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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric infrared sounder Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

humidity profiles which are also measurable by a microwave sounder... on a geosynchronous satellite. The proposed microwave sounder could provide sensing of atmospheric...

2

ARM - Field Campaign - ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology 2008.07.08 - 2008.07.18 Lead Scientist : Michael Howard For data sets, see below. Description Goals of assist were to intercompare radiance spectra and profile retrievals from a new AERI-like instrument, called "ASSIST" with the SGP site AERI(s) and calculations from Radiosondes measurements. * To bring the ASSIST instrument to the SGP ACRF and perform simultaneous measurements of the sky radiation with those from the AERI. * On relatively cloud-free days, release a special radiosonde at the

3

An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

4

Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide Water vapor #12;Atmospheric composition (parts per million by volume) · Nitrogen (N2) 780Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere Bill Satzer 3M Company #12;Outline,840 · Oxygen (O2) 209,460 · Argon (Ar) 9340 · Carbon dioxide (CO2) 394 · Methane (CH4) 1.79 · Ozone (O3) 0

Olver, Peter

5

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, W. F. Feltz, R. D. Knuteson, and D. D. Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin B. M. Lesht Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois L. Strow University of Maryland College Park, Maryland C. Barnet Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology Baltimore, Maryland E. Fetzer National Aeronautics Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, California Introduction The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution infrared sounder on the earth observing plan (EOS) Aqua platform. Temperature and water vapor profile retrievals from AIRS are

6

Development of a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)  

SciTech Connect

Satellite-observed radiance is a nonlinear functional of surface properties and atmospheric temperature and absorbing gas profiles as described by the radiative transfer equation (RTE). In the era of hyperspectral sounders with thousands of high-resolution channels, the computation of the radiative transfer model becomes more time-consuming. The radiative transfer model performance in operational numerical weather prediction systems still limits the number of channels we can use in hyperspectral sounders to only a few hundreds. To take the full advantage of such high-resolution infrared observations, a computationally efficient radiative transfer model is needed to facilitate satellite data assimilation. In recent years the programmable commodity graphics processing unit (GPU) has evolved into a highly parallel, multi-threaded, many-core processor with tremendous computational speed and very high memory bandwidth. The radiative transfer model is very suitable for the GPU implementation to take advantage of the hardware's efficiency and parallelism where radiances of many channels can be calculated in parallel in GPUs. In this paper, we develop a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched in 2006 onboard the first European meteorological polar-orbiting satellites, METOP-A. Each IASI spectrum has 8461 spectral channels. The IASI radiative transfer model consists of three modules. The first module for computing the regression predictors takes less than 0.004% of CPU time, while the second module for transmittance computation and the third module for radiance computation take approximately 92.5% and 7.5%, respectively. Our GPU-based IASI radiative transfer model is developed to run on a low-cost personal supercomputer with four GPUs with total 960 compute cores, delivering near 4 TFlops theoretical peak performance. By massively parallelizing the second and third modules, we reached 364x speedup for 1 GPU and 1455x speedup for all 4 GPUs, both with respect to the original CPU-based single-threaded Fortran code with the -O{sub 2} compiling optimization. The significant 1455x speedup using a computer with four GPUs means that the proposed GPU-based high-performance forward model is able to compute one day's amount of 1,296,000 IASI spectra within nearly 10 min, whereas the original single CPU-based version will impractically take more than 10 days. This model runs over 80% of the theoretical memory bandwidth with asynchronous data transfer. A novel CPU-GPU pipeline implementation of the IASI radiative transfer model is proposed. The GPU-based high-performance IASI radiative transfer model is suitable for the assimilation of the IASI radiance observations into the operational numerical weather forecast model.

Huang Bormin, E-mail: bormin@ssec.wisc.ed [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Mielikainen, Jarno [Department of Computer Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Oh, Hyunjong; Allen Huang, Hung-Lung [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

7

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B Near-Infrared Radiative Transfer Model B.15 Near-Infrared Observations of Neptunes Clouds with the133 6.2 Near-infrared spectroscopy . . . . . .

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mars atmospheric CO[subscript 2] condensation above the north and south poles as revealed by radio occultation, climate sounder, and laser ranging observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We study the condensation of CO[subscript 2] in Mars' atmosphere using temperature profiles retrieved from radio occultation measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) as well as the climate sounding instrument onboard ...

