfo

2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Atmospheric Profiles at the Southern Pierre Auger Observatory and their Relevance to Air Shower Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of atmospheric conditions on altitude and time have to be known at the site of an air shower experiment for accurate reconstruction of extensive air showers and their simulations. The height-profile of atmospheric depth is of particular interest as it enters directly into the reconstruction of longitudinal shower development and of the primary energy and mass of cosmic rays. For the southern part of the Auger Observatory, the atmosphere has been investigated in a number of campaigns with meteorological radio soundings and with continuous measurements of ground-based weather stations. Focussing on atmospheric depth and temperature profiles, temporal variations are described and monthly profiles are developed. Uncertainties of the monthly atmospheres that are currently applied in the Auger reconstruction are discussed.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; D. Gora; P. Homola; H. Klages; J. Pekala; M. Risse; M. Unger; B. Wilczynska; H. Wilczynski; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

Retrieval of Atmospheric Parameters from Hydrometeor Backscatter Measured with Doppler Radar Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of backscatter spectra of clouds and precipitation measured with Doppler radar profilers allows the retrieval of a number of important atmospheric parameters. This retrieval leads to inaccurate results if vertical wind parameters ...

Dirk Klugmann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Retrieval of Atmospheric Temperature Profiles from AMSU-A Measurement Using a Neural Network Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Backpropagation neural networks are applied to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles and tropopause variables from the NOAA-15 Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) measurement based on two different data sources. The first case uses ...

Lei Shi

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Simplified Active Array L-Band Radar for Atmospheric Wind Profiling: Initial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple approach is presented to implement an active aperture radar with a constrained beam-forming network that is adequate enough to generate multiple beams for atmospheric wind profiling. In this approach, elements of the antenna array are fed ...

P. Srinivasulu; P. Yasodha; A. Jayaraman; S. N. Reddy; S. Satyanarayana

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

On the Analytical Solutions of Flux-Profile Relationships for the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical solutions Of surface layer similarity equations are presented for the nondimensional profile functional forms suggested by Businger et al. For stable atmospheric conditions, exact analytical solutions of the Monin-Obukhoy stability ...

Daewon W. Byun

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

1280-MHz Active Array Radar Wind Profiler for Lower Atmosphere: System Description and Data Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An L-band radar wind profiler was established at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Gadanki, India (13.5°N, 79.2°E), to provide continuous high-resolution wind measurements in the lower atmosphere. This system utilizes a fully active array ...

P. Srinivasulu; P. Yasodha; P. Kamaraj; T. N. Rao; A. Jayaraman; S. N. Reddy; S. Satyanarayana

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Vertical Velocity and Buoyancy Characteristics of Coherent Echo Plumes in the Convective Boundary Layer, Detected by a Profiling Airborne Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft and airborne millimeter-wave radar observations are used to interpret the dynamics of radar echoes and radar-inferred updrafts within the well-developed, weakly sheared continental convective boundary layer. Vertically pointing radar ...

Qun Miao; Bart Geerts; Margaret LeMone

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

An Airborne Profiling Radar Study of the Impact of Glaciogenic Cloud Seeding on Snowfall from Winter Orographic Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from an airborne vertically pointing millimeter-wave Doppler radar are used to study the cloud microphysical effect of glaciogenic seeding of cold-season orographic clouds. Fixed flight tracks were flown downstream of ground-based silver ...

Bart Geerts; Qun Miao; Yang Yang; Roy Rasmussen; Daniel Breed

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Atmospheric Temperature and Absolute Humidity Profiles over the Beaufort Sea and Amundsen Gulf from a Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Radiometrics MP-3000A microwave radiometric profiler (MWRP) provided high temporal resolution atmospheric profiles for temperature and absolute humidity up to 10 km, while 113 radiosondes were launched (and 68 were used in the analysis) over sea ...

Lauren M. Candlish; Richard L. Raddatz; Matthew G. Asplin; David G. Barber

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Airborne Radar and Passive Radiometer Measurements: Comparison with Dual-Frequency Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares precipitation rate profiles derived from a single frequency radar and radiometer with such profiles derived from a dual-frequency radar.

J. A. Weinman; R. Meneghini; K. Nakamura

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Retrieval of Atmospheric Profiles from Satellite Radiance Data by Typical Shape Function Maximum a Posteriori Simultaneous Retrieval Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval of vertical profiles of temperature and water vapor from atmospheric radiances is an ill-posed, nonlinear inversion problem. A linear retrieval estimator must be cast in a form which both minimizes the effects of unmodeled nonlinear ...

Michael J. Uddstrom

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Extrapolation of Vertical Profiles of Wind Speed within the Marine Atmospheric Surface layer Using the p Formula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Values of p for the exponent-type wind profile formulation, used in vertical extrapolations of wind speed, were derived for the marine atmospheric surface layer. Nomograms were constructed providing p values as dependent on a single elevation ...

M. Segal; R. A. Pielke

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

WHAT DO SPECTRAL LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES TELL US ABOUT THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, analysis of solar spectra obtained with the EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) onboard the Hinode satellite has revealed the ubiquitous presence of asymmetries in transition region (TR) and coronal spectral line profiles. These asymmetries have been observed especially at the footpoints of coronal loops and have been associated with strong upflows that may play a significant role in providing the corona with hot plasma. Here, we perform a detailed study of the various processes that can lead to spectral line asymmetries, using both simple forward models and state-of-the-art three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere using the Bifrost code. We describe a novel technique to determine the presence and properties of faint secondary components in the wings of spectral line profiles. This method is based on least-squares fitting of observed so-called R(ed)B(lue) asymmetry profiles with pre-calculated RB asymmetry profiles for a wide variety of secondary component properties. We illustrate how this method could be used to perform reliable double Gaussian fits that are not over- or under-constrained. We also find that spectral line asymmetries appear in TR and coronal lines that are synthesized from our three-dimensional MHD simulations. Our models show that the spectral asymmetries are a sensitive measure of the velocity gradient with height in the TR of coronal loops. The modeled TR shows a large gradient of velocity that increases with height: this occurs as a consequence of ubiquitous, episodic heating at low heights in the model atmosphere. We show that the contribution function of spectral lines as a function of temperature is critical for sensitivity to velocity gradients and thus line asymmetries: lines that are formed over a temperature range that includes most of the TR are the most sensitive. As a result, lines from lithium-like ions (e.g., O VI) are found to be the most sensitive to line asymmetries. We compare the simulated line profiles directly with line profiles observed in the quiet Sun with SOHO/SUMER and Hinode/EIS and find that the shape of the profiles is very similar. In addition, the simulated profiles with the strongest blueward asymmetry occur in footpoint regions of coronal loops, which is similar to what we observe with SUMER and EIS. There is however a significant discrepancy between the simulations and observations: the simulated RB asymmetries are an order of magnitude smaller than the observations. We discuss the possible reasons for this discrepancy. In summary, our analysis shows that observations of spectral line asymmetries can provide a powerful new diagnostic to help constrain coronal heating models.

MartInez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); McIntosh, Scott W., E-mail: j.m.sykora@astro.uio.no [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

ABLE: Development of an Airborne Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acronym ABLE (Airborne Lidar Experiment) identifies a project to develop and fly an optical radar on a stratospheric platform for studies related to atmospheric radiation and composition. The prototype, ABLE 1, has been successfully flown on ...

Giorgio Fiocco; Paolo G. Calisse; Marco Cacciani; Stefano Casadio; Giandomenico Pace; Daniele Fua

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Near-Continuous Profiling of Temperature, Moisture, and Atmospheric Stability Using the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) has funded the development and installation of five ground-based atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) systems at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ...

W. F. Feltz; W. L. Smith; H. B. Howell; R. O. Knuteson; H. Woolf; H. E. Revercomb

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Information Content and Uncertainties in Thermodynamic Profiles and Liquid Cloud Properties Retrieved from the Ground-Based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) observes spectrally resolved downwelling radiance emitted by the atmosphere in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Profiles of temperature and water vapor, and cloud liquid ...

D.D. Turner; U. Löhnert

54

Validation of aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles from routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy with which vertical profiles of aerosol extinction ?ep(?) can be retrieved from ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) routine measurements was assessed using data from two airborne field campaigns, the ARM Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP, May 2003), and the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE, September 2005). This assessment pertains to the aerosol at its ambient concentration and thermodynamic state (i.e. ?ep(?) either free of or corrected for sampling artifacts) and includes the following ACRF routine methods: Raman Lidar, Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) and in-situ aerosol profiles (IAP) with a small aircraft. Profiles of aerosol optical depth ?p(???, from which the profiles of ?ep(???are derived through vertical differentiation, were measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14); these data were used as truth in this evaluation. The ACRF IAP ?ep(550 nm) were lower by 16% (during AIOP) and higher by 10% (during ALIVE) when compared to AATS-14. The ACRF MPL ?ep(523 nm) were higher by 24% (AIOP) and 19%-21% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14 but the correlation improved significantly during ALIVE. In the AIOP a second MPL operated by NASA showed a smaller positive bias (13%) with respect to AATS-14. The ACRF Raman Lidar ?ep(355 nm) were higher by 54% (AIOP) and higher by 6% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14. The large bias in AIOP stemmed from a gradual loss of the sensitivity of the Raman Lidar starting about the end of 2001 going unnoticed until after AIOP. A major refurbishment and upgrade of the instrument and improvements to a data-processing algorithm led to the significant improvement and very small bias in ALIVE. Finally we find that during ALIVE the Raman Lidar water vapor densities ?w are higher by 8% when compared to AATS-14, whereas comparisons between AATS-14 and in-situ measured ?w aboard two different aircraft showed small negative biases (0 to -3%).

Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Ferrare, Richard; Clayton, Marian F.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P. B.; Gore, W.; Dominguez, Roseanne

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Raman Lidar Profiling of Atmospheric Water Vapor: Simultaneous Measurements with Two Collocated Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Raman lidar is a loading candidate for providing the detailed space-and time-resolved measurements of water vapor needed by a variety of atmospheric studies. Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric watervapor are described using two collocated ...

J. E. M. Goldsmith; Scott E. Bisson; Richard A. Ferrare; Keith D. Evans; David N. Whiteman; S. H. Melfi

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Self-consistent Method for Determining Vertical Profiles of Aerosol and Atmospheric Properties Using a High Spectral Resolution Rayleigh-Mie Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-consistent method of inverting high spectral resolution, Rayleigh-Mie lidar signals to obtain profiles of atmospheric state variables, as well as aerosol properties, is presented. Assumed are a known air pressure at a reference height, ...

D. A. Krueger; L. M. Caldwell; C. Y. She; R. J. Alvarez II

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The NCAR Airborne Infrared Lidar System: Status and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research Airborne Infrared Lidar System is being developed for Doppler wind measurements using heterodyne detection. Its design is based on a pulsed CO2 laser transmitter and a single continuous-wave CO2 laser ...

R. L. Schwiesow; M. P. Spowart

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Signal Postprocessing and Reflectivity Calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915-MHz Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has recently initiated a new research avenue toward a better characterization of the transition from cloud to precipitation. Dual-wavelength techniques applied to millimeter-...

Frédéric Tridon; Alessandro Battaglia; Pavlos Kollias; Edward Luke; Christopher R. Williams

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: An Evaluation of Signal Processing and Sampling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several specific locations within different climatological regimes. These vertically pointing cloud ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce A. Albrecht; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Mark A. Miller; Karen L. Johnson; Kenneth P. Moran

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Applicability of AIRS Monthly Mean Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiles over the Tibetan Plateau Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research explores the applicability of the gridded (level 3) monthly tropospheric water vapor (version 5) retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on board the NASA Aqua ...

Yuwei Zhang; Donghai Wang; Panmao Zhai; Guojun Gu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Comparisons of Satellite-Derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors, Rawinsondes, and NOAA Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary satellite-derived atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) have been used over several decades in a wide variety of meteorological applications. The ever-increasing horizontal and vertical resolution of numerical weather prediction models ...

Kristopher M. Bedka; Christopher S. Velden; Ralph A. Petersen; Wayne F. Feltz; John R. Mecikalski

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effects of overburden, biomass and atmospheric inversions on energy and angular distributions of gamma rays from U, K, Th, and airborne radon sources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a set of radiation transport calculations that were run with the AHISN S/sub n/ discrete ordinates code and a point kernel code to determine the energy, polar angle and height in air distributions of the total and direct gamma-ray flux densities from: (1) uranium sources of 3.2, 200 and 800 ppM in a sandstone orebody covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (2) thorium sources of 12, 25 and 80 ppM in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (3) potassium source (2.5 wt %) in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (4) constant airborne source with height for no inversion and for inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (5) exponentially decreasing airborne source for no inversion and inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (6) 3.2 ppM uranium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; (7) 12 ppM thorium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm; (8) 2.5 wt % of potassium in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; and (9) 3.2 ppM, 200 ppM, and 800 ppM uranium source in sandstone orebody covered with overburden thicknesses of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm. Gamma-ray emission from the decay of natural uranium, thorium, radon, and potassium are given in a 45-energy group structure applicable to the energy windows used to map the potential uranium ore reserves.

Rubin, R.M.; Leggett, D.; Wells, M.B.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Mole Fractions: Source and Sink Detection and Environmental Impacts on Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report atmospheric CO2 column abundance measurement results from a summer, 2011 series of flights of a 2.05 ?m laser absorption spectrometer on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method is used ...

Robert T. Menzies; Gary D. Spiers; Joseph Jacob

65

An Evaluation and Comparison of Vertical Profile Data from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical procedures are used to compare vertical profiles of temperature and moisture derived from VAS with three different algorithms to those of corresponding rawinsonde measurements for a clear-cold environment. To account for time and ...

Gary J. Jedlovec

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Moisture Profiling of the Cloudy Winter Atmosphere Using Combined Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for deriving profiles of tropospheric water vapor and liquid water from a combination of ground-based remote sensors was applied and tested under winter conditions in Colorado. The method is an extension of physical retrieval ...

B. B. Stankov; B. E. Martner; M. K. Politovich

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Extended Overdetermined Dual-Doppler Formalism in Synthesizing Airborne Doppler Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the intensive observing period of the field phase of the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) of the Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program, airborne Doppler radars capable of fore–aft scanning (dual-Doppler ...

Michel Chong; Cláudia Campos

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Electronically Stabilized Phased Array System for Shipborne Atmospheric Wind Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction, and first results are presented of a 915-MHz Doppler wind profiler that may be mounted on a moving platform such as a mobile land vehicle, ocean buoy, or a ship. The long dwell times in multiple beam directions, required ...

D. C. Law; S. A. McLaughlin; M. J. Post; B. L. Weber; D. C. Welsh; D. E. Wolfe; D. A. Merritt

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Class of Single- and Dual-Frequency Algorithms for Rain-Rate Profiling from a Spaceborne Radar. Part II: Tests from Airborne Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, four single-frequency (SF) algorithms and a dual-frequency (DF) algorithm for range profiling of the rain rate from a spaceborne radar were described and tested from numerical simulations. In Part II, performances of these algorithms ...

Paul Amayenc; Jean Philippe Diguet; Mongi Marzoug; Taoufik Tani

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Retrieval of Atmospheric Optical Depth Profiles from Downward-Looking High-Resolution O2 A-Band Measurements: Optically Thin Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-linear retrieval was developed to profile moderately thin atmospheres using a high-resolution O2 A-band spectrometer. The retrieval is explicitly linear with respect to single scattering; the multiple-scattering contribution is treated as ...

Qilong Min; Lee C. Harrison

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Airborne Internet : market & opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis to evaluate the opportunity for service provider entry and of the airborne internet, to analyze the disruptive impact technology used by AirCell and AeroSat has had on the development of an ...

Bhadouria, Anand

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Determination of Atmospheric Temperature Profiles from a Statistical Combination of Ground-Based Profiler and Operational NOAA 6/7 Satellite Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiometric soundings from the Wave Propagation Laboratory's ground-based Profiler, the NOAA 6/7 satellites, and the combination of the two, were compared in their ability to derive temperature and moisture profiles. Radiosonde data for the ...

E. R. Westwater; W. B. Sweezy; L. M. McMillin; Charles Dean

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Profiling the Lower Troposphere over the Ocean with Infrared Hyperspectral Measurements of the Marine-Atmosphere Emitted Radiance Interferometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the spectra of infrared emission from the atmosphere were taken by a Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) deployed on the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol and Ocean Science Expedition (AEROSE) in ...

Malgorzata Szczodrak; Peter J. Minnett; Nicholas R. Nalli; Wayne F. Feltz

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols at the US Southern Great Plains Climate Study Site  

SciTech Connect

There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program, Southern Great Plains CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site in northern Oklahoma. Research conducted at several laboratories has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We have developed and installed a ruggedized Raman lidar system that resides permanently at the CART site, and that is computer automated to eliminate the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar provides quantitative characterizations of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies.

Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Blair, F.H.; Bisson, S.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Airborne Inspection Technology: Market Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents findings of an investigation into various airborne inspection technologies currently used within the electric utility industry.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

The ELDORA/ASTRAIA Airborne Doppler Weather Radar: High-Resolution Observations from TOGA COARE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ELDORA/ASTRAIA (Electra Doppler Radar/Analyese Stereoscopic par Impulsions Aeroporte) airborne Doppler weather radar was recently placed in service by the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the Centre d'étude des Environnements ...

