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1

Methane (CH4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane (CH4) Gateway Pages to Methane Data Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica 800,000-year Ice-Core Records of...

2

800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores 800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) This page introduces ice-core records of methane (CH4) extending back 800,000 years at Dome C, Antarctica and over 400,000 years at the Vostok site. Links are also provided to shorter records from other Antarctic locations. The 2000-year record from Law Dome, Antarctica, has been merged with modern records to create a long-term record to the present. These records are maintained by the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and have graciously been made freely available for access and distribution. The original investigators made the effort to obtain the data and assure their quality. To assure proper credit is given, please follow the citation instructions

3

Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CH4) » Ice Cores (CH4) » Ice Cores Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric methane (CH4) over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing currently active stations. Records in recent decades (time period depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote locations, which represent global atmospheric conditions rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year record ending with the most recent data. A spline function has

4

CH4 sources estimated from atmospheric observations of CH4 and its C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios: 2. Inverse modeling of CH4 fluxes from geographical regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmosphere, and CH 4 from fossil fuels such as coal andTermites Biomass burning Fossil Fuels Coal Natural gas andbiomass burning and fossil fuel source processes to the a

Mikaloff Fletcher, S.E.; Tans, P P; Bruhwiler, L M; Miller, J B; Heimann, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Atmospheric CH4 Concentrations from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CH4 Concentrations from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network image Alert, NWT, Canada Cape Ferguson, Australia Cape Grim, Australia Estevan Point, BC, Canada Macquarie...

6

CH4 sources estimated from atmospheric observations of CH4 and its C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios: 1. Inverse modeling of source processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of methane from combustion and biomass burning, J. Geophys.biomass leading to differing isotopic signatures in emissions from combustion

Mikaloff Fletcher, S.E.; Tans, P P; Bruhwiler, L M; Miller, J B; Heimann, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Atmospheric Methane at Cape Meares, Oregon, U.S.A.: A High-Resolution Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Methane » Atmospheric Trace Gases » Methane » Atmospheric Methane, Cape Meares Atmospheric Methane at Cape Meares, Oregon, U.S.A.: A High-Resolution Data Base for the Period 1979-1992 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1007 data Data (DB1007) Investigators M. A. K. Khalil and R. A. Rasmussen Description This data base presents continuous automated atmospheric methane (CH4) measurements taken at the atmospheric monitoring facility in Cape Meares, Oregon, by the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology. The Cape Meares data represent some 119,000 individual atmospheric methane measurements carried out during 1979-1992. Analysis of ambient air (collected 12 to 72 times daily) was carried out by means of an automated sampling and measurement system, using the method of gas chromatography and

8

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Title Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Volume 117 Issue D11 Keywords atmospheric transport, emission inventory, greenhouse gas, inverse model, methane Abstract We estimate seasonal variations in methane (CH4) emissions from central California from December 2007 through November 2008 by comparing CH4 mixing ratios measured at a tall tower with transport model predictions based on a global 1° a priori CH4emissions map (EDGAR32) and a 10 km seasonally varying California-specific map, calibrated to statewide by CH4emission totals. Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport models. Uncertainties due to wind velocity and boundary layer mixing depth are evaluated using measurements from radar wind profilers. CH4signals calculated using the EDGAR32 emission model are larger than those based on the California-specific model and in better agreement with measurements. However, Bayesian inverse analyses using the California-specific and EDGAR32 maps yield comparable annually averaged posterior CH4emissions totaling 1.55 ± 0.24 times and 1.84 ± 0.27 times larger than the California-specific prior emissions, respectively, for a region of central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. If these results are applicable across California, state total CH4 emissions would account for approximately 9% of state total greenhouse gas emissions. Spatial resolution of emissions within the region near the tower reveal seasonality expected from several biogenic sources, but correlations in the posterior errors on emissions from both prior models indicate that the tower footprints do not resolve spatial structure of emissions. This suggests that including additional towers in a measurement network will improve the regional specificity of the posterior estimates.

9

SoilAtmosphere Exchange of Nitrous Oxide, Nitric Oxide, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Logged and Undisturbed Forest in the Tapajos National Forest, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective logging is an extensive land use in the Brazilian Amazon region. The soilatmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2) are studied on two soil types (clay Oxisol and sandy loam ...

Michael Keller; Ruth Varner; Jadson D. Dias; Hudson Silva; Patrick Crill; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira Jr.; Gregory P. Asner

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane and 13C12C, Flask Air Samples Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999) data Data Investigators Paul Quay and...

11

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Title On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012...

12

Comparison Between Dust Particle Generation In CH4 or CH4/N2 Mixing RF Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Dust particles have been spontaneously generated either in pure CH4 or in CH4/N2 r.f. plasmas. The dust particle formation results from homogeneous nucleation in the plasma and is detected by laser light scattering (Ar+, {lambda} = 514.5 nm). The temporal and spatial behaviour of dust particles is studied. In pure methane gas, particles are trapped in well defined clouds at the plasma sheath boundaries. In a CH4/N2 mixture, the nitrogen addition leads to an expansion of the clouds. For nitrogen contents higher than 50%, the space between the electrodes is nearly completely filled with dust particles leading to plasma instabilities and a void appears in the center of the discharge. The particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.8-2 {mu}m. For nitrogen-rich plasmas, the particles growth is improved and leads to a rough shape with an orange-peel-type surface texture.

Pereira, Jeremy; Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences, Universite d'Orleans, Site de Bourges, rue G.Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France)

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

TRENDS: METHANE EMISSIONS - INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Of the total direct radiative forcing of long-lived greenhouse gases (2.45 Wm-2), almost 20% is attributable to methane (CH4), according to the 1995 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 1995). Since the mid-1700s, the atmospheric concentration of methane has increased by about 145% (IPCC 1995). Thus, an understanding of the various sources of methane is important. Atmospheric methane is produced both from natural sources (e.g., wetlands) and from human activities (see global methane cycle, from Professor W.S. Reeburgh at the University of California Irvine). Total sources of methane to the atmosphere for the period 1980-1990 were about 535 (range of 410-660) Tg (1 Teragram = 1 million metric tons) CH4 per year, of which 160 (110-210) Tg CH4/yr were from natural sources and 375 (300-450) Tg CH4/yr

14

Salinity-induced hydrate dissociation: A mechanism for recent CH4 release on Mars  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere suggest that CH4 has been added relatively recently. Several mechanisms for recent CH4 release have been proposed including subsurface biological methanogenesis, abiogenic hydrothermal and/or volcanic activity, dissociation of CH4 hydrates, atmospheric photolysis, or addition of organics via bolide impact. This study examines the effects of increasing salinity on gas hydrate stability and compares estimates of the Martian geothermal gradient to CH4 and CO2 hydrate stability fields in the presence of high salinity brines. The results demonstrate that salinity increases alone result in a significant decrease in the predicted hydrate stability zone within the Martian subsurface and may be a driving force in CH4 hydrate destabilization. Active thermal and/or pressure fluctuations are not required in order for CH4 hydrates to be the source of atmospheric CH4.

Madden, Megan Elwood [ORNL; Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Onstott, Tullis [Princeton University; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Validation of the Greenhouse Gas Balance of the Netherlands. Observational constraints on CO2, CH4 and N2O from atmospheric monitoring station Lutjewad.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this PhD thesis a method is described to determine the atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions for a large area using in-situ measurements. The method was (more)

Laan, Sander van der

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

INHIBITION OF METHANE ATMOSPHERIC FLAMES BY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... atmospheric pressure was studied. The burner temperature was maintained at 65 C by using a thermostat. The volumetric velocity ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

Ian MacDonald

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Aquatic Sources and Sinks of CO2 and CH4 in the Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highest concentration and greatest seasonal amplitudes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 occur at 6070N, outside the 3060N band where the main sources of anthropogenic CO2 and CH4 are located, indicating that the northern environment is a ...

I. P. Semiletov

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

AOCS Official Method Ch 4-91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorophyll Pigments AOCS Official Method Ch 4-91 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method is used to determine mg/kg of chlorophyll-related p

20

Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

22

Diel Variation of Methane Emission from a Subtropical Paddy Field of South China in the Second Crop Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rice paddy has been identified as one of the important sources of the atmospheric methane and has large variability in emission estimates. This study was conducted to evaluate CH4 emission from a subtropical paddy field of south China with closed static ... Keywords: Diel variation, paddy field, methane, greenhouse gas

Hui Liu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4/Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for Investigating Vortex Flame Interactions Title Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for...

24

Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earths atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Study on CO2 Reforming of CH4 by Dielectric Barrier Discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article it is demonstrated that DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) is an effective tool to convert CH4 and CO2 to synthesis gas (syngas, H2/CO) at low temperature and ambient pressure. The DBD is performed in the co-axial quartz cube by using ... Keywords: methane, carbon dioxide, syngas, dielectric barrier discharge

Zhao Yuhan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

SciTech Connect

Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

HOT METHANE LINE LISTS FOR EXOPLANET AND BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

We present comprehensive experimental line lists of methane (CH{sub 4}) at high temperatures obtained by recording Fourier transform infrared emission spectra. Calibrated line lists are presented for the temperatures 300-1400 Degree-Sign C at twelve 100 Degree-Sign C intervals spanning the 960-5000 cm{sup -1} (2.0-10.4 {mu}m) region of the infrared. This range encompasses the dyad, pentad, and octad regions, i.e., all fundamental vibrational modes along with a number of combination, overtone and hot bands. Using our CH{sub 4} spectra, we have estimated empirical lower state energies (E{sub low} in cm{sup -1}) and our values have been incorporated into the line lists along with line positions ({nu}-bar in cm{sup -1}) and calibrated line intensities (S' in cm molecule{sup -1}). We expect our hot CH{sub 4} line lists to find direct application in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and brown dwarfs.

Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Beale, Christopher A.; Michaux, Laurent; Irfan, Melis, E-mail: rjh135@york.ac.uk, E-mail: cbeale@odu.edu, E-mail: lm595@york.ac.uk, E-mail: melis.irfan@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region  

SciTech Connect

The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Damage of Land Biosphere due to Intense Warming by 1000-Fold Rapid Increase in Atmospheric Methane: Estimation with a ClimateCarbon Cycle Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decadal-time-scale responses of climate and the global carbon cycle to warming associated with rapid increases in atmospheric methane from a massive methane release from marine sedimentary methane hydrates are investigated with a coupled climate...

Atsushi Obata; Kiyotaka Shibata

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Assessment of kinetic modeling for lean H2/CH4/O2/diluent flames at high pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Hydrogen; Methane; Syngas; Flame speed; Chemical mechanism 1. Introduction The H2/O2 reaction system CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other small hydrocarbons (synthetic gas or "syngas") from coal or biomass gasification [2]. Typical syngas mixtures can contain significant amounts of small molecular weight

Ju, Yiguang

31

Fluxes of methane between landfills and the atmosphere: Natural and engineered controls  

SciTech Connect

Field measurement of landfill methane emissions indicates natural variability spanning more than 2 seven orders of magnitude, from approximately 0.0004 to more than 4000 g m{sub -2} day{sup -1}. This wide range reflects net emissions resulting from production (methanogenesis), consumption (methanotrophic oxidation), and gaseous transport processes. The determination of an {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} emission rate for a given field site requires sampling designs and statistical techniques which consider spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, particularly at sites with pumped gas recovery systems, it is possible for methanotrophic microorganisms in aerated cover soils to oxidize all of the methane from landfill sources below and, additionally, to oxidize methane diffusing into cover soils from atmospheric sources above. In such cases, a reversed soil gas concentration gradient is observed in shallow cover soils, indicating bidirectional diffusional transport to the depth of optimum methane oxidation. Rates of landfill methane oxidation from field and laboratory incubation studies range up to 166 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} among the highest for any natural setting, providing an effective natural control on net emissions. Estimates of worldwide landfill methane emissions to the atmosphere have ranged from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup -1}, differing mainly in assumed methane yields from estimated quantities of landfilled refuse. At highly controlled landfill sites in developed countries, landfill methane is often collected via vertical wells or horizontal collectors. Recovery of landfill methane through engineered systems can provide both environmental and energy benefits by mitigating subsurface migration, reducing surface emissions, and providing an alternative energy resource for industrial boiler use, on-site electrical generation, or upgrading to a substitute natural gas.

Bogner, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Meadows, M. [ETSU, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Czepiel, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Rational Catalyst Design for Direct Conversion of CH4 and CO2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Possibilities for mitigation of carbon dioxide and methane levels in the atmosphere are of major global interest. One of the alternatives that attracts much scientific (more)

Havran Mueller, Vesna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Palladium-catalyzed combustion of methane: Simulated gas turbine combustion at atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure tests were performed in which a palladium catalyst ignites and stabilizes the homogeneous combustion of methane. Palladium exhibited a reversible deactivation at temperatures above 750 C, which acted to ``self-regulate`` its operating temperature. A properly treated palladium catalyst could be employed to preheat a methane/air mixture to temperatures required for ignition of gaseous combustion (ca. 800 C) without itself being exposed to the mixture adiabatic flame temperature. The operating temperature of the palladium was found to be relatively insensitive to the methane fuel concentration or catalyst inlet temperature over a wide range of conditions. Thus, palladium is well suited for application in the ignition and stabilization of methane combustion.

Griffin, T.; Weisenstein, W. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Daettwill (Switzerland); Scherer, V. [ABB Kraftwerke, Mannheim (Germany); Fowles, M. [ICI Katalco, Cleveland (United Kingdom)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Extraction of the Thermal Emission Band of Methane from the Longwave Spectrum of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal emission band at 1306 cm?1 of atmospheric methane, an important greenhouse gas, is presented for a cold, clear day in January 1994. A spectrum of the nonmethane emission features has been simulated using the FASCD3P radiation code and ...

W. F. J. Evans; E. Puckrin

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Experimental and Computational Study of Catalytic Combustion of Methane-Air and Syngas-Air Mixtures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Catalytic combustion and conversion of methane (CH4) and Syngas (in our case, a gas mixture of H2, CO, CO2 and CH4) is characterized by the (more)

Pathak, Saurav

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 / CH4 Exchange Completed DE-NT0006553 Goal The goal of this project is to define, plan, conduct and evaluate the results of a field trial of a methane hydrate production methodology whereby carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules are exchanged in situ for methane (CH4) molecules within a hydrate structure, releasing the methane for production. The objective is to evaluate the viability of this hydrate production technique and to understand the implications of the process at a field scale. image showing Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the production of natural gas from hydrates Conceptual rendering of proposed CO2 - CH4 exchange methodology for the

37

Methane Emissions from Rice Fields - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Methane (Ch4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning.

Khalil, M. Aslam; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

METHANE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE TRANSITING HOT NEPTUNE GJ436B?  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of seven primary transit observations of the hot Neptune GJ436b at 3.6, 4.5, and 8 {mu}m obtained with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. After correcting for systematic effects, we fitted the light curves using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. Combining these new data with the EPOXI, Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based V, I, H, and K{sub s} published observations, the range 0.5-10 {mu}m can be covered. Due to the low level of activity of GJ436, the effect of starspots on the combination of transits at different epochs is negligible at the accuracy of the data set. Representative climate models were calculated by using a three-dimensional, pseudospectral general circulation model with idealized thermal forcing. Simulated transit spectra of GJ436b were generated using line-by-line radiative transfer models including the opacities of the molecular species expected to be present in such a planetary atmosphere. A new, ab-initio-calculated, line list for hot ammonia has been used for the first time. The photometric data observed at multiple wavelengths can be interpreted with methane being the dominant absorption after molecular hydrogen, possibly with minor contributions from ammonia, water, and other molecules. No clear evidence of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide is found from transit photometry. We discuss this result in the light of a recent paper where photochemical disequilibrium is hypothesized to interpret secondary transit photometric data. We show that the emission photometric data are not incompatible with the presence of abundant methane, but further spectroscopic data are desirable to confirm this scenario.

Beaulieu, J.-P.; Batista, V. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095, CNRS, Universite Paris VI, 98bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Tinetti, G.; Kipping, D. M.; Barber, R. J.; Tennyson, J.; Waldmann, I.; Miller, S.; Fossey, S. J.; Aylward, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ribas, I. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Cho, J. Y.-K.; Polichtchouk, I. [Astronomy Unit, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Yurchenko, S. N. [Institut fur Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie, Technische Universitat Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Griffith, C. A. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Carey, S. [IPAC-Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mousis, O., E-mail: beaulieu@iap.fr [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

A New Portable Instrument for In Situ Measurement of Atmospheric Methane Mole Fraction by Applying an Improved Tin DioxideBased Gas Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new portable instrument based on a tin dioxide natural gas leak detector was developed to monitor the atmospheric methane mixing ratio in areas lacking sufficient infrastructure to sustain a conventional measurement system, such as a large ...

Hiroshi Suto; Gen Inoue

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Measurement and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of CO2 for CH4 has been proposed (and briefly tested) as a method of both extracting methane and sequestering carbon dioxide. Our suite of measurements can be systematically...

42

Methane and Nitrous Oxide: Their Effects on the Terrestrial Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplified band models are developed for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) bands in the longwave radiation spectrum. The band models are then employed in a radiation model to calculate the seasonally and latitudinally varying contributions of ...

L. Donner; V. Ramanathan

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several perialpine and alpine investigated greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from reservoirs located across an altitude gradient in Switzerland. These are the first results of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs at high elevations

Wehrli, Bernhard

44

Dynamics and Disequilibrium Carbon Chemistry in Hot Jupiter Atmospheres, With Application to HD 209458b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical equilibrium considerations suggest that, assuming solar elemental abundances, carbon on HD 209458b is sequestered primarily as carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4). The relative mole fractions of CO(g) and CH4(g) in chemical equilibrium are expected to vary greatly according to variations in local temperature and pressure. We show, however, that in the p = 1--1000 mbar range, chemical equilibrium does not hold. To explore disequilibrium effects, we couple the chemical kinetics of CO and CH4 to a three-dimensional numerical model of HD 209458b's atmospheric circulation. These simulations show that vigorous dynamics caused by uneven heating of this tidally locked planet homogenize the CO and CH4 concentrations at p < 1 bar, even in the presence of lateral temperature variations of ~500--1000 K. In the 1--1000 mbar pressure range, we find that over 98% of the carbon is in CO. This is true even in cool regions where CH4 is much more stable thermodynamically. Our work shows furthermore that planets 300--500 K cooler than HD 209458b can also have abundant CO in their upper layers due to disequilibrium effects. We demonstrate several interesting observational consequences of these results.