Hu, Renyu

9

Retrieval of cloud-cleared atmospheric temperature profiles from hyperspectral infrared and microwave observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of retrieving the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere from overhead infrared and microwave observations of spectral radiance in cloudy conditions. The contributions of the thesis ...

Blackwell, William Joseph, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer David A in atmospheric water vapor that distort the phase coherence of incoming celestial signals. The signal received water vapor, this paper presents results obtained with a second generation IRMA operating at the James

Naylor, David A.

11

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures P. Varanasi and Q. Zou Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Water vapor is undoubtedly the most dominant greenhouse gas in the terrestrial atmosphere. In the two facets of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research, atmospheric remote sensing (air-borne as well as Cloud and Radiation Testbed [CART] site-based) and modeling of atmospheric radiation, the spectrum of water vapor, ranging from the microwave to the visible wavelengths, plays a significant role. Its spectrum has been the subject of many studies throughout the last century. Therefore, it is natural to presume it should be fairly well established by now. However, the need for a

12

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Site Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and Retrieval Validation Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Moy, Leslie University of Wisconsin-Madison Lesht, Barry Argonne National Laboratory Cress, Ted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Strow, Larrabee Hannon, Scott Fetzer, Eric Jet Propulsion Laboratory The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua platform is the first of a new generation of advanced hyperspectral atmospheric sounders with the capability of retrieving temperature and trace gas profiles with high vertical resolution and absolute accuracy. In the past few years ARM has played a major role in the validation of AIRS, including the launch of

13

Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements  

SciTech Connect

The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

DISTRIBUTION OF CO{sub 2} IN SATURN'S ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/CIRS INFRARED OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on the CO{sub 2} distribution in Saturn's atmosphere based on analysis of infrared spectral observations of Saturn made by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer aboard the Cassini spacecraft. The Cassini spacecraft was launched in 1997 October, inserted in Saturn's orbit in 2004 July, and has been successfully making infrared observations of Saturn, its rings, Titan, and other icy satellites during well-planned orbital tours. The infrared observations, made with a dual Fourier transform spectrometer in both nadir- and limb-viewing modes, cover spectral regions of 10-1400 cm{sup 1}, with the option of variable apodized spectral resolutions from 0.53 to 15 cm{sup 1}. An analysis of the observed spectra with well-developed radiative transfer models and spectral inversion techniques has the potential to provide knowledge of Saturn's thermal structure and composition with global distributions of a series of gases. In this paper, we present an analysis of a large observational data set for retrieval of Saturn's CO{sub 2} distribution utilizing spectral features of CO{sub 2} in the Q-branch of the ?{sub 2} band, and discuss its possible relationship to the influx of interstellar dust grains. With limited spectral regions available for analysis, due to low densities of CO{sub 2} and interference from other gases, the retrieved CO{sub 2} profile is obtained as a function of a model photochemical profile, with the retrieved values at atmospheric pressures in the region of ?1-10 mbar levels. The retrieved CO{sub 2} profile is found to be in good agreement with the model profile based on Infrared Space Observatory measurements with mixing ratios of ?4.9 10{sup 10} at atmospheric pressures of ?1 mbar.

Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A. [NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Woodard, E.; Young, M.; Stanbro, M. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Flasar, F. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G.; Brasunas, J.; Jennings, D. E. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kunde, V. G., E-mail: Mian.M.Abbas@nasa.gov, E-mail: Andre.C.LeClair@nasa.gov, E-mail: eaw0009@uah.edu, E-mail: mcs0001@uah.edu, E-mail: youngmm@uah.edu, E-mail: f.m.flasar@nasa.gov, E-mail: virgil.g.kunde@gsfc.nasa.gov [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Collaboration: and the Cassini/CIRS team

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Absorption of infra-red radiation by atmospheric molecular cluster-ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protonated water clusters are a common species of atmospheric molecular cluster-ion, produced by cosmic rays throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. Under clear-sky conditions or periods of increased atmospheric ionisation, such as solar proton events, the IR absorption by atmospheric ions may affect climate through the radiative balance. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry in a long path cell, of path length 545m, has been used to detect IR absorption by corona-generated positive molecular cluster-ions. The column concentration of ions in the laboratory spectroscopy experiment was estimated to be ~10^13 m-2; the column concentration of protonated atmospheric ions estimated using a simple model is ~10^14 m-2. Two regions of absorption, at 12.3 and 9.1 um are associated with enhanced ion concentrations. After filtering of the measured spectra to compensate for spurious signals from neutral water vapour and residual carbon dioxide, the strongest absorption region is at 9.5 to 8.8 um (1050 to 1140 cm-1)...