Peter H. Hildebrand; Wen-Chau Lee; Craig A. Walther; Charles Frush; Mitchell Randall; Eric Loew; Richard Neitzel; Richard Parsons; Jacques Testud; François Baudin; Alain LeCornec

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part I: Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic error sources that require correction when making remote airborne measurements of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere, using an oxygen differential absorption lidar, are analyzed. A detailed analysis of this ...

Cyrille N. Flamant; Geary K. Schwemmer; C. Laurence Korb; Keith D. Evans; Stephen P. Palm

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Airborne Measurements of Surface, Layer Turbulence over the Ocean during Cold Air Outbreaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of atmospheric turbulence spectra and cospectra made at the 50 m level above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold air outbreaks have been studied. The data cover nearshore areas of cloud streets or roll vortices. In the ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eueng-Nan Yeh

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Retrieving Winds in the Surface Layer over Land Using an Airborne Doppler Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne Doppler wind lidars are increasingly being used to measure winds in the lower atmosphere at higher spatial resolution than ever before. However, wind retrieval in the range gates closest to the earth’s surface remains problematic. When a ...

K. S. Godwin; S. F. J. De Wekker; G. D. Emmitt

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

On the application of the MODTRAN4 atmospheric radiative transfer code to optical remote sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantification of atmospheric effects on the solar radiation measured by a spaceborne or airborne optical sensor is required for some key tasks in remote sensing, such as atmospheric correction, simulation of realistic scenarios or retrieval of atmospheric ...

Luis Guanter; Rudolf Richter; Hermann Kaufmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Airborne measurements of mass, momentum, and energy fluxes for the boardman-arm regional flux experiment-1991. Preliminary data release. Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

During 2 - 19 June 1991 the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division of NOAA measured flux densities of mass, momentum, and energy from an airplane in support of DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Over 507 horizontal flux transects were completed, along with 24 vertical atmospheric profiles, during the 93 flight hours. Flux transects passed over both irrigated farmland and steppe. The report describes the variation in wind, radiation, and surface temperature, along with exchange of mass (CO2, H2O, and O3), momentum, and energy as observed along the transects. Airborne measurements are compared with those from flux towers in wheat, corn, and steppe. In general, the measurements correspond well. The largest difference occurs at the steppe tower, with stronger heat fluxes reported by the tower. This discrepancy increases as heat flux increases. The cause may be a significant vertical flux divergence or an inconsistant specification of the mean state.

Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Birdwell, K.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluation of an LES-Based Wind Profiler Simulator for Observations of a Daytime Atmospheric Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The daytime atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) is characterized by strong turbulence that is primarily caused by buoyancy forced from the heated underlying surface. The present study considers a combination of a virtual radar and large ...

Danny E. Scipión; Phillip B. Chilson; Evgeni Fedorovich; Robert D. Palmer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: Second-Generation Sampling Strategies, Processing, and Cloud Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars in several climatologically distinct regions. The digital signal processors for these radars were recently upgraded and ...

Pavlos Kollias; Mark A. Miller; Edward P. Luke; Karen L. Johnson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Kevin B. Widener; Bruce A. Albrecht

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spatial and Structural Variation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer during Summer in Israel—Profiler and Rawinsonde Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An opportunity to improve understanding related to the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in Israel along the coastal region environs emerged in April 1997 when the Israel Electric Corporation, Ltd. (IEC), installed and began the ...

Uri Dayan; Batia Lifshitz-Goldreich; Karel Pick

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-performance Raman lidar operating in the UV portion of the spectrum has been used to acquire, for the first time using a single lidar, simultaneous airborne profiles of the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscatter, aerosol extinction, ...

David N. Whiteman; Kurt Rush; Scott Rabenhorst; Wayne Welch; Martin Cadirola; Gerry McIntire; Felicita Russo; Mariana Adam; Demetrius Venable; Rasheen Connell; Igor Veselovskii; Ricardo Forno; Bernd Mielke; Bernhard Stein; Thierry Leblanc; Stuart McDermid; Holger Vömel

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods  

SciTech Connect

An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

Deaton, Juan D. (Menan, ID); Schmitt, Michael J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Warren F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Definition: Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Airborne Gravity Survey Airborne gravity gradiometry (AGG) surveys provide information regarding the mass distribution of the...

88

ARM - Evaluation Product - Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) 1997.08.01 - 1997.08.01 Site(s) SGP General Description AVIRIS is an optical sensor that delivers calibrated images of the upwelling spectral radiance in 224 contiguous spectral channels (bands) with wavelengths from 400 to 2500 nanometers. AVIRIS has been flown on two aircraft platforms: a NASA ER-2 jet and the Twin Otter turboprop. The main objective of the AVIRIS project is to identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures. Research with

89

Structure and Evolution of Hurricane Claudette on 7 September 1991 from Airborne Doppler Radar Observations. Part I: Kinematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 7 September 1991, an experiment was conducted with the two National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research aircraft to investigate the inner-core region of Hurricane Claudette. Both aircraft carried airborne Doppler radar,...

Frank Roux; Nicolas Viltard

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Structure and Evolution of Hurricane Claudette on 7 September 1991 from Airborne Doppler Radar Observations. Part II: Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the kinematic and precipitating fields of Hurricane Claudette have been analyzed, using airborne Doppler radar data collected on 7 September 1991 by the two National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research ...

Nicolas Viltard; Frank Roux

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling for Airborne Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Airborne Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

94

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne...

95

Airborne remote sensing in the frozen north  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 Airborne remote sensing in the frozen north High level shot from 10,000 feet shows, Chief Pilot and Operations Manager for NERC's Airborne Remote Sensing Facility reports on a recent trip expert ­ the Airborne Remote Sensing Facility flew to the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard on August 3

Brierley, Andrew

96

AIRBORNE RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionization chamber used for measuring the radioactivity of dust present in atmospheric air is described. More particularly. the patent describes a device comprising two concentric open ended, electrically connected cylinders between which is disposed a wire electrcde. A heating source is disposed inside of the cylinder to circulate air through the space between the two cylinders by convective flow. A high voltage electric field between the wire electrcde of the electrically connected cylinder will cause ionization of the air as it passes therethrough.

Cartmell, T.R.; Gifford, J.F.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Use of Passive Microwave Observations in a Radar Rainfall-Profiling Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based methodology to incorporate passive microwave observations in a “rain-profiling algorithm” is developed for space- or airborne radars at frequencies exhibiting attenuation. The rain-profiling algorithm deploys a formulation for ...

Mircea Grecu; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparison between the TOPAZ Airborne Ozone Lidar and In Situ Measurements during TexAQS 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NOAA airborne ozone lidar system [Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and Ozone (TOPAZ)] is compared with the fast-response chemiluminescence sensor flown aboard the NOAA WP-3D during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS). TOPAZ ...

A. O. Langford; C. J. Senff; R. J. Alvarez II; R. M. Banta; R. M. Hardesty; D. D. Parrish; T. B. Ryerson

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Mathematics of Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gaussian plume model is a standard approach for studying the transport of airborne contaminants due to turbulent diffusion and advection by the wind. This paper reviews the assumptions underlying the model, its derivation from the advection-diffusion ... Keywords: Gaussian plume solution, advection-diffusion equation, atmospheric dispersion, contaminant transport, inverse problem, linear least squares

John M. Stockie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Development of a new airborne humidigraph system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling and measurements of aerosol properties is complicated by the hygroscopic behavior of the aerosols adding significant uncertainty to our best estimates of the direct effect aerosols exert on the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Airborne measurements of aerosol hygroscopicity are particularly challenging but critically needed. This motivated the development of a newly designed system which can measure the dependence of the aerosol light scattering coefficient (?sp) on relative humidity (RH), known as f(RH), in real-time at a rapid rate (humidity conditioners for simultaneous measurement of the ?sp at three different RHs. The humidity is directly controlled in exchanger cells without significant temperature disturbances and without particle dilution, heating or loss of volatile compounds. The single-wavelength nephelometers are illuminated by LED-based light sources thereby minimizing heating of the sample stream. The flexible design of the RH conditioners, consisting of a number of specially designed exchanger cells (driers or humidifiers), enables us to measure f(RH) under hydration or dehydration conditions (always starting with the aerosol in a known state) with a simple system re-configuration. These exchanger cells have been characterized for losses of particles using latex spheres and laboratory generated ammonium sulfate aerosols. Residence times of 6 - 9 s in the exchangers and subsequent lines is sufficient for most aerosols to attain equilibrium with the new water vapor content. The performance of this system has been assessed aboard DOE’s G-1 research aircraft during test flights over California, Oregon, and Washington.

Pekour, Mikhail S.; Schmid, Beat; Chand, Duli; Hubbe, John M.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Nelson, Danny A.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Humidity Profiles over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere affects climate change through radiative balance and surface evaporation. The variabilities of atmospheric humidity profile over oceans from daily to interannual time scales were examined using ...

W. Timothy Liu; Wenqing Tang; Pearn P. Niiler

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

103

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California Title Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in...

104

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water Vapor Radiometer Pazmany, Andrew ProSensing Inc. Category: Instruments ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz, 1.5 mm wavelength) water vapor radiometer (GVR) for the measurement of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. The instrument's precipitable water vapor measurement precision is approximately 0.01 mm in dry (<2 mm vapor column) conditions. The ground-based version of the instrument was first deployed at ProSensing's facility in Amherst, MA in February 2005, then at the North Slope of Alaska DOE ARM site in Barrow AK in April 2005, where it has been continuously operating since. An airborne version, designed to operate from a standard PMS 2-D probe canister, is now being

105

Development of a Data Management System for the Kuwait Oil Fire Atmospheric Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the onset of the Kuwait oil fires in early 1991, numerous efforts to monitor and estimate the environmental effects of the fires were initiated. These efforts produced a diverse set of atmospheric data from airborne, surface-based, and ...

Julie A. Haggerty; Stephen P. Carley; David B. Johnson; Amy D. Michaelis

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Average Vertical Motions in the Tropical Atmosphere Observed by a Radar Wind Profiler on Pohnpei (7°N Latitude, 157°E Longitude)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average vertical profiles of the vertical wind obtained under clear sky conditions as weal as under conditions of both light-to-moderate and heavy rainfall am presented from data obtained using a radar wind profiler located on the island of ...

B. B. Balsley; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; A. C. Riddle; K. S. Gage

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Mountain Waves in the Tropical Pacific Atmosphere: A Comparison of Vertical Wind Fluctuations over Pohnpei and Christmas Island Using VHF Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare vertical wind fluctuations observed by VHF radar wind profilers in the tropical troposphere over a large, mountainous island (Pohnpei, at 7°N, 158°E) and a large, low-profile atoll (Christmas Island, at 2°N, 157°W). The major ...

Ben B. Balsley; David A. Carter

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sierra Barrier Jets, Atmospheric Rivers, and Precipitation Characteristics in Northern California: A Composite Perspective Based on a Network of Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five 915-MHz wind profilers and global-positioning-system receivers across California’s northern Central Valley (CV) and adjacent Sierra foothills and coastal zone, in tandem with a 6-km-resolution gridded reanalysis dataset generated from the ...

Paul J. Neiman; Mimi Hughes; Benjamin J. Moore; F. Martin Ralph; Ellen M. Sukovich

109

THE 2011 JUNE 23 STELLAR OCCULTATION BY PLUTO: AIRBORNE AND GROUND OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

On 2011 June 23, stellar occultations by both Pluto (this work) and Charon (future analysis) were observed from numerous ground stations as well as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This first airborne occultation observation since 1995 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory resulted in the best occultation chords recorded for the event, in three visible wavelength bands. The data obtained from SOFIA are combined with chords obtained from the ground at the IRTF, the U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, and Leeward Community College to give the detailed state of the Pluto-Charon system at the time of the event with a focus on Pluto's atmosphere. The data show a return to the distinct upper and lower atmospheric regions with a knee or kink in the light curve separating them as was observed in 1988, rather than the smoothly transitioning bowl-shaped light curves of recent years. The upper atmosphere is analyzed by fitting a model to all of the light curves, resulting in a half-light radius of 1288 {+-} 1 km. The lower atmosphere is analyzed using two different methods to provide results under the differing assumptions of particulate haze and a strong thermal gradient as causes for the lower atmospheric diminution of flux. These results are compared with those from past occultations to provide a picture of Pluto's evolving atmosphere. Regardless of which lower atmospheric structure is assumed, results indicate that this part of the atmosphere evolves on short timescales with results changing the light curve structures between 1988 and 2006, and then reverting these changes in 2011 though at significantly higher pressures. Throughout these changes, the upper atmosphere remains remarkably stable in structure, again except for the overall pressure changes. No evidence of onset of atmospheric collapse predicted by frost migration models is seen, and the atmosphere appears to be remaining at a stable pressure level, suggesting it should persist at this full level through New Horizon's flyby in 2015.

Person, M. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Levine, S. E.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Zangari, A. M.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Sallum, S. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Dunham, E. W.; Collins, P.; Bida, T.; Bright, L. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Pandey, S.; Amrhein, D. [Williams College-Hopkins Observatory, Williamstown, MA (United States); Tholen, D. J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Taylor, B. [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Wolf, J.; Pfueller, E. [Deutsches SOFIA Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 29, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Meyer, A., E-mail: mjperson@mit.edu [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); and others

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Retrieval of atmospheric properties of extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method to retrieve molecular abundances and temperature profiles from exoplanet atmosphere photometry and spectroscopy. Our method allows us to run millions of 1-D atmosphere models in order to cover the ...

Nikku, Madhusudhan, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Title Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50880 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Tihomir Novakov, and Peter V. Hobbs Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Keywords black carbon, evolved gas analysis, light absorption, organic carbon, positive sampling artifact, SAFARI Abstract Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60% larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60% more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18±0.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25±0.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

112

Turbulence Length Scales in Stably Stratified Free Shear Flow Analyzed from Slant Aircraft Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere close to a coastline is investigated using airborne measurements. The measurements are from a field experiment close to the coast in the southeast of Sweden, in the Baltic Sea. The Baltic ...

Michael Tjernström

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

SAFARI 2000 MODIS Airborne Simulator Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne Simulator Data Airborne Simulator Data The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a new SAFARI 2000 data set. The data set "SAFARI 2000 MODIS Airborne Simulator Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000" contains MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) multispectral data collected during the SAFARI 2000 project. Twenty flights with the MAS instrument were undertaken over Southern Africa by the NASA ER-2 aircraft during August and September 2000. The MAS spectrometer collects 50 multispectral bands at 16-bit resolution with a ground resolution of 50 meters from 20,000 meters altitude and a cross track scan width of 85.92 degrees. This data set is organized by flight, and each flight consists of several straight-line segments called tracks. There is a MAS multispectral data file for each track. The data are available in Hierarchical Data Format

114

Chemistry of airborne particles from metallurgical processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airborne particles fall into one of three size ranges. The nucleation range consists of nanoparticles created from vapor atom collisions. The decisive parameter for particle size and composition is the supercooling of the ...

Jenkins, Neil Travis, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

An Airborne APT Weather Satellite Imaging System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a novel airborne system that receives a real-time imagery broadcast in the Automatic Picture Transmission (APT) format from polar-orbiting weather satellites. The availability of such real-time imagery ...

James E. Jordan; David L. Marcotte; G. W. K. Moore

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Mapping of Airborne Doppler Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of equations are derived to 1) map airborne Doppler radar data from an aircraft-relative coordinate system to an earth-relative coordinate system, and 2) remove the platform motion from the observed Doppler velocities. These equations ...

Wen-Chau Lee; Peter Dodge; Frank D. Marks Jr.; Peter H. Hildebrand

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Performance of Some Airborne Thermometers in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of airborne instruments to measure temperature in cloud is studied using theoretical analyses and experimental data. Theoretical predictions of the effects of sensor wetting are reviewed and modified, and are then compared to ...

R. Paul Lawson; William A. Cooper

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Waterspout Velocity Measurements by Airborne Doppler Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Doppler lidar measures the line-of-sight velocity of cloud droplets in a waterspout much as a meteorological Doppler radar measures the velocity of larger hydrometeors. We discuss details of the application of an airborne Doppler lidar to ...

R. L. Schwiesow; R. E. Cupp; P. C. Sinclair; R. F. Abbey Jr.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Targeted Observations with an Airborne Wind Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the possibilities and limitations of airborne Doppler lidar for adaptive observations over the Atlantic Ocean. For the first time, a scanning 2-?m Doppler lidar was applied for targeted measurements during the Atlantic “...

M. Weissmann; R. Busen; A. Dörnbrack; S. Rahm; O. Reitebuch

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

123

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Title Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Yungang, Philip K. Hopke, X. Xia, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, and M. J. Source Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 55 Start Page 525 Pagination 525-532 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords source apportionment positive matrix factorization (pmf) particulate matter (pm) molecular markers (mm) aethalometer delta-c Abstract Source apportionment is typically performed on chemical composition data derived from particulate matter (PM) samples. However, many common sources no longer emit significant amounts of characteristic trace elements requiring the use of more comprehensive chemical characterization in order to fully resolve the PM sources. Positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF, version 4.1) was used to analyze 24-hr integrated molecular marker (MM), secondary inorganic ions, trace elements, carbonaceous species and light absorption data to investigate sources of PM2.5 in Rochester, New York between October 2009 and October 2010 to explore the role of specific MMs. An eight-factor solutionwas found for which the factors were identified as isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%, 7.8%, 45.5%, 9.1%, 7.9%, and 6.3% to the average PM2.5 concentration, respectively Concentrations of pentacosane, hexacosane, heptacosane, and octacosane in the gasoline vehicles factor were larger compared to diesel emissions. Aethalometer Delta-C was strongly associated with wood combustion. The compounds, n-heptacosanoic acid and n-octacosanoic acid, occasionally used in the past as tracers for road dust, were found to largely associate with SOA in this study. In comparison with a standard PMF analyses without MM, inclusion of themwas necessary to resolve SOA and wood combustion factors in urban areas.