Curtis S. Cooper; Adam P. Showman

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Hydration of Gases to Reduce Major Greenhouse Gases Emission into the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology on replacement methane (CH4) from natural gas hydrate (NGH) with carbon dioxide (CO2) is described. And the technology is demonstrated in theoretics and experiment, respectively. Moreover, combined with the main emission channel of CH4 in ... Keywords: greenhouse effect, hydrate, CO2, CH4

Feng Xu; Lihua Zhu; Qiang Wu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND GAS MIXING ON FORMATION PRESSURE, CO2 SEQUESTRATION AND METHANE PRODUCTION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CO2) injected into subsurface coalbeds replaces adsorbed methane (CH4) on coal surfaces, allowing and levels of CO2 adsorption on coal surfaces, and swelling/shrinkage of coal due to adsorption of CO2 injection. (3) CO2 is more than twice as adsorbing on coal as CH4, and remains tightly bound to coal

47

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

47 47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 4.8.2 SUBSURFACE WATER Subsurface water at INEEL occurs in the under- lying Snake River Plain Aquifer and the vadose zone (area of unsaturated soil and material above the aquifer). This section describes the regional and local hydrogeology, vadose zone hydrology, perched water, and subsurface water quality. 4.8.2.1 Regional Hydrogeology INEEL overlies the Snake River Plain Aquifer as shown in Figure 4-12. This aquifer is the major source of drinking water for southeast- ern Idaho and has been desig- nated a Sole Source Aquifer by EPA. The aquifer flows to the south and southwest and covers an area of 9,611 square miles. Water storage in the aquifer is estimated at 2 billion acre-feet, and irrigation wells can yield 7,000 gallons per minute (DOE 1995). Depth to the

48

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

71 71 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS university research programs and private con- tractors. Ongoing studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, also carefully tracks possible health effects from past activities at INEEL. 4.11.1.1 Radiological Health Risk Very low doses of radiation are not known to cause health effects in humans; however, extrapolation of the dose-response relationship from high doses indicates that statistical effects might be observed in large populations. The doses reported in this EIS from INEEL opera- tions are in this very low category. This EIS reports two values: col- lective dose (in person- rem) and the hypothetical number of latent cancer fatalities. For effects on

49

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Affected Environment 4.6 Geology and Soils This section describes the geological, mineral resources, seismic, and volcanic characteristics of INEEL, INTEC, and surrounding areas. A more detailed description of geology at INEEL can be reviewed in the SNF & INEL EIS, Volume 2, Part A, Section 4.6 (DOE 1995). 4.6.1 GENERAL GEOLOGY INEEL occupies a relatively flat area on the northwestern edge of the Eastern Snake River Plain. Figure 4-4 shows important geological features of the INEEL area. The area consists of a broad plain that has been built up from the eruptions of multi- ple flows of basaltic lava, which is shown on Figure 4-5. The flows at the surface range in age from 1.2 million to 2,100 years. The Plain is bounded on the north and south by the north-to-north-

50

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 40 Affected Environment playas 15 to 20 miles northeast of INTEC, where the water infiltrates. The water in Birch Creek and the Little Lost River is diverted in summer months for irriga- tion prior to reaching INEEL. During periods of unusually high precipitation or rapid snow melt, water from Birch Creek and the Little Lost River may enter INEEL from the northwest and infil- trate the ground, recharging the underlying aquifer. 4.8.1.2 Local Drainage INTEC is located on an alluvial plain approxi- mately 200 feet from the Big Lost River channel near the channel intersection with Lincoln Boulevard on INEEL. INTEC is surrounded by a stormwater drainage ditch system (DOE 1998). Stormwater runoff from most areas of INTEC flows through the ditches to an abandoned gravel

51

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

58 58 Affected Environment 4.9.1 PLANT COMMUNITIES AND ASSOCIATIONS INEEL lies within a cool desert ecosystem dom- inated by shrub-steppe vegetation. The area is relatively undisturbed, providing important habi- tat for species native to the region. Vegetation and habitat on INEEL can be grouped into six types: shrub-steppe, juniper woodlands, native grasslands, modified ephemeral playas, lava, and wetland-like areas. Figure 4-16 shows these areas. More than 90 percent of INEEL falls within the shrub-steppe vegetation type. The shrub-steppe vegetation type is dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), saltbush (Atriplex spp.), and rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus spp.). Grasses found on INEEL include cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), wheatgrass (Agropyron spp.), and

52

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include Mud Lake and Terreton to the east; Arco, Butte City, and Howe to the west; and Atomic City to the south. The larger com- munities of Idaho Falls, Rexburg, Rigby,...

53

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1998, INEEL 1998, INEEL contracts paid $1.4 million to the State of Idaho in Idaho sales taxes and an additional $0.9 million in Idaho franchise tax. 4.4 Cultural Resources 4.4.1 CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND CONSULTATION AT INEEL Cultural resources at INEEL include archaeolog- ical and historic resources, such as prehistoric camp sites and historic buildings and trails, as well as the plants, animals, physical locations, and other features of INEEL environment impor- tant to the culture of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and to national, regional and local history. Several Federal laws, which are described in Chapter 6, govern the protection of archaeologi- cal and historic resources on lands managed by Federal agencies. These and other laws also require consultations among Federal agencies,

54

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

towers that reach 250 feet. 4.5 Aesthetic and Scenic Resources This section describes a baseline visual character of INEEL and the surrounding area, including designated scenic...

55

Hypothesis for increased atmospheric methane input from hydrocarbon seeps on exposed continental shelves during glacial low sea level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.- 2 Sept.1998 '" HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL AND COAL BED METHANE, USING BYPRODUCT CO2 FOR ENHANCED METHANE RECOVERY AND SEQUESTERING THE CO2 IN mE COAL BED RH Williams, Center for Energy and Environmental that are poorly endowed with conventional hydrocarbon resources but coal- and coal-bed-methane-rich would

Luyendyk, Bruce

56

Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR?¢????s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument?¢????s robustness in a real-world situation.

Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the ...

Ruppel, Carolyn

58

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions Title Laboratory Investigations of a Low-swirl Injector withH2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Cheng, Robert K., David Littlejohn, P. A. Strakey, and T. Sidwell Journal Science Direct Abstract Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P0 < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T0 < 580K, 18 < U0 < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H2 at up to f = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H2 fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H2. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H2. The change in the flame position with increasing H2 concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NOx emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

59

CO2 + CH4 Chemistry over Pd: Results of Kinetic Simulations Relevant to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen (methane is `reformed' to synthesis gas or `syngas'). Rezaei et al. [3] reported the production of syngas by methane reforming on a number of transition metal surfaces. They attribute the relatively low efficacy of Pd for the syngas production by methane reforming to carbon deposits on the surface

Spiteri, Raymond J.

60

Methane emissions from natural wetlands  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

Meyer, J.L. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Burke, R.A. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

62

Estimation of methane and carbon dioxide surface fluxes using a 3-D global atmospheric chemical transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane (CH?) and carbon dioxide (CO?) are the two most radiatively important greenhouse gases attributable to human activity. Large uncertainties in their source and sink magnitudes currently exist. We estimate global ...

Chen, Yu-Han, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Methane Main  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee on Methane Hydrate Issues and Opportunities Including Assessment of Uncertainty of the Impact of Methane Hydrate on Global Climate Change December 2002 Report of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee on Methane Hydrate Issues and Opportunities Including Assessment of Uncertainty of the Impact of Methane Hydrate on Global Climate Change December 2002 i CONTENTS What is Methane Hydrate? ............................................................................................. 1 Why Methane Hydrate Matters for the United States? ..................................................... 4 Resource Potential of Methane Hydrate .......................................................................... 5 Implications of Methane Hydrate on Safety and Seafloor Stability

64

Application of numerical, experimental and life cycle assessment methods to the investigation of natural gas production from methane hydrate deposits using carbon dioxide clathrate sequestration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas hydrates, commonly called methane (CH4) hydrates, are ice-like materials belonging to the family of clathrates that form at low temperature and high pressure. (more)

Nago, Annick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASLAB Network GASLAB Network CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace Gases (April 2003) data Data Investigators L.P. Steele, P.R. Krummel, and R.L. Langenfelds Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1021 Data are available for four atmospheric trace gases at nine stationary sites and one moving platform (aircraft over Cape Grim, Tasmania, and Bass Strait, between the Australian continent and Tasmania). The trace gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H2). Measurements of δ13C from CO2 are also included in this database. The nine stationary sites are, from north to south: Alert, Canada; Shetland Islands, Scotland; Estevan Point, Canada; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Cape Ferguson,

66

Remote Sensing D/H Ratios in Methane Ice: Temperature-Dependent Absorption Coefficients of CH3D in Methane Ice and in Nitrogen Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of strong absorption bands of singly deuterated methane (CH3D) at wavelengths where normal methane (CH4) absorbs comparatively weakly could enable remote measurement of D/H ratios in methane ice on outer solar system bodies. We performed laboratory transmission spectroscopy experiments, recording spectra at wavelengths from 1 to 6 \\mum to study CH3D bands at 2.47, 2.87, and 4.56 \\mum, wavelengths where ordinary methane absorption is weak. We report temperature-dependent absorption coefficients of these bands when the CH3D is diluted in CH4 ice and also when it is dissolved in N2 ice, and describe how these absorption coefficients can be combined with data from the literature to simulate arbitrary D/H ratio absorption coefficients for CH4 ice and for CH4 in N2 ice. We anticipate these results motivating new telescopic observations to measure D/H ratios in CH4 ice on Triton, Pluto, Eris, and Makemake.

Grundy, W M; Bovyn, M J; Tegler, S C; Cornelison, D M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

I N V I T E D R E V I E W Methane emissions from wetlands: biogeochemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Methane is responsible for about 18% of human- induced radiative forcing, making it the second most) with their large areal extent and high CH4 fluxes per area. However, the dominant research effort has focused on CH- tries at northern latitudes with their greater research (a) (b) Fig. 2 Global methane sources in (a

68

The thermal decomposition of methane in a tubular reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction rate of methane decomposition using a tubular reactor having a 1 inch inside diameter with an 8 foot long heated zone was investigated in the temperature range of 700 to 900 C with pressures ranging from 28.2 to 56.1 atm. Representing the rate by a conventional model, {minus}dC{sub CH4}/dt= k1 C{sub CH4} {minus}k2 C{sub H2}{sup 2}, the rate constant k1 for methane decomposition was determined. The activation energy, 31.3 kcal/mol, calculated by an Arrhenius Plot was lower than for previously published results for methane decomposition. This result indicates that submicron particles found in the reactor adhere to the inside of the reactor and these submicron high surface area carbon particles tend to catalyze the methane decomposition. The rate constant has been found to be approximately constant at 900 C with pressure range cited above. The rate of methane decomposition increases with methane partial pressure in first-order. The rate of the methane decomposition is favored by higher temperatures and pressures while the thermochemical equilibrium of methane decomposition is favored by lower pressures. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Kobayashi, Atsushi; Steinberg, M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Why Sequence a Methane-Oxidizing Archaean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Methane-Oxidizing Archaeon? a Methane-Oxidizing Archaeon? Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose atmospheric concentration has increased significantly because of anthropogenic activities and fluctuated naturally over glacial and interglacial cycles. While the importance of methane in Earth's climate dynamics has been well established, the global processes regulating its oceanic cycling remain poorly understood. Although there are high rates of methane production in many marine sedimentary environments (including a number that have been targeted as petroleum reserves), net methane sources from the ocean to the atmosphere appear to be small. This is due in large part to a biogeochemical process known as the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Microbially mediated AOM reduces methane flux from ocean to atmosphere, stimulates subsurface microbial

70

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determine the potential impacts of gas hydrate instability in terms of the release of methane into seafloor sediments, the ocean and the atmosphere. Performers University of...

71

methane hydrate science plan-final.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Revolu on. Methane in the atmosphere comes from many sources, including wetlands, rice cul va on, termites, cows and other ruminants, forest fi res, and fossil fuel...

72

Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P activity or CH{sub 4} pool size.

Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils  

SciTech Connect

Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P < 0.003, r{sup 2} = 0.86). A multiple regression model that included initial CH{sub 4} concentration and CH{sub 4} oxidation rate as independent variables accounted for 94 percent of the variability in the isotope fractionation data, suggesting that both factors are important in determining the extent of isotopic fractionation (P < 0.002, r{sup 2} = 0.94). The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. These results challenge the assumption that the isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation remains constant, regardless of metabolic activity or CH{sub 4} pool size.

Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Computer Simulation Study of the Adsorption/Separation Process of CO2/CH4 Mixture on Natural Zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storage and separation of carbon dioxide and methane are of practical interests in environmental engineering and energy engineering. The processes characteristics of the carbon dioxide and methane in zeolites of ERI, HEU and MOR are studied by computer ... Keywords: storage, separatione, carbon dioxide, methane, molecular simulatione

Zhi Li; Cheng Peng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water  

SciTech Connect

The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (??Methane in the Arctic Shelf? or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (??metagenomes?). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in anaerobic methane oxidation.

David Kirchman

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX E: METHANE EMISSIONS FROM NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION, OIL PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER PRODUCTION, COAL MINING, AND OTHER SOURCES An Appendix to the Report "A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM of natural gas, which is mostly CH4, occurs through natural gas production, oil production, and coal mining

Delucchi, Mark

77

Catalytic Partial Oxidation of CH4 Over Ni-Substituted Hexaaluminate Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) of methane is an attractive source of H2 and CO for fuel cell applications. However, the deposition of carbon onto the surface of the catalyst and the migration and loss of active metals remain the principal issues in the development of a suitable catalyst. The formation of elemental carbon onto the surface of a catalyst has been shown to be related to both the size of the active metal cluster [1] and its coordination [2]. The substitution of a catalytic metal into the lattice of hexaaluminate compounds may serve to reduce the size of active metal clusters and to increase their dispersion thereby reducing their susceptibility toward carbon deposition. Interactions between neighboring substituted metals and the hexaaluminate lattice may serve to suppress active metal mobility. In the present work, a series of barium hexaaluminate catalysts with Ni substituted into the lattice were prepared with the general formula, BaNiyAl12-yO19-? (y = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0). The temperature programmed activity and selectivity for this series were investigated.

Gardner, T.H.; Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.A.; Salazar, M.D.; Smith, M.W.; Kugler, E.L.; Haynes, D.J.; Spivey, J.J.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Methane Hydrates and Climate Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrates and Climate Change Hydrates and Climate Change Methane Hydrates and Climate Change Methane hydrates store huge volumes of methane formed by the bacterial decay of organic matter or leaked from underlying oil and natural gas deposits. The active formation of methane hydrates in the shallow crust prevents methane, a greenhouse gas, from entering the atmosphere. On the other hand, warming of arctic sediments or ocean waters has the potential to cause methane hydrate to dissociate, releasing methane into the deepwater sediments, the ocean or atmosphere. DOE is conducting research to understand the mechanisms and volumes involved in these little-studied processes. DOE environmental and climate change research projects related to Arctic methane hydrate deposits include: Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading

79

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 1/8/2013 Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 1/8/2013 DE-NT0005667 Goal The goal of this project is to assess the efficacy of aerobic methanotrophy in preventing the escape of methane from marine, hydrate-bearing reservoirs to the atmosphere and ultimately to better define the role of aerobic methanotrophy in the global carbon cycle. Graph overlayed on photo - Methane seeps with the resulting methane plume Methane seeps with the resulting methane plume, Geophysical Research Letters, November 2007 Performers University of California – Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara (UCSB), CA 93106 Background The global methane reservoir in the form of gas hydrate is estimated at 500–10,000 Gt (KVENVOLDEN, 1995; MILKOV, 2004). This pool of carbon

80

Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & PracticeCh 4 Chemical Structure and Microenvironmental Effects on Surfactant Fundamental Properties/Related Performance Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Utilization of Surfactants: Principles & Practice Ch 4 Chemical Structure and Microenvironmental Effects on Surfactant Fundamental Properties/Related Performance Properties Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Dete

82

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Properties of Hydrate-Bearing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Subjected to Changing Gas Compositions Last Reviewed 12/11/2013 Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Subjected to Changing Gas Compositions Last Reviewed 12/11/2013 ESD12-011 Goal The objective of this research is to measure physical, chemical, mechanical, and hydrologic property changes in methane hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to injection of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Performer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720 Background A number of studies have investigated the impact of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) and CO2-nitrogen (N2) mixtures into methane hydrate for the purpose of sequestering CO2 and releasing methane (CH4), and review articles have been published summarizing the literature. Most of these studies have investigated the fundamental physical/chemical nature of the exchange of CO2 and/or N2 with CH4 in the clathrate. These studies have

83

GRI methane chemistry program review meeting  

SciTech Connect

Methane is an important greenhouse gas which affects the atmosphere directly by the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation as well as indirectly, through chemical interactions. Emissions of several important greenhouse gases (GHGS) including methane are increasing, mainly due to human activity. Higher concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are projected to cause a decrease in the amount of infrared radiation escaping to space, and a subsequent warming of global climate. It is therefore vital to understand not only the causes of increased production of methane and other GHGS, but the effect of higher GHG concentrations on climate, and the possibilities for reductions of these emissions. In GRI-UIUC methane project, the role of methane in climate change and greenhouse gas abatement strategies is being studied using several distinct approaches. First, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms controlling each important methane source and sink, and hence the atmospheric concentration of methane, is being developed for use with the UIUC Integrated Science Assessment Model. The focus of this study is to resolve the factors which determine methane emissions and removal, including human population, land use, energy demand, global temperature, and regional concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides, non-methane hydrocarbons, water vapor, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone.

Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Grossman, A.; Wuebles, D.; Brasseur, G.; Madronich, S.; Huang, T.; Chang, J.; Lott, B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mixing Ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and Isotope Ratios of Associated 13C, 18O,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Samples, Niwot Ridge, Colorado Air Samples, Niwot Ridge, Colorado Mixing Ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and Isotope Ratios of Associated 13C, 18O, and 2H in Air Samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Montaña de Oro, California, USA (January 2004) image Abstract graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Stanley C. Tyler Department of Earth System Science University of California Irvine, CA DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1022 Description and Methods Air samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado (41°N, 105°W) and Montaña de Oro, CA (35°N, 121°W) have been collected at approximately semi-monthly to monthly intervals since the mid 1990s. The beginning dates for each gas and isotope analyzed are as follows: GASLAB Flask Sampling Network Data Available (April 2003) Gas or isotope Niwot Ridge Montaña de Oro

85

The role of methane in tropospheric chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While methane is chemically quite inert to reactions with atmospheric molecular species, it does react with atomic species and molecular radicals. Because of its relatively large abundance in the global troposphere and ...