Aplin, K L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Near-Infrared Constraints on the Presence of Warm Dust at Metal-Rich, Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, we present near-infrared spectroscopic observations of 15 helium atmosphere, metal-rich white dwarfs obtained at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. While a connection has been demonstrated between the most highly polluted, hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs and the presence of warm circumstellar dust and gas, their frequency at the helium atmosphere variety is poorly constrained. None of our targets show excess near-infrared radiation consistent with warm orbiting material. Adding these near-infrared constraints to previous near- and mid-infrared observations, the frequency of warm circumstellar material at metal-bearing white dwarfs is at least 20% for hydrogen-dominated photospheres, but could be less than 5% for those effectively composed of helium alone. The lower occurrence of dust disks around helium atmosphere white dwarfs is consistent with Myr timescales for photospheric metals in massive convection zones. Analyzing the mass distribution of 10 white dwarfs with warm circumstellar material, we search for similar trends between the frequency of disks and the predicted frequency of massive planets around intermediate mass stars, but find the probability that disk-bearing white dwarfs are more massive than average is not significant.

Mukremin Kilic; J. Farihi; Atsuko Nitta; S. K. Leggett

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

17

Recent progress in high precision atmospheric trace gas instruments using mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report results from high precision spectroscopic instruments for atmospheric trace gases using with mid-IR quantum cascade lasers. Numerous gases can be measured with 1s absorption...

McManus, John B; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; McGovern, Ryan; Agnese, Mike

18

Copper Doped GaAs Infrared Filter for the 8-13 m Atmospheric Window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regions of interest, such as atmospheric transmission windows. Filters exclude solar or thermal photonsCdTe is typically melt grown in a high temperature furnace. All three elements in this alloy are toxic. Stability

Peale, Robert E.

19

Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra  

SciTech Connect

A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

Stiller, G.P.; Gunson, M.R.; Lowes, L.L.; Abrams, M.C.; Raper, O.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.P. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); [Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); [Liege Univ., Liege (Belgium); [NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Atmospheric Monitoring with a LIDAR and an Infra-red Camera at Black Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density, the US atmospheric standard model is used so far, and a radio sonde data is also used COLLABORATION 1 Department of Physics, Kinki University 2 Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University 3 for cosmic rays experiment. The aims of atmospheric moni- toring are to calibrate observed energy

22

Fourier transform infrared cell for surface studies at controlled temperatures and in controlled atmospheres with time resolution and spatial resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new micro?Fourier transform infrared cell has been constructed and evaluated using (i) the transformation of aurichalcite crystals at 298475 K (ii) the adsorption/desorption of pyridine on a Cu2O/ZnO junction and (iii) the adsorption of CO on Pt/alumina pellets; it enables spatial and time resolution of processes in such diverse samples held at known thermal and baric conditions. The potential of this cell in catalytic and analytical science is considered.

V. A. Self; P. A. Sermon

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, June 2002.  