124

New Approaches to Differential Mobility Analysis for Airborne Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Differential Mobility to Differential Mobility Analysis for Airborne Measurements Rick Flagan Chemical Engineering and Environmental Science and Engineering California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Support: NSF, ONR, Davidow Foundation Differential Mobility Analysis Air Sample Aerosol Charger/Neutralizer (Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization) Sheath Air Q sh ~ 10 Q a Volumetric flow rate Q s Exhaust Q ex =Q sh Differential Mobility Analyzer DMA (Aerodynamic Analog of Sector Mass Spectrometer) E F e =eE F drag = 6πµR p V C slip (λ /R p ) CPC Q a =Q s Steady or Scanned Voltage Migration Velocity * Mobility * Peclet number for migration v E = Z p E Z p = n p e k B T D Pe mig = electrophoretic migration diffusive transport = bv E D = bn p eE k B T Singly Charged Particles  Radial DMA  Cylindrical DMA E = V b Pe = eV k B T E =

125

Gamma-analysis of airborne particulates sampled in Youzhno-Sakhalinsk town at March - April 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experience of discovery of the radioactive products which have released into atmosphere of Sakhalin region from Fukushima Daiichi accident is presented. Sampling of airborne particulates and atmosphere fallout was carried out by means of the air ventilation set and horizontal gauze planchs, respectively. The HPGe detector was used for gamma analyses of the airborne samples. Since 23 March we confidently measured 131I in the airborne samples, after 03.04.2011 we also registered a rise of activity 137Cs and 134Cs. 132Te and 132I were discovered in ashen sample of the planch, which had exposed in Youzhno-Kurilk from 14 to 17 March. The effect of the pairs production when in the samples 208Tl presence, which emits gamma-quanta of 2615 keV, causes a rise in apparatus spectra of the peak corresponding to energy 1593 keV, which could be in error ascribed to 140La. It had been experimentally shown that the systematic reduction of 134Cs content in measuring samples due to effect of gamma - gamma coincidence did not exceed 7 % (for the detector and geometry of the measurement used).

E. G. Tertyshnik; V. P. Martynenko; F. A. Andreev; G. B. Artemyev

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gamma-analysis of airborne particulates sampled in Youzhno-Sakhalinsk town at March - April 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experience of discovery of the radioactive products which have released into atmosphere of Sakhalin region from Fukushima Daiichi accident is presented. Sampling of airborne particulates and atmosphere fallout was carried out by means of the air ventilation set and horizontal gauze planchs, respectively. The HPGe detector was used for gamma analyses of the airborne samples. Since 23 March we confidently measured 131I in the airborne samples, after 03.04.2011 we also registered a rise of activity 137Cs and 134Cs. 132Te and 132I were discovered in ashen sample of the planch, which had exposed in Youzhno-Kurilk from 14 to 17 March. The effect of the pairs production when in the samples 208Tl presence, which emits gamma-quanta of 2615 keV, causes a rise in apparatus spectra of the peak corresponding to energy 1593 keV, which could be in error ascribed to 140La. It had been experimentally shown that the systematic reduction of 134Cs content in measuring samples due to effect of gamma - gamma coincidence did no...

Tertyshnik, E G; Andreev, F A; Artemyev, G B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Vertical Profile of Liquid and Ice Water Content in Midlatitude Mixed-Phase Altocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical properties of mixed-phase altocumulus clouds are investigated using in situ airborne measurements acquired during the ninth Cloud Layer Experiment (CLEX-9) over a midlatitude location. Approximately ? of the sampled profiles are ...

Lawrence D. Carey; Jianguo Niu; Ping Yang; J. Adam Kankiewicz; Vincent E. Larson; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Airborne Electromagnetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: provide data on rock type and mineral content Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: can be used to detect changes in density of fluids and indicate if there is salt water intrusion Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 48.274,827 centUSD 0.0483 kUSD 4.827e-5 MUSD 4.827e-8 TUSD / mile Median Estimate (USD): 317.3831,738 centUSD 0.317 kUSD

129

New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms Speaker(s): Klaus Willeke Date: February 27, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Klaus Willeke and his international team of engineers, physicists, microbiologists, industrial hygienists and environmental scientists have worked for about 15 years on the development of new methods for sampling airborne microorganisms. The following topics will be highlighted: long-term bioaerosol sampling into liquid by swirling air motion ("Biosampler"); personal aerosol sampling with low wind sensitivity and highfilter deposit uniformity ("Button Aerosol Sampler"); collection of microorganisms by electrostatic means; source testing as a predictor for microorganism release from surfaces; particle concentrating from large air

130

Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Airborne Gravity Survey Airborne Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Airborne Gravity Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Gravity Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Gravity Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Distribution of density in the subsurface enables inference of rock type. Stratigraphic/Structural: Delineation of steeply dipping formations, geological discontinuities and faults, intrusions and the deposition of silicates due to hydrothermal activity. Hydrological: Density of sedimentary rocks are strongly influenced by fluid contained within pore space. Dry bulk density refers to the rock with no moisture, while the wet bulk density accounts for water saturation; fluid content may alter density by up to 30%.(Sharma, 1997)

131

Intercomparison of Water Vapor Data Measured with Lidar during IHOP_2002. Part II: Airborne-to-Airborne Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dataset of the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) gives the first opportunity for direct intercomparisons of airborne water vapor lidar systems and allows very important conclusions to be drawn for future field campaigns. Three airborne ...

Andreas Behrendt; Volker Wulfmeyer; Thorsten Schaberl; Hans-Stefan Bauer; Christoph Kiemle; Gerhard Ehret; Cyrille Flamant; Susan Kooi; Syed Ismail; Richard Ferrare; Edward V. Browell; David N. Whiteman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A model for forming airborne synthetic aperture radar images of underground targets  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from an airborne platform has been proposed for imaging targets beneath the earth`s surface. The propagation of the radar`s energy within the ground, however, is much different than in the earth`s atmosphere. The result is signal refraction, echo delay, propagation losses, dispersion, and volumetric scattering. These all combine to make SAR image formation from an airborne platform much more challenging than a surface imaging counterpart. This report treats the ground as a lossy dispersive half-space, and presents a model for the radar echo based on measurable parameters. The model is then used to explore various imaging schemes, and image properties. Dynamic range is discussed, as is the impact of loss on dynamic range. Modified window functions are proposed to mitigate effects of sidelobes of shallow targets overwhelming deeper targets.

Doerry, A.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

ARMAR: An Airborne Rain-Mapping Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new airborne rain-mapping radar (ARMAR) has been developed by NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for operation on the NASA Ames DC-8 aircraft. The radar operates at 13.8 GHz, the frequency to be used by the radar on the Tropical Rainfall ...

S. L. Durden; E. Im; F. K. Li; W. Ricketts; A. Tanner; W. Wilson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Vertical Profiles of Aerosol and Radiation and the Influence of a Temperature Inversion: Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an airborne experiment performed near Mönchengladbach (Germany) in November 1993 are reported. Besides meteorological data, vertical profiles of aerosol properties (number concentration, size distribution) and radiation (...

M. Wendisch; S. Mertes; A. Ruggaber; T. Nakajima

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Characteristics of the Vertical Profiles of Dual-Frequency, Dual-Polarization Radar Data in Stratiform Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne dual-wavelength and dual-polarization radar data are analyzed for measurements taken in stratiform rain in the western Pacific during September 1990. The focus of the paper is on the vertical profiles of the linear depolarization ratio, ...

R. Meneghini; H. Kumagai

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Christmas Island Wind Profiler: A Prototype VHF Wind-Profiling Radar for the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After a decade of development, VHF wind profilers are being used for atmospheric research at several locations in the tropical Pacific. A prototype 50-MHz wind profiler was installed on Christmas Island in 1985 and has operated continuously since ...

K. S. Gage; J. R. Mcafee; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; C. R. Williams; P. E. Johnston; A. C. Riddle

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Analyzing Options for Airborne Emergency Wireless Communications  

SciTech Connect

In the event of large-scale natural or manmade catastrophic events, access to reliable and enduring commercial communication systems is critical. Hurricane Katrina provided a recent example of the need to ensure communications during a national emergency. To ensure that communication demands are met during these critical times, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the guidance of United States Strategic Command has studied infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities associated with an airborne wireless communications capability. Such a capability could provide emergency wireless communications until public/commercial nodes can be systematically restored. This report focuses on the airborne cellular restoration concept; analyzing basic infrastructure requirements; identifying related infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities and offers recommended solutions.

Michael Schmitt; Juan Deaton; Curt Papke; Shane Cherry

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

GROA AIRBORNE RELEASE DISPERSION FACTOR CALCULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to calculate airborne release dispersion factors ({chi}/Q) for the surface and subsurface facilities at the Geological Repository Operations Area (GROA). The calculated {chi}/Q values may be used to estimate radiological consequences to workers for potential releases from normal operations and event sequences for License Application. The scope of this document is to provide estimates of {chi}/Q values at potential onsite receptors from facility releases, under normal operating conditions and event sequences.

J. Wang

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

Johnson, Robert E., E-mail: rej@virginia.ed [Engineering Physics, Thornton Hall B102, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

Roy Whitney; George Neil

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%,...

142

The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Institute www.hnei.hawaii.edu The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability Richard Rocheleau Trent Molter William Collins Silvia Wessel Hawaii...

143

Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect

Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OPPORTUNITY AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

channel 8-12 microns, 320 spatial pixels. Large-format RC-10 aerial survey camera with images beingANNOUNCEMENT OF OPPORTUNITY AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://arsf.nerc.ac.uk 2010 OCTOBER 2009 The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF) invites direct access applications for UK

145

Analysis and Processing of Airborne LIDAR Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airborne LIDAR systems have been in use for many years to measure points on the earth's surface. They can rapidly produce accurate digital surface models and offer significantly lower costs in field operations and post-processing compared to traditional survey methods. This makes the LIDAR technology an attractive alternative for a variety of mapping applications. From scattered 3-D point clouds to useful representations for end-users requires further research and development of post-processing algorithms. Up to now, the post-processing of LIDAR data is still in an early phase of development because no single technique currently is considered optimum or satisfactory for all conditions and requirements.

Yong Hu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Airborne Demonstrator for the Direct-Detection Doppler Wind Lidar ALADIN on ADM-Aeolus. Part I: Instrument Design and Comparison to Satellite Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global observation of profiles of the atmospheric wind speed is the highest-priority unmet need for global numerical weather prediction. Satellite Doppler lidar is the most promising candidate to meet the requirements on global wind profile ...

Oliver Reitebuch; Christian Lemmerz; Engelbert Nagel; Ulrike Paffrath; Yannig Durand; Martin Endemann; Frederic Fabre; Marc Chaloupy

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Architecture and Algorithms for an Airborne Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Air Force currently is in the process of developing an Airborne Network (AN) to provide support to its combat aircrafts on a mission. The reliability needed for continuous operation of an AN is difficult to achieve through completely infrastructure-less mobile ad hoc networks. In this paper we first propose an architecture for an AN where airborne networking platforms (ANPs - aircrafts, UAVs and satellites) form the backbone of the AN. In this architecture, the ANPs can be viewed as mobile base stations and the combat aircrafts on a mission as mobile clients. The combat aircrafts on a mission move through a space called air corridor. The goal of the AN design is to form a backbone network with the ANPs with two properties: (i) the backbone network remains connected at all times, even though the topology of the network changes with the movement of the ANPs, and (ii) the entire 3D space of the air corridor is under radio coverage at all times by the continuously moving ANPs. In addition to proposing an...

Sen, Arunabha; Silva, Tiffany; Das, Nibedita; Kundu, Anjan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 34313443 Chemical evolution of an isolated power plant plume during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Texas 2000 Air Quality Study; Aerosol growth; Airborne measurements 1. Introduction Power plantsAtmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 3431­3443 Chemical evolution of an isolated power plant plume from a coal-burning power plant were measured during a research flight of the DOE G-1 during the Texas

149

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Particle Size Vertical Profile Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and shapes. The vertical variation of ice crystal size can alter the radiative heatingcooling profiles in cirrus cloudy atmospheres and hence is an important component in the...

150

A 3-GHz Profiler for Precipitating Cloud Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3-GHz profiler has been developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Aeronomy Laboratory to observe the evolution and vertical structure of precipitating cloud systems. The profiler is very portable, robust, and relatively ...

Warner L. Ecklund; Christopher R. Williams; Paul E. Johnston; Kenneth S. Gage

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Meteorological Education and Training Using A-Train Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA A-Train vertical profilers provide detailed observations of atmospheric features not seen in traditional imagery from other weather satellite data. CloudSat and Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) profiles ...

Thomas F. Lee; Richard L. Bankert; Cristian Mitrescu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

153

Airborne Process Commercial Scale Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCPI 2) CCPI 2) contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Mustang Clean Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Peabody Energy St. Louis, MO. Airborne Process(tm) commerciAl scAle DemonstrAtion ProgrAm (withDrAwn Prior to AwArD) Project Description Mustang Clean Energy will design, construct, and operate a full scale sodium-based multi-pollutant scrubber in conjunction with a revenue-generating fertilizer by-product processing plant at Mustang Energy Company, LLC's Mustang Generating Station. Both Mustang Clean Energy and Mustang Energy Company are subsidiaries of Peabody Energy, the world's largest coal company. The 300 MW (net) station will

154

Exposure to airborne asbestos in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings and its implication for the health of building occupants is a major public health issue. A total of 2892 air samples from 315 public, commercial, residential, school, and university buildings has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result of exposure to the presence of asbestos containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all asbestos structures was 0.02 structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of asbestos greater than or equal to 5 microns long was 0.00013 fibers/ml (f/ml). The concentration of asbestos was higher in schools than in other buildings. In 48% of indoor samples and 75% of outdoor samples, no asbestos fibers were detected. The observed airborne concentration in 74% of the indoor samples and 96% of the outdoor samples is below the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act clearance level of 0.01 s/ml. Finally, using those fibers which could be seen optically, all indoor samples and all outdoor samples are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure level of 0.1 f/ml for fibers greater than or equal to 5 microns in length. These results provide substantive verification of the findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public building study which found very low ambient concentrations of asbestos fibers in buildings with ACM, irrespective of the condition of the material in the buildings.

Lee, R.J.; Van Orden, D.R.; Corn, M.; Crump, K.S. (RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

An Improved Airborne Aitken Nucleus Counter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrument has been designed for measuring with high accuracy and resolution the size and concentration of atmospheric particles ?0.005 ?m. It is pressure compensated for aircraft use and can take five readings per second with a system ...

C. G. Michael

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Diabatic Heating Profiles in Recent Global Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diabatic heating profiles are extremely important to the atmospheric circulation in the tropics and therefore to the earth’s energy and hydrological cycles. However, their global structures are poorly known because of limited information from in ...

Jian Ling; Chidong Zhang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils Starting in the 1970s, federal regulatory control and eventual elimination of lead-based "anti-knock" additives in gasoline decreased the level of airborne Pb in the USA by two orders-of-magnitude [1]. Blood lead levels of the USA figure 1 Figure 1. The good, the bad, and the ugly. Ambient airborne particulate matter captured on filters of woven silica fiber (large strips) and TeflonTM (round). Clean fiber filter at bottom for comparison. Take a deep breath? population decreased correspondingly [2,3]. Despite this dramatic improvement in both exposure risk and body burden of Pb, the sources and health threat of the low levels of lead in our "unleaded" air remain topics

158

Simulator Evaluation of Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) Concept  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) concept is designed to support independent parallel approach operations to runways spaced as close as 2500 ft. This report describes the AILS operational concept and the results of a ground-based flight ...

Abbott Terence S.; Elliott Dawn M.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Accurate Airborne Surface Temperature Measurements with Chopper-stabilized Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of chopper-stabilized radiometers for the meteorological measurement of surface temperatures was investigated during a series of airborne trails, including tests at high altitude using a pressurized aircraft. The significant finding ...

Dieter Lorenz

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Calibrations and performance of the airborne Cloud Extinction Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new airborne instrument that measures extinction coefficient ? in clouds and precipitation has been designed by Environment Canada. The Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP) utilizes the transmissiometric method which is based on direct measurement of ...

Alexei Korolev; Alex Shashkov; Howard Barker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Airborne Cloud-Physics Projects From 1974 Through 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the principal airborne cloud-physics projects during the ten-year period 1974-1984 are documented to provide selected information on the type and quantity of microphysical data that have beencollected. The emphasis is on measurements ...

Richard K. Jeck

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

Hospodsky, Denina

163

Feasibility Test of an Airborne Pulse-Doppler Meteorological Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically scanning, airborne, pulse-Doppler radar is described. Data processing methods to yield pseudo-dual-Doppler horizontal winds are presented. Results of an intercomparison with a ground-based dual-Doppler network are presented and ...

David P. Jorgensen; Peter H. Hildebrand; Charles L. Frush

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pre-EUCREX Intercomparison of Airborne Humidity Measuring Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the pre-EUCREX (European Cloud and Radiation Experiment) intercomparison of airborne instrumentation in January 1992, nine hygrometers mounted on three different aircraft were compared. Although the different instruments are based on ...