Golomb, D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Atmospheric Trace Gases, Carbon Isotopes, Radionuclides, and Aerosols: Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Scroll down to find Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, a subheading under the broader heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases, etc.) CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to isotopes in greenhouse gases includes: Monthly atmospheric 13C/12C isotopic ratios for 10 SIO stations, (2005) (Trends Online) Mixing ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and isotope ratios of associated 13C, 18O, and 2H in air samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Montaa de Oro, California, USA (2004) Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values from Fossil-Fuel Consumption in the U.S.A., (2004) (Trends Online) ?13C in CO2 from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network (Trends Online) In Situ 13CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (2001) (Trends Online) In situ Carbon 13 and Oxygen 18 Ratios of Atmospheric CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 (1995) Carbon-13 Isotopic Abundance and concentration of Atmospheric Methane for Background Air in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres from 1978 to 1989 (1995) Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999) 14CO 2 Observations from Schauinsland, Germany (1997) (Trends Online) Carbon-14 Measurements in Atmospheric CO 2 from Northern and Southern Hemisphere Sites, 1962-1992 (1996) Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 (1998) (Specialized Interface)

87

Coalbed Methane  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Coalbed methane is natural gas found in coal deposits. It was once considered a nuisance and mine safety hazard, but today has become a valuable part of the U.S. energy portfolio. A major reason for this is resource characterization and the establishment of efficient recovery methods pioneered by Office of Fossil Energy R&D.

88

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation-Air Methane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and use of Coal Mine Capture and use of Coal Mine Ventilation - air Methane Background Methane emissions from coal mines represent about 10 percent of the U.S. anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Methane-the second most important non-water greenhouse gas-is 21 times as powerful as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in its global warming potential. Ventilation-air methane (VAM)-the exhaust air from underground coal mines-is the largest source of coal mine methane, accounting for about half of the methane emitted from coal mines in the United States. Unfortunately, because of the low methane concentration (0.3-1.5 percent) in ventilation air, its beneficial use is difficult. However, oxidizing the methane to CO 2 and water reduces its global warming potential by 87 percent. A thermal

89

Effects of Temperature and Pressure on CO2 absorption and Changes in Coal due to CO2 Sequestration and CH4 Desorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the environmental quality of the water found in coal bed methane wells. Their research led to the novel, low AvAilAble for licensing The Invention Argonne's Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System provides a low-cost process that accelerates biological methane production rates at least fivefold

Harris, Jerry M.

90

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

91

NIST Kevin Douglass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1.6 micron atmospheric window region where three critical greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O), and methane (CH 4 ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

An Intercomparison of Ground-Based Solar FTIR Measurements of Atmospheric Gases at Eureka, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the results of an intercomparison of vertical column amounts of hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen fluoride (HF), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric acid (HNO3), methane (CH4), ozone (O3), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen (N2) ...

C. Paton-Walsh; R. L. Mittermeier; W. Bell; H. Fast; N. B. Jones; A. Meier

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Version History Methane Symmetry Operations. JT Hougen Optical Technology Division Gloria Wiersma ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with emphasis; (6) detailed study of CH4-CO2 exchange as a unique alternative to recover CH4 gas while sequestering CO2; (7) the relevance of fines in otherwise clean sand sediments on gas recovery and related phenomena such as fines migration and clogging, vuggy structure formation, and gas-driven fracture formation during gas production by depressurization.

J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Last Reviewed 8/21/2013 Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Last Reviewed 8/21/2013 Field Work Proposals: ESD07-014 (LBNL) and 08FE-003 (LANL) Project Goal The primary objectives of this project are to: 1) investigate the effect of rising water temperatures on the stability of oceanic hydrate accumulations, 2) estimate the global quantity of hydrate-originating carbon that could reach the upper atmosphere as CH4 or CO2 thus affecting global climate, 3) quantify the interrelationship between global climate and the amount of hydrate-derived carbon reaching the upper atmosphere focusing on the potential link between hydrate dissociation and cascading global warming and 4) test the discharge phase of the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis which stipulates large-scale hydrate dissociation and gas

96

The European land and inland water CO2, CO, CH4 and N2O balance between 2001 and 2005  

SciTech Connect

Globally, terrestrial ecosystems have absorbed about 30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions over the period 2000-2007 and inter-hemispheric gradients indicate that a significant fraction of terrestrial carbon sequestration must be north of the Equator. We present a compilation of the CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O balances of Europe following a dual constraint approach in which (1) a land-based balance derived mainly from ecosystem carbon inventories and (2) a land-based balance derived from flux measurements are compared to (3) the atmospheric data-based balance derived from inversions constrained by measurements of atmospheric GHG (greenhouse gas) concentrations. Good agreement between the GHG balances based on fluxes (1294 {+-} 545 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}), inventories (1299 {+-} 200 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) and inversions (1210 {+-} 405 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) increases our confidence that the processes underlying the European GHG budget are well understood and reasonably sampled. However, the uncertainty remains large and largely lacks formal estimates. Given that European net land to atmosphere exchanges are determined by a few dominant fluxes, the uncertainty of these key components needs to be formally estimated before efforts could be made to reduce the overall uncertainty. The net land-to-atmosphere flux is a net source for CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, because the anthropogenic emissions by far exceed the biogenic sink strength. The dual-constraint approach confirmed that the European biogenic sink removes as much as 205 {+-} 72 Tg C yr{sup -1} from fossil fuel burning from the atmosphere. However, This C is being sequestered in both terrestrial and inland aquatic ecosystems. If the C-cost for ecosystem management is taken into account, the net uptake of ecosystems is estimated to decrease by 45% but still indicates substantial C-sequestration. However, when the balance is extended from CO{sub 2} towards the main GHGs, C-uptake by terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is offset by emissions of non-CO{sub 2} GHGs. As such, the European ecosystems are unlikely to contribute to mitigating the effects of climate change.

Luyassaert, S [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Abril, G [Laboratoire EPOC, CNRS; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Bastviken, D [Linkoping University; Bellassen, V [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Bergamaschi, P [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Bousquet, P [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Chevallier, F [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Ciais, P. [LSCE/CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Corazza, M [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Dechow, R [Johann Heinrich von Thnen Institute; Erb, K-H [Alpen-Adria Universitaet Klagenfurt-Vienna-Graz; Etiope, G [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia; Fortems-Cheiney, A [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Grassi, G [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Hartmann, J [University of Hamburg; Jung, M. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Lathiere, J [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Lohila, A [Finnish Meteorological institute; Mayorga, E [University of Washington; Moosdorf, N [University of Hamburg; Njakou, D [University of Antwerp; Otto, J [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; Peters, W [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Peylin, P [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Raymond, Peter A [Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; Rodenbeck, C [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Saarnio, S [University of Eastern Finland; Schulze, E.-D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Szopa, S [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Thompson, R [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Verkerk, P [European Forest Institute; Vuichard, N [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Wang, R [Peking University; Wattenbach, M [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre For Geosciences; Zaehle, S [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

High Precision Long-Term Monitoring of Radiatively Active and Related Trace Gases at Surface Sites and from Aircraft in the Southern Hemisphere Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routine high precision measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, and CO2 stable isotopes are conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia). Of particular relevance to global monitoring of ...

R. J. Francey; L. P. Steele; R. L. Langenfelds; B. C. Pak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Methane Emissions from Natural Wetlands in the United States: Satellite-Derived Estimation Based on Ecosystem Carbon Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wetlands are an important natural source of methane to the atmosphere. The amounts of methane emitted from inundated ecosystems in the United States can vary greatly from area to area. Seasonal temperature, water table dynamics, and carbon ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Seth Hiatt; Matthew Fladeland; Vanessa Genovese; Peggy Gross

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

Widory, D., E-mail: d.widory@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G. [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Bour, O. [INERIS, Parc Technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Heat pipe methanator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

Ranken, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf The Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf was created to provide a repository for information collected from projects funded as part of the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program. As output from the projects is received, it will be reviewed and then placed onto the reference shelf to be available to other methane hydrate researchers. Projects: DOE/NETL Projects : These pages contain detailed information on methane hydrate projects funded through the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Publications: Newsletter | Bibliography | Software | Reports | Program Publications | Photo Gallery Newsletter: Fire in the Ice: A publication highlighting the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program Bibliography: "Project Reports Bibliography"[PDF]: The bibliography lists publications resulting from DOE/NETL-sponsored

102

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Subtask 1.22 - Microbial Cycling of CH4, CO2, and N2O in a Wetlands Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil microbial metabolic activities play an important role in determining CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems. To verify and evaluate CO{sub 2} sequestration potential by wetland restoration in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), as well as to address concern over restoration effects on CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions, laboratory and in situ microcosm studies on microbial cycling of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O were initiated. In addition, to evaluate the feasibility of the use of remote sensing to detect soil gas flux from wetlands, a remote-sensing investigation was also conducted. Results of the laboratory microcosm study unequivocally proved that restoration of PPR wetlands does sequester atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Under the experimental conditions, the simulated restored wetlands did not promote neither N{sub 2}O nor CH{sub 4} fluxes. Application of ammonia enhanced both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission, indicating that restoration of PPR wetlands may reduce both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission by cutting N-fertilizer input. Enhancement of CO{sub 2} emission by the N-fertilizer was observed, and this observation revealed an overlooked fact that application of N-fertilizer may potentially increase CO{sub 2} emission. In addition, the CO{sub 2} results also demonstrate that wetland restoration sequesters atmospheric carbon not only by turning soil conditions from aerobic to anoxic, but also by cutting N-fertilizer input that may enhance CO{sub 2} flux. The investigation on microbial community structure and population dynamics showed that under the experimental conditions restoration of the PPR wetlands would not dramatically increase population sizes of those microorganisms that produce N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}. Results of the in situ study proved that restoration of the PPR wetland significantly reduced CO{sub 2} flux. Ammonia enhanced the greenhouse gas emission and linearly correlated to the CO{sub 2} flux within the experimental rate range (46-200 kg N ha{sup -1}). The results also clarified that the overall reduction in global warming potential (GWP) by the PPR wetland restoration was mainly contributed from reduction in CO{sub 2} flux. These results demonstrate that restoration of currently farmed PPR wetlands will significantly reduce the overall GWP budget. Remote sensing investigations indicate that while the 15-meter resolution of the imagery was sufficient to delineate multiple zones in larger wetlands, it was not sufficient for correlation with the ground-based gas flux measurement data, which were collected primarily for smaller wetland sites (<250 meters) in the areas evaluated by this task. To better evaluate the feasibility of using satellite imagery to quantify wetland gas flux, either higher-resolution satellite imagery or gas flux data from larger wetland sites is needed.

Dingyi Ye; Bethany Kurz; Marc Kurz

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

105

Methane cracking over a bituminous coal char  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane cracking over a bed of Chinese bituminous coal char was studied using a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 1073 and 1223 K. Methane conversion over the fresh char increased with increasing temperature to 90% at 1223 K. Hydrogen was the only gas-phase product that was detected during the experimentation. The char was shown to exert a significant catalytic effect on methane cracking by comparing results from experiments with the raw char and demineralised char as well as from blank experiments using quartz. It was further shown that the ash was not the source of the catalytic effect of the char. However, both methane conversion and hydrogen yield decreased with increasing reaction time, irrespective of other experimental conditions, indicating that the char rapidly became deactivated following the exposure to methane. It was speculated that the deposition of carbon from methane cracking was responsible for this deactivation, which is supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image analysis. It was demonstrated that the catalytic activity of the deactivated char can be partially recovered by burning off the carbon deposits with an oxidizing gas mixture containing 0.46% oxygen. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Zhi-qiang Sun; Jin-hu Wu; Mohammad Haghighi; John Bromly; Esther Ng; Hui Ling Wee; Yang Wang; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Large Scale Atmospheric Chemistry Simulations for 2001: An Analysis of Ozone and Other Species in Central Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A key atmospheric gas is ozone. Ozone in the stratosphere is beneficial to the biosphere because it absorbs a significant fraction of the sun's shorter wavelength ultraviolet radiation. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant (respiratory irritant in humans and acts to damage crops, vegetation, and many materials). It affects the Earths energy balance by absorbing both incoming solar radiation and outgoing long wave radiation. An important part of the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere involves ozone, through a photolysis pathway that leads to the hydroxyl radical (OH). Since reaction with OH is a major sink of many atmospheric species, its concentration controls the distributions of many radiatively important species. Ozone in the troposphere arises from both in-situ photochemical production and transport from the stratosphere. Within the troposphere, ozone is formed in-situ when carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) react in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NO, = NO + NO2) and sunlight. The photochemistry of the stratosphere differs significantly from that in the troposphere. Within the stratosphere, ozone formation is initiated by the photolysis of 02. Stratospheric ozone may be destroyed via catalytic reactions with NO, H (hydrogen), OH, CI (chlorine) and Br (bromine), or photolysis. In the past, attempts to simulate the observed distributions of ozone (and other important gases) have focused on either the stratosphere or the troposphere. Stratospheric models either employed simplified parameterizations to represent tropospheric chemical and physical processes, or assumed the troposphere behaved as a boundary condition. Likewise, tropospheric models used simplified stratospheric chemistry and transport.

Atherton, C; Bergmann, D; Cameron-Smith, P; Connell, P; Molenkamp, C; Rotman, D; Tannahil, J

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ridge region Ongoing areas of study in the Hydrate Ridge region Map showing where gas hydrates occur off the Cascadia Margin Locations of methane hydrate off the Cascadia Margin...

108

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrates Primer provides background and general information about the history of hydrate R&D, the science of methane hydrates, their occurrences, and R&D related issues. Photo...

109

Methane level rise blamed in greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

As scientists continue to probe effects of global warming trends and the greenhouse effect, increasing attention is being placed on the impact of methane. Last year, scientists at the University of California in Irvine found there were almost 1.7 parts per million of methane in the troposphere- 11% higher that a decade ago and climbing at 1% annually. European scientists came up with similar analyses, and the belief is that methane is currently 2.4 times higher than it has ever been in the last 160,000 years. The big challenge now is to identify the sources of the methane. About 15 to 20% can be traced to oil and gas wells, coal mining and other tapping of the gas trapped in the planet's crust. Other sources are bacteria working in tropical rain forests, burned-off clearings, etc. Cattle figure high on the list of methane generators. When domesticated herds of sheep, goats, pigs, etc. are figured, the total rises to 73 million metric tons per year- a 435% increase since 1890. Rice paddies are also rated a major source of methane. It's estimated that 115 million metric tons rise from rice paddies a year, as much as is coming from natural swamps and wetlands. When scientists added up all the published estimates of methane production, the total ranged from 400 million to 640 million metric tons a year. Estimates of how much methane the atmosphere can handle are similarly uncertain, ranging from 300 million to 650 million metric tons a year.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Why not methane--5. Delivering methane  

SciTech Connect

A discussion showed that the methane delivery system in the U.S. consists of 350,000 mi of underground high-pressure pipelines, 650,000 mi of distribution mains and connections to 45 million energy users. This delivery system now carries much less natural gas than it could carry because of the regulation-caused shortages of recent years. The delivery system is also connected to an efficient storage system of exhausted underground gas wells into which methane from any source (e.g., gasification of coal or vegetation) could be pumped and then recovered as needed. This storage system could be readily expanded and could thus be used for strategic storage of methane. Enough methane could be stored to replace foreign oil if the foreign supply should be interrupted; and methane can be quickly delivered nation-wide, whereas strategic oil storage requires unusual and expensive provisions for delivery. Natural gas usage could be increased by 20Vertical Bar3< in two years and would reduce payments for imported oil by about $10 billion. Doubling the amount of methane used in the U.S. would eliminate the need for foreign oil entirely.

Luntey, E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Measuring Diffusivity in Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Films using Inert Gas Permeation: II. Diffusion of AR, KR, Xe, and CH4 through Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an experimental technique to measure the diffusivity of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their Tg. The approach uses the permeation of inert gases through supercooled liquid overlayers as a measure of the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid itself. The desorption spectra of the probe gas is used to extract the low temperature supercooled liquid diffusivities. In the preceding companion paper, we derived equations using ideal model simulations from which the diffusivity could be extracted using the desorption peak times for isothermal or peak temperatures for TPD experiments. Here, we discuss the experimental conditions for which these equations are valid and demonstrate their utility using amorphous methanol with Ar, Kr, Xe, and CH4 as probe gases. The approach offers a new method by which the diffusivities of supercooled liquids can be measured in the experimentally challenging temperature regime near the glass transition temperature.

Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Methane to methanol conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a novel process by which natural gas or methane from coal gasification products can be converted to a transportable liquid fuel. It is proposed that methanol can be produced by the direct, partial oxidation of methane utilizing air or oxygen. It is anticipated that, compared to present technologies, the new process might offer significant economic advantages with respect to capital investment and methane feedstock purity requirements. Results to date are discussed. 6 refs.

Finch, F.T.; Danen, W.C.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Rofer, C.K.; Ferris, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

115

Coalbed Methane Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2006 2007 2008 2009...

116

PlasmaMethane Reformation  

INL thermal plasma methane reformation process produces hydrogen and elemental carbon from natural gas and other hydrocarbons, such as natural gas or ...

117

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics graphics Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples The following links are for methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, alkyl nitrates, and chlorinated carbon...

119

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane Symmetry Operations. ... At least three T d symmetry classification systems are widely used at present in the methane literature [5-13]. ...

120

TITAN'S TRANSPORT-DRIVEN METHANE CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The mechanisms behind the occurrence of large cloud outbursts and precipitation on Titan have been disputed. A global- and annual-mean estimate of surface fluxes indicated only 1% of the insolation, or {approx}0.04 W m{sup -2}, is exchanged as sensible and/or latent fluxes. Since these fluxes are responsible for driving atmospheric convection, it has been argued that moist convection should be quite rare and precipitation even rarer, even if evaporation globally dominates the surface-atmosphere energy exchange. In contrast, climate simulations indicate substantial cloud formation and/or precipitation. We argue that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative imbalance is diagnostic of horizontal heat transport by Titan's atmosphere, and thus constrains the strength of the methane cycle. Simple calculations show the TOA radiative imbalance is {approx}0.5-1 W m{sup -2} in Titan's equatorial region, which implies 2-3 MW of latitudinal heat transport by the atmosphere. Our simulation of Titan's climate suggests this transport may occur primarily as latent heat, with net evaporation at the equator and net accumulation at higher latitudes. Thus, the methane cycle could be 10-20 times previous estimates. Opposing seasonal transport at solstices, compensation by sensible heat transport, and focusing of precipitation by large-scale dynamics could further enhance the local, instantaneous strength of Titan's methane cycle by a factor of several. A limited supply of surface liquids in regions of large surface radiative imbalance may throttle the methane cycle, and if so, we predict more frequent large storms over the lakes district during Titan's northern summer.