SciTech Connect

ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite--Beginning in July, all three ARM sites (Southern Great Plains [SGP], North Slope of Alaska, and Tropical Western Pacific; Figure 1) will participate in the AIRS Validation IOP. This three-month intensive operational period (IOP) will validate data collected by the satellite-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) recently launched into space. On May 4, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Aqua, the second spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. The EOS satellites monitor Earth systems including land surfaces, oceans, the atmosphere, and ice cover. The first EOS satellite, named Terra, was launched in December 1999. The second EOS satellite is named Aqua because its primary focus is understanding Earth's water cycle through observation of atmospheric moisture, clouds, temperature, ocean surface, precipitation, and soil moisture. One of the instruments aboard Aqua is the AIRS, built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA agency. The AIRS Validation IOP complements the ARM mission to improve understanding of the interactions of clouds and atmospheric moisture with solar radiation and their influence on weather and climate. In support of satellite validation IOP, ARM will launch dedicated radiosondes at all three ARM sites while the Aqua satellite with the AIRS instrument is orbiting overhead. These radiosonde launches will occur 45 minutes and 5 minutes before selected satellite overpasses. In addition, visiting scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will launch special radiosondes to measure ozone and humidity over the SGP site. All launches will generate ground-truth data to validate satellite data collected simultaneously. Data gathered daily by ARM meteorological and solar radiation instruments will complete the validation data sets. Data from Aqua-based instruments, including AIRS, will aid in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and greenhouse gas studies. These instruments will provide more accurate, detailed global observations of weather and atmospheric parameters that will, in turn, improve the accuracy and quality of weather forecasts. A satellite-based instrument is cost-effective because it can provide continuous global measurements, eliminating isolated yet costly weather balloon releases. Aqua, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California (Figure 2), carries six state-of-the-art instruments that measure various water vapor parameters: (1) AIRS, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity, land and sea surface temperatures, cloud properties, and radiative energy flux; (2) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity during both cloudy and cloud-free periods; (3) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, precipitation rates, land surface wetness, sea ice, snow cover, sea surface temperature, and wind fields; (4) Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, which measures radiative energy flux; (5) Humidity Sounder for Brazil, which measures atmospheric humidity by using a passive scanning microwave radiometer; and (6) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, aerosol properties, land cover and land use change, vegetation dynamics, land surface temperature, fire occurrence, volcanic effects, sea surface temperature, ocean color, snow cover, atmospheric temperature and humidity, and sea ice. The data-gathering capabilities of the Aqua instruments will provide an unprecedented view of atmosphere-land interactions (Figure 3). The availability of more frequent, more accurate global measurements of important atmospheric parameters will both improve our capabilities for short-term weather forecasting and lead to a better understanding of climate variability and climate change. Simultaneous measurements of many parameters will allow scientists to study complicated forcings and feedbacks of the atmosphere, which can be

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

ARM - Instrument - assist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsassist govInstrumentsassist Documentation ASSIST : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports ASSIST : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Instrument Categories Radiometric The Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST), like the AERI, measures infrared spectral zenith radiance at high spectral resolution. Output Datastreams assistch1 : Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): channel 1 data assistch2 : Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): channel 2 data

25

Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) Upwelling shortwave (reflected) Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

Stoffel, T

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) Antenna Brightness Temperature Data Record (TDR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) Antenna Brightness Temperature Data Record (TDR/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research Contributors from: Banghua Yan (Lead), QSS/JCSDA Ninghai Sun, IMSG, Metoffice, UK Yong Han, STAR/JCSDA Mark Liu, QSS/JCSDA Distribution to: Ralph Ferrrao, STAR Tom Schott, OSD

28

INVERTED ECHO SOUNDER DEVELOPMENT G. F. Chaplin and D. Randolph Watts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVERTED ECHO SOUNDER DEVELOPMENT G. F. Chaplin and D. Randolph Watts Graduate School thermocline. Watts (1975), in discussing IES data from MODE I, showed that changes in dynamic height can evolving since its initial development. The first multi- instrument deployment was in MODE I (Watts

Rhode Island, University of

29

Infrared Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high-resolution solar abundance model. . . . .cross-correlation: solar abundance model. . . . . . . . .cross-correlation: 10 solar abundance model. . . . . . 203

Crossfield, Ian James Mills

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A NEW SYNTHETIC LIBRARY OF THE NEAR-INFRARED Ca II TRIPLET INDICES. I. INDEX DEFINITION, CALIBRATION, AND RELATIONS WITH STELLAR ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS  