J. Ström; R. Busen; M. Quante; B. Guillemet; P. R. A. Brown; J. Heintzenberg

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Airborne Doppler Lidar Observations of Convective Phenomena in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 30 June 1981, the wind fields around a variety of convective clouds, ranging from large thunderstorm complexes to isolated cumulus congestus, were observed in Oklahoma using an airborne Doppler lidar operated by the National Aeronautics and ...

Eugene W. McCaul Jr.; Howard B. Bluestein; Richard J. Doviak

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

6. Impact of smoke and moisture on shortwave radia7ve hea7ng profile Dynamical and Radia7ve Influences of Smoke Transport on the Southeast Atlan7c Atmospheric Ver7cal Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office, United Kingdom Email: aadebiyi@rsmas.miami.edu 1. Introduc7on Seasonal of Miami, Rosens=el School of Marine & Atmospheric Science, Miami, FL; 2UK Met over the southeast Atlan:c ocean, with the peak in aerosol loading occurring

Zuidema, Paquita

167

ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements  

SciTech Connect

The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

Sebastien Biraud

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

Sebastien Biraud

169

Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coherent Doppler lidar has been used in an aircraft to measure the 2-dimensional wind field in a number of different atmospheric situations. The lidar, a pulsed CO2 system, was installed in the NASA Convair 990. Galileo II, and flown in a ...

J. Bilbro; G. Fichtl; D. Fitzjarrald; M. Krause; R. Lee

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures P. Varanasi and Q. Zou Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Water vapor is undoubtedly the most dominant greenhouse gas in the terrestrial atmosphere. In the two facets of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research, atmospheric remote sensing (air-borne as well as Cloud and Radiation Testbed [CART] site-based) and modeling of atmospheric radiation, the spectrum of water vapor, ranging from the microwave to the visible wavelengths, plays a significant role. Its spectrum has been the subject of many studies throughout the last century. Therefore, it is natural to presume it should be fairly well established by now. However, the need for a

171

Quantitative Measurements of Path-Integrated Rain Rate by an Airborne Microwave Radiometer over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on the airborne microwave radiometer, which is one of the sensors of the airborne microwave rain-scatterometer/radiometer (AMRS) system, are analyzed to infer path-integrated rain rate measured from topside. The equation of radiative ...

Masaharu Fujita; Ken'ichi Okamoto; Harunobu Masuko; Takeyuki Ojima; Nobuyoshi Fugono

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fast Temperature and True Airspeed Measurements with the Airborne Ultrasonic Anemometer–Thermometer (AUSAT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne thermometer–anemometer with fast response is designed and built using the well-known sonic anemometer–thermometer technique. The shape of this new airborne sonic sensor, without the conventional style probes, is a cylinder with its ...

D. Cruette; A. Marillier; J. L. Dufresne; J. Y. Grandpeix; P. Nacass; H. Bellec

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Development of an Airborne Infrared Interferometer for Meteorological Sounding Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) has developed an airborne interferometer to act as a simulator for future satellite-based infrared meteorological sounders. The Airborne Research Interferometer Evaluation System (ARIES) consists of ...

S. H. S. Wilson; N. C. Atkinson; J. A. Smith

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Airborne Doppler Lidar Measurements of Valley Flows in Complex Coastal Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional winds obtained with an airborne Doppler lidar are used to investigate the spatial structure of topographically driven flows in complex coastal terrain in Southern California. The airborne Doppler lidar collected four hours of ...

S. F. J. De Wekker; K. S. Godwin; G. D. Emmitt; S. Greco

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1979 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To show that AEM methods can be useful in exploration for and defining geothermal systems Notes Extensive audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) work by the USGS in KGRA's showed that many geothermal systems do have a near-surface electrical signature which should be detectable by an AEM system. References Christopherson, K.R.; Long, C.L.; Hoover, D.B. (1 September 1980) Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Airborne_Electromagnetic_Survey_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1979)&oldid=510231

177

Evaluation of Meteorological Airborne Doppler Radar. Part II: Triple-Doppler Analyses of Air Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Part II of a paper dealing with the capabilities and use of airborne Doppler radar to observe motions within storms. Part I deals with dual-Doppler analyses of convective storm structure, using airborne and combinations of airborne and ...

Cynthia K. Mueller; Peter H. Hildebrand

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Continuous Humidity Monitoring in a Tropical Region with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radar remote sensing technique that estimates humidity profiles using a wind profiler is applied to the equatorial atmosphere radar (EAR) to monitor detailed humidity variations in tropical regions. Turbulence echo power intensity is related to ...

Jun-ichi Furumoto; Toshitaka Tsuda; Satoshi Iwai; Toshiaki Kozu

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

THE ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS MISSION FOR GLOBAL WIND FIELD MEASUREMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prime aim of the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission is to demonstrate measurements of vertical wind profiles from space. Extensive studies conducted by the European Space Agency over the past 15 years have culminated in the selection of a high-...

Ad Stoffelen; Jean Pailleux; Erland Källén; J. Michael Vaughan; Lars Isaksen; Pierre Flamant; Werner Wergen; Erik Andersson; Harald Schyberg; Alain Culoma; Roland Meynart; Martin Endemann; Paul Ingmann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Estimation of Atmospheric Duct Structure Using Radar Sea Clutter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retrieving atmospheric refractivity profiles from the sea surface backscattered radar clutter is known as the refractivity-from-clutter (RFC) technique. Because the relationship between refractivity and radar sea clutter is clearly nonlinear and ...

Zhao Xiaofeng; Huang Sixun

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Vertical Resolution and Accuracy of Atmospheric Infrared Sounding Spectrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis is performed to evaluate the accuracy and vertical resolution of atmospheric profiles obtained with the HIRS/2, GOES I/M, and HIS instruments. In addition, a linear simultaneous retrieval algorithm is used with aircraft ...

Hung-Lung Huang; William L. Smith; Harold M. Woolf

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Airborne Lidar Tracking of Fluorescent Tracers for Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development and validation of transport models for the study of regional acid deposition require improved observations of pollutant transport and dispersion processes. No suitable method for air-parcel tracking along nonconstant density surfaces ...

Edward E. Uthe; William Viezee; Bruce M. Morley; Jason K. S. Ching

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Methods to determine the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods to determine the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus Methods to determine the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus Title Methods to determine the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors Russell, Marion L., Regine Goth-Goldstein, Michael G. Apte, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Prior research has demonstrated that rhinovirus infections can be transmitted via person-to-person contact and via inhalation of infectious aerosols. Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. To detect airborne HRV, we developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine the assay detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 10,000-fold. This assay was used to quantify the size distribution of an artificially-produced HRV aerosol captured with an Andersen six-stage cascade impactor. In future studies, we hope to use the methods developed here to characterize the size distribution of naturally occurring viral-aerosols

184

Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus Title Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Russell, Marion L., Regine Goth-Goldstein, Michael G. Apte, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 1 Pagination 40-45 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor

185

Geolocation of Multiple Targets from Airborne Video Without Terrain Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The task of geolocating targets from airborne video is required for many applications in surveillance, law enforcement, reconnaissance, etc. The usual approaches to target geolocation involve terrain data, single target tracking, gimbal control of camera ... Keywords: Geolocation, IMU-Camera calibration, Tracking, Unmanned aerial vehicle

Kyung Min Han; Guilherme N. Desouza

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Mitigating Geomagnetic Noise in Airborne Magnetic Surveys using GPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitigating Geomagnetic Noise in Airborne Magnetic Surveys using GPS S. Skone Department, a limiting factor remains ­ the small-amplitude variations caused by geomagnetic pulsations arising from the correlation of TEC variations with geomagnetic pulsations. Variations in TEC during intervals of Pc 3

Calgary, University of

187

Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of radiological airborne emissions. This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to written requirements.

Boom, R.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

Vance, L.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking, Version 2(RATCHET2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual describes the atmospheric model and computer code for the Atmospheric Transport Module within SAC. The Atmospheric Transport Module, called RATCHET2, calculates the time-integrated air concentration and surface deposition of airborne contaminants to the soil. The RATCHET2 code is an adaptation of the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). The original RATCHET code was developed to perform the atmospheric transport for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Fundamentally, the two sets of codes are identical; no capabilities have been deleted from the original version of RATCHET. Most modifications are generally limited to revision of the run-specification file to streamline the simulation process for SAC.

Ramsdell, James V.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Pierre Auger Atmosphere-Monitoring Lidar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluorescence-detection techniques of cosmic-ray air-shower experiments require precise knowledge of atmospheric properties to reconstruct air-shower energies. Up to now, the atmosphere in desert-like areas was assumed to be stable enough so that occasional calibration of atmospheric attenuation would suffice to reconstruct shower profiles. However, serious difficulties have been reported in recent fluorescence-detector experiments causing systematic errors in cosmic ray spectra at extreme energies. Therefore, a scanning backscatter lidar system has been constructed for the Pierre Auger Observatory in Malargue, Argentina, where on-line atmospheric monitoring will be performed. One lidar system is already deployed at the Los Leones fluorescence detector site and the second one is currently (April 2003) under construction at the Coihueco site. Next to the established ones, a novel analysis method with assumption on horizontal invariance, using multi-angle measurements is shown to unambiguously measure optical depth, as well as absorption and backscatter coefficient.

A. Filipcic; M. Horvat; D. Veberic; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik; M. Chiosso; R. Mussa; G. Sequeiros; M. A. Mostafa; M. D. Roberts

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of DBS Wind Measurement Technique in Different Beam Configurations for a VHF Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric winds in the troposphere have been observed routinely for many years with wind profiling (VHF and UHF) radars using the Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique. Accuracy of wind estimates using wind profiling radars with different beam ...

I. Srinivasa Rao; V. K. Anandan; P. Narasimha Reddy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A New Parametric Model of Vortex Tangential-Wind Profiles: Development, Testing, and Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new parametric model of vortex tangential-wind profiles is presented that is primarily designed to depict realistic-looking tangential wind profiles such as those in intense atmospheric vortices arising in dust devils, waterspouts, tornadoes, ...

Vincent T. Wood; Luther W. White

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) Pilot Experiment at NYC" - Michael Reynolds, BNL 17:30 "EML Pilot Studies for the Urban Atmospheric Observatory" - Hsi-Na (Sam) Lee, EML 17:40 "A...

195

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: INPUT airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were conducted during 1979 in five Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's). AEM work has not been significantly utilized in the past for geothermal purposes because it was thought that a shallow exploration technique would not be effective. Extensive audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) work by the USGS in KGRA's showed that many geothermal systems do have a near-surface electrical signature which should be detectable by an AEM system. INPUT responses in the form of

196

Mentor Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

197

Mentee Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

198

ARM - Campaign Instrument - s-band-profiler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentss-band-profiler govInstrumentss-band-profiler Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA S-band (2835 Mhz) Profiler (S-BAND-PROFILER) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns CRYSTAL-FACE [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2002.06.26 - 2002.08.01 Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 2006.01.21 - 2006.02.13 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available

199

A Global Profiling System for Improved Weather and Climate Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new long-term global observing system is proposed that would provide routine, detailed vertical profiles of measurements in the atmosphere and oceans. The system, which would need to be designed, developed, and operated by a consortium of ...

Alexander E. MacDonald

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

On the Use of Radars for Operational Wind Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of clear-air radars to operational wind profiling is considered. Several alternative techniques for determining atmospheric winds from radars are surveyed and, in light of the current interest in operational applications, the ...

B. B. Balsley; K. S. Gage

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

An Evaluation of Wind Profiler, RASS, and Microwave Radiometer Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several ground-based remote Sensors were operated together in Colorado during February and March 1991 to obtain continuous profiles of the kinematic and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. Instrument performance is compared for five ...

B. E. Martner; D. B. Wuertz; B. B. Stankov; R. G. Strauch; E. R. Westwater; K. S. Gage; W. L. Ecklund; C. L. Martin; W. F. Dabberdt

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mobile Lidar Profiling of Tropical Aerosols and Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar profiling of atmospheric aerosols and clouds in the lower atmosphere has been in progress at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune (18°32?N, 73°52?E, 559 m MSL), India, for more than two decades. To enlarge the scope of ...

P. C. S. Devara; P. E. Raj; K. K. Dani; G. Pandithurai; M. C. R. Kalapureddy; S. M. Sonbawne; Y. J. Rao; S. K. Saha

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Constraints on the Profiles of Total Water PDF in AGCMs from AIRS and a High-Resolution Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) cloud parameterizations generally include an assumption about the subgrid-scale probability distribution function (PDF) of total water and its vertical profile. In the present study, the Atmospheric ...

Andrea Molod

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

205

A Bistatic Sodar for Precision Wind Profiling in Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ground-based wind profiling technology—a scanned bistatic sodar—is described. The motivation for this design is to obtain a “mastlike” wind vector profile in a single atmospheric column extending from the ground to heights of more than 200 ...

Stuart Bradley; Sabine von Hünerbein; Torben Mikkelsen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP Mlawer, Eli Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Delamere, Jennifer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Johnson, Karen Brookhaven National Laboratory Troyan, David Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Shippert, Timothy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Long, Chuck Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Heck, Patrick University of Wisconsin Rutan, David Analytical Services & Materials, Inc.

208

A detailed calibration of a stack monitor used in the measurement of airborne radionuclides at a high energy proton accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed calibration of a stack monitor used in the measurement of airborne radionuclides at a high energy proton accelerator

Vaziri, K; Cossairt, J D; Böhnlein, D J; Elwyn, A J

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Forecasting airborne pollen concentration time series with neural and neuro-fuzzy models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasting airborne pollen concentrations is one of the most studied topics in aerobiology, due to its crucial application to allergology. The most used tools for this problem are single lineal regressions and autoregressive models (ARIMA). Notwithstanding, ... Keywords: Aerobiology, Airborne pollen, Forecasting, Neuro-fuzzy, Time series

José Luis Aznarte M.; José Manuel Benítez Sánchez; Diego Nieto Lugilde; Concepción de Linares Fernández; Consuelo Díaz de la Guardia; Francisca Alba Sánchez

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://arsf.nerc.ac.uk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments can be made available for special applications: Large-format RC-10 aerial survey cameraAIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://arsf.nerc.ac.uk ANNOUNCEMENT OF OPPORTUNITY 2009 OCTOBER 2008 The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF) invites direct access applications for UK

211

NERC AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://www.nerc.ac.uk/arsf/home.htm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-12 microns, 320 spatial pixels) Large-format RC-10 aerial survey camera, with images being suppliedNERC AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://www.nerc.ac.uk/arsf/home.htm SPECIAL OF PROPOSALS: FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER 2009 The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF) invites applications

212

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

213

Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

Sehmel, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Chemical detection using the airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer (TIRIS)  

SciTech Connect

A methodology is described for an airborne, downlooking, longwave infrared imaging spectrometer based technique for the detection and tracking of plumes of toxic gases. Plumes can be observed in emission or absorption, depending on the thermal contrast between the vapor and the background terrain. While the sensor is currently undergoing laboratory calibration and characterization, a radiative exchange phenomenology model has been developed to predict sensor response and to facilitate the sensor design. An inverse problem model has also been developed to obtain plume parameters based on sensor measurements. These models, the sensors, and ongoing activities are described.

Gat, N.; Subramanian, S.; Sheffield, M.; Erives, H. [Opto-Knowledge Systems, Inc. (United States); Barhen, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Measurements of Ocean Surface Backscattering Using an Airborne 94-GHz Cloud Radar—Implication for Calibration of Airborne and Spaceborne W-Band Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Backscattering properties of the ocean surface have been widely used as a calibration reference for airborne and spaceborne microwave sensors. However, at millimeter-wave frequencies, the ocean surface backscattering mechanism is still not well ...

Lihua Li; Gerald M. Heymsfield; Lin Tian; Paul E. Racette

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Comparison of Airborne In Situ, Airborne Radar–Lidar, and Spaceborne Radar–Lidar Retrievals of Polar Ice Cloud Properties Sampled during the POLARCAT Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study illustrates the high potential of RALI, the French airborne radar–lidar instrument, for studying cloud processes and evaluating satellite products when satellite overpasses are available. For an Arctic nimbostratus ice cloud collected ...

Julien Delanoë; Alain Protat; Olivier Jourdan; Jacques Pelon; Mathieu Papazzoni; Régis Dupuy; Jean-Francois Gayet; Caroline Jouan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Twenty Years of Airborne Research at the University of Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wherein is revealed the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of operating an aircraft for atmospheric research at a university over the past 20 years.

Peter V. Hobbs

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Biomass burning : particle emissions, characteristics, and airborne measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning started to attract attention since the last decade because of its impacts on the atmosphere and the environmental air quality, as well as… (more)

Wardoyo, Arinto Yudi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Activity Date 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The airborne resistivity (Fig. 2; panel c) shows high values in most of the areas including the Chena pluton, with the exception of the very northern and southern portion of the map where the Paleozoic metamorphic unit is located. Lineations of low resistivity at the west end of the area are generally associated with the location of the valley fill. However, some

220

Vertical Moist Thermodynamic Structure of the Madden–Julian Oscillation in Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Retrievals: An Update and a Comparison to ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale vertical moist thermodynamic structure of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) was documented using the first 2.5 yr (2002–05) of version 4 atmospheric specific humidity and temperature profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared ...