Mitchell, Jonathan L. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter...

122

Investigations into methane accumulation in coal storage silos  

SciTech Connect

The ventilation systems of coal storage silos are normally capable of rapidly dispersing any accumulations of methane in the atmosphere above the coal pile surface. However, the results of an investigation which is presented in this report show that hazardous concentrations of methane can accumulate within the coal pile. Methane trapped within the coal pile is released into the atmosphere of the loading gallery when coal is discharged from a silo. If the methane released is of a flammable concentration it is necessary to ventilate the gallery to reduce the risk of an ignition. This report proposes a simple test, which, after further investigations may prove to be an effective method to calculate gallery ventilation requirements.

Kolada, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Seasonal Production and Emission of Methane from Rice Fields, Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

B 139 - Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning. The global emissions from these sources are still not well known. In the middle 1980s there were few available data on methane emissions from rice fields leading to estimates of a global source between 100-280 Tg/yr. Extensive worldwide research during the last decade has shown that the global emissions from rice fields are more likely to be in the range of 30-80Tg/yr. While this work has led to a substantial reduction in the estimated emissions, the uncertainty is still quite large, and seriously affects our ability to include methane in integrated assessments for future climate change and environmental management.China dominated estimates of methane emissions from rice fields because it was, and is, the largest producer of rice, and major increases in rice production had taken place in the country over the last several decades. This report summarizes the work in Sichuan Province, China, in each of the following areas: the design of the experiment; the main results on methane emissions from rice fields, delineating the factors controlling emissions; production of methane in the soil; a survey of water management practices in sample of counties in Sichuan province; and results of ambient measurements including data from the background continental site. B139

Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Supply and Emerging Resources Future Supply and Emerging Resources The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship Program Jeffrey James Marlow, a graduate student in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology, was recently selected as the 2012 recipient of the NETL-National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship. Please see page 15 of the March 2013 issue (Vol. 13, Issue 1) of Fire in the Ice for more information on the recipient. The Department of Energy has a long history of building synergistic relationships with research universities. Funding academic research is a "win-win-win" situation. The U.S. government is able to tap into some of the best minds available for solving national energy problems, the universities get the support they need to maintain cutting edge faculty and laboratories, and the students involved are provided with opportunities that help them along their chosen path of study, strengthening the national pool of scientists and engineers. According to Samuel Bodman, speaking about graduate research in methane hydrates, "Students are the foundation of our energy future, bringing new ideas and fresh perspectives to the energy industry. What better way to assure technology innovation than to encourage students working on the development of a resource that has the potential to tip our energy balance toward clean-burning, domestic fuels."

125

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

126

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2011 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress July 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | July 2012 FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report entitled U.S. Department of Energy FY 2011 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area of research. Pursuant to statutory requirements, this report is being provided to the following

127

Methane Hydrate Annual Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of Methane Hydrate research. Listed are the Annual Reports per...

128

Methane Hydrate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fiscal Year 2012 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress August 2013 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | August 2013 Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the actions taken to carry out methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report, entitled U.S. Department of Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area

129

Conversion of CH4/CO2 to syngas over Ni-Co/Al2O3-ZrO2 nanocatalyst synthesized via plasma assisted co-impregnation method: Surface properties and catalytic performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ni/Al2O3 catalyst promoted by Co and ZrO2 was prepared by co-impregnation method and treated with glow discharge plasma. The catalytic activity of the synthesized nanocatalysts has been tested toward conversion of CH4/CO2 to syngas. The physicochemical characterizations like XRD EDX

Nader Rahemi; Mohammad Haghighi; Ali Akbar Babaluo; Mahdi Fallah Jafari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Formation and emission of methane in rice soils: Experimental determination and modeling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rice paddy soils have been identified as a major source of methane emissions contributing to the observed atmospheric increase in methane. This points to the need for a method of quantifying and predicting methane emissions for the widely varying conditions used in rice agriculture throughout the world. In the present work, a mathematical model for estimating the emission of methane from rice paddy soils is developed and refined. Kinetic parameters for methanogenesis in a Louisiana rice soil are determined from laboratory data on methane production from acetic acid substrate. Use of a stirred reactor allows simultaneous measurement of acetate consumption and methane production while minimizing mass transfer limitations. An existing model for rice plant growth is utilized to provide data on the availability of root exudates as a carbon source for the methanogens. The final methane model includes the kinetic parameters, plant data, and estimated transport parameters. With adjustments in these parameters, it provides an acceptable match to field data.

Law, V.J.; Bhattacharya, S.K.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electrochemical methane sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

1984-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes June 6th - 7th, 2013...

133

Effect of carbon dioxide and nitrogen on the diffusivity of methane confined in nano-porous carbon aerogel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microscopic diffusivity of methane (CH{sub 4}) confined in nano-porous carbon aerogel was investigated as a function of added carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) pressure using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). In the range of the external pressure of 1-2.5 MPa, the self-diffusivity of methane was found to increase with CO{sub 2} pressure and remain practically unchanged in the N{sub 2} environment. Increasing mobility of methane with CO{sub 2} pressure suggests that the adsorbed CH4 molecules become gradually replaced by CO{sub 2} on the surface of carbon aerogel pores, whereas the presence of N{sub 2} does not induce the replacement. The molecular mobility of the methane, with or without added carbon dioxide and nitrogen, is described by the unrestricted diffusion model, which is characteristic of methane compressed in small pores. On the other hand, both nitrogen and carbon dioxide molecules in carbon aerogel, when studied alone, with no methane present, follow a jump diffusion process, characteristic of the molecular mobility in the densified adsorbed layers on the surface of the aerogel pores.

Mavila Chathoth, Suresh [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Methane Hydrate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Methane Hydrate Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Types of Methane Hydrate Deposits Methane hydrate is a cage-like lattice of ice inside of which are trapped molecules of methane, the chief constituent of natural gas. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will revert back to water and natural gas. When brought to the earth's surface, one cubic meter of gas hydrate releases 164 cubic meters of natural gas. Hydrate deposits may be several hundred meters thick and generally occur in two types of settings: under Arctic permafrost, and beneath the ocean floor. Methane that forms hydrate can be both biogenic, created by biological activity in sediments, and thermogenic, created by geological processes deeper within the earth.

135

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 6142013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate...

136

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Controls On Methane Expulsion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems Last Reviewed 12/24/2013 Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems Last Reviewed 12/24/2013 DE-FE0010406 Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced temperature change, the conditions under which gas will be expelled from existing accumulations of gas hydrate into the shallow ocean or directly to the atmosphere. When those conditions are met, the fraction of the gas accumulation that escapes and the rate of escape shall be quantified. The predictions shall be applicable in Arctic regions and in gas hydrate systems at the updip limit of the stability zone on continental margins. The behavior shall be explored in response to both longer term changes in sea level (e.g., twenty-thousand years) and shorter term due to atmospheric

137

Intercomparison of NDSC Ground-Based Solar FTIR Measurements of Atmospheric Gases at Lauder, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formal intercomparison of atmospheric total column measurements of N2O, N2, CH4, O3, HCl, HNO3, and HF by two ground-based solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers conducted as part of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric ...

D. W. T. Griffith; N. B. Jones; B. McNamara; C. Paton Walsh; W. Bell; C. Bernardo

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The basics of coalbed methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is an overview of coalbed methane (CBM), also known as coal seam gas. It provides an overview of what coalbed methane is and the current status of global coalbed methane exploration and production. Topics covered in the report include: An analysis of the natural gas industry, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; A detailed description of coalbed methane, its characteristics, and future potential; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coalbed methane; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of coalbed methane; An overview of the technologies used for coalbed methane production and water treatment; and Profiles of key coalbed methane producing countries. 25 figs., 5 tabs., 1 app.

NONE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Methane Emissions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent; Estimated 2003 ... for about 8.7 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions when weighted by methanes global warming potential factor.

140

Enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Warming and Methane--Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as ''greenhouse gases.'' These gases include water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoro-carbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Greenhouse gases can absorb outgoing infrared (heat) radiation and re-emit it back to Earth, warming the surface. Thus, these gases act like the glass of a greenhouse enclosure, trapping infrared radiation inside and warming the space. One of the more important greenhouse gases is the naturally occurring hydrocarbon methane. Methane, a primary component of natural gas, is the second most important contributor to the greenhouse effect (after carbon dioxide). Natural sources of methane include wetlands, fossil sources, termites, oceans, fresh-waters, and non-wetland soils. Methane is also produced by human-related (or anthropogenic) activities such as fossil fuel production, coal mining, rice cultivation, biomass burning, water treatment facilities, waste management operations and landfills, and domesticated livestock operations (Figure 1). These anthropogenic activities account for approximately 70% of the methane emissions to the atmosphere. Methane is removed naturally from the atmosphere in three ways. These methods, commonly referred to as sinks, are oxidation by chemical reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl ion, oxidation within the stratosphere, and microbial uptake by soils. In spite of their important role in removing excess methane from the atmosphere, the sinks cannot keep up with global methane production. Methane concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by 145% since 1800. Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world population growth, pointing to anthropogenic sources as the cause (Figure 2). Increases in the methane concentration reduce Earth's natural cooling efficiency by trapping more of the outgoing terrestrial infrared radiation, increasing the near-surface temperature.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Predicting methane fermentation biodegradability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimation of the feedstock digestibility in cows by procedures developed by Van Soest was performed. By feeding cows feedstuff of different lignin content, cell wall digestibility can be estimated. In this article a digestibility model has been employed and tested along with other models for the rapid prediction of substrate methane fermentation biodegradability.

Chandler, J.A.; Jewell, W.J.; Gossett, J.M.; Van Soest, P.J.; Robertson, J.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN TITAN's METHANE: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING  

SciTech Connect

The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere ({approx}6% level at the surface) presents a unique enigma, as photochemical models predict that the current inventory will be entirely depleted by photochemistry in a timescale of {approx}20 Myr. In this paper, we examine the clues available from isotopic ratios ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H) in Titan's methane as to the past atmosphere history of this species. We first analyze recent infrared spectra of CH{sub 4} collected by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer, measuring simultaneously for the first time the abundances of all three detected minor isotopologues: {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D, and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}D. From these we compute estimates of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 86.5 {+-} 8.2 and D/H = (1.59 {+-} 0.33) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, in agreement with recent results from the Huygens GCMS and Cassini INMS instruments. We also use the transition state theory to estimate the fractionation that occurs in carbon and hydrogen during a critical reaction that plays a key role in the chemical depletion of Titan's methane: CH{sub 4} + C{sub 2}H {yields} CH{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Using these new measurements and predictions we proceed to model the time evolution of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C and D/H in Titan's methane under several prototypical replenishment scenarios. In our Model 1 (no resupply of CH{sub 4}), we find that the present-day {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C implies that the CH{sub 4} entered the atmosphere 60-1600 Myr ago if methane is depleted by chemistry and photolysis alone, but much more recently-most likely less than 10 Myr ago-if hydrodynamic escape is also occurring. On the other hand, if methane has been continuously supplied at the replenishment rate then the isotopic ratios provide no constraints, and likewise for the case where atmospheric methane is increasing. We conclude by discussing how these findings may be combined with other evidence to constrain the overall history of the atmospheric methane.

Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Temelso, B. [Dean's Office, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Mandt, K. E. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Sherrill, C. D. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Flasar, F. M. [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

The landfill methane balance: Model and practical applications  

SciTech Connect

A rational mass-balance framework is described for improved quantification of landfill methane processes at a given site. The methane balance model examines the partitioning of methane generated into methane recovered (via extraction systems), methane emitted, methane oxidized, methane migrated, and methane storage. This model encourages use of field-based data to better quantify rates of methane recovery and emissions.

Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Subgroup and Full ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1, this leads to one of the three D 2d subgroups of T d . It is also possible to orient the CH 4 molecule differently, so that singling out the z axis leads ...

146

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Production Trial Using CO2 CH4 Exchange Last Reviewed 822013 DE-NT0006553 Goal The goal of this project is to define, plan, conduct and evaluate the results of a...

147

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of Sea Floor Monitoring Station Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of Sea Floor Monitoring Station DE-FC26-02NT41328 Goal Determine the potential impacts of gas hydrate instability in terms of the release of methane into seafloor sediments, the ocean and the atmosphere. Performers University of California, San Diego (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) - manage geochemical, hydrological and sedimentological investigations Texas A&M University - manage field monitoring program Location La Jolla, California 92093 Background This project will monitor, characterize, and quantify the rates of formation and dissociation of methane gas hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and determine linkages between formation/dissociation and physical/chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of a year. The stability and response of shallow gas hydrates to temperature and chemical perturbations will be monitored in situ, and localized seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation characterized. The following will be determined: 1) The equilibrium/steady state conditions for structure II methane gas hydrates at the field site,2) whether the system is in dynamic equilibrium and the local hydrology is characterized by steady state episodic fluid flow, and 3) how fluid fluxes and fluid composition work together to dynamically influence gas hydrate stability.

148

Methane conversion to methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor for the partial oxidation of methane. The specific goals are to demonstrate that we can improve product yield, demonstrate the optimal conditions for membrane reactor operation, determine the transport properties of the membrane, and provide demonstration of the process at the pilot plant scale. The last goal will be performed by Unocal, Inc., our industrial partner, upon successful completion of this study.

Noble, R.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coal Bed Methane Primer  

SciTech Connect

During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of stakeholders to present a consistent and complete synopsis of the key issues involved with CBM. In light of the numerous CBM NEPA documents under development this Primer could be used to support various public scoping meetings and required public hearings throughout the Western States in the coming years.

Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Utilization of fuel cells to beneficially use coal mine methane. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has been given the responsibility to encourage industry to recover and use methane that is currently being released to the atmosphere. At this time the only method being employed at the Left Fork Mine to remove methane is the mine ventilation system. The methane content was measured at one one-hundredth of a percent. To prevent this methane from being vented to the atmosphere, degasification wells are proposed. To use the coal mine methane, it is proposed to use phosphoric-acid fuel cells to convert methane to electric power. These fuel cells contain (1) a steam reformer to convert the methane to hydrogen (and carbon dioxide), (2) the fuel cell stack, and (3) a power conditioner that provides 200 kW of 60 Hz alternating current output. The environmental impacts and benefits of using this technology ware summarized in the report. The study indicates the methane emission reduction that could be achieved on a national and Global level. The important point being that this technology is economically viable as is demonstrated in the report.

Brown, J.T.; O`Brien, D.G.; Miller, A.R.; Atkins, R.; Sanders, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil coastal ocean near Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara Channel, California. Methane was quantified in the down originating from Coal Oil Point enters the atmosphere within the study area. Most of it appears

California at Santa Barbara, University of

152

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Interagency Coordination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links to interagency pdf. The multi-faceted issues associated with naturally occurring methane hydrates demand a coordinated approach to studying (1) the potential of this resource...

153

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Questions and Answers - In the chemical equation for methane gas why is  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon found in all organicand inorganic matter? carbon found in all organic<br>and inorganic matter? Previous Question (Is carbon found in all organic and inorganic matter?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How do you separate tungsten from its ore?) How do you separatetungsten from its ore? In the chemical equation CH4 for methane gas why is there more hydrogen than carbon? This is a very good question, and the answer is at the heart of modern atomic physics. The nucleus is at the center of the atom, like the sun is at the center of the solar system. Electrons move around in orbits around the nucleus, like the planets around the sun. But there is an important difference: electrons can only have very special energies, which correspond to specific orbits. The orbits in the atoms are called shells, and each shell can only hold so

156

Methyl Chloride from Direct Methane Partial Oxidation: A High-Temperature Shilov-Like Catalytic System  

SciTech Connect

The intention of this study is to demonstrate and evaluate the scientific and economic feasibility of using special solvents to improve the thermal stability of Pt-catalyst in the Shilov system, such that a high reaction temperature could be achieved. The higher conversion rate (near 100%) of methyl chloride from partial oxidation of methane under the high temperature ({approx} 200 C) without significant Pt0 precipitation has been achieved. High concentration of the Cl- ion has been identified as the key for the stabilization of the Pt-catalysts. H/D exchange measurements indicated that the over oxidation will occur at the elevated temperature, developments of the effective product separation processes will be necessary in order to rationalize the industry-visible CH4 to CH3Cl conversion.

Yongchun Tang; John (Qisheng) Ma

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

NREL: News - NREL to Help Convert Methane to Liquid Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

113 113 NREL to Help Convert Methane to Liquid Diesel Advanced research project could lead to lower greenhouse emissions, new life for spent gas and oil wells January 3, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will help develop microbes that convert methane found in natural gas into liquid diesel fuel, a novel approach that if successful could reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower dependence on foreign oil. The amount of natural gas simply flared or vented from oil wells globally is enormous - equal to one-third of the amount of petroleum used in the United States each year. And every molecule of methane vented to the atmosphere in that process has the global-warming capacity of 12 molecules of carbon dioxide.

158

Florida Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Florida Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

159

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with sampling and observation from the surface ship. Activities included collection of methane hydrate, sediment, water, and other materials from methane hydrate and seep sites...

160

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Td Symmetry Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents Methane Symmetry Operations. 11. ... Magnetic-dipole transitions are observed in molecular-beam studies of methane [42]. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

represent components of dynamic biogeochemical environments with inputs and outputs of methane, accurate rates of biological methane production are poorly understood. Recent...

162

Michigan Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Michigan Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

163

Kentucky Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

164

Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Renewable Methane Production System Technology available for licensing: Enhanced renewable methane production system provides a low-cost process that accelerates...

165

MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Academies 2010 One of these is methane hydrate - molecules of natural gas trapped in ice crystals. Containing vast amounts of natural gas, methane hydrate occurs in a variety...

166

New Materials Make Methane Capture Possible  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2013... SBN, captured enough medium source methane to turn it to high purity methane, which in turn could be used to generate efficient electricity.