SciTech Connect

Adopting the SPECTRUM package, which is a stellar spectral synthesis program, we have synthesized a comprehensive set of 2890 near-infrared (NIR) synthetic spectra with a resolution and wavelength sampling similar to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the forthcoming Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra. During the synthesis, we applied the 'New grids of ATLAS9 Model Atmosphere' to develop a grid of local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres for effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) ranging from 3500 to 7500 K, for surface gravities (log g) from 0.5 to 5.0 dex, for metallicities ([Fe/H]) from -4.0 to 0.5 dex, and for solar ([{alpha}/Fe] = 0.0 dex) and non-solar ([{alpha}/Fe] = +0.4 dex) abundances. This synthetic stellar library is composed of 1350 solar scaled abundance (SSA) and 1530 non-solar scaled abundance (NSSA) spectra, grounding on which we have defined a new set of NIR Ca II triplet indices and an index CaT as the sum of the three. These defined indices were automatically measured on every spectrum of the synthetic stellar library and calibrated with the indices computed on the observational spectra from the INDO-U.S. stellar library. In order to check the effect of {alpha}-element enhancement on the so-defined Ca II indices, we compared indices measured on the SSA spectra with those on the NSSA ones at the same trine of stellar parameters (T{sub eff}, log g, [Fe/H]); luckily, little influences of {alpha}-element enhancement were found. Furthermore, comparisons of our synthetic indices with the observational ones from measurements on the INDO-U.S. stellar library, the SDSS-DR7 and SDSS-DR8 spectroscopic survey are presented, respectively, for dwarfs and giants in specific. For dwarfs, our synthetic indices could well reproduce the behaviors of the observational indices versus stellar parameters, which verifies the validity of our index definitions for dwarfs. For giants, the consistency between our synthetic indices and the observational ones does not appear to be as good. However, a new synthetic library of NIR Ca II indices has been founded for deeper studies on the NIR wave band of stellar spectra, and this library is particularly appropriate for the SDSS and the forthcoming LAMOST stellar spectra. We have regressed the strength of the CaT index as a function of stellar parameters for both dwarfs and giants after a series of experimental investigations into relations of the indices with stellar parameters. For dwarfs, log g has little effect on the indices, while [Fe/H] and T{sub eff} play a role together. The leading factor is probably [Fe/H], which changes the strength of the indices by a positive trend. For giants, log g starts to influence the strength of the indices by a negative trend for the metal-poor, and even impact deeply for the metal-rich; besides, [Fe/H] and T{sub eff} still matter. In addition, we briefly discussed the major differences between our Ca II triplet indices and the CaHK doublet indices. Ultimately, a supplemental experiment was carried out to show that spectral noises do have effects on our set of NIR Ca II indices. However, the influence is not weak enough to be ignored if the signal-to-noise ratio falls below 20.

Du, W.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, Y. H., E-mail: wdu@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: lal@nao.cas.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

Smith, Arthur P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Solar Infrared Photometer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sun photometer which operates at five wavelengths in the near infrared between 1.0 and 4.0 ?m has been developed. The instrument is a manually operated, fitter wheel design and has principal applications for atmospheric aerosol studies. The ...

J. D. Spinhirne; M. G. Strange; L. R. Blaine

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ULF wave occurrence statistics in a high-latitude HF Doppler sounder D. M. Wright, T. K. Yeoman, T. B. Jones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ULF wave occurrence statistics in a high-latitude HF Doppler sounder D. M. Wright, T. K. Yeoman, T was to establish the optimum con®guration for a new high-latitude Doppler sounder experiment, called DOPE (Wright, 1996; Wright et al., 1997), and to determine the likelihood of the experiment observing pulsation eects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

Atmospheric Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

competencies Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced...

35

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Validation of infrared  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of infrared cloud radiative transfer simulations and spectral Validation of infrared cloud radiative transfer simulations and spectral cloud properties retrievals using S-HIS, AERI and HSRL measurements from M-PACE Holz, Robert University of Wisconsin, CIMMS DeSlover, Daniel University of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Turner, David Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Eloranta, Edwin University of Wisconsin As part of the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) the Scanning High spectral resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) flew on the Proteus high altitude aircraft with the ARM-UAV instrumentation. The University of North Dakota Cessna Citation capable of cloud situ measurements was coordinated with the Proteus to obtain coincident down looking and situ

36

Infrared Spectrophotometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wavelengths at which radiation is absorbed or emitted by minerals in the IR region can be related to the interatomic vibrations in the molecules or crystals. Infrared measurements, therefore, have definite...

W. M. Tuddenham; J. D. Stephens

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Infrared Audit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The infrared audit is a technique of investigation that allows ... a surface. Applications of thermography in the energy fields are very widespread, since through such ... . This chapter describes the application...

Giuliano DallO

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

AN APPROACH TO IMPROVEMENT TEMPERATURE AND MOISTURE RETRIEVALS FROM THE GOES SOUNDER MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated from radiosonde observations of the atmospheric state, generating an ensemble of computed GOES together against radiances from CO2, water vapor, and window bands. This method is often used to generate on the changes in the atmospheric state using a physically-based retrieval of temperature and moisture profiles

Li, Jun

39

Clear Skies S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. A. Clough S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by- line mode! then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. consistent with downlooking data taken with the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) (Smith et al. 1983) from 20 km and with simultaneous data taken

40

A Study of Satellite-derived Moisture with Emphasis on the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Visible-Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer (VISSR) Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) moisture retrievals are compared to the National Meteorological Center Regional Analysis and Forecast System (RAFS) 12-h forecast and to 1200 UTC rawinsondes over the United ...