Baijun Tian; Duane E. Waliser; Eric J. Fetzer; Yuk L. Yung

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

Robinson, Tyler D. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Catling, David C., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, W. F. Feltz, R. D. Knuteson, and D. D. Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin B. M. Lesht Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois L. Strow University of Maryland College Park, Maryland C. Barnet Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology Baltimore, Maryland E. Fetzer National Aeronautics Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, California Introduction The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution infrared sounder on the earth observing plan (EOS) Aqua platform. Temperature and water vapor profile retrievals from AIRS are

223

Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Simulation of Atmospheric Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral atmospheric circulation model is time-integrated for approximately 18 years. The model has a global computational domain and realistic geography and topography. The model undergoes an annual cycle as daily values of seasonally varying ...

Syukuro Manabe; Douglas G. Hahn

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Atmospheric Laser Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly ...

Kenneth W. Fischer*Michael R. Witiw; Jeffrey A. Baars+; T. R. Oke

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Atmospheric Available Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total potential energy of the atmosphere is the sum of its internal and gravitational energies. The portion of this total energy available to be converted into kinetic energy is determined relative to an isothermal, hydrostatic, equilibrium ...

Peter R. Bannon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

ARM - Evaluation Product - Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) 2000.03.01 - 2006.02.28 Site(s) SGP General Description The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties

230

Application Of Airborne Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Application Of Airborne Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Burlington Northern (BN) conducted TIR surveys using a fixed wing aircraft over 17 different geothermal prospects in Washington, Montana and Wyoming because of this remote sensing tool's ability to detect variations in the heat emitted from the earth's surface. The surveys were flown at an average elevation of 5000 ft. above the ground surface which gave a spatial resolution of approximately 7 feet diameter. BN found thermal activity which had not been recognized previously in some prospects (e.g., Lester,

231

Synthetic IR Scene Simulation of Air-borne Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR scenes of high fidelity are needed to support the development and testing of various target detection and tracking techniques. It is impractical to test detection and tracking algorithms under all conceivable conditions. Therefore, to test the effectiveness of detection and tracking algorithms under variety of scenarios, synthetic IR scenes are generated. For air-borne targets, the presence of clouds plays an important role, since they affect most IR sensors. We propose, a mod- ification of original Gardner's Method [3], in order to generate clouds of richer spectral content. We also ex- plore an algorithm based on self-similarity [5] for cloud texture generation. Synthetic IR cloud images generated by our scene simulation software are radiometrically accurate and have typical cloud texture variations. We use Modtran J.O for radiometric calculation and VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) for scene rendering.

Shankar T. More; Avinash A. Pandit; Avinash A. P; S. N. Merchant; U. B. Desai

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.  

SciTech Connect

Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) Simulation Experiment for a Severe Storm Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GOES satellites launched in the 1980's are carrying an instrument called the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS), which is designed to provide temperature and moisture profile-sounding capability for mesoscale weather systems. As a controlled ...

Dennis Chesters; Louis W. Uccellini; Anthony Mostek

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The ONSAM Experiment: Remote Sensing Techniques for Vertical Sounding of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ONSala Atmospheric Measurement program was carried out in May 1983 in order to test the performance of new remote sensing equipment, compared with radiosondes launched for this particular program. A temperature profiling radiometer and a ...

J. Askne; G. Elgered; H. Nordius; G. Skoog; E. Winberg; A. Ha?ga?rd; E. Andersson; N. Gustafsson; J. Svensson; I. Carlsson

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An Algorithm for Lidar Mapping of Aerosol Concentrations in a Varying Atmospheric Background Density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for the determination of the number density profiles of a specific aerosol as a function of time and space is developed and discussed. The algorithm is applicable to atmospheric conditions in which a varying density particulate ...

Moshe Kleiman; Smadar Egert; Ariel Cohen

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Shipboard Use of a Low-Level Atmospheric Thermograph in Fog and Stratus Investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Low-Level Atmospheric Thermograph (LLAT) to obtain fine-scaled and detailed vertical temperature profiles to an altitude of 1000 m has been developed through a simple modification of the Sippican Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT) system. Only ...

J. G. Norton; G. E. Schacher

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Airborne Scanning Spectrometer for Remote Sensing of Cloud, Aerosol, Water Vapor, and Surface Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne scanning spectrometer was developed for measuring reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation in 50 narrowband channels between 0.55 and 14.2 µm. The instrument provides multispectral images of outgoing radiation for purposes of ...

Michael D. King; W. Paul Menzel; Patrick S. Grant; Jeffrey S. Myers; G. Thomas Arnold; Steven E. Platnick; Liam E. Gumley; Si-Chee Tsay; Christopher C. Moeller; Michael Fitzgerald; Kenneth S. Brown; Fred G. Osterwisch

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Influence of Airborne Doppler Radar Data Quality on Numerical Simulations of a Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of airborne Doppler radar data assimilation on improving numerical simulations of tropical cyclones (TCs) has been well recognized. However, the influence of radar data quality on the numerical simulation of tropical cyclones has not ...

Lei Zhang; Zhaoxia Pu; Wen-Chau Lee; Qingyun Zhao

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fixed-Antenna Pointing-Angle Calibration of Airborne Doppler Cloud Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler velocity measurements from airborne meteorological Doppler radars require removal of the aircraft motion contribution in order to provide radial velocity of hydrometeor targets. This is a critical step for hydrometeor motion and wind ...

Samuel Haimov; Alfred Rodi

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Solo-based automated quality control algorithm for airborne tail Doppler radar data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated quality control pre-processing algorithm for removing non-weather radar echoes in airborne Doppler radar data has been developed. This algorithm can significantly reduce the time and experience level required for interactive radar ...

Michael M. Bell; Wen-Chau Lee; Cory A. Wolff; Huaqing Cai

242

Correcting Airborne Temperature Data for Lags Introduced by Instruments with Two-Time-Constant Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne resistance wire temperature sensors can introduce a time lag before ambient air temperature changes are registered. It has been found that a second-order linear response system adequately describes the behavior of the Rosemount non-...

G. W. Inverarity

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Simultaneous Measurement of Ocean Winds and Waves with an Airborne Coherent Real Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coherent, X-band airborne radar has been developed to measure wind speed and direction simultaneously with directional wave spectra on the ocean. The coherent real aperture radar (CORAR) measures received power, mean Doppler shifts, and mean ...

William J. Plant; William C. Keller; Kenneth Hayes

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Design of a small fast steering mirror for airborne and aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the analysis and design of a small advanced fast steering mirror (sAFSM) for airborne and aerospace platforms. The sAFSM provides feedback-controlled articulation of two rotational axes for precision ...

Boulet, Michael Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Preliminary Results from Multiparameter Airborne Rain Radar Measurement in the Western Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results are presented from multiparameter airborne radar measurements of tropical storms. The experiment was conducted in the western Pacific in September 1990 with the NASA DC-8 aircraft that was equipped with a dual-wavelength radar ...

Hiroshi Kumagai; Robert Meneghini; Toshiaki Kozu

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Variational Analysis for Airborne Conically Scanned Doppler Lidar to Retrieve Mesoscale Wind Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne pulsed Doppler lidar implementing a downlooking conical scan rotating around the vertical axis is under development. The information contained in the measured radial velocities is studied to assess the capacity to retrieve the 3D wind ...

Alain Dabas; Julie Périn; Pierre H. Flamant

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Airborne Dual-Doppler Observations of an Intense Frontal System Approaching the Pacific Northwest Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne Doppler radar data, collected off the Pacific Northwest coast by a NOAA WP-3D Orion aircraft over an 8-h period on 8 December 1993 during the Coastal Observations and Simulations with Topography experiment, reveal the mesoscale structure ...

Scott A. Braun; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Bradley F. Smull

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Structure of Thermals in Cumulus from Airborne Dual-Doppler Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly developed technique for airborne dual-Doppler observations with the Wyoming Cloud Radar is used to characterize the velocity fields in vertical planes across cumulus turrets. The clouds sampled were continental in nature, with high bases (...

Rick Damiani; Gabor Vali; Samuel Haimov

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Resolution and Accuracy of an Airborne Scanning Laser System for Beach Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne scanning laser technology provides an effective method to systematically survey surface topography and changes in that topography with time. In this paper the authors describe the capability of a rapid-response lidar system in which ...

J. H. Middleton; C. G. Cooke; E. T. Kearney; P. J. Mumford; M. A. Mole; G. J. Nippard; C. Rizos; K. D. Splinter; I. L. Turner

250

Quantification of the effects of shattering on airborne ice particle measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice particle shattering poses a serious problem to airborne characterization microstructure of ice clouds. Shattered ice fragments may contaminate particle measurements resulting in artificially high concentrations of small ice. The ubiquitous ...

A. V. Korolev; E. F. Emery; J. W. Strapp; S. G. Cober; G. A. Isaac

251

Environmental Flow Impacts on Tropical Cyclone Structure Diagnosed from Airborne Doppler Radar Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a recent demonstration of multicase compositing of axisymmetric tropical cyclone (TC) structure derived from airborne Doppler radar measurements, the authors extend the analysis to the asymmetric structure using an unprecedented database ...

Paul D. Reasor; Robert Rogers; Sylvie Lorsolo

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Design and Sampling Characteristics of a New Airborne Aerosol Inlet for Aerosol Measurements in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of a new submicron aerosol inlet (SMAI) for airborne sampling of aerosol particles is introduced and its performance characteristics under a range of sampling conditions are presented. Analysis of inlet performance in clear-air and cloud ...

Lucas Craig; Allen Schanot; Arash Moharreri; David C. Rogers; Suresh Dhaniyala

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Comparison of Near-Infrared Diode Laser Techniques for Airborne Hygrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-frequency wavelength modulation spectroscopy and dual beam absorption noise canceler methods are compared for near-infrared laser detection of moisture at levels relevant to airborne hygrometry. Both techniques exhibit sensitivities ...

Joel A. Silver; David Christian Hovde

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Airborne Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the airborne data collected during the 2002 and 2003 Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). These data include gamma radiation observations, multi- and hyperspectral optical imaging, optical altimetry, and passive and active ...

Don Cline; Simon Yueh; Bruce Chapman; Boba Stankov; Al Gasiewski; Dallas Masters; Kelly Elder; Richard Kelly; Thomas H. Painter; Steve Miller; Steve Katzberg; Larry Mahrt

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Estimation of Rainfall Parameters Using Spaceborne and Airborne Nadir-Pointing Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When pointed toward ground, spaceborne and airborne radars must use several frequencies in order to estimate rainfall parameters. It is now well known, for example, that the differences between specific attenuations at different frequencies ...

A. R. Jameson

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Airflow and Precipitation Fields within Deep Alpine Valleys Observed by Airborne Doppler Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although airborne Doppler radar is increasingly relied upon to provide detailed descriptions of mesoscale precipitation systems in remote and complex meteorological settings, the utility of these observations has often been limited by the ...

Olivier Bousquet; Bradley F. Smull

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Multichannel Cloud Pyranometer System for Airborne Measurement of Solar Spectral Reflectance by Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and performance of a spectral radiometer system are described for airborne measurements of solar flux reflectance by clouds. The system consists of a pair of identical multichannel pyranometers: one installed on the top and the other ...

Shoji Asano; Masataka Shiobara; Yuji Nakanishi; Yukiharu Miyake

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

An evaluation of airborne laser scan data for coalmine subsidence mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accurate mapping of coalmine subsidence is necessary for the continued management of potential subsidence impacts. The use of airborne laser scan (ALS) data for subsidence mapping provides an alternative method to traditional ground-based approaches ...

D. R. Palamara; M. Nicholson; P. Flentje; E. Baafi; G. M. Brassington

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fixed-antenna Pointing-angle Calibration of Airborne Doppler Cloud Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler velocity measurements from airborne meteorological Doppler radars require removal of the aircraft motion contribution in order to provide radial velocity of hydrometeor targets. This is a critical step for hydrometeor motion and wind ...

Samuel Haimov; Alfred Rodi

260

Estimating the Evaporative Cooling Bias of an Airborne Reverse Flow Thermometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne reverse flow immersion thermometers were designed to prevent sensor wetting in cloud. Yet there is strong evidence that some wetting does occur and therefore also sensor evaporative cooling as the aircraft exits a cloud. Numerous ...

Yonggang Wang; Bart Geerts

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Use of the Inertial Dissipation Method for Calculating Turbulent Fluxes from Low-Level Airborne Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements are currently used for computing turbulence fluxes of heat and momentum. The method generally used is the eddy correlation technique, which requires sophisticated equipments to calculate the absolute velocities of the air. ...

Pierre Durand; Leonardo De Sa; Aimé Druilhet; Frédérique Said

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Quantification of the Effects of Shattering on Airborne Ice Particle Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice particle shattering poses a serious problem to the airborne characterization of ice cloud microstructure. Shattered ice fragments may contaminate particle measurements, resulting in artificially high concentrations of small ice. The ubiquitous ...

A. V. Korolev; E. F. Emery; J. W. Strapp; S. G. Cober; G. A. Isaac

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Airborne Doppler Lidar Investigation of Sea Surface Reflectance at a 355-nm Ultraviolet Wavelength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the sea surface reflectance for different incidence angles based on observations of an airborne Doppler lidar at an ultraviolet wavelength of 355 nm is described. The results were compared to sea surface reflectance models, ...

Zhigang Li; Christian Lemmerz; Ulrike Paffrath; Oliver Reitebuch; Benjamin Witschas

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Real-Time Airborne Analysis of Aircraft Data Supporting Operational Hurricane Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hurricane Research Division has developed a technique for real-time airborne analysis of aircraft data from reconnaissance and research flights in tropical cyclones. The technique uses an onboard workstation that analyzes flight-level ...

Joseph S. Griffin; Robert W. Burpee; Frank D. Marks Jr.; James L. Franklin

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL): An Airborne Simulator for the ICESat-2 Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the motivation for, and initial results from, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental lidar (MABEL) instrument. The MABEL instrument provides a new capability for airborne altimetry measurements and serves as a prototype and ...

Matthew McGill; Thorsten Markus; V. Stanley Scott; Thomas Neumann

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Wintertime Gulf Coast Squall Line Observed by EDOP Airborne Doppler Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive wintertime squall line on 13 January 1995 occurring along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coastline is examined using airborne radar observations combined with conventional data analysis. Flight tracks with the ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) ...

G. M. Heymsfield; J. B. Halverson; I. J. Caylor

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Airborne Observations of Fetch-Limited Waves in the Gulf of Tehuantepec  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present airborne observations of fetch-limited waves during strong offshore winds in the Gulf of Tehuantepec. The measurements, collected over a wide range of fetches, include one- and two-dimensional surface wavenumber spectra and ...

Leonel Romero; W. Kendall Melville

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Derivation of Effective Aerodynamic Surface Roughness in Urban Areas from Airborne Lidar Terrain Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated technique was developed that uses only airborne lidar terrain data to derive the necessary parameters for calculation of effective aerodynamic surface roughness in urban areas. The technique provides parameters for geometric models ...

Donald E. Holland; Judith A. Berglund; Joseph P. Spruce; Rodney D. McKellip

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Resolution and Accuracy of an Airborne Scanning Laser System for Beach Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne scanning laser technology provides an effective method to systematically survey surface topography and changes in that topography with time. In this paper, the authors describe the capability of a rapid-response lidar system in which ...

J. H. Middleton; C. G. Cooke; E. T. Kearney; P. J. Mumford; M. A. Mole; G. J. Nippard; C. Rizos; K. D. Splinter; I. L. Turner

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Estimation of Cloud Physical Parameters from Airborne Solar Spectral Reflectance Measurements for Stratocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is proposed to retrieve various cloud physical parameters of water clouds from the solar-flux reflectances at four wavelengths measured by using the airborne Multi-channel Cloud Pyranometer (MCP) system. The MCP system was designed ...

Shoji Asano; Masataka Shiobara; Akihiro Uchiyama

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Detection of Ice Hydrometeor Alignment Using an Airborne W-band Polarimetric Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents airborne W-band polarimetric radar measurements at horizontal and vertical incidence on ice clouds using a 95-GHz radar on the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft. Coincident, in situ measurements from probes on ...

J. Galloway; A. Pazmany; J. Mead; R. E. McIntosh; D. Leon; J. French; R. Kelly; G. Vali

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Portable Airborne Scanning Lidar System for Ocean and Coastal Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable compact airborne scanning lidar system based on the Riegl LMS-Q240i has been developed and its functionality demonstrated for oceanographic and coastal measurements. Differential GPS (DGPS) and an inertial navigation system are ...

Benjamin D. Reineman; Luc Lenain; David Castel; W. Kendall Melville

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Airborne Measurements of the Wavenumber Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves. Part II: Directional Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne scanning lidar system acquires three-dimensional (3D) spatial topography of ocean surface waves. From the spatial data, wavenumber spectra are computed directly. The spectral properties in terms of the spectral slope and dimensionless ...

Paul A. Hwang; David W. Wang; Edward J. Walsh; William B. Krabill; Robert N. Swift

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

Jerry Myers

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mesoscale Waves as a Probe of Jupiter's Deep Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search of the Voyager images of Jupiter reveals a class of mesoscale waves occurring near the extrema of the zonal velocity profile between latitudes 30°S and 30°N. The average horizontal wavelength is 300 km, compared to an atmospheric scale ...