167

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coal mine methane global review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including 3 Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in Whole-air Samples graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Donald Blake Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, California, 92697 USA Period of Record April 1979 - December 2012 Methods Whole-air samples are collected in conditioned, evacuated, 2-L stainless steel canisters; each canister is filled to ambient pressure over a period of about 1 minute (approximately 20 seconds to 2 minutes). These canisters are returned to the University of California at Irvine for chromatographic analysis. Analysis for methane includes gas chromatography with flame ionization, as

170

Microbial methane formation from hard coal and timber in an abandoned coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7% of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines.

Kruger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Thielemann, T.; Cramer, B.; Schippers, A.; Cypionka, H. [Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Controls On Methane...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems Last Reviewed 6242013 DE-FE0010406 Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced...

172

Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials  

SciTech Connect

The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

Rachor, Ingke, E-mail: i.rachor@ifb.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Methane Credit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane Credit Methane Credit Jump to: navigation, search Name Methane Credit Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28273 Product Specialises in utilising methane produced on municipal landfill sites. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter Methane Hydrate R&D Program Newsletter An image of a hydrate burning overlayed with the Newsletter Title: Fire in the Ice The methane hydrate newsletter, Fire in the Ice, is a bi-annual publication highlighting the latest developments in international gas hydrates R&D. Fire in the Ice promotes the exchange of information amoung those involved in gas hydrates research and development, and also recognizes the efforts of a hydrate researcher in each issue. The newsletter now reaches nearly 1300 scientists and other interested individuals in sixteen countries. To subscribe electronically to Fire in the Ice please send an email to karl.lang@contr.netl.doe.gov Please click on the links below to access issues of "Fire in the Ice". More on Methane Hydrates

175

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

176

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India Last Reviewed 12/15/2011 Heat flow and gas hydrates on the continental margin of India Last Reviewed 12/15/2011 DE-NT0005669 Goal The goals of this project are to construct maps of apparent and residual heat flow through the western continental margin of India and to investigate the relationship of residual heat flow anomalies to fluid flow and gas hydrate distribution in the subsurface. Performer Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science, Corvallis, OR 97331 Map of the four regions sampled during NGHP Expedition 01 Map of the four regions sampled during NGHP Expedition 01 Background Gas hydrate distribution in sediments depends on methane supply, which in turn depends on fluid flow. When drilling data are available to calibrate seismic observations of the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ),

177

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th-7th, 2013 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, June 6th-7th, 2013 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee...

178

Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 Methane Hydrate Research and...

179

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, January 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes January, 2010 Atlanta, GA Methane Hydrate Advisory...

180

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Descriptions for Energy Department Methane...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, March 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, March 2010 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes March 2010 Washington, DC Methane Hydrate Advisory...

182

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History U.S. 18,743 18,390 19,892 19,620 21,874 20,798 1989-2008 Alabama 1,665 1,900 1,773 2,068 2,126 1,727 1989-2008 Alaska 0 0 2007-2008 Arkansas 31 31 2007-2008 California 0 0 2007-2008 Colorado 6,473 5,787 6,772 6,344 7,869 8,238 1989-2008 Florida 0 0 2007-2008 Kansas 340 301 2007-2008 Kentucky 0 0 2007-2008 Louisiana 7 9 2007-2008 North 7 9 2007-2008 South Onshore 0 0 2007-2008 South Offshore 0 0 2007-2008 Michigan 0 0 2007-2008 Mississippi 0 0 2007-2008 Montana 66 75 2007-2008 New Mexico 4,396 5,166 5,249 4,894 4,169 3,991 1989-2008

183

CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

restructuring policies, resulting in a decline in coal production and consump- tion. Although China found a net increase in coal-bed emissions from 5.58 Tg CH4 in 1990 to 6.75 Tg in 1996, falling to 5 is that they are increasing steadily, because of the large quantities of coal being used to fuel a fast-growing industrial

Nur, Amos

184

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate informed decision-making regarding the potential development of gas hydrate resources between the scientific community and other stakeholders/decision makers. The Assessment will provide science-based information on the role of gas hydrates in natural climate change and the carbon cycle, their sensitivity to climate change, and the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of hydrate production. Performers Stiftelsen GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway Funding Institutions United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Statoil Schlumberger United States Department of Energy (USDOE)

185

An intensity-modulated dual-wavelength He-Ne laser for remote sensing of methane  

SciTech Connect

The differential absorption laser radar for methane sensing detects a leakage of methane gas by emitting into the atmosphere the light of a wavelength absorbable by methane, receiving the light returning after being reflected or scattered on a road or wall surface, etc., and measuring the light intensity lost during the travel. This methane detection system is highly practicable as it makes an instantaneous remote detection possible. The authors have developed a new He-Ne laser that could be used as the light source for the above system. This device emits a two-wavelength laser beam (one wavelength absorbable by methane and the other not absorbable by methane but used for referential purposes) from a single plasma tube, and there is no possibility of the axes of the two-wavelength component deviating from each other. Further, using this laser, they have developed a vehicle-mounted type differential absorption laser radar system which has successfully detected low density methane leakage while the vehicle was moving.

Ueki, T.; Tanaka, H.; Uehara, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events  

SciTech Connect

Unusually large and locally variable carbon isotope excursions coincident with mass extinctions at the end of the Permian Period (253 Ma) and Guadalupian Epoch (260 Ma) can be attributed to methane outbursts to the atmosphere. Methane has isotopic values {delta}{sup 13}C low enough to reduce to feasible amounts the carbon required for isotopic mass balance. The duration of the carbon isotopic excursions and inferred methane releases are here constrained to < 10,000 yr by counting annual varves in lake deposits and by estimating peat accumulation rates. On paleogeographic maps, the most marked carbon isotope excursions form linear arrays back to plausible methane sources: end-Permian Siberian Traps and Longwood-Bluff intrusions of New Zealand and end-Guadalupian Emeishan Traps of China. Intrusion of coal seams by feeder dikes to flood basalts could create successive thermogenic methane outbursts of the observed timing and magnitude, but these are unreasonably short times for replenishment of marine or permafrost sources of methane. Methane released by fracturing and heating of coal during intrusion of large igneous provinces may have been a planetary hazard comparable with bolide impact.

Retallack, G.J.; Jahren, A.H. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR (USA). Dept. of Geological Science

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 4.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mitigation may be the replacement of wetlands in another suitable location. Most of the waste materials generated by this facility would be disposed of offsite in licensed...

189

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as described by Dillon, et al. (1998). Failure would be accompanied by the release of methane gas, but a portion of the methane is likely to be oxidized unless the gas release is...

190

Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

191

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Waters Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-NT0005666 Goal The goal of this project is gain a better understanding of...

192

NETL: News Release - Methane Hydrate Production Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of CO2 molecules for methane molecules in the solid-water hydrate lattice, the release of methane gas, and the permanent storage of CO2 in the formation. This field experiment will...

193

coalbed methane | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coalbed methane coalbed methane Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations Source NREL Date Released April 30th, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 07th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords coalbed methane GEF Kenya NREL SWERA TMY UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Data (zip, 5.4 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

194

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time.

Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA); D' Este, Joseph R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time. 3 figs.

Noceti, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; D`Este, J.R.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

QUEST FOR NEW MATERIALS FOR METHANE STORAGE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quest for New Materials for Methane Storage: Gas Adsorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements. Yang Peng, 1,2 Vaiva ...

197

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

198

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields under relatively mild reaction conditions. Results in this document are reported under the headings: methane oxidation over silica, methane oxidation over Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, and oxidative coupling of methane over sulfate-doped Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. 24 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

NIST: Methane Symmetry Operations - Nuclear spin functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane Symmetry Operations. 9. Symmetry Properties of Laboratory-Fixed Nuclear Spin Functions, Nuclear Spin Statistics, and Parities. ...

200

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane Dariusz Strapo´c,1, Maria Mastalerz,2 Katherine, biodegradation Abstract Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal- bearing basins low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older

Macalady, Jenn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Methane production by attached film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

Jewell, William J. (202 Eastwood Ave., Ithaca, NY 14850)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

205

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Advisory Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee The Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee was created in response to provisions of the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000 and reauthorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The Committee is to advise the Secretary of Energy on potential applications of methane hydrate; assist in developing recommendations and priorities for the methane hydrate research and development program; and submit to Congress one or more reports on an assessment of the research program and an assessment of the DOE 5-year research plan. The Committee's charter stipulates that up to 15 members can be appointed by the Secretary of Energy, representing institutions of higher education, industrial enterprises and oceanographic institutions and state agencies.

206

Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Feasibility Production Feasibility Methane Hydrate Production Feasibility The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. The red curves are temperature profiles for various water depths; the blue line shows methane hydrate stability relative to temperature and pressure. The area enclosed by the two curves represents the area of methane hydrate stability. Methane, the predominant component of natural gas, forms hydrate in the presence of water, low temperatures and high pressures. Alternatively, when the temperature is increased or the pressure decreased so that hydrates are outside their stability field, they dissociate into methane and water.

207

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to modelmade at 91 and 483 m on a tall-tower near Walnut Grove, CA (

Zhao, Chuanfeng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery-Masking theII. METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAs RECOVERY- IN THE2011] METHANE DIGESTERS AND BIOGAS RECOVERY methane, and 64%

Di Camillo, Nicole G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dairy methane generator. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the work completed under this contract are presented. During the winter of 1979-80 three students enrolled, in the Mechanical Design Engineering Technology program at the Pennsylvania State University's Capitol Campus (Middletown, PA), undertook a feasibility study for the utilization of the manure generated by the dairy cows located on Mr. Thomas B. Williams farm for the generation and use of methane gas. The results of their effort was the design of an Anaerobic Digester/Electric Generation System. This preliminary designed system was later changed and improved by another group of P.S.U. MDET students in the spring of 1980. The final design included working drawings and an economic analysis of the estimated investment necessary to complete the Methane Generator/Electric Power Generation System.

Williams, T.B.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Method of making compost and spawned compost, mushroom spawn and generating methane gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Newly designed ribbon-type mixers provide an improved method for making composts, aerating composts, growing mushroom spawn, generating methane gas, and filling conveyors in the mushroom-growing industry. The mixers may be the double-ribbon type for purely mixing operations or the single-ribbon type for moving the material from one place to another. Both types can operate under pressure. In preparing compost for mushroom growing, operators can first use the airtight mixers for a preliminary anaerobic fermentation to produce methane, then by changing the atmosphere to an oxidizing one, complete the compost preparation under the necessary aerobic conditions.

Stoller, B.B.

1981-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 Characterization and Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02/17/2010 EST-380-NEDA Goal The purpose of this study is to establish sediment lithology and quantification of methane in hydrates hosted in fine-grained sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), a marine site of methane hydrate occurrence. The results will help establish a correlation between laboratory data and hydrate accumulation field data on dispersed hydrates in the natural environment. Performer Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York 11973 Background Gas hydrates are located in permafrost and marine environments and show potential as a vast methane source worldwide. However, methane is about 17 times more potent a greenhouse gas than CO2 and the inherent instability of

214

A STUDY ON SPHERICAL EXPANDING FLAME SPEEDS OF METHANE, ETHANE, AND METHANE/ETHANE MIXTURES AT ELEVATED PRESSURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-pressure experiments and chemical kinetics modeling were performed for laminar spherically expanding flames for methane/air, ethane/air, methane/ethane/air and propane/air mixtures at pressures between 1 and 10 atm and equivalence ratios ranging from 0.7 to 1.3. All experiments were performed in a new flame speed facility capable of withstanding initial pressures up to 15 atm. The facility consists of a cylindrical pressure vessel rated up to 2200 psi. Vacuums down to 30 mTorr were produced before each experiment, and mixtures were created using the partial pressure method. Ignition was obtained by an automotive coil and a constant current power supply capable of reducing the spark energy close to the minimum ignition energy. Optical cine-photography was provided via a Z-type schlieren set up and a high-speed camera (2000 fps). A full description of the facility is given including a pressure rating and a computational conjugate heat transfer analysis predicting temperature rises at the walls. Additionally, a detailed uncertainty analysis revealed total uncertainty in measured flame speed of approximately +-0.7 cm/s. This study includes first-ever measurements of methane/ethane flame speeds at elevated pressures as well as unique high pressure ethane flame speed measurements. Three chemical kinetic models were used and compared against measured flame velocities. GRI 3.0 performed remarkably well even for high-pressure ethane flames. The C5 mechanism performed acceptably at low pressure conditions and under-predicted the experimental data at elevated pressures. Measured Markstein lengths of atmospheric methane/air flames were compared against values found in the literature. In this study, Markstein lengths increased for methane/air flames from fuel lean to fuel rich. A reverse trend was observed for ethane/air mixtures with the Markstein length decreasing from fuel lean to fuel rich conditions. Flame cellularity was observed for mixtures at elevated pressures. For both methane and ethane, hydrodynamic instabilities dominated at stoichiometric conditions. Flame acceleration was clearly visible and used to determine the onset of cellular instabilities. The onset of flame acceleration for each high-pressure experiment was recorded.

De Vries, Jaap

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Methane Hydrates R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrates R&D Program Methane Hydrates R&D Program Gas hydrates are a naturally-occurring combination of methane gas and water that form under specific conditions of low temperature and high pressure. Once thought to be rare in nature, gas hydrates are now known to occur in great abundance in association with arctic permafrost and in the shallow sediments of the deep-water continental shelves. The most recent estimates of gas hydrate abundance suggest that they contain

216

Microbial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent Conversion to Methane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent conversion to Methane By Nirupam Pal Associate Professor California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Email : npal@calpoly.edu Phone : (805) 756-1355 INTRODUCTION The rising level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been of growing concern in recent years. The increasing levels of carbon dioxide, the most dominant component of greenhouse gases, contribute to global warming and changing global weather patterns which could potentially lead to catastrophic events that could threaten life in every form on this planet. The level of carbon dioxide in the worlds atmosphere has increased from about 280 ppm in 1850 to the current level of approximately 350 ppm. There are several natural sources and sinks of

217

Table 16. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

aIncludes Illinois and Indiana. Note: The above table is based on coalbed methane proved reserves and production volumes as reported to the EIA on ...

218

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Hydrate Model Code Comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study An International Effort to Compare Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulators Code Comparison Logo The National Energy Technology Laboratory...

219

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of gas hydrates. The effort aims to quantify the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and hydrate cemented sediments for use in models of the dynamic behavior of...

220

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5102012 ESD05-048 Goal The project is bringing new laboratory measurements and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Projects If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. Search Hydrates Projects Active Projects | Completed...

222

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

characterization and temporal variation of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes on the Alaska North Slope in response to Arctic climate change Last Reviewed 632013 DE-NT0005665...

223

,"California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","...

224

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Gulf of Mexico and 2) NRL's Advanced Research Initiative on shallow sediment methane seeps. Geochemical data coupled with heat flow probe data were used to estimate...

225

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2013 Washington, DC July 16, 2013 Meeting Minutes More Documents & Publications Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes Electricity Advisory Committee Notice of Open...

226

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

late Quaternary. An investigation of the nature of deposition and alteration of the methane hydrate in cores from the Umnak Plateau in the southeastern Bering Sea was conducted...

227

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

establishing high-priority geographical regions of prospective interest, in terms of methane volume estimates; c). Prediction of environmental effects and geologic risks at the...

228

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

goal was to develop new methodologies to characterize the physical properties of methane hydrate and hydrate sediment systems. Performers Westport Technology Center...

229

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

during NGHP Expedition 01 Background Gas hydrate distribution in sediments depends on methane supply, which in turn depends on fluid flow. When drilling data are available to...

230

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3182013 Project Goals The primary goals of the DOENETL Natural Gas Hydrate Field Studies...

231

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(RUS) technique to examine hydrate formationdissociation processes. For determining methane abundance and location on a grain-to-grain scale, a completely new method of...

232

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

natural and simulated sediment samples, and to use these sediments as hosts to form methane hydrate and to investigate the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation...

233

,"Federal Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

234

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for this sample, but Raman bands from both samples were essentially identical: methane and ethane along with trace amounts of isobutene and trans-butane. Small angle...

235

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the behavior of gas hydrates in their natural environment under either production (methane gas extraction) or climate change scenarios. This research is closely linked with...

236

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decomposition Kinetic Studies of Methane Hydrate in Host Sediments under Subsurface Mimic Conditions Last Reviewed 02172010 EST-380-NEDA Goal The purpose of this study is to...

237

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and presentations as well as a listing of funded students can be found in the Methane Hydrate Program Bibliography PDF. A final report is available by request. Contact...

238

,"Miscellaneous States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

239

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and presentations as well as a listing of funded students can be found in the Methane Hydrate Program Bibliography PDF. Final Project Report PDF-23MB - October, 2009...

240

,"Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization project has resulted in a characterization of two large prospective methane hydrate accumulations (or trends); the Eileen Trend, which underlies but extends well...

242

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Physical Properties of Methane Hydrate Deposit at Blake Ridge Last Reviewed 02052010 Bathymetric location map of the Blake Ridge study area Bathymetric location map...

243

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horizon spill approximately 10 miles from the observatory showed increased levels of methane at two depths where detectable levels had not been seen in the past. The evidence...

244

NETL: Methane Hydrates - ANS Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slope represents an important milestone in an ongoing evaluation of Alaskan Arctic methane hydrate potential. This evaluation, a joint effort of DOE, USGS, BP Exploration...

245

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey, Woods Hole Field Center Location Woods Hole Massachusetts Background Oceanic methane hydrates are a major emerging research topic spanning energy resource issues, global...

246

New Materials Make Methane Capture Possible  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2013... and FER, were able to concentrate dilute methane streams into moderate concentrations that could be used to treat coal-mine ventilation air.

247

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL ORD Methane Hydrate Research - Thermal Properties of Hydrate Tool Development Last Reviewed 3182013 Project Goal The goal of this project is increased understanding of...

248

Coal bed methane reservoir simulation studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to perform simulation studies for a specific coal bed methane reservoir. First, the theory and reservoir engineering aspects of (more)

Karimi, Kaveh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

250

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seol, Y. and T. J. Kneafsey, Methane hydrate induced permeability modification for multiphase flow in unsaturated porous media, Journal of Geophysical Research, 2011, In...

251

Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method for converting methane and water to methanol and hydrogen using visible light and a catalyst.

Noceti, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; D' Este, J.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane New Field Discoveries Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production...

253

Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production LA, South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

254

California (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

255

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Reserves Based Production (Billion Cubic Feet)...

256

Texas (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Texas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

257

Texas--RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

258

Texas--RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

259

Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...