Anthony J. Schreiner; Christopher M. Hayden; Cecil A. Paris

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Infrared floodlight  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared floodlight assembly designed particularly for security purposes and including a heat-conducting housing, a lens secured to the housing to provide a closure therefor, and a floodlight located within (and surrounded by) the housing. The floodlight combines the use of a tungsten halogen light source and dichroic hot and cold mirrors for directing substantially only infrared radiation toward the assembly's forward lens. Visible radiation is absorbed by the housing's interior wall(s) and, optionally, by a filter located between the floodlight and lens. An optional means may be used within the floodlight to reflect all forward radiation back toward the paraboloidal hot mirror or, alternatively, to reflect only visible radiation in this direction. The dichroic hot and cold mirrors preferably each comprise a glass substrate having multiple layers of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thereon.

Levin, Robert E. (S. Hamilton, MA); English, George J. (Reading, MA)

1986-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Musical Atmospherics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE characteristics of audio musical atmospherics which are obtained when an ... musical atmospherics which are obtained when an audio amplifier is placed in a long line or aerial have been discussed from time to ...

T. L. ECKERSLEY

1935-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, In vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation (LA) with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-surface exchange processes Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric surface layer during CBLAST, in 16th Symposium on Boundary Layers... on heat, gas, and momentum transport, infrared remote sensing, upper-ocean processes,...

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere radiation budget Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the solar constant albedo Changes in atmospheric infrared opacity The "greenhouse effect" Time constants Source: Sherwood, Steven - Climate Change Research Centre,...

50

A Spitzer White Dwarf Infrared Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present mid-infrared photometry of 124 white dwarf stars with Spitzer Space Telescope. Objects were observed simultaneously at 4.5 and 8.0um with sensitivities better than 1 mJy. This data can be used to test models of white dwarf atmospheres in a new wavelength regime, as well as to search for planetary companions and debris disks.

F. Mullally; Mukremin Kilic; William T. Reach; Marc J. Kuchner; Ted von Hippel; Adam Burrows; D. E. Winget

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Perfluorocarbons in the global atmosphere: tetrafluoromethane, hexafluoroethane, and octafluoropropane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present atmospheric baseline growth rates from the 1970s to the present for the long-lived, strongly infrared-absorbing perfluorocarbons (PFCs) tetrafluoromethane (CF4), hexafluoroethane (C2F6), and octafluoropropane ...

Muhle, J.

53

Atmospheric tritium  

SciTech Connect

Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Sco McWilliams U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consor;um (PVMC) Infrared Thermography Infrared Thermography (IRT) has been demonstrated...

55

Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc Plasma and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an atmospheric-pressure arc plasma are described from the viewpoint of continuorts radiation tlieory of the atmospheric arc plasma column is very sensitive to the electron density in the near infrared frequency rangeB ) Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc

Eagar, Thomas W.

56

Posters Long-Pathlength Infrared Absorption Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Posters Long-Pathlength Infrared Absorption Measurements in the 8- to 14-µm Atmospheric Window: Self-Broadening Coefficient Data T. J. Kulp (a) and J. Shinn Geophysics and Environmental Research Program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Introduction The accurate characterization of the latent infrared (IR) absorption in the atmospheric window regions continues to be an area of research interest for the global climate modeling community. In the window between 8 and 14 µm, this absorption can be attributed primarily to water vapor. It consists of 1) weak lines originating from the edge of the water vapor pure rotational band (at low wavenumbers) and the trailing P-branch of the υ 2 rovibrational band (at the high-wavenumber boundary of the window); and 2) the

57

A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

Hoerst, S. M. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Brown, M. E., E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Infrared microscope inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

Forman, Steven E. (Framingham, MA); Caunt, James W. (Concord, MA)

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Long-term stratospheric carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) increase inferred from 19852004 infrared space-based solar occultation measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1993, 1994, and 2004. The 1985 to 1994 measurements were recorded from the ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace infrared solar occultation measurements from space was pioneered by the Atmospheric Trace MOlecule, Spacelab 3 from April 29­May 6, 1985, the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1