F. M. Flasar; P. J. Gierasch

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A New Microwave Temperature Profiler … First Measurements in Polar Regions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Temperature Profiler - First Microwave Temperature Profiler - First Measurements in Polar Regions E. N. Kadygrov, A. V. Koldaev, and A. S. Viazankin Central Aerological Observatory Moscow, Russia A. Argentini, and A. Conidi Institute of Atmospheric Physics CNR, Italy Introduction Temperature inversions are a ubiquitous feature of the high latitude atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In Polar Regions, the temperature inversion is a complicated phenomenon involving interactions between surface radiative cooling, subsidence and warm air advection. In the period 1997-2002, several microwave temperature profilers were used to measure temperature inversion parameters at one of the three sites of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

277

Comparison of temperature and humidity profiles with elastic-backscatter lidar data  

SciTech Connect

This contribution analyzes elastic-backscatter lidar data and temperature and humidity profiles from radiosondes acquired in Barcelona in July 1992. Elastic-backscatter lidar data reveal the distribution of aerosols within the volume of atmosphere scanned. By comparing this information with temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere at a similar time, we are able to asses de relationship among aerosol distribution and atmospheric stability or water content, respectively. Comparisons have shown how lidar`s revealed layers of aerosols correspond to atmospheric layers with different stability condition and water content.

Soriano, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buttler, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baldasano, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

279

User_TalentProfile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile information. Task A. Access Talent Profile Enter the web address (URL) of the user application into your browser Address field and press the Enter key. Enter your user ID in the User ID textbox. Enter your password in the Password textbox. Click Sign In. Access Talent Profile 4 Steps Task A Add Information to Talent Profile Sections 5 Steps Task B Edit Talent Profile Sections

280

Atmospheric Soundings in Near-Real Time from Combined Satellite and Ground-Based Remotely Sensed Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile profiling system has been developed that is capable of probing the atmosphere from the surface to over 30 km. The Mobile Profiling System (MPS) combines ground-based instruments, including a five-beam 924-MHz radar wind profiler, a radio ...

James Cogan; Edward Measure; Daniel Wolfe

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

282

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

283

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

284

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

285

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

286

Assimilation of Surface-Based Boundary Layer Profiler Observations during a Cool-Season Weather Event Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment. Part II: Forecast Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, atmospheric analyses obtained through assimilation of temperature, water vapor, and wind profiles from a potential network of ground-based remote sensing boundary layer profiling instruments were used to generate short-range ...

Daniel C. Hartung; Jason A. Otkin; Ralph A. Petersen; David D. Turner; Wayne F. Feltz

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Site Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and Retrieval Validation Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Moy, Leslie University of Wisconsin-Madison Lesht, Barry Argonne National Laboratory Cress, Ted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Strow, Larrabee Hannon, Scott Fetzer, Eric Jet Propulsion Laboratory The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua platform is the first of a new generation of advanced hyperspectral atmospheric sounders with the capability of retrieving temperature and trace gas profiles with high vertical resolution and absolute accuracy. In the past few years ARM has played a major role in the validation of AIRS, including the launch of

288

Precomputed atmospheric scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new and accurate method to render the atmosphere in real time from any viewpoint from ground level to outer space, while taking Rayleigh and Mie multiple scattering into account. Our method reproduces many effects of the scattering of light, ...

Eric Bruneton; Fabrice Neyret

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Confinement of airborne radioactivity. Progress report, January--December 1974  

SciTech Connect

Several commercial activated carbons, marketed for iodine removal in reactor off-gas cleanup systems, were evaluated for iodine penetration at elevated temperatures (4 hr at 180$sup 0$C), and the penetration data varied widely. Subsequent chemical analysis of the samples indicated a strong correlation between the atom ratio of iodine to potassium (I/K) in the carbon and the high-temperature performance data. Iodine penetration tests were also performed on several carbons in an intense gamma radiation field (greater than 10$sup 7$ rads/hr). Test data show that carbons intentionally exposed to high concentrations of DOP aerosol performed as well as unexposed carbons. Studies of the rate of evaporation of elemental iodine from aqueous solutions indicated that significant quantities of I$sub 2$ might be expected to become airborne within a short period of time (5 hr) after release to open ponds. Addition of sodium thiosulfate to the solution substantially reduced the evaporative loss of iodine; however, the effects of high-intensity radiation fields on iodine-thiosulfate solutions remain to be evaluated. Small HEPA filters containing filter media of the type used in the Savannah River confinement system were exposed to reactor building air and a high-intensity radiation field. Following this exposure, they were tested for flow performance under simulated accident conditions. Radiation exposure slightly impaired the performance of new filters and improved the performance of service-aged filters. Service aging effects on filter performance were far more significant than radiation effects. (auth)

Dexter, A.H.; Evans, A.G.; Jones, L.R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The effects of improved residential furnace filtration on airborne particles  

SciTech Connect

Forced air furnaces with distributed ducting systems have always had an air filter, but traditionally the filter quality was only adequate to protect the furnace fan and heat exchanger from debris. In the past several years, there has been an increasing number of more effective particulate filters that are being marketed to reduce airborne particulate or dust. These include upgraded panel filters, passive electrostatic, active electrostatic, and HEPA or near-HEPA variants. Consumers are bewildered by the lack of standardized and comprehensible performance results and need better advice on whether it would be useful for them to upgrade their current furnace filter. In order to help them make these decisions, the whole range of available furnace filters were tested in six occupied houses. The filter efficiency was determined by particulate measurement in the ducting system before and after the filter. Indoor particulates were measured in a bedroom and living room, and outdoor levels were monitored simultaneously. Testing encompassed several weeks in each house, and the results are available in the whole range of particle sizes. The project also looked at the air-cleaning effectiveness of a stand-alone air cleaner and at the ozone production of electrostatic precipitators installed in 20 houses. Test results will be helpful in specifying suitable filtration for houses.

Fugler, D.; Bowser, D.; Kwan, W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Extraction of Mangrove Biophysical Parameters Using Airborne LiDAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Tree parameter determinations using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) have been conducted in many forest types, including coniferous, boreal, and deciduous. However, there are only a few scientific articles discussing the application of LiDAR to mangrove biophysical parameter extraction at an individual tree level. The main objective of this study was to investigate the potential of using LiDAR data to estimate the biophysical parameters of mangrove trees at an individual tree scale. The Variable Window Filtering (VWF) and Inverse Watershed Segmentation (IWS) methods were investigated by comparing their performance in individual tree detection and in deriving tree position, crown diameter, and tree height using the LiDAR-derived Canopy Height Model (CHM). The results demonstrated that each method performed well in mangrove forests with a low percentage of crown overlap conditions. The VWF method yielded a slightly higher accuracy for mangrove parameter extractions from LiDAR data compared with the IWS method. This is because the VWF method uses an adaptive circular filtering window size based on an allometric relationship. As a result of the VWF method, the position

Wasinee Wannasiri; Masahiko Nagai; Kiyoshi Honda; Phisan Santitamnont; Poonsak Miphokasap

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

293

Surface-Layer Fluxes, Profiles, and Turbulence Measurements over Uniform Terrain under Near-Neutral Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric surface-layer experiment over a nearly uniform plowed field was performed to determine the constants in the flux-profile similarity formulas, particularly the von Kármán constant. New instruments were constructed to minimize flow ...

Steven P. Oncley; Carl A. Friehe; John C. Larue; Joost A. Businger; Eric C. Itsweire; Sam S. Chang

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Retrieval of Clear Sky Moisture Profiles using the 183 GHz Water Vapor Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for retrieving vertical moisture profiles from downlooking radiometric measurements of atmospheric radiation near the 183 GHz water vapor line is described. A simulation experiment utilizing this retrieval technique and temperature ...

Ramesh K. Kakar

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Wind Profiler Observations Preceding Outbreaks of Large Hail over Northeastern Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind profiler, rawinsonde, and surface observations of the atmosphere over northeastern Colorado during the morning hours on 44 days were compared to the severity of subsequent thunderstorm activity. On half of thes days, large hail (diameter ?2 ...

David H. Kitzmiller; Wayne E. Mcgovern

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Performance of a Wind-Profiling Lidar in the Region of Wind Turbine Rotor Disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the wind energy sector continues to grow, so does the need for reliable vertical wind profiles in the assessment of wind resources and turbine performance. In situ instrumentation mounted on meteorological towers can rarely probe the atmosphere ...

Matthew L. Aitken; Michael E. Rhodes; Julie K. Lundquist

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground—Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote ...

D. D. Turner; W. F. Feltz; R. A. Ferrare

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Classification of Tropical Precipitating Systems Using Wind Profiler Spectral Moments. Part I: Algorithm Description and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lower atmospheric wind profiler (LAWP) measurements made at Gadanki, India, have been used to develop an objective algorithm to classify the tropical precipitating systems. A detailed investigation on the existing classification scheme ...

T. Narayana Rao; N. V. P. Kirankumar; B. Radhakrishna; D. Narayana Rao; K. Nakamura

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Profiles of Wind Speed Variances within Nocturnal Low-Level Jets Observed with a Sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous sodar measurements of wind profiles have been carried out at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics since 2008. The station is located in a slightly inhomogeneous rural area about 45 km west of ...

Margarita A. Kallistratova; Rostislav D. Kouznetsov; Valerii F. Kramar; Dmitrii D. Kuznetsov

300

Uncertainties in Climatological Tropical Humidity Profiles: Some Implications for Estimating the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical profile of water vapor, the principal infrared-absorbing gas in the atmosphere, is an important factor in determining the energy balance of the climate system. This study examines uncertainties in calculating a climatologicai ...

Dayid S. Gutzler

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Vertical Tracer Concentration Profiles Measured during the Joint Urban 2003 Dispersion Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric tracer dispersion study known as Joint Urban 2003 was conducted in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during July of 2003. As part of this field program, vertical concentration profiles were measured at approximately 1 km from the downtown ...

Julia E. Flaherty; Brian Lamb; K. Jerry Allwine; Eugene Allwine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Doppler Profiler and Radar Observations of Boundary Layer Variability during the Landfall of Tropical Storm Gabrielle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observations of boundary layer structure were acquired on 14 September 2001, prior to and during the landfall of Tropical Storm Gabrielle. The Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) and the Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research and ...

Kevin R. Knupp; Justin Walters; Michael Biggerstaff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Uncertainty of Boundary Layer Heat Budgets Computed from Wind Profiler—RASS Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainties in the evaluation of the atmospheric heat budget, in which the turbulent heat flux divergence term is calculated as a residual, are investigated for a triangular array of 915-MHz wind profilers—radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS) ...

Markus Furger; C. David Whiteman; James M. Wilczak

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

305

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trade and Reliability; All Reports ‹ See all Electricity Reports State Electricity Profiles. ... Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010:

307

Hydrostatic Adjustment in Nonisothermal Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author examines hydrostatic adjustment due to heating in two nonisothermal atmospheres. In the first case both the temperature and lapse rate decrease with height; in the second case the atmosphere consists of a troposphere with constant ...

Dean G. Duffy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Efficient rendering of atmospheric phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rendering of atmospheric bodies involves modeling the complex interaction of light throughout the highly scattering medium of water and air particles. Scattering by these particles creates many well-known atmospheric optical phenomena including rainbows, ...

Kirk Riley; David S. Ebert; Martin Kraus; Jerry Tessendorf; Charles Hansen

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

310

Real-time modeling of complex atmospheric releases in urban areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If a nuclear installation in or near an urban area has a venting, fire, or explosion, airborne radioactivity becomes the major concern. Dispersion models are the immediate tool for estimating the dose and contamination. Responses in urban areas depend on knowledge of the amount of the release, representative meteorological data, and the ability of the dispersion model to simulate the complex flows as modified by terrain or local wind conditions. A centralized dispersion modeling system can produce realistic assessments of radiological accidents anywhere in a country within several minutes if it is computer-automated. The system requires source-term, terrain, mapping and dose-factor databases, real-time meteorological data acquisition, three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, and experienced staff. Experience with past responses in urban areas by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory illustrate the challenges for three-dimensional dispersion models.

Baskett, R.L. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Propagation of B mesons in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collisions of cosmic rays in the atmosphere may produce heavy hadrons of very high energy. The decay length of a $B$ meson of energy above $10^7$ GeV is larger than 1 km, implying that such a particle tends to interact in the air before it decays. We show that the fraction of energy deposited in these interactions is much smaller than in proton and pion collisions. We parameterize their elasticity and determine the average number of interactions and the atmospheric depth at the decay point for different initial energies. We find that the profile of a $3\\times 10^9$ GeV bottom shower may be very different from the profile of a proton shower of the same energy, defining either a very deep maximum, or two maxima, or other features that cannot be parameterized with a single Gaisser-Hillas function. Finally, we discuss under what conditions a bottom hadron inside the parent air shower may provide observable effects.

A. Bueno; A. Gascon; J. I. Illana; M. Masip

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

313

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Atmospheric Mercury Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary and analysis of research findings on utility and environmental mercury from 1997 to 2003. The update categorizes and describes recent work on mercury in utility-burned coal and its route through power plants, the measures for its control, and its fate in the environment following emissions from utility stacks. This fate includes atmospheric chemistry and transport, deposition to land and water surfaces, aquatic cycling, the dynamics of mercury in freshwater fish food webs, and th...

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) data access concept  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the conceptual design for accessing data collected under the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) program and for accessing data about that data. The purpose of the AMPS program is to provide multisensor data for data fusion research as it applies to arms control treaty verification, non-proliferation surveillance, and related programs. Secondary objectives include sensor development and technology demonstration. The program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Arms Control and Non-proliferation (DOE/AN) and is integrated into the overall DOE AN-10.1 technology development program. The AMPS program interacts with other technology programs of DOE/NN-20. The AMPS program participants include five DOE laboratories. Four will be responsible for collecting and supplying data to AMPS data researchers: (1) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); (2) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL); (3) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (4) Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has been assigned data management responsibility for the program, which is defined as the process of planning, acquiring, organizing, qualifying and disseminating data. Data ranges from single sensor readings, to high resolution images, to video. The potential volume of data to be collected under the AMPS program will require considerable management effort. The AMPS program specifies a distributed approach for the sharing and management of AMPS data. This approach shares the burden of data distribution across the DOE laboratories, which will be responsible for AMPS instruments development and implementation and the data those instruments produce. This approach will also provide the laboratories with direct control over the distribution of the data for which they are responsible.

Jou, Jiing-Yih J.; Meitzler, W.D.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Atmospheric transport in complex terrain at Los Alamos, Area G  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the atmospheric dispersion used in the Area G Performance Assessment for off-site airborne dose calculations. Potential airborne contaminants from the mesa top disposal facility disperse in the complex terrain dominated by narrow mesas in parallel to narrow canyons. The dispersion is characterized by site-specific values of X/Q [(Ci/m{sup 3})/(Ci/s)] at each of two designated receptor locations, a {open_quote}maximum off-site dose{close_quote} location and a nearby population center (White Rock, NM). The values of X/Q in each of the sixteen wind sectors are first estimated with the CAP-88 computer code using 1992 annual meteorologic data from Area G and assuming an area source for release. This data captures the dominant wind direction on the mesa tops from the SSW. These dispersion parameters are assumed to apply to open, flat terrain and must be corrected for the complex mesa and canyon terrain terrain surrounding the Area G site. Additional meteorologic data has been collected over two years from six remote temporary meteorological stations operated on the mesas and in the canyons immediately around Area G. These data indicate that the wind flow in the canyons is exclusively bimodel, flowing up canyon during the day and down canyon at night. It is conservatively assumed that all ground level releases from Area G which blow out across an adjacent canyon become entrained in the canyon flow. This effectively combines the contaminant release for several sectors into a single canyon flow which is upstream during the day or downstream at night. This canyon channeling mechanism is implemented in the model by summing the wind sector dispersion factors over those sectors appropriate to the geometry for a release from Area G toward either adjacent canyon.

Vold, E.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

Jannik, G.T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attenuation of solar radiation by the atmosphere between the heliostat and receiver of a Central Receiver solar energy system has been computed for a number of atmospheric conditions and tower-heliostat distances. The most important atmospheric variable is found to be the atmospheric aerosol content. No dependence of atmospheric water vapor is found and only a weak dependence on solar zenith angle. For a 500 m heliostat-tower distance two to four percent reductions are expected under typical desert conditions (50 to 120 km visibility). The reduction is approximately linear with heliostat-tower distance. A representative value of the attenuation coefficient is 0.051 km/sup -1/.

Randall, C.M.

1977-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Airborne-temperature-survey maps of heat-flow anomalies for exploration geology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Airborne temperature surveys were used to depict the small surface temperature differences related to heat flow anomalies. Zones with conductive heat flow differences of 45 +- 16 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/(s) had predawn surface temperature differences of 1.4 +- 0.3/sup 0/C. Airborne temperature surveys were coordinated with field temperature surveys at Long Valley, California, the site of a known geothermal resource area. The airborne temperature surveys recorded redundant, predawn temperatures at two wavelengths and at two elevations. Overall temperature corrections were determined by calibrating dry soil surface temperatures with thermistor probes. The probes measured air and soil temperatures within 2 cm of the surface, every twenty minutes, during the survey overflights.

Del Grande, N.K.