260

Texas--RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Texas--RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

262

Lower 48 Federal Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Federal Offshore U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

263

Texas--RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

264

Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 LA, South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

265

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Alaska Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

266

Texas--RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

267

Texas--RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

268

Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

269

North Dakota Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

270

Texas--RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

271

Texas--RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

272

Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...

273

Texas--RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

274

Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, October 2011...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2011 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes, October 2011 Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes October 2011 Washington, DC Advisory Committee...

275

New York Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production New York Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

276

Texas--RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

277

North Dakota Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production North Dakota Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

278

Louisiana--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production LA, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

279

Texas--RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

280

Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

282

Alaska (with Total Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Alaska Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

283

Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

284

Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

285

Why sequence functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen cycles in freshwater lakes? Methane is a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, but it is also a potential source of...

286

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in the Sacramento Valley of California Title Airborne observations of methane emissions from rice cultivation in...

287

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Advisory Committee Charter 1. Committee's Official Designation. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee (MHAC) 2. Authority....

288

Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

289

Texas--RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

290

Mississippi (with State off) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production Mississippi Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

291

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Coalbed Methane, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

292

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Application of Crunch...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

multi-dimensional reactive transport simulation code to constrain modern day methane fluxes and to reconstruct past episodes of methane flux that can be correlated with...

293

Changes related to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)" Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)...

294

Pages that link to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)" Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)...

295

Self-induced unstable behaviors of CH4 and H2/CH4 flames in a...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portillo, David Littlejohn, Scott M. Martin, and Robert K. Cheng Journal Combustion and Flame Volume 160 Issue 2 Pagination 307 - 321 Date Published 022013 ISSN 00102180 DOI...

296

Manifold methods for methane combustion  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to develop a new method for studying realistic chemistry in turbulent methane combustion with NO{sub x} mechanism. The realistic chemistry is a simplification to a more detailed chemistry based on the manifold method; accuracy is determined by interaction between the transport process and the chemical reaction. In this new (tree) method, probability density function or partially stirred reactor calculations are performed. Compared with the reduced mechanism, manifold, and tabulation methods, the new method overcomes drawbacks of the reduced mechanism method and preserves the advantages of the manifold method. Accuracy is achieved by specifying the size of the cell.

Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

298

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 11/30/2011 Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 11/30/2011 DE-FC26-06NT42963 Goal The goal of this project is to develop observational and experimental data that can provide a better understanding of the basic mechanisms at work in a methane hydrate reservoir that is under production. To this end, a thorough physical understanding of underlying phenomena associated with methane hydrate production will be acquired through unique, multi-scale experiments and associated analyses. In addition, one or more mathematical models that account for the observed phenomena and provide insights that may help to optimize methane hydrate production methods will be developed. Performers Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

299

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Atmospheric Radon Measurements in the Arctic; Fronts, Seasonal Observations, and Transport of Continental Air to Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon was determined in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean in flights of a United States Naval Research Laboratory aircraft in April and May 1974. Simultaneously collected air samples were analyzed for carbon monoxide, methane, ...

P. E. Wilkniss; R. E. Larson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Remote sensor improves methane leakage surveys  

SciTech Connect

The remote sensing methane detector (RSMD) described in this paper is the result of a twelve year cooperative research program sponsored by the Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Environmental Research and Technology, Inc. and the Gas Research Institute. It is a hand-held, rechargeable battery-powered sensor that operates eight hours on one charge with a sensitivity very specific to methane. It can be scanned along the right of way to detect any methane in its path, up to at least 50 feet away. The RSMD is methane specific in that it only sense methane with minor sensitivity to ethane. This makes it particularly useful in industrial areas where present instruments are confused by solvents. It cannot be poisoned by silicones or leaded gasoline, since it is an optical system. When a cloud of methane has been detected by the RSMD, a sample cell attachment can be used to determine methane concentration in parts per million. A low power microcomputer is used in the RSMD to control its operation.

Eberle, A.C.; Kebabian, P.L.; Kruse, J.R.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012

303

Diffusive Accumulation of Methane Bubbles in Seabed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider seabed bearing methane bubbles. In the absence of fractures the bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface tension forces; therefore the dominant mechanism of transfer of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. The adequate description of this process requires accounting "other-than-normal" (non-Fickian) diffusion effects, thermodiffusion and gravity action. We evaluate the diffusive flux of aqueous methane and predict the possibility of existence of bubble mass accumulation zones (which can appear independently from the presence/absence of hydrate stability zone) and effect of non-Fickian drift on the capacity of shallow and deep methane-hydrate deposits.

Goldobin, D S; Levesley, J; Lovell, M A; Rochelle, C A; Jackson, P; Haywood, A; Hunter, S; Rees, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future New Methane Hydrate Research: Investing in Our Energy Future August 31, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas. Jenny Hakun What Are Methane Hydrates? Methane hydrates are 3D ice-lattice structures with natural gas locked inside. The substance looks remarkably like white ice, but it does not behave like ice. If methane hydrate is either warmed or depressurized, it will release the trapped natural gas.

305

METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

Frazer, J.W.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

Methane Digester Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program Methane Digester Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate RFA can provide up to $250,000 of loan principal Program Info Funding Source Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) State Minnesota Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount RFA participation limited to 45% of loan principal Provider Minnesota Department of Agriculture Established in 1998, the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture Methane Digester Loan Program helps livestock producers install on-farm anaerobic digesters used for the production of electricity by providing zero-interest loans to eligible borrowers. The loan program is part of the Rural Finance Authority (RFA) revolving loan fund, through which farmers can receive financial aid

307

Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2010 FY 2010 Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress September 2011 U.S. Department of ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | September 2011 FY 2010 Methane Hydrate Program Annual Report to Congress | Page 2 Message from the Secretary Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed report entitled, U.S. Department of Energy FY 2010 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy and summarizes the progress being made in this important area of

308

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate DE-FC26-05NT42663 Goal The goal of this project was to establish rock physics models for use in generating synthetic seismic signatures of methane hydrate reservoirs. Ultimately, the intent was to improve seismic detection and quantification of offshore and onshore methane hydrate accumulations. Performer Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Background Gas hydrate reservoir characterization is, in principle, no different from traditional hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. The seismic response of the subsurface is determined by the spatial distribution of the elastic properties (properties of the subsurface that deform as seismic waves pass through it) and attenuation. By mapping changes in the elastic properties, scientists can identify geologic features, including hydrocarbon reservoirs.

309

Arkansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 3 3 3...

310

Alabama Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 23...

311

Kansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 17 25 38...

312

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the DV JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02052010 DE-FC26-01NT41329 photo of a man showing the pressure...

313

Virginia Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 56 81...

314

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that the hydrate in this region occurs in patchy deposits and may require a high methane flux from the subsurface in order to form more continuous drilling prospects. Project...

315

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-AF26-01NT00370 Goal The goal of the project is to better characterize potential methane hydrate drilling sites in the Gulf of Mexico for the Ocean Drilling Program....

316

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 133 278...

317

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area, known as Mississippi Canyon lease block 118, is well-known for the occurrence of methane hydrate and is the location of the University of Mississippis gas hydrate...

318

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 58 68...

319

Methane Hydrates - Mt. Elbert Well Log Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more. Project background information - Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization - DE-FC26-01NT41332 More information on the National Methane Hydrates R&D Program...

320

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FWP-4340-60 and FWP-42C1-01 Goal Determine the presence and activity of methanogens in methane hydrate-bearing sediments. Background The project was set up to determine a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of high chloride concentration and no sulfate reduction zone, indicating areas of high methane flux. The February 2005 RV Pelican cruise was a follow-up to the May 2004 cruise....

322

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 182013 DE-NT0005667 Goal The goal of this project is to assess the efficacy of...

323

Montana Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 12 12 13...

324

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3 5...

325

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to develop a two-dimensional, basin-scale model for the deep sediment biosphere with methane dynamics to provide a better picture of the distribution of hydrates on the sea floor...

326

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal The overall objective of this project is to develop a new method to assess methane hydrate distribution using 3-D seismic data calibrated to wellbore data. The method...

327

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-FC26-06NT42960 Goal The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of regional and local differences in gas...

328

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Studies in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5/10/2012 Laboratory Studies in Support of Characterization of Recoverable Resources from Methane Hydrate Deposits Last Reviewed 5/10/2012 ESD05-048 Goal The project is bringing new laboratory measurements and evaluation techniques to bear on the difficult problems of characterization and gas recovery from methane hydrate deposits. Performer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Background LBNL is performing laboratory tests to provide data to support the characterization and development of methane hydrate deposits. Major areas of research underway include hydrologic measurements, combined geomechanical/geophysical measurements, and synthetic hydrate formation studies. Hydrologic Measurements Relatively little research has been done to experimentally determine

329

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection and Microbiological Analysis of Gas Hydrate Cores Collection and Microbiological Analysis of Gas Hydrate Cores FWP-4340-60 and FWP-42C1-01 Goal Determine the presence and activity of methanogens in methane hydrate-bearing sediments. Background The project was set up to determine a fundamental modeling parameter - the amount of methane generated in deep sediments by methanogenic microorganisms. This would allow methane distribution models of gas hydrate reservoirs to accurately reflect an unknown volume and the distribution of biogenic methane within in a reservoir. The personnel at INEL have experience in similar biologic research and are considered to be experts by their global peers. Performer Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) - sample collection and analysis Location

330

Time-series analysis for the episodic production and transport of methane from the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands, northern Minnesota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The large peat basins of North America are an important reservoir in the global carbon cycle and a significant source of atmospheric methane. The authors investigated carbon cycling in the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands (GLAP) of Minnesota. Initially in 1990, they identified a dramatic change in the concentration of methane in the pore-waters of the raised bogs in the GLAP during an extreme drought. This methane dissipated when the drought broke in 1991 and the occurrence of deep methane is related to changes in the direction of groundwater flow in the peat column. The production of methane and its diffusive loss to the atmosphere was modeled and was about 10 times less than that measured directly in chambers at the land surface. It is clear from the reversals in hydraulic heat, changes in pore-water chemical composition over time, and paleostratigraphic markers, that regional ground water flow systems that are controlled by climate change are unexpectedly a major control over methanogenesis and carbon cycling in GLAP. Seismic profiles made showed that buried bedrock ridges particularly deflect regional groundwater flow upwards towards the land surface and towards raised bog landforms. In addition, high-resolution GPS measurements from data stations funded by this DOE project have shown this year that the peakland land surface elevation changes daily on a scale of cms, and seasonally on a scale of 10s of cm. This most recent observation is exciting because it may reflect episodic degassing of free phase methane from the peat column to the atmosphere, a source for methane previously unaccounted for by methane researchers.

Siegel, D.I.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Production and Ebullition of Methane in a Shallow Eutrophic Lake (Lake Elsinore, CA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide and total gaseous mercuryFluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from a small productiveebullition of methane and carbon dioxide from a eutrophied

Martinez, Denise Nicole

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues with Methane and Propane Michael A. Green LawrenceSAFETY ISSUES WITH METHANE AND PROPANE M. A. Green Lawrencehydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary

Green, Michael A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Separation and Purification of Methane from coal-Bed Methane via the Hydrate Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separation of methane from coal-bed methane (CBM) via hydrate process using tetrahydrofuran (THF) + sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as additives was investigated in this work. The effect of additives, the concentration of the additives and hydrate memory ... Keywords: CBM, hydrate, separation, THF, SDS

Cai Jing; Chen Zhaoyang; Li Xiaosen; Xu Chungang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

TCE degradation by methane-oxidizing cultures grown with various nitrogen sources  

SciTech Connect

Methane-oxidizing microorganisms exhibit great potential for vadose zone bioremediation. This paper reports the effects of supplying nitrogen as nitrate, ammonia, and molecular nitrogen on the growth, trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation capacity, and energy storage capacity of a mixed methane-oxidizing culture. Cells inoculated from a nitrate-supplied methane-oxidizing culture grew fastest while fixing atmospheric nitrogen when oxygen partial pressures were kept less than 8%. Cell growth and methane oxidation were more rapid for ammonia-supplied cells than for nitrate-supplied or nitrogen-fixing cells. However, nitrogen-fixing cells were capable of oxidizing TCE as efficiently as nitrate or ammonia-supplied cells, and they exhibited the highest TCE transformation capacity of all three cultures both with and without formate as an exogenous reducing energy source. The TCE product toxicity was not as pronounced for the nitrogen fixing cells as for the nitrate- or ammonia-supplied cells after exposure to high (20 mg/L) or low (2 mg/L) TCE concentrations. Energy storage in the form of poly-{beta}- hydroxybutyrate was 20% to 30% higher for nitrogen-fixing cells; increased energy storage may be responsible for the higher transformation capacity of nitrogen-fixing cells when no external reducing energy was available. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Chu, K.H.; Alvarez-Cohen, L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

336

Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO{sub 4}-34 or AlPO{sub 4}-5, or related AlPO{sub 4} structure activate methane starting at approximately 350{degree}C. Between 400 and 500{degree}C and at methane pressures {le} 1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500{degree}C approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The cobalt substituted AlPO{sub 4}-34 structure (CoAPSO-34) produces ethylene, ethane, propylene, and propane in varying proportions, depending on reaction conditions. The cobalt-substituted AlPO{sub 4}-5 (CoAPSO-5) produces polypropylene in very high yield, with ethane, ethylene, and propane also produced. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal (III) from of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the transition metal(II) form to the transition metal (III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O{sub 2}) or electrochemically. 4 figs.

Iton, L.E.; Maroni, V.A.

1990-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Extracting value from coal mine methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging US policy to regulate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a cap-and-trade program presents mine managers with a new opportunity to explore and develop methane utilization or abatement projects that generate value from the anodization of carbon offset credits. In addition, the rising focus on US energy security and domestic energy supply is promoting mine managers and engineers to give further consideration to the importance of their methane gas by-products. The market through which coal mine methane offset projects can be developed and carbon offset credits monetized is quickly maturing. While many methane utilization projects have previously been uneconomical, the carbon offset credit market provides a new set of financing tools for mine engineers to capitalize these projects today. Currently , there are two certification programs that have approved project protocols for CMM projects. The Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) offers a methodology approved under the Clean Development Mechanism, the international compliance based offset market under the Kyoto Protocol. The VCS protocol is applicable to projects that combust ventilation air methane (VAM) and methane extracted from pre-and post-mine drainage systems. The Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX), which operates a voluntary yet binding cap-and-trade market, also has an approved protocol for CMM projects. CCX's protocol can be applied to projects combusting VAM, and methane extracted from pre-and-post-mine drainage systems, as well as abandoned mines. The article describes two case studies - Developing a gob gas utilization project financed by carbon offset credits and First VAM oxidation system to be commissioned at an operating mine in the US. 1 tab., 4 photos.

Liebert, B. [Verdao Group (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ignitions in mixtures of coal dust, air, and methane from abrasive impacts of hard minerals with pneumatic pipeline steel. Report of investigations 1976  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory equipment which simulated abrasive impacts between steel and minerals as might occur during pneumatic transport of coal was used by the Bureau of Mines to characterize the potential explosion hazard due to such collisions in an atmosphere of fine coal dust-air-methane. A variety of coal mine rock materials, including sandstone, limestone, and pyrite-bearing limestone, were impacted with specimens of pipeline steel. Tests were conducted in atmospheres containing zero to 6.4 vol-pct methane mixed with zero to 300 mg/l coal dust. Coal dust-air alone was not ignited by abrasive impacts, but additions of as little as 1 vol-pct methane to coal dust-air resulted in ignitions. Steel impacting against sandstone caused ignitions in coal-air-methane mixtures with the probability for ignitions increasing with an increase in methane. Ignitions in coal-air-methane were found to be caused by a hot friction-induced smear on the impacted rock at the impact site rather than by sparks. High-speed photography was used to verify this observation.

Kelley, J.E.; Forkner, B.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Water-Gas Shift and CO Methanation Reactions over Ni-CeO2(111) Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies were used to study the interaction of Ni atoms with CeO2(111) surfaces. Upon adsorption on CeO2(111) at 300 K, nickel remains in a metallic state. Heating to elevated temperatures (500 800 K) leads to partial reduction of the ceria substrate with the formation of Ni2? species that exists as NiO and/or Ce1-xNixO2-y. Interactions of nickel with the oxide substrate significantly reduce the density of occupied Ni 3d states near the Fermi level. The results of core-level photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure point to weakly bound CO species on CeO2(111) which are clearly distinguishable from the formation of chemisorbed carbonates. In the presence of Ni, a stronger interaction is observed with chemisorption of CO on the admetal. When the Ni is in contact with Ce?3 cations, CO dissociates on the surface at 300 K forming NiCx compounds that may be involved in the formation of CH4 at higher temperatures. At medium and large Ni coverages ([0.3 ML), the Ni/CeO2(111) surfaces are able to catalyze the production of methane from CO and H2, with an activity slightly higher than that of Ni(100) or Ni(111). On the other hand, at small coverages of Ni (\\0.3 ML), the Ni/CeO2(111) surfaces exhibit a very low activity for CO methanation but are very good catalysts for the water gas shift reaction.