Nassar, Ray

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Near infrared detectors for SNAP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near Infrared Detectors for SNAP M. Schubnell a , N. Barron1k 1k and 2k 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured byas part of the near infrared R&D e?ort for SNAP (the Super-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

$\\alpha$ Centauri A in the far infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromospheres and coronae are common phenomena on solar-type stars. Understanding the energy transfer to these heated atmospheric layers requires direct access to the relevant empirical data. Study of these structures has, by and large, been limited to the Sun thus far. The region of the temperature reversal can be directly observed only in the far infrared and submm. We aim at the determination of the characteristics of the atmosphere in the region of the temperature minimum of the solar sister star alpha Cen A. For the nearby binary system alpha Centauri, stellar parameters are known with high accuracy from measurements. For the basic model parameters Teff, log g and [Fe/H], we interpolate in the grid of GAIA/PHOENIX stellar model atmospheres and compute the corresponding model for the G2 V star alpha Cen A. Comparison with photometric measurements shows excellent agreement between observed photospheric data in the optical and infrared. For longer wavelengths, the modelled spectral energy distribution is co...

Liseau, R; Olofsson, G; Bryden, G; Marshall, J P; Ardila, D; Aran, A Bayo; Danchi, W C; del Burgo, C; Eiroa, C; Ertel, S; Fridlund, M C W; Krivov, A V; Pilbratt, G L; Roberge, A; Thbault, P; Wiegert, J; White, G J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evolution of infrared instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of consumer-oriented infrared (IR) imaging devices is discussed. The discussion shows that the industry is presently dwindling because it does not fulfill expanding consumer needs. The features of future imaging devices are pointed out - smaller, easier to use, and easier to maintain. The challenge in the 1980s for the infrared manufacturing industry is to develop new technical innovations, smart IR imagining sensors, and consumer-oriented marketing, and produce a business/competitive industry. (MCW)

Sears, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Thermography Laboratory Infrared Thermography Laboratory The Infrared Thermography Laboratory (IRLab) conducts detailed laboratory experiments on the thermal performance of windows and other insulated systems. During a typical experiment, a specimen is placed between two environmental chambers that simulate a long, cold night during winter. Besides generating informative thermal images, the experiments collect several types of quantitative data with high spatial resolution that are useful for understanding subtle details in the thermal performance and for validating computer simulations of heat and fluid flows. Thermography experiments in the IRLab use an infrared imager to produce qualitative thermal images, or thermograms, that help provide a visual interpretation of how heat is flowing through the specimen. The infrared thermograms are also taken and postprocessed to extract numerical data to perform quantitative thermography that produces a database of the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm side of various specimen. A traversing system is also used to measure the distribution of air temperatures and velocities near the specimen. Research results are presented at various technical conferences -- see our schedule of upcoming conferences. Technical papers on infrared thermography are available for downloading. The IRLab contains a machine tool shop area that supports fabrication efforts in the Building Technologies Department. Other types of research, such as Non-Destructive Evaluation, are also conducted in the IRLab.

65

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steffes 1996) and a solar abundance or less of NH 3 (RomaniSteffes 1996) and using a solar abundance of nitrogen in NHof 0.1 times the solar abundance, from observations of the

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Infrared systems and components III: Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 16, 17, 1989  

SciTech Connect

Topics presented include infrared signal processing and automatic target recognition, detection of closely spaced objects using radial variance, the U.S. Army FLIR/ATR evolution path, and classifiability of IR target signatures. Also presented are infrared sensors and detectors, spectral agility, Bayesian analysis of signals from closely spaced objects, and enhanced atmospheric models for IR image simulation. Consideration is given to calibration and testing of infrared sensors, electrooptical-detector laser susceptibility testing, the performance of a thermal scene generator, optics and thin films in the infrared, the optical performance of replica beryllium mirrors, a high-speed video data acquisition system, and antireflection coatings for germanium without zinc.