1982-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Temperature profile of the infrared image Heat exchange between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T Temperature profile of the infrared image Heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean References part at high frequencies delivers the exchange time. Cool skin of the ocean the net heat flux between gas exchange and wind speed over the ocean, J. Geophys. Res. 97, 7373-7381, 1992, Nightingale, P

Jaehne, Bernd

324

Integration and Ocean-Based Prelaunch Validation of GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager Legacy Atmospheric Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ocean-based prelaunch evaluation of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) legacy atmospheric profile (LAP) products is conducted using proxy data based upon the Spinning Enhanced ...

Hua Xie; Nicholas R. Nalli; Shanna Sampson; Walter W. Wolf; Jun Li; Timothy J. Schmit; Christopher D. Barnet; Everette Joseph; Vernon R. Morris; Fanglin Yang

325

Integration and Ocean-Based Prelaunch Validation of GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager Legacy Atmospheric Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ocean-based prelaunch evaluation of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R series Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) legacy atmospheric profile (LAP) products is conducted using proxy data based upon the Spinning Enhanced ...

Hua Xie; Nicholas R. Nalli; Shanna Sampson; Walter W. Wolf; Jun Li; Timothy J. Schmit; Christopher D. Barnet; Everette Joseph; Vernon R. Morris; Fanglin Yang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Application of a dynamic-stochastic approach to short-term forecasting of the atmospheric boundary layer.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, dynamic-stochastic model presented in this study is used for short-term forecasting of vertical profiles of air temperature and wind velocity orthogonal components in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The technique of using ...

V. S. Komarov; A. V. Lavrinenko; N. Ya. Lomakina; S. N. Il’in

327

Climatology of the Low-Level Jet at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique dataset obtained with combinations of minisodars and 915-MHz wind profilers at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Kansas was used to examine the detailed characteristics of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ). In ...

Jie Song; Ke Liao; Richard L. Coulter; Barry M. Lesht

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

STRAT: An Automated Algorithm to Retrieve the Vertical Structure of the Atmosphere from Single-Channel Lidar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today several lidar networks around the world provide large datasets that are extremely valuable for aerosol and cloud research. Retrieval of atmospheric constituent properties from lidar profiles requires detailed analysis of spatial and ...

Y. Morille; M. Haeffelin; P. Drobinski; J. Pelon

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

PNNL: FCSD: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change: Programs &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs & Facilities Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and ARM Climate Research Facility ARM Aerial Facility Environmental...

330

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg{sub evap} to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg[sub evap] to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The DeTect Inc. RAPTOR VAD-BL Radar Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DeTect Inc. RAPTOR VAD-BL (Velocity-Azimuth Display Boundary Layer) radar wind profiler is a pulsed Doppler radar used to make automatic unattended measurements of wind profiles in the lower atmosphere. All data products are produced on site, ...

Elías Lau; Scott McLaughlin; Frank Pratte; Bob Weber; David Merritt; Maikel Wise; Gary Zimmerman; Matthew James; Megan Sloan

333

The DeTect Inc. RAPTOR VAD-BL Radar Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DeTect Inc. RAPTOR velocity–azimuth display boundary layer (VAD-BL) radar wind profiler is a pulsed Doppler radar used to make automatic unattended measurements of wind profiles in the lower atmosphere. All data products are produced on site, ...

Elías Lau; Scott McLaughlin; Frank Pratte; Bob Weber; David Merritt; Maikel Wise; Gary Zimmerman; Matthew James; Megan Sloan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Texas Crop Profile: Onions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This profile of onion production in Texas gives an overview of basic commodity information; discusses insect, disease and weed pests; and covers cultural and chemical control methods.

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

ARM - Field Campaign - ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology 2008.07.08 - 2008.07.18 Lead Scientist : Michael Howard For data sets, see below. Description Goals of assist were to intercompare radiance spectra and profile retrievals from a new AERI-like instrument, called "ASSIST" with the SGP site AERI(s) and calculations from Radiosondes measurements. * To bring the ASSIST instrument to the SGP ACRF and perform simultaneous measurements of the sky radiation with those from the AERI. * On relatively cloud-free days, release a special radiosonde at the

336

A Moored Profiling Instrument*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specifications and performance of a moored vertical profiling instrument, designed to acquire near-full-ocean-depth profile time series data at high vertical resolution, are described. The 0.8-m-diameter by 0.4-m-wide device utilizes a ...

K. W. Doherty; D. E. Frye; S. P. Liberatore; J. M. Toole

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

338

ARM - Field Campaign - NASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsNASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test Campaign govCampaignsNASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : NASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test Campaign 2009.07.27 - 2009.08.07 Lead Scientist : Edward Browell For data sets, see below. Description This airborne field test campaign was designed to obtain a coordinated set of remote CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) measurements using the NASA Langley/ITT 1.57-micron Continuous-Wave (CW) LAS operating from the NASA Langley UC-12 aircraft; the NASA Goddard 1.57-micron pulsed LAS operating from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft; and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 2.0-micron CW-coherent LAS operating from a contracted Twin Otter aircraft. These remote LAS CO2 column measurements were compared with

339

Analysis of Airborne Doppler Lidar Measurements of the Extended California Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of airborne Doppler lidar data taken by NASA near the top of the planetary boundary layer in the central valley of California is presented. These data include downward wan angles that intercept the ground. The maximum errors in the ...

John J. Carroll

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Airborne Particulate Matter in HVAC Systems and its Influence on Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews the mechanisms governing movement of PMs in HVAC systems. Then, the basic equations governing PM deposition in ducts are introduced and investigations on airborne PMs distribution in HVAC systems are reviewed. The influence of PMs on indoor air quality and effectiveness of corresponding controlling measures is discussed extensively in the paper. Finally, recommendations for further research are given.

Fu, Z.; Li, N.; Wang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Improved Airborne Hot-Wire Measurements of Ice Water Content in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of ice water content (IWC) in both ice and mixed phase clouds remain one of the long standing problems in experimental cloud physics. For nearly three decades, IWC has been measured with the help of the Nevzorov hot-wire ...

A. Korolev; J. W. Strapp; G. A. Isaac; E. Emery

342

Artificial neural networks to predict corn yield from Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the light of recent advances in spectral imaging technology, highly flexible modeling methods must be developed to estimate various soil and crop parameters for precision farming from airborne hyperspectral imagery. The potential of artificial neural ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, CASI, Corn, Crop yield, Hyperspectral remote sensing, Precision agriculture

Y. Uno; S. O. Prasher; R. Lacroix; P. K. Goel; Y. Karimi; A. Viau; R. M. Patel

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Estimation and Mapping of Hurricane Turbulent Energy Using Airborne Doppler Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) was computed using airborne Doppler measurements from the NOAA WP-3D tail radars, and TKE data were retrieved for a variety of storms at different stages of their life cycle. The geometry of the radar ...

Sylvie Lorsolo; Jun A. Zhang; Frank Marks Jr.; John Gamache

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Open Access Development of a Methodology to Estimate Biomass from Tree Height Using Airborne Digital Image  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2012 J. Jenitha Ferdinent and Raj Chandar Padmanaban. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Globally biomass is becoming imperative for function such as climate change, combined heat and power generation. The biomass energy is gaining significance as a source of clean heat for domestic heating and community heating applications. Regarding climatic change and global warming, the biomass is being estimated in various ways. By including three dimensions (i.e.) height of a tree or stand height of trees in forest will greatly help in estimation biomass more accurately. Traditionally close range Photogrammetry is used to determine volume and biomass of the tree. However, this method of volume/height of a tree is not feasible in large scale applications and time consuming. Globally researchers are working to estimate this by using either airborne/space borne data. In this project, a methodology to measure tree height in case of single tree or stand height (mean tree height) of an area is developed using airborne digital camera. The height of the tree was first estimated from the airborne digital camera image data. The image taken from Airborne UltraCamD has been used. This image is 23cm X 15cm image size and 20cm resolution. Aerial

J. Jenitha Ferdinent; Raj Ch; Ar Padmanaban

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Measurement of Condensed Water Content in Liquid and Ice Clouds Using an Airborne Counterflow Virtual Impactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensed water content (CWC) measured using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) with a Lyman-? hygrometer downstream is compared with that measured by other airborne instruments (a hot-wire probe, a PMS FSSP, and a PMS 2D-C). Results indicate ...

Cynthia H. Twohy; Allen J. Schanot; William A. Cooper

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Application of Airborne Field Mill Data for Use in Launch Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne field mill (ABFM) system was implemented on a Learjet 36A and was used to collect electric-field and microphysical data for summertime convective clouds new Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center. This system is described and the ...

Ray Harris-Hobbs; Kathy Giori; Michael Bellmore; Arleen Lunsford

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Wind Tunnel Tests of the Airborne PVM-100A Response to Large Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gerber Scientific, Inc. Particle Volume Monitor (PVM) is widely used to measure the liquid water content (LWC) and droplet effective radius (reff) of water clouds. The LWC response of the airborne version of this instrument, the PVM-100A, was ...

M. Wendisch; T. J. Garrett; J. W. Strapp

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Measurement of airborne radioactivity from the Fukushima reactor accident in Tokushima, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The airborne radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was measured in Tokushima, western Japan. The continuous monitoring has been carried out in Tokushima. From March 23, 2011 the fission product $^{131}$I was observed. The radioisotopes $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs were also observed in the beginning of April. However the densities were extremely smaller than the Japanese regulation of radioisotopes.

Fushimi, K; Sakama, M; Sakaguchi, Y

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Measurement of airborne radioactivity from the Fukushima reactor accident in Tokushima, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The airborne radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plan t was measured in Tokushima, western Japan. The continuous monitoring has been carried out in Tokushima. From March 23, 2011 the fission product $^{131}$I was observed. The radioisotopes $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs were also observed in the beginning of April. However the densities were extremely smaller than the Japanese regulation of radioisotopes.

K. Fushimi; S. Nakayama; M. Sakama; Y. Sakaguchi

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Airborne Measurements of Air Mass from O2 A-Band Absorption Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne experiments to assess the feasibility of remote sensing surface pressure from a space platform are described. The data are high-resolution spectra in the O2 A band (759–771 nm) of sunlight reflected from the sea surface, measured by a ...

D. M. O’Brien; R. M. Mitchell; S. A. English; G. A. Da Costa

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Airborne lidar surveys are an at-tractive alternative to the methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to changing from a visual- based aerial survey (wide swath, shallow penetration) to a lidar-based Modeling264 Airborne lidar surveys are an at- tractive alternative to the methods presentlyusedinfishery-independent surveys of epipelagic fishes (Hunter and Churnside1). They would cost much less per survey mile than ship

352

Three-Dimensional Mapping of Fluorescent Dye Using a Scanning, Depth-Resolving Airborne Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a pilot study using a fluorescent dye tracer imaged by airborne lidar in the ocean surface layer on spatial scales of meters to kilometers and temporal scales of minutes to hours. The lidar used here employs a scanning, ...

M. A. Sundermeyer; E. A. Terray; J. R. Ledwell; A. G. Cunningham; P. E. LaRocque; J. Banic; W. J. Lillycrop

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sediment facies classification of a sandy shoreline by means of airborne imaging spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne imaging spectroscopy data (AISA Eagle and HyMap) were applied to classify the sediments of a sandy beach in seven sand type classes. On the AISA-Eagle data, several classification strategies were tried out and compared with each other. The best ...

B. Deronde; P. Kempeneers; R. Houhuys; J. -P. Henriet; V. Van Lancker

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH On the parameterization of ice and water substance mixing ratio fields were only strongly altered by turning off the ice phase of these schemes includes ice processes. But in mid- latitudes and also in tropics the ice phase is an important

Moelders, Nicole

355

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14 C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14 C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Atmospheric Corrosion Test Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 27   Some marine-atmospheric corrosion test sites around the world...Zealand Phia Marine 0.2 0.12 15.8 2.4 � � � � Greece Rafina Marine 0.2 0.12 13.6 1.0 � � � � Rhodes Marine 0.2 0.12 14.3 1.5 � � � � Netherlands Schagen Marine 2.4 1.5 17.0 2.0 � � � � Spain Almeria � 0.035 0.022 22.4 1.6 � � � � Cartagena � 0.050 0.031 5.2 1.9 � � � � La Coruña � 0.160 0.1 26.2 1.4...

357

Assimilating AIRS Temperature and Mixing Ratio Profiles Using an Ensemble Kalman Filter Approach for Convective-Scale Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One satellite data product that has received great interest in the numerical weather prediction community is the temperature and mixing ratio profiles derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on board the Aqua satellite. ...

Thomas A. Jones; David J. Stensrud

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Dynamic Assimilation of MODIS-Retrieved Humidity Profiles within a Regional Model for High-Latitude Forecast Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A “hot start” technique is applied to the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) to dynamically assimilate cloud properties and humidity profiles retrieved from the ...

Xingang Fan; Jeffrey S. Tilley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Impact of an Exponential Profile of Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity within the ISBA LSM: Simulations over the Rhône Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on the influence of an exponential profile of saturated hydraulic conductivity, ksat, with soil depth on the water budget simulated by the Interaction Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model over the French Rhône ...

B. Decharme; H. Douville; A. Boone; F. Habets; J. Noilhan

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An Alternative Mass Flux Profile in the Kain–Fritsch Convective Parameterization and Its Effects in Seasonal Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have altered the vertical profile of updraft mass flux detrainment in an implementation of the Kain–Fritsch2 (KF2) convective parameterization within the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric ...

Christopher J. Anderson; Raymond W. Arritt; John S. Kain

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Vertical Profile of Radar Reflectivity of Convective Cells: A Strong Indicator of Storm Intensity and Lightning Probability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflectivity data from Doppler radars are used to construct vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) of convective cells in mesoscale convective systems (MCSS) in three different environmental regimes. The National Center for Atmospheric ...

Edward J. Zipser; Kurt R. Lutz

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Classification of Tropical Precipitating Systems Using Wind Profiler Spectral Moments. Part II: Statistical Characteristics of Rainfall Systems and Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated precipitation algorithm to classify tropical precipitating systems has been described in a companion paper (Part I). In this paper, the algorithm has been applied to 18 months of lower atmospheric wind profiler measurements to study ...

T. Narayana Rao; N. V. P. Kirankumar; B. Radhakrishna; D. Narayana Rao; K. Nakamura

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ozone Profile Retrieval from an Advanced Infrared Sounder: Experiments with Tropopause-Based Climatology and Optimal Estimation Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by a significant potential for retrieving atmospheric ozone profile information from advanced satellite infrared sounders, this study investigates various methods to optimize ozone retrievals. A set of retrieval experiments has been ...

Jennifer C. Wei; Laura L. Pan; Eric Maddy; Jasna V. Pittman; Murty Divarkarla; Xiaozhen Xiong; Chris Barnet

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Multipeak Raindrop Size Distribution Observed by UHF/VHF Wind Profilers during the Passage of a Mesoscale Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indian Mesosphere–Stratosphere–Troposphere radar (IMSTR), Lower Atmospheric Wind Profiler (LAWP), and Joss–Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer measurements during the passage of two distinctly different (in terms of total rain and rainfall rate) ...

B. Radhakrishna; T. Narayana Rao

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

366

profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

profiles profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

367

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

368

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

369

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

370

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

371

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

372

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

373

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

374

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

375

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

376

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

377

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

378

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

379

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

380

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

382

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

383

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

384

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

385

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

386

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

387

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

388

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

389

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

390

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

391

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

392

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

393

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

394

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

395

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

396

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

397

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

398

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

399

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

400

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

402

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

403

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

404

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

405

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

406

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

407

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

408

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

409

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

410

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

411

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

412

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

413

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

414

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

415

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

416

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

417

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

418

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

419

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

420

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

422

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

423

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

424

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

425

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

426

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

427

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

428

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

429

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

430

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

431

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

432

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

433

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

434

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

435

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

436

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

437

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

438

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

439

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

440

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

442

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

443

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

444

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

445

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

446

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

447

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

448

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

449

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

450

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

451

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

452

Adaptive web usage profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web usage models and profiles capture significant interests and trends from past accesses. They are used to improve user experience, say through recommendation of pages, pre-fetching of pages, etc. While browsing behavior changes dynamically over time, ...

Bhushan Shankar Suryavanshi; Nematollaah Shiri; Sudhir P. Mudur

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Vertically Rising Microstructure Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertically rising microstructure profiler was designed to measure temperature gradient and conductivity gradient microstructure in lakes, reservoirs and coastal seas. The instrument is totally independent of surface craft while collecting ...

G. D. Carter; J. Imberger

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Performance profiles style sheet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

investment throughout most of this period compared with the 1990s. Title: Performance profiles style sheet Author: Greg Filas Created Date: 12/23/2010 7:12:57 PM ...

455

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

456

Fermilab | Women's History Month - Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Profiles The profiles on this page present a cross section of women from the Fermilab community. Fermilab hopes that profiles of these women will inspire young women everywhere to...

457

ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm-cryo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Cryogenic Chilled Mirror Hygrometer (CM-CRYO) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Profiling, Airborne...

458

ARM - Campaign Instrument - tethersonde-cm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Tethersonde With Chilled Mirror (TETHERSONDE-CM) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Profiling, Airborne...

459

Demonstration Measurements of Water Vapor, Cirrus Clouds, and Carbon Dioxide Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profile measurements of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus clouds, and carbon dioxide using the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic lidar (RASL) during ground-based, upward-looking tests are presented here. These measurements improve upon any previously ...