Senanayake, Sanjaya D [ORNL; Evans, Jaime [Universidad Central de Venezuela; Agnoli, Stefano [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Barrio, Laura [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Chen, Tsung-Liang [ORNL; Hrbek, Jan [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Radriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Methane Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane Power Inc Methane Power Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Methane Power Inc. Name Methane Power Inc. Address 121 Edinburgh South Drive Place Cary, NC Zip 27511 Sector Renewable Energy Product Methane Power is a renewable energy project developer that focuses on landfill gas-to-energy projects. Currently, they are a supplier of landfill gas generated energy to Duke Energy in North Carolina. Phone number 919-297-7206 Website http://www.methanepower.net Coordinates 35.7395875°, -78.8029226° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.7395875,"lon":-78.8029226,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coal bed methane global market potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide increases in energy prices, as well as the increased potential for project financing derived from emissions credits, have renewed focus on coal bed methane (CBM) and coal mine methane (CMM) projects in coal-producing countries around the world. Globally, CBM utilization projects (in the operational, development, or planning stages) capture and utilize methane from gassy underground coal mines in at least 13 countries. The total methane emission reductions that could be achieved by these projects are approximately 135 billion cubic feet per year (equal to 14.8 million tons of carbon equivalent per year). This global activity level reflects a growing awareness of the technological practicality and the economic attractiveness of coal mine methane recovery and use. This report outlines the potential of the global CBM market. Contents: An overview of CBM; Challenges and issues; Technologies to generate power from CAM; Global CBM/CMM utilization; Country highlights; Ranking of countries with the largest CMM development potential (Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, USA, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Africa); Planning CBM/CMM projects; Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies; Demonstration projects; Development plan and application process; Equity and debt; Carbon financing; Government sponsors; Private sponsors; Project risk reduction support; Examples of integrated project financing; Glossary.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland  

SciTech Connect

Peatlands are one of the most important terrestrial reservoirs in the global cycle for carbon, and are a major source for atmospheric methane. However, little is known about the dynamics of these carbon reservoirs or their feedback mechanisms with the pool of atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the Holocene. Specifically, it is unknown whether large peat basins are sources, sinks, or steady-state reservoirs for the global carbon cycle. In particular, the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved organic carbon form the deeper portions of these peatlands is unknown. Our DOE research program is to conduct an integrated ecologic and hydrogeochemical study of the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands (northern Minnesota) to better understand the carbon dynamics in globally significant peat basins. Specifically, our study will provide local and regional data on (1), rates of carbon accumulation and loss and fluxes of methane in the peat profiles; (2) the physical and botanical factors controlling the production of methane and carbon dioxide in the wetland; and (3) the role of hydrogeologic processes in controlling the fluxes of gases and solutes through the peat. We intend to use computer simulation models, calibrated to field data, to scale-up from local to regional estimates of methane and carbon dioxide within the basin. How gases and dissolved organic carbon escapes form peatlands in unknown. It has been suggested that the concentrations of methane produced in the upper peat are sufficient to produce diffusion gradients towards the surface. Alternatively, gas may move through the peat profile by groundwater advection.

Siegel, D.I.

1992-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

344

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

345

Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

346

New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

347

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

348

Western States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Western States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Western States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

349

New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

350

Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

351

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

352

Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Western States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

353

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic energy conversion system being considered in thisEnergy Fixation and Conversion with Algal Bacterial Systems/energy producer based on current methane prices. bility of a kelp to methane conversion system

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart.........................................................................................8 Coal and Metabolite Enrichment Studies ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16

Maxwell, Bruce D.

355

MethaneHydrateRD_FC.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

gas is an important energy gas is an important energy resource for the United States, providing nearly one-quarter of total energy use. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has played a major role in developing technologies to help tap new, unconventional sources of natural gas. FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH BENEFITS Methane Hydrate R&D "The (DOE) Program has supported and managed a high-quality research portf olio that has enabled signifi cant progress toward the (DOE) Program's long-term goals." The Nati onal Academies 2010 One of these is methane hydrate - molecules of natural gas trapped in ice crystals. Containing vast amounts of natural gas, methane hydrate occurs in a variety of forms in sediments within and below thick permafrost in Arctic regions, and in the

356

SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

Sundaram, Muthu S. (Shoreham, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments - Chatham Rise, New Zealand Task Last Reviewed 12/30/2013 DE-AI26-06NT42878 Goal The goal of the Interagency Agreement between the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Naval Research Laboratory is to conduct research to enhance understanding of the extent and dynamics of gas hydrate deposits and their relation to areas of focused fluid flux at and beneath the seafloor. Performer Marine Biogeochemistry Section, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Background Methane is a potent greenhouse gas necessitating a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling its contribution to the atmospheric carbon cycle. Active methane fluxes (from deep sediment hydrates and seeps) contribute to shallow sediment biogeochemical carbon cycles, which in turn

360

Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

Atherton, C.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CFD Modeling of Methane Production from Hydrate-Bearing Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane hydrate is being examined as a next-generation energy resource to replace oil and natural gas. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that methane hydrate may contain more organic carbon the the world's coal, oil, and natural gas combined. To assist in developing this unfamiliar resource, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has undertaken intensive research in understanding the fate of methane hydrate in geological reservoirs. This presentation reports preliminary computational fluid dynamics predictions of methane production from a subsurface reservoir.

Gamwo, I.K.; Myshakin, E.M.; Warzinski, R.P.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July-September 2007 July-September 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Rice University University of Houston George J. Hirasaki Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Table of Contents DOE Methane Hydrate Program Peer Review.................................................. 3 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ........................... 3 Task 6: Numerical Models for Quantification of Hydrate and Free Gas Accumulations....................................................................................................

363

Method for removal of methane from coalbeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Upgrading drained coal mine methane to pipeline quality: a report on the commercial status of system suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's scenario of growing energy demand worldwide and rising natural gas prices, any methane emitted into the atmosphere is an untapped resource of energy and potentially a lost opportunity for additional revenue. In 2005, 9.7% of the total US anthropogenic emissions of methane were attributed to coal production. In recent years, many gassy coal mines have seized the opportunity to recover coal mine methane (CMM) and supply it to natural gas pipeline systems. With natural gas prices in the US exceeding $7.00 per million Btu, CMM pipeline sales brought in an annual revenue topping $97 million in 2005. However, significant opportunity still exists for tapping into this resource as 22% of the drained CMM remains unutilized as of 2005, primarily because its quality does not meet the requirements of natural gas pipeline systems. Recent advances in technologies now offer off-the-shelf options in the US that can upgrade the drained CMM to pipeline quality. These gas upgrading technologies are not only opening up the market to lower-quality methane resources but also providing significant means for reducing emissions, since methane is over 20 times a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. This report reviews current gas upgrading technologies available in the market for removal of typical CMM contaminants, provides examples of their successful commercial implementation and compiles a list of vendors specific to nitrogen rejection systems, since nitrogen exposes the biggest challenge to upgrading CMM. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 9 apps.

Carothers, F.P.; Schultz, M.L.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Multivariate statistical evaluation of equilibrium methane adsorption isotherms of coal  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of methane by coals varies over a broad range of values and appears to depend on a complex function related to coal rank. In order to evaluate these variations in methane adsorption 100 coal samples were analyzed. The paper presents some preliminary results of this study based on multivariate statistical evaluation of equilibrium methane adsorption isotherm data, coal petrology, and vitrinite reflectance.

Schwarzer, R.S.; Bayliss, G.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 Abstract Methane gas is a by-product of landfilling municipal solid wastes (MSW). Most tonnes of methane annually, 70% of which is used to generate heat and/or electricity. The landfill gas. All rights reserved. Keywords: Landfill gas; Renewable energy; Municipal solid waste; Biogas; Methane

Columbia University

367

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico Keywords: Methane flux Mass spectrometer Brine pool Methane oxidation Gulf of Mexico a b s t r a c t Deep report direct measurements of methane concentrations made in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool located

Girguis, Peter R.

368

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

File:Methane.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methane.pdf Methane.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Methane.pdf Size of this preview: 448 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,218 × 1,630 pixels, file size: 929 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 5 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:51, 9 February 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:51, 9 February 2012 1,218 × 1,630, 5 pages (929 KB) Graham7781 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file: Hydraulic Fracturing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=File:Methane.pdf&oldid=404017"

370

California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - No...

371

Federal Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Offshore California Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 -...

372

Generating power with drained coal mine methane  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

NONE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Methane Hydrates R&D U S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Power of Working Together Interagency Coordination on Methane Hydrates R&D U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l...

374

Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

Song Jin

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act establishes a long-term coal bed methane protection account and a coal bed methane protection program for the purpose of compensating private landowners and water right holders for damage to land and to water quality and availability that is attributable to the development of coal bed methane wells. The Act aims to provide for

377

Methane Hydrates - The National R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrates R&D Program Methane Hydrates R&D Program The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program Welcome to the information portal for the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program. Over the past eight years, research carried out under this program has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of methane hydrates, their role in nature, and their potential as a future energy resource. This success is largely due to an unprecedented level of cooperation between federal agencies, industry, national laboratories, and academic institutions. For a quick introduction to methane hydrate and its potential as a fuel source, please read the 2011 Methane Hydrates Primer. Information on other elements of the program can be found under the remaining Key Links. Read More.

378

The Effects of Dissolved Methane upon Liquid Argon Scintillation Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report on measurements of the effects of dissolved methane upon argon scintillation light. We monitor the light yield from an alpha source held 20 cm from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (PMT) assembly as methane is injected into a high-purity liquid argon volume. We observe significant suppression of the scintillation light yield by dissolved methane at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. By examining the late scintillation light time constant, we determine that this loss is caused by an absorption process and also see some evidence of methane-induced scintillation quenching at higher concentrations (50-100 ppb). Using a second PMT assembly we look for visible re-emission features from the dissolved methane which have been reported in gas-phase argon methane mixtures, and we find no evidence of visible re-emission from liquid-phase argon methane mixtures at concentrations between 10 ppb and 0.1%.

B. J. P. Jones; T. Alexander; H. O. Back; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; A. Greene; T. Katori; S. Pordes; M. Toups

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Operation of an aircraft engine using liquefied methane fuel  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a reciprocating aircraft engine on methane fuel is demonstrated. Since storage of the methane fuel in the gaseous state would impractical for a flight fuel system, a liquid storage system was used. System valving was configured to deliver only liquid methane to the engine supply line. The equipment description includes photo and diagram illustrations of the liquid methane storage dewar, and photos of the methane heat exchanger, pressure regulator and air-fuel mixer. The engine test results are presented for gasoline and methane in terms of RPM, horsepower, fuel flow, specific energy consumption and standard conditions horsepower. Conclusions include the finding that conversion of an aircraft reciprocating engine to operate on liquified methane is possible with very satisfactory results.

Raymer, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Carbon-13 Isotopic Abundance and Concentration of Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and 35 from the Southern Hemisphere. The air samples were collected mostly in rural or marine locations remote from large sources of CH4 and are considered representative...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a primary source of greenhouse gases. Injection of CO2 from power plants near coalbed reservoirs is a win-win method to reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. Limited studies have investigated CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production in San Juan and Alberta basins, but reservoir modeling is needed to assess the potential of the Black Warrior basin. Alabama ranks 9th nationally in CO2 emissions from power plants; two electricity generation plants are adjacent to the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway. This research project was a reservoir simulation study designed to evaluate the potential for CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery in the Blue Creek Field of Black Warrior basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector and producer. The simulation study was based on a 5-spot well pattern 40-ac well spacing. Injection of 100 percent CO2 in coal seams resulted in average volumes of 0.57 Bcf of sequestered CO2 and average volumes of 0.2 Bcf of enhance methane production for the Mary Lee coal zone only, from an 80-acre 5-spot well pattern. For the entire Blue Creek field of the Black Warrior basin, if 100 percent CO2 is injected in the Pratt, Mary Lee and Black Creek coal zones, enhance methane resources recovered are estimated to be 0.3 Tcf, with a potential CO2sequestration capacity of 0.88 Tcf. The methane recovery factor is estimated to be 68.8 percent, if the three coal zones are completed but produced one by one. Approximately 700 wells may be needed in the field. For multi-layers completed wells, the permeability and pressure are important in determining the breakthrough time, methane produced and CO2 injected. Dewatering and soaking do not benefit the CO2 sequestration process but allow higher injection rates. Permeability anisotropy affects CO2 injection and enhanced methane recovery volumes of the field. I recommend a 5-spot pilot project with the maximum well BHP of 1,000 psi at the injector, minimum well BHP of 500 psi at the producer, maximum injection rate of 70 Mscf/D, and production rate of 35 Mscf/D. These technical results, with further economic evaluation, could generate significant projects for CO2 sequestration and enhance coalbed methane production in Blue Creek field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama.

He, Ting

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Regulation of methane genes and genome expression  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the methane genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ?H (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein, designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences and alternative initiation codons in translation initiation, established that polarity e

John N. Reeve

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 In Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-FC26-01NT41329 photo of a man showing the pressure core sampler on the deck of JOIDES Resolution Pressure core sampler on deck courtesy Texas A&M University Goal The goal of the project was to characterize hydrate accumulation at Hydrate Ridge (offshore Oregon) and improve the ability to use geophysical and subsurface logging to identify hydrates. A follow-on goal was to characterize hydrate accumulation at offshore Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. Background This project focused on physically verifying the existence of hydrates at Hydrate Ridge through the collection of pressurized and non-pressurized core samples and logging data. This study developed and tested tools to

384

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-FC26-06NT42960 Goal The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of regional and local differences in gas hydrate systems from three perspectives: as an energy resource, as a geohazard, and as a long-term influence on global climate. Performers Rice University, Houston, TX University of Texas, Austin, TX Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Background Heterogeneity in the distribution of gas hydrate accumulations impacts all aspects of research into gas hydrate natural systems. The challenge is to delineate, understand, and appreciate these differences at the regional and local scales, where differences in in situ concentrations are relevant to the importance of gas hydrate as a resource, a geohazard, and a factor in

385

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 - Methane Hydrate Research - Geoscience Evaluations and Field Studies Last Reviewed 3/18/2013 Project Goals The primary goals of the DOE/NETL Natural Gas Hydrate Field Studies (NGHFS) project are: Conduct field-based studies that advance the ability to predict, detect, characterize, and understand distribution of and controls on natural gas hydrate occurrences. Analyze geologic, geochemical, and microbiologic data for indications of past and current changes to the stability of natural gas hydrate in marine settings. Develop links between the U.S. Gas Hydrate Program and international R&D efforts through direct participation in international field programs and workshops. Evaluate the potential role natural gas hydrates may play in the global carbon cycle through analysis of modern and paleo-natural gas

386

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 – Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Last Reviewed 07/7/2011 Project Objective Observe hydrate formation and dissociation phenomena in various porous media and characterize hydrate-bearing sediments by estimating physical properties (kinetic parameters for hydrate formation and dissociation, thermal conductivity, permeability, relative permeability, and mechanical strength) to enhance fundamental understanding on hydrate formation and accumulation and to support numerical simulations and potential gas hydrate production Project Performers Yongkoo Seol – NETL Office of Research & Development Jeong Choi – Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Jongho Cha-Virginia Polytech Institute Project Location National Energy Technology Laboratory - Morgantown, West Virginia

387

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 1 - Characterization and Qualification of the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Phase 1 - Characterization and Qualification of the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to characterize and quantify the postulated gas hydrate resource associated with the Barrow Gas Fields – three producing fields located in a permafrost region near Barrow, the North Slope's biggest population center and economic hub. Map of the North Slope Borough showing the location of its eight major communities, including Barrow, the site of this research project. Map of the North Slope Borough showing the location of its eight major communities, including Barrow, the site of this research project. Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska (North Slope Borough) 99723

388

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost Last Reviewed 02/05/2010 DE-FC26-01NT41331 photo of new Anadarko drilling rig in place at Hot Ice No.1 on Alaska's North Slope Hot Ice No. 1 Drilling Platform courtesy Anadarko Petroleum Corp. Goal The goal of the project was to develop technologies for drilling and recovering hydrates in arctic areas. The specific objectives were to drill, core, and test a well through the hydrate stability zone in northern Alaska Performers Maurer Technology, Inc.* - Project coordination with DOE Anadarko Petroleum Corporation - Overall project management for the design, construction, and operation of the Arctic Drilling Platform and mobile core lab, and field coring operations Noble Engineering and Development* - Real time data collection and

389

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Submitted by: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August, 2007 Office of Fossil Energy Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Quarterly Progress Report Reporting Period: April-June 2007 Prepared by: George Hirasaki Rice University August 2007 CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-06NT42960 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; Fax: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu

390

Methane Hydrate Field Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Studies Field Studies Methane Hydrate Field Studies Arctic/Alaska North Slope Field Studies Since 2001, DOE has conducted field trials of exploration and production technology in the Alaska North Slope. Although Alaska methane hydrate resources are smaller than marine deposits and currently lack outlets to commercial markets, Alaska provides an excellent laboratory to study E&P technology. The research also has implications for various Alaska resources, including potential gas hydrate resources for local communities, conventional "stranded" gas, as well as Alaska's large unconventional oil resources. The hydrate deposits have been delineated in the process of developing underlying oil fields, and drilling costs are much lower than offshore. DOE-BP Project

391

Effect of bubble size and density on methane conversion to hydrate  

SciTech Connect

Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. One area of investigation is the storage of methane as methane hydrates. An economical and efficient means of storing methane in hydrates opens many commercial opportunities such as transport of stranded gas, off-peak storage of line gas, etc.We have observed during our investigations that the ability to convert methane to methane hydrate is enhanced by foaming of the methanewater solution using a surfactant. The density of the foam, along with the bubble size, is important in the conversion of methane to methane hydrate.

Leske, J.; Taylor, C.E.; Ladner, E.P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the experimental demonstration of a process for the direct thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. The process utilizes a thermal plasma heat source to dissociation products react to form a mixture of acetylene and hydrogen. The use of a supersonic expansion of the hot gas is investigated as a method of rapidly cooling (quenching) the product stream to prevent further reaction or thermal decomposition of the acetylene which can lower the overall efficiency of the process.

Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Enhanced carbon monoxide utilization in methanation process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide - containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is subsequently reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Surprisingly, hydrogen and water vapor present in the feed gas do not adversely affect CO utilization significantly, and such hydrogen actually results in a significant increase in CO utilization.

Elek, Louis F. (Peekskill, NY); Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

On the streamer propagation in methane plasma discharges  

SciTech Connect

The initial stages of formation and propagation of a streamer in methane at atmospheric pressure were studied using a 2-dimensional axial symmetric hydrodynamic model. The model is based on the drift diffusion approximation and exploits electron transport parameters determined using an external Boltzmann equation solver. The resulting system of equations was solved using the finite element methods and integrated in time with an Euler backward algorithm. An approach useful to alleviate the numerical difficulties determined by the steep gradients that appear on the streamer front was developed. It is based on a proper choice of the adaptation algorithm of the integration time step. Three phases in the streamer development could be identified, in agreement with analytical and numerical models reported in the literature: ionization avalanche, streamer, and shielded plasma. The properties of the three phases have been characterized analyzing the evolution in time of the most important variables characterizing the system (ion and electron densities, potential, and electric field). Finally, the influence of some operative parameters, such as inter-electrodic gap, seed electron density, and applied potential, has been investigated in order to determine how it affects the evolution of the micro-discharge, and in particular, the transition from ionization avalanche to streamer.

Ferrara, Carlo; Preda, Marco; Cavallotti, Carlo [Dept. di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria chimica 'G. Natta,' Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7-20131 Milano (Italy)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Methane Hydrate » Oil & Gas » Methane Hydrate » International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates International Cooperation in Methane Hydrates In 1982 the multi-national Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) recovered the first subsea substantial methane hydrate deposits, which spurred methane hydrate research in the US and other countries. The successor programs, the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampled hydrate deposits off Oregon (ODP 204, 2002) and in the Cascadia Margin off Vancouver Island, Canada (ODP 146, 1992 and IODP 311, 2005). In the Atlantic Ocean off the US, ODP Leg 146 sampled hydrate deposits on the Blake Ridge and Carolina Rise in 1995. International cooperation helps scientists in the US and other countries

396

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE METHANE HYDRATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE U.S. Department of Energy Advisory Committee Charter - - - - ---- ---- ------~ 1. Committee's Official Designation. Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee (MHAC) 2. Authority:. This charter establishes the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee (Committee) pursuant to Title IX, Subtitle F, Section 968, Methane Hydrate Research of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), Public Law 109-58. This charter establishes the MHAC under the authority of the Department of Energy (DOE). The MHAC is being renewed in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), as amended, 5 U.S.C., App.2. 3. Objectives and Scope of Activities. The Committee provides advice to the Secretary of Energy by developing recommendations and broad programmatic priorities for the methane

397

Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Bayesian Modelling Volatility of Growth Rate in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric gases, such as carbon dioxide, ozone, methane, nitrous oxide, and etc., create a natural greenhouse effect and cause climate change. Therefore, modelling behavior of these gases could help policy makers to control greenhouse effects. In a ... Keywords: Stochastic volatility, Smooth transition autoregressive, Markov chain Monte Carlo, methods, Bayesian, ARCH, GARCH

Esmail Amiri

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

400

,"Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2011,"6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is to develop analytical techniques capable of quantitatively evaluating the nature of methane hydrate reservoir systems through modeling of their acoustic response using...

402

,"Texas--RRC District 2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

403

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - GAS HYDRATE DYNAMICS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the first systematic geochemical and microbiological data to constrain subseafloor methane sinks and the spatio-temporal changes in the nature of microbial systems and pore...

404

,"Lower 48 Federal Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

405

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

406

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","812013"...

407

,"Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

408

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

409

,"Colorado Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

410

,"Texas--RRC District 8 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

411

,"Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

412

,"Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

413

Table 16: Coalbed methane proved reserves and production, 2007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Coalbed methane proved reserves and production, 2007 - 2011" "billion cubic feet" ,,"Reserves",,,,,,"Production" "State and Subdivision",,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,,2007,2008,2009...

414

,"Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

415

NETL-ORD Methane Hydrate Project - Micro XCT Characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the experimental systempressure vessel development and system parameter optimization, methane hydrate will be formed and dissociated in packed sediments. Micro-XCT scans will be...

416

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2011,"6301989"...

417

,"Texas--RRC District 9 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

418

,"Texas--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

419

,"Michigan Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

420

,"Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

,"Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

422

,"Kansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

423

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

424

,"Texas--RRC District 5 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

425

,"Texas--RRC District 10 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

426

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Verification Of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will help to determine bottomhole pressure, predict more accurate production rates of methane and water, and facilitate the selection of hydrate reservoirs for economic...

427

,"Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

428

,"North Dakota Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

429

,"Louisiana--North Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

430

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Properties of Hydrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is to measure physical, chemical, mechanical, and hydrologic property changes in methane hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to injection of carbon dioxide and nitrogen....

431

,"Florida Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

432

Converting Methane to Methanol: Structural Insight into the Reaction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA. Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are extremely attractive from a chemist's...

433

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

434

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Development of a...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

activities to assess the geologic occurrence, regional context, and characteristics of methane hydrate deposits along the continental margins of the U.S. with an emphasis on the...

435

,"New Mexico--East Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

436

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

437

Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Dollars awarded will go to research the advance understanding of the nature and occurrence of Deepwater and Arctic gas...

438

,"New Mexico Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

439

,"Texas--RRC District 4 Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

440

,"West Virginia Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

,"New York Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

442

Table 16. Coalbed methane proved reserves and production, 2007 - 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 16: Coalbed methane proved reserves and production, 2007 2011 billion cubic feet State and Subdivision 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

443

EA-1157: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1157: Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas, Carrollton, Kentucky EA-1157: Methyl Chloride via...

444

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Mapping Permafrost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 percent of the land area in the northern hemisphere and often contains associated methane hydrate. Numerous studies have indicated that permafrost and hydrate are actively...

445

,"Louisiana--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

446

,"New Mexico--West Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

447

,"Kentucky Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

448

,"Texas (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

449

,"Texas--RRC District 1 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

450

,"Arkansas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

451

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Gas Hydrate Research in Deep Sea Sediments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemistry Section, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 Background Methane is a potent greenhouse gas necessitating a better understanding of the mechanisms...

452

,"Lower 48 States Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

453

NETL-ORD Methane Hydrate Project - Experimental Analysis and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to describe the experimentally-observed stress-strain behavior as a function of methane hydrate saturation All the experimental data and their relationships will be...

454

,"Federal Offshore--Texas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

455

,"Texas--RRC District 6 Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

456

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

457

,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

458

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis - Fugro Operations and Geotechnical Investigations PDF-7.13MB National Methane Hydrate R&D Program website. Photos: Photo Gallery - miscellaneous - Photos from...

459

,"Louisiana (with State Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

460

,"California--State Offshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Reconstructing Paleo...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to track diagenetic changes that are associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane. To achieve this goal, this project aims to (1) reconstruct the paleo-positions of...

462

,"Alaska (with Total Offshore) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

463

,"Louisiana--South Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

464

NETL: Methane Hydrates - 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluid, by flowmeters in the Low-flow Gas Measurement Skid. Compositional analysis of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and tracers pumped during injection are being monitored...

465

Hydrogen Production from Methane Using Oxygen-permeable Ceramic Membranes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest as membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons (more)

Faraji, Sedigheh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies The USGS published a USGS Professional Paper in 2010 entitled

467

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies Dataset Summary...

468

Coalbed Methane Resources in the Powder River Basin: Lithologic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Wyoming and North Dakota. Specifically, the analysis looked at: total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high-pressure methane adsorption isotherm data from 963 cored coal samples...

469

Evaluation of Fluid Transport Properties of Coal Bed Methane Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Determination of petro-physical properties of coal bed methane (CBM) reservoirs is essential in evaluating a potential prospect for commercial exploitation. In particular, permeability is the (more)

Alexis, Dennis Arun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Resource Recovery of Coal Bed Methane Formation Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the excavation of natural gas, petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted brine water, termed production water, is drawn from the coal bed methane formations (CBMF) along with the (more)

Bishop, Catherine Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

,"Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2010,"...

472

UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate Layer ... would serve as energy sources as well as carbon dioxide storage sites in the ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

474

Extinction Studies of Hydrofluorocarons in Methane/Air and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a major fire threat in shipboard flammable liquid storage rooms (FLSRs). ... agent volume concentration in air for methane and propane fuels ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

475

Methane Hydrate Research and Modeling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Modeling Clean Coal Carbon Capture and Storage Oil & Gas Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale Gas Research is focused on understanding...

476

Microbe-Metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep benthos. Marine Geology.Geology (Thurber AR, Krger K, Neira C, Wiklund H, Levin LA, 2010. Stable isotope

Thurber, Andrew R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Microbe-metazoan interactions at Pacific Ocean methane seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope signatures and methane use by New Zealand cold seep benthos. Marine Geology.Geology (Thurber AR, Krger K, Neira C, Wiklund H, Levin LA, 2010. Stable isotope

Thurber, Andrew Reichmann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Extinguishment of methane diffusion flames by carbon dioxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These were determined from a flammability map presented by Coward and Jones for methane in air diluted with CO2 [41]. ... [15] KE Lange, AT Perka ...

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

479

Decomposition of methane during oxide reduction using Natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decomposition of methane during oxide reduction using Natural gas DELIVERING ... Reaction mechanism and reaction rate of Sn evaporation from liquid steel.

480

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Borehole Tool for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liquid and gas permeabilities and their variation with saturation define flow rates; and heat capacity and conduction limit dissociation. The study of methane hydrate-bearing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric methane ch4" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Effect of matrix shrinkage on permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dynamic nature of coalbed methane reservoir permeability makes the continuous modeling of the flow process difficult. Knowledge of conventional reservoir modeling is of little (more)

Tandon, Rohit, 1966-

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Mechanistic studies of electron transfer, complex formation, C-H bond activation, and product binding in soluble methane monooxygenase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase: Activation of Dioxygen and Methane The mechanisms by which soluble methane monooxygenase uses dioxygen to convert methane selectively to methanol have come into sharp focus. Diverse ...

Kopp, Daniel Arthur

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Thermodynamic investigation into steam-methane reforming and the synthesis of methane from carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

In this study the stream-methane equilibrium reaction was investigated by considering both methane synthesis from hydrogen and carbon monoxide and by considering steam-methane reforming from methane and steam. A FORTRAN computer program was written to carry out all the calculations over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and initial compositions. The products of each process as a function of pressure, temperature, and starting ratio of reactant gases were calculated, as well as the heats involved. In both processes the minimum ratios above which no carbon precipitates were determined as a function of temperature and pressure were given.

Wu, L.H.; Lietzke, M.H.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Small hydrocarbon molecules in cloud-forming Brown Dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the abundances of complex carbon-bearing molecules in the oxygen-rich dust- forming atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and giant gas planets. The inner atmospheric re- gions that form the inner boundary for thermochemical gas-phase models are investigated. Results from Drift-phoenix atmosphere simulations, which include the feedback of phase- non-equilibrium dust cloud formation on the atmospheric structure and the gas-phase abun- dances, are utilised. The resulting element depletion leads to a shift in the carbon-to-oxygen ratio such that several hydrocarbon molecules and cyanopolycyanopolyynene molecules can be present. An increase in surface gravity and/or a decrease in metallicity support the increase in the partial pressures of these species. CO, CO2, CH4, and HCN contain the largest fraction of carbon. In the upper atmosphere of low-metallicity objects, more carbon is contained in C4H than in CO, and also CH3 and C2H2 play an increasingly important role as carbon-sink. We determine chemical relaxation...

Bilger, Camille; Helling, Christiane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

On the Insignificance of Photochemical Hydrocarbon Aerosols in the Atmospheres of Close-in Extrasolar Giant Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The close-in extrasolar giant planets (CEGPs) reside in irradiated environments much more intense than that of the giant planets in our solar system. The high UV irradiance strongly influences their photochemistry and the general current view believed that this high UV flux will greatly enhance photochemical production of hydrocarbon aerosols. In this letter, we investigate hydrocarbon aerosol formation in the atmospheres of CEGPs. We find that the abundances of hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of CEGPs are significantly less than that of Jupiter except for models in which the CH$_4$ abundance is unreasonably high (as high as CO) for the hot (effective temperatures $\\gtrsim 1000$ K) atmospheres. Moreover, the hydrocarbons will be condensed out to form aerosols only when the temperature-pressure profiles of the species intersect with the saturation profiles--a case almost certainly not realized in the hot CEGPs atmospheres. Hence our models show that photochemical hydrocarbon aerosols are insignificant in the atmospheres of CEGPs. In contrast, Jupiter and Saturn have a much higher abundance of hydrocarbon aerosols in their atmospheres which are responsible for strong absorption shortward of 600 nm. Thus the insignificance of photochemical hydrocarbon aerosols in the atmospheres of CEGPs rules out one class of models with low albedos and featureless spectra shortward of 600 nm.

Mao-Chang Liang; Sara Seager; Christopher D. Parkinson; Anthony Y. -T; . Lee; Yuk L. Yung

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

486

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Texas--RRC District 8A Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC District 8A Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

488

Texas--RRC District 8A Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 8A Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

489

Texas--RRC District 7C Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 TX, RRC Distict 7C Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,...

490

Texas--RRC District 7B Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC District 7B Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

491

Texas--RRC District 7C Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Estimated Production TX, RRC Distict 7C Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves...

492

Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Methane Title: Carbon Dioxide Mixed Hydrates Tae-Hyukof methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposedsequestration of carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) and/or production

Kwon, T.H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies U.S. and Japan Complete Successful Field Trial of Methane Hydrate Production Technologies May 2,...

494

Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland. Progress report, January 15, 1991--July 14, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Peatlands are one of the most important terrestrial reservoirs in the global cycle for carbon, and are a major source for atmospheric methane. However, little is known about the dynamics of these carbon reservoirs or their feedback mechanisms with the pool of atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the Holocene. Specifically, it is unknown whether large peat basins are sources, sinks, or steady-state reservoirs for the global carbon cycle. In particular, the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved organic carbon form the deeper portions of these peatlands is unknown. Our DOE research program is to conduct an integrated ecologic and hydrogeochemical study of the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands (northern Minnesota) to better understand the carbon dynamics in globally significant peat basins. Specifically, our study will provide local and regional data on (1), rates of carbon accumulation and loss and fluxes of methane in the peat profiles; (2) the physical and botanical factors controlling the production of methane and carbon dioxide in the wetland; and (3) the role of hydrogeologic processes in controlling the fluxes of gases and solutes through the peat. We intend to use computer simulation models, calibrated to field data, to scale-up from local to regional estimates of methane and carbon dioxide within the basin. How gases and dissolved organic carbon escapes form peatlands in unknown. It has been suggested that the concentrations of methane produced in the upper peat are sufficient to produce diffusion gradients towards the surface. Alternatively, gas may move through the peat profile by groundwater advection.

Siegel, D.I.

1992-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

495

Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

Tajbl, Daniel G. (Evanston, IL); Lee, Bernard S. (Lincolnwood, IL); Schora, Jr., Frank C. (Palatine, IL); Lam, Henry W. (Rye, NY)

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

496

Assessment of emissions prediction capability of RANS based PDF models for lean premixed combustion of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high computational cost of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) makes Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods the current standard for turbulent combustion modeling. Empirical models for turbulence, turbulence-combustion interaction and chemical kinetics are, however, a major source of uncertainty in RANS based combustion simulation. While Probability Density Function (PDF) based models overcome some of these issues, most commercial codes do not take full advantage of these models. In this study, lean premixed combustion of methane in a bluff-body combustor is simulated using two different reduced chemical mechanisms (ARM9 and ARM19) combined with the composition PDF transport combustion model in the commercial code FLUENT. Two different turbulence models, namely the RNG k-? model and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) are used and the results of the simulations are compared to experimental data. For all the models tested, the prediction of temperature and major species (CH4, O2, CO2, CO, H2, and H2O) was good when compared to experiments. While all of the model predictions for the intermediate species OH showed an order magnitude difference (compared to the experiments) close to the bluff body surface; downstream axial locations showed good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the experiments. In a trend similar to the previous study (Nanduri et al., 2007) using the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) model, predicted values for NO emission radial profiles showed an average difference of 5 ppm when compared to experimental values. The results were also compared to the results of a velocity-composition joint PDF model developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. In terms of emissions (NO and CO) predictions the relatively expensive composition PDF model in FLUENT did not give significant improvement when compared to the computationally cheaper EDC models. However, the velocity-composition joint PFD model used by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh did show significant improvement over EDC models in the prediction of NO. Both of the PDF models resulted in better qualitative and quantitative agreement in H2 prediction, thus showing the promise of PDF based models in simulating lean premixed combustion of fuel blends like hydrogen enriched natural gas.

Parsons, D.R.; Nanduri, J.R.; Celik, Ismail; Strakey, P.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Shock-Tube Study of Methane Ignition with NO2 and N2O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOx produced during combustion can persist in the exhaust gases of a gas turbine engine in quantities significant to induce regulatory concerns. There has been much research which has led to important insights into NOx chemistry. One method of NOx reduction is exhaust gas recirculation. In exhaust gas recirculation, a portion of the exhaust gases that exit are redirected to the inlet air stream that enters the combustion chamber, along with fuel. Due to the presence of NOx in the exhaust gases which are subsequently introduced into the burner, knowledge of the effects of NOx on combustion is advantageous. Contrary to general NOx research, little has been conducted to investigate the sensitizing effects of NO2 and N2O addition to methane/oxygen combustion. Experiments were made with dilute and real fuel air mixtures of CH4/O2/Ar with the addition of NO2 and N2O. The real fuel air concentrations were made with the addition of NO2 only. The equivalence ratios of mixtures made were 0.5, 1 and 2. The experimental pressure range was 1 - 44 atm and the temperature range tested was 1177 2095 K. The additives NO2 and N2O were added in concentrations from 831 ppm to 3539 ppm. The results of the mixtures with NO2 have a reduction in ignition delay time across the pressure ranges tested, and the mixtures with N2O show a similar trend. At 1.3 atm, the NO2 831 ppm mixture shows a 65% reduction and shows a 75% reduction at 30 atm. The NO2 mixtures showed a higher decrease in ignition time than the N2O mixtures. The real fuel air mixture also showed a reduction. Sensitivity Analyses were performed. The two most dominant reactions in the NO2 mixtures are the reaction O+H2 = O+OH and the reaction CH3+NO2 = CH3O+NO. The presence of this second reaction is the means by which NO2 decreases ignition delay time, which is indicated in the experimental results. The reaction produces CH3O which is reactive and can participate in chain propagating reactions, speeding up ignition. The two dominant reactions for the N2O mixture are the reaction O+H2 = O+OH and, interestingly, the other dominant reaction is the reverse of the initiation reaction in the N2O-mechanism: O+N2+M = N2O+M. The reverse of this reaction is the direct oxidation of nitrous oxide. The O produced in this reaction can then speed up ignition by partaking in propagation reactions, which was experimentally observed.

Pemelton, John

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

The Numerical Simulation of Conventional Ground Coalbed Methane Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The migration, accumulation, and production of coalbed methane (CBM) are absolutely different from the conventional natural gas. The mechanism of the migration and production of CBM are researched and the geological model of CBM reservoir simulation ... Keywords: coalbed methane, numerical simulation, desportion-diffusion, two phase flow, fully implicit finite difference

Lin Xiaoying; Liu Guowei; Su Xianbo

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production While Sequestration CO2 in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road South Park, PA 15129 412-854-6676 dickwinschel@consolenergy.com EnhancEd coalbEd MEthanE Production WhilE SEquEStrating co 2 in unMinEablE coal SEaMS Background CONSOL Energy...

500

Simulation of terrace wall methane-steam reforming reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrace wall arrangement is one of the most common arrangements for methane-steam reforming reactor furnaces. In this work, a mathematical model of heat transfer in terrace wall furnaces has been developed. The model has been coupled with a reliable ... Keywords: heat transfer modeling, methane-steam reforming, reformer simulation, terrace wall furnace

J. S. Soltan Mohammadzadeh; A. Zamaniyan

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z