David N. Whiteman; Kurt Rush; Igor Veselovskii; Martin Cadirola; Joseph Comer; John R. Potter; Rebecca Tola

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA What does airborne particulate matter look like? How do we develop quantitative descriptors for particles of complex morphology? These challenges were highlighted in the NIST workshop report "Aerosol Metrology Needs for Climate Science" (Dec, 2011). Sure, we can capture aerosol particles on surfaces - removing them from their airborne state - and probe them with high resolution optical and chemical imaging tools, but what information do we lose about the airborne particles? How can we follow dynamics? In this talk we will explore these very basic questions and their importance to combustion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric profiling airborne" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Low-Wavenumber Structure and Evolution of the Hurricane Inner Core Observed by Airborne Dual-Doppler Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The asymmetric dynamics of the hurricane inner-core region is examined through a novel analysis of high temporal resolution, three-dimensional wind fields derived from airborne dual-Doppler radar. Seven consecutive composites of Hurricane Olivia’...

Paul D. Reasor; Michael T. Montgomery; Frank D. Marks Jr.; John F. Gamache

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Aerosol Size Spectra in a Convective Marine Layer with Stratus: Results of Airborne Measurements near San Nicolas Island, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of the aerosol size spectra n (r) (r is radius) were made in a vertical plane extending northeastward 18 km from San Nicolas Island, California. Thin, patchy, stratus clouds were present in a deepening convective marine ...

V. Ray Noonkester

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A Dual-Pulse Repetition Frequency Scheme for Mitigating Velocity Ambiguities of the NOAA P-3 Airborne Doppler Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To mitigate some of the deleterious effects of the relatively small unambiguous Doppler velocity range (Nyquist interval) of airborne X-band Doppler radars, a technique has been developed to extend this interval. This technique, termed the batch-...

David P. Jorgensen; Tom R. Shepherd; Alan S. Goldstein

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Application of Clouds Occurrence Climatology from CALIOP to Evaluate Performances of Airborne and Satellite Electro-Optical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide variety of optronic sensors, onboard satellite or airborne platform, are used for remote sensing, surveillance applications or telecommunications. Cloud presence in the field of view is one of the key factors limiting the performances of ...

A. Bizard; K. Caillault; C. Lavigne; A. Roblin; P. Chervet

465

Initialization of a Cloud-Resolving Model with Airborne Doppler Radar Observations of an Oceanic Tropical Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler radar–derived fields of wind and reflectivity, retrieved temperature perturbations, estimated water vapor, and cloud water contents are used to initialize a nonhydrostatic cloud-resolving model. Airborne Doppler data collected in a ...

Soline Bielli; Frank Roux

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Retrieval of Cirrus Microphysical Properties with a Suite of Algorithms for Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar, Radar, and Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms are developed to convert data streams from multiple airborne and spaceborne remote sensors into layer-averaged cirrus bulk microphysical properties. Radiometers such as the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observe ...

Yuying Zhang; Gerald G. Mace

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Experiments of Hurricane Initialization with Airborne Doppler Radar Data for the Advanced Research Hurricane WRF (AHW) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initialization of the hurricane vortex in weather prediction models is vital to intensity forecasts out to at least 48 h. Airborne Doppler radar (ADR) data have sufficiently high horizontal and vertical resolution to resolve the hurricane vortex ...

Qingnong Xiao; Xiaoyan Zhang; Christopher Davis; John Tuttle; Greg Holland; Patrick J. Fitzpatrick

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Airborne Measurements of the Wavenumber Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves. Part I: Spectral Slope and Dimensionless Spectral Coefficient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne scanning lidar system acquires 3D spatial topography of ocean surface waves. From the spatial data, wavenumber spectra are computed directly. The spectral analyses of two distinctively different wave fields are presented. The first ...

Paul A. Hwang; David W. Wang; Edward J. Walsh; William B. Krabill; Robert N. Swift

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Assimilating Airborne Doppler Radar Observations with an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Convection-Permitting Hurricane Initialization and Prediction: Katrina (2005)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF)-based ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation system, the impact of assimilating airborne radar observations for the convection-permitting analysis and prediction of Hurricane Katrina (...

Yonghui Weng; Fuqing Zhang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahlers, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Almela, A.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Nicolas /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

2001 Exhibition: Event Profile - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2001 Exhibition: Event Profile ... Event Profile ... in transportation and other growing markets require the material to be designed for load bearing applications.

472

Mountain Forces and the Atmospheric Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although mountains are generally thought to exert forces on the atmosphere, the related transfers of energy between earth and atmosphere are not represented in standard energy equations of the atmosphere. It is shown that the axial rotation of the ...

Joseph Egger

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect

The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

474

Baiu rainband termination in atmospheric and atmosphere-ocean models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baiu rainband is a summer rainband stretching from eastern China through Japan towards the Northwest Pacific. The climatological termination of the Baiu rainband is investigated using Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis (JRA25), a stand-alone atmospheric ...

Akira Kuwano-Yoshida; Bunmei Taguchi; Shang-Ping Xie

475

Fluorescence emission induced by extensive air showers in dependence on atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged particles of extensive air showers (EAS), mainly electrons and positrons, initiate the emission of fluorescence light in the Earth's atmosphere. This light provides a calorimetric measurement of the energy of cosmic rays. For reconstructing the primary energy from an observed light track of an EAS, the fluorescence yield in air has to be known in dependence on atmospheric conditions, like air temperature, pressure, and humidity. Several experiments on fluorescence emission have published various sets of data covering different parts of the dependence of the fluorescence yield on atmospheric conditions. Using a compilation of published measurements, a calculation of the fluorescence yield in dependence on altitude is presented. The fluorescence calculation is applied to simulated air showers and different atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence of the atmospheric conditions on the reconstructed shower parameters.

Keilhauer, Bianca

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O' Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Krypton-85 in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement results are presented on 85Kr content in the atmosphere over the European part of Russia in 1971-1995 based on the analysis of the commercial krypton, which is separated from air by industrial plants. Our results are by 15 per cent lower then 85Kr activites observed over West Europe. According our prediction by 2030 85Kr content in the atmosphere over Europe will amount to 1,5-3 Bq in m3 air. Average 85Kr release to the atmosphere from regeneration of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is estimated, some 180 TBq per a ton SNF. It is advisable to recommence monitoring of 85Kr content within Russia.

A. T. Korsakov; E. G. Tertyshnik

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

478

Krypton-85 in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement results are presented on 85Kr content in the atmosphere over the European part of Russia in 1971-1995 based on the analysis of the commercial krypton, which is separated from air by industrial plants. Our results are by 15 per cent lower then 85Kr activites observed over West Europe. According our prediction by 2030 85Kr content in the atmosphere over Europe will amount to 1,5-3 Bq in m3 air. Average 85Kr release to the atmosphere from regeneration of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is estimated, some 180 TBq per a ton SNF. It is advisable to recommence monitoring of 85Kr content within Russia.

Korsakov, A T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Glossary Term - Composition of the Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Earth's Atmosphere Source: Definition of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere (1976) CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th Edition Gas Formula Abundance percent by volume...

480

A Computational Thermodynamic Analysis of Atmospheric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2001 ... The vacuum atmosphere is typically 0.1 atm. However, the vacuum atmosphere creates two major problems: air leakage and batch operation to ...

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481

INSIGHTS FROM LABORATORY AND AIRBORNE BRDF MEASUREMENTS FOR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Aerosols and Surface Optical Properties from Airborne Spectral Measurements of Directional Reflectance C.K.Gatebe 1,2 & M.D. King, 2,3 Collaborators: O. Dubovik, 4 A.Sinyuk, 2,5 P. Russell, 6 J. Redemann 6 Acknowledgements: G.T. Arnold (SSAI & GSFC) Gala Wind (SSAI & GSFC) Rajesh Poudyal (SSAI & GSFC) Hal Maring & Andy Roberts (NASA HQ) 1 University of Maryland, Baltimore County 2 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 3 University of Colorado 4 Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique 5 Science Systems and Applications Inc. 6 NASA Ames Research Center Background: CAR Airborne Platforms 1998-2008 NASA P-3B Convair CV-580 Aerocommander 690A Jetstream-31 AATS SSFR/BBR SSFR CAR The NASA P-3B 2008 BBR CAR Time CAR Quicklook Image 2008 http://car.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ BRDF Measurements

482

"Airborne Wind Energy - Harnessing a Vast, Untapped Renewable Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 14, 2012, 4:15pm November 14, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "Airborne Wind Energy - Harnessing a Vast, Untapped Renewable Energy Source" Dr. Kenneth Jensen Makani Power Inc. At just 500 m above the ground, the average power density of the wind is double that at 100 m where wind turbines typically reside. This makes high-altitude wind one of the most concentrated forms of renewable energy after hydro-power. Building conventional wind turbines at this height is uneconomical, which begs the question: how do we harness this concentrated and completely untapped resource? Makani Power is developing a novel airborne wind turbine (AWT), which consists of a turbine-carrying aircraft that is tethered to the ground. Propelled by the wind, the AWT travels in a circular path (similar to the

483

Correlation between predicted and observed levels of airborne tritium at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory site boundary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, a computer code based on the Gaussian plume model is used to estimate radiation doses from routine or accidental release of airborne radioactive material. Routine releases of tritium have been used as a test of the overall uncertainty associated with these estimates. The ration of concentration to release rate at distances from the two principal release points to each of six site boundary sampling locations has been calcuated using local meteorological data. The concentration of airborne tritiated water vapor is continuously measured at the six sampling stations as part of the Laboratory's environmental monitoring program. Comparison of predicted with observed annual tritiated water concentrations in 1978 showed an average ratio of 2.6 with a range of from 0.97 to 5.8.

Lindeken, C.L.; Silver, W.J.; Toy, A.J.; White, J.H.

1980-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

484

Apparatus for real-time airborne particulate radionuclide collection and analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus for collecting and analyzing an airborne particulate radionuclide having a filter mounted in a housing, the housing having an air inlet upstream of the filter and an air outlet downstream of the filter, wherein an air stream flows therethrough. The air inlet receives the air stream, the filter collects the airborne particulate radionuclide and permits a filtered air stream to pass through the air outlet. The improvement which permits real time counting is a gamma detecting germanium diode mounted downstream of the filter in the filtered air stream. The gamma detecting germanium diode is spaced apart from a downstream side of the filter a minimum distance for a substantially maximum counting detection while permitting substantially free air flow through the filter and uniform particulate radionuclide deposition on the filter.

Smart, John E. (West Richland, WA); Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

A Progressive Morphological Filter for Removing Nonground Measurements from Airborne LIDAR Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology allow rapid and inexpensive measurements of topography over large areas. This technology is becoming a primary method for generating high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) that are essential to numerous applications such as flood modeling and landslide prediction. Airborne LIDAR systems usually return a three-dimensional cloud of point measurements from reflective objects scanned by the laser beneath the flight path. In order to generate a DTM, measurements from nonground features such as buildings, vehicles, and vegetation have to be classified and removed. In this paper, a progressive morphological filter was developed to detect nongroundLIDARmeasurements.By gradually increasingthe window size of the filter andusing elevation difference thresholds, themeasurements of vehicles, vegetation, and buildings are removed, while ground data are preserved. Datasets from mountainous and flat urbanized areas were selected to test the progressive morphological filter. The results show that the filter can remove most of the nonground points effectively.

Keqi Zhang; Shu-ching Chen; Dean Whitman; Mei-ling Shyu; Jianhua Yan; Chengcui Zhang; Student Member

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

The Workshop in Atmospheric Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A workshop on the subject of atmospheric predictability was held during 23-25 April 2001 at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. Of primary concern was the nature of forecast uncertainty due to initial conditionuncertainty of ...

Ronald M. Errico; Rolf Langland; David P. Baumhefner

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

488

Precursors to atmospheric blocking events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric blocking events disturb synoptic-scale features from their normal eastward progression, causing anomalous weather conditions for the duration of the blocking event. The essence of blocking can be captured by ...

Marino, Garrett P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Automated Measurements of Atmospheric Visibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using a solid-state, linear-array imaging device coupled with computerized scene analysis and display to measure daytime atmospheric visibility is described. Computer software is implemented for routine conversion of observed ...

W. Viezee; W. E. Evans

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Navy's Operational Atmospheric Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January of 1988, significant upgrades were made to the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS). Among these improvements was the implementation of a multivariate optimum interpolation analysis scheme. Since that time, ...

James S. Goerss; Patricia A. Phoebus

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Stochastic Simulation of Atmospheric Trajectories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are presented for generating an ensemble of synthetic atmospheric trajectories. These include methods for a set of independent trajectories, and methods for a correlated set of sequential trajectories. The models incorporate first-order ...

Mitchell J. Small; Perry J. Samson

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Atmospheric Water Vapor over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinese radiosonde data from 1970 to 1990 are relatively homogeneous in time and are used to examine the climatology, trends, and variability of China’s atmospheric water vapor content. The climatological distribution of precipitable water (PW) ...

Panmao Zhai; Robert E. Eskridge

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Assessment of atmospherically-released radionuclides using the computerized radiological risk investigation system  

SciTech Connect

For radionuclides, the standards are in terms of an annual dose, and the regulations require assurance that no member of the general public receives a dose in excess of that standard. Thus, spatial variations in the population around an emission source must be considered. Furthermore, for most chemical pollutants the standards are written in terms of an air concentration while for radionuclides other pathways of exposure, e.g., uptake of the airborne emissions by terrestrial food chains must also be considered. The remainder of this paper discusses the computer codes that make up the CRRIS and how they are used to perform an assessment of the health impacts on man of radionuclides released to the atmosphere.

Nelson, C.B.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Miller, C.W.; Baes, C.F. III

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Modeling Plot-Level Biomass and Volume Using Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Forest Service (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program provides a diverse selection of data used to assess the status of the nation’s forested areas using sample locations dispersed throughout the country. Airborne, and more recently, terrestrial lidar (light detection and ranging) systems are capable of producing accurate measurements of individual tree dimensions and also possess the ability to characterize three-dimensional vertical forest structure. This study investigates the potential of airborne and terrestrial scanning lidar systems for modeling forest volume and aboveground biomass on FIA subplots in the Malheur National Forest, eastern Oregon. A methodology for the creation of five airborne lidar metric sets (four point cloud-based and one individual tree based) and four terrestrial lidar metric sets (three height-based and one distance-based) is presented. Metrics were compared to estimates of subplot aboveground biomass and gross volume derived from FIA data using national and regional allometric equations respectively. Simple linear regression models from the airborne lidar data accounted for 15 percent of the variability in subplot biomass and 14 percent of the variability in subplot volume, while multiple linear regression models increased these amounts to 29 percent and 25 percent, respectively. When subplot estimates of biophysical parameters were scaled to the plot-level and compared with plot-level lidar metrics, simple linear regression models were able to account for 60 percent of the variability in biomass and 71 percent of the variation in volume. Terrestrial lidar metrics produced moderate results with simple linear regression models accounting for 41 percent of the variability in biomass and 46 percent of the variability in volume, with multiple linear regression models accounting for 71 percent and 84 percent, respectively. Results show that: (1) larger plot sizes help to mitigate errors and produce better models; and (2) a combination of height-based and distance-based terrestrial lidar metrics has the potential to estimate biomass and volume on FIA subplots.

Sheridan, Ryan D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

A long-term study of radon and airborne particulates at phosphogypsum stacks in central Florida  

SciTech Connect

The EPA is presently assessing the significance of radioactive emissions from phosphogypsum stacks to determine if they should be regulated under the Clean Air Act. As part of this assessment, a one-year study was conducted to measure the airborne radionuclide emissions from five phosphogypsum stacks in central Florida. This report provides a detailed description of this study. Measurements were conducted over a 12-month period on four active and one inactive phosphogypsum stacks. The study included the following measurements: 1260 radon-222 flux, 90 ambient radon-222, and 50 gamma-ray exposure rates. Also, radionuclide analyses were performed on 33 airborne particulate samples, 9 airborne particle-size samples, and 50 phosphogypsum samples. The annual average radon flux determined for the dry-loose material on top of active phosphogypsum stacks was 20 pCi/mS-s, and is regarded as representative of stacks in the central Florida region. The annual average flux on the top surface of the inactive stack was 4 to 5 times smaller, due to a surface crust. The data suggest that to obtain a representative annual average radon flux on a phosphogypsum stack the total number of measurements made is more important than the period of time over which the measurements are made. 11 ref., 16 figs., 24 tabs.

Horton, T.R.; Blanchard, R.L.; Windham, S.T.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

Jerry Myers

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

497

AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION  

SciTech Connect

Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

Jerry Myers

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

498

Mars atmospheric CO[subscript 2] condensation above the north and south poles as revealed by radio occultation, climate sounder, and laser ranging observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We study the condensation of CO[subscript 2] in Mars' atmosphere using temperature profiles retrieved from radio occultation measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) as well as the climate sounding instrument onboard ...

Hu, Renyu

499

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

500

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 vii Major Findings This edition of Performance Profiles reviews financial and operating data for the calendar year 2009 and discusses important trends and emerging issues relevant to U.S. energy company operations. Major U.S.-based oil and natural gas producers and petroleum refiners submit the data in this report annually on Form EIA-28, the Financial Reporting System (FRS). FRS companies' net income declined to the lowest level since 2002.  Net income fell 66 percent (in constant 2009 dollars) to $30 billion in 2009 from $88 billion in 2008. Substantial reductions in oil and natural gas prices in 2009 slowed revenue growth. FRS companies cut operating costs but by less than the decline in revenue, resulting in a 69-percent drop in operating income.