Caswell, R.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

What are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

back into space. However, greenhouse gases will not let all the infrared light pass throughWhat are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as greenhouse gases the land and oceans. The warmed Earth releases this heat in the form of infrared light (longwave radiation

68

Infrared Thermography Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists measuring sample at IR Thermography lab Scientists measuring sample at IR Thermography lab Infrared Thermography Laboratory In the Infrared Thermography Laboratory (IRLab), researchers test the thermal performance of windows and other insulated systems. Test specimens are placed between chambers that simulate different climate conditions, including household room temperature versus extreme winter cold with high exterior wind speed. Using an infrared imaging system, the IRLab produces calibrated quantitative thermal images, or surface temperature maps, of the specimens in heat transfer experiments. This high resolution non-contact surface temperature data help researchers understand details of thermal performance and validate computer simulations of heat and fluid flow, as well as provide a powerful visualization of detailed thermal features in

69

Variable waveband infrared imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

Hunter, Scott R.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Infrared source test  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

Ott, L.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

IMPROVING AND EXPANDING PRECISION ORBIT DERIVED ATMOSPHERIC DENSITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the area facing the Earth, were determined so that these areas could be used to estimate the atmospheric drag, the force due to solar radiation pressure, and the force due to Earth radiation pressure (infrared and Earth albedo). This was done for both Terra...

Mysore Krishna, Dhaval

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Infrared Thermometer (IRT) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Infrared Thermometer (IRT) is a ground-based radiation pyrometer that provides measurements of the equivalent blackbody brightness temperature of the scene in its field of view. The downwelling version has a narrow field of view for measuring sky temperature and for detecting clouds. The upwelling version has a wide field of view for measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface.

VR Morris

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Infrared radiation: Herschel revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The year 2000 marks the 200th anniversary of Herschels discovery of infrared radiation. Using a car light in place of the Sun and a liquid crystal sheet instead of thermometers the experiment is an effective classroom demonstration of invisible light.

Erin E. Pursell; Richard Kozlowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Infrared Basics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrared Basics Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Infrared Basics Author Protherm Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided...

75

Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine blade . . . . . . . . . . FLIR TM A320G InfraredTable 1.1: Specifications of the FLIR TM A320G InfraredInfrared Camera: A FLIR TM A320G Infrared camera was used

Manohar, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF COOL WHITE DWARFS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present near-infrared photometric observations of 15 and spectroscopic observations of 38 cool white dwarfs (WDs). This is the largest near-infrared spectroscopic survey of cool WDs to date. Combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry and our near-infrared data, we perform a detailed model atmosphere analysis. The spectral energy distributions of our objects are explained fairly well by model atmospheres with temperatures ranging from 6300 K down to 4200 K. Two WDs show significant absorption in the infrared, and are best explained with mixed H/He atmosphere models. Based on the up-to-date model atmosphere calculations by Kowalski and Saumon, we find that the majority of the stars in our sample have hydrogen-rich atmospheres. We do not find any pure helium atmosphere WDs below 5000 K, and we find a trend of increasing hydrogen to helium ratio with decreasing temperature. These findings present an important challenge to understanding the spectral evolution of WDs.

Kilic, Mukremin [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kowalski, Piotr M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Von Hippel, Ted [Physics Department, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)], E-mail: mkilic@cfa.harvard.edu

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

Crawford, T.V.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

8, 10691088, 2008 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the atmosphere (Molina et al., 1974; Farman et al., 1985) has led to an interna- tional effort to replace

Boyer, Edmond

80

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with *the plasma frethe progress...explorcreated an even larger number of...the upper atmosphere and ionosphere...the upper atmosphere. For this...ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...field is large, the horizontal...resolved. The atmospheric gravity waves...simul-taneously at a large number of...two regions plasma drifts separated...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DATA, JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND TERRESTRIAL...IN NEAR-EARTH PLASMA, SPACE SCIENCE...INVESTIGATION OF WHISTLING ATMOSPHERICS, PHILOSOPHICAL...TRANSPOLAR EXOSPHERIC PLASMA .1. PLASMASPHERE...dynamics of the upper atmosphere. For this purpose...the ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

83

ARM - Evaluation Product - Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) 1997.08.01 - 1997.08.01 Site(s) SGP General Description AVIRIS is an optical sensor that delivers calibrated images of the upwelling spectral radiance in 224 contiguous spectral channels (bands) with wavelengths from 400 to 2500 nanometers. AVIRIS has been flown on two aircraft platforms: a NASA ER-2 jet and the Twin Otter turboprop. The main objective of the AVIRIS project is to identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures. Research with

84

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 399426, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/399/2014/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA 2Department. The version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sound- ing Unit differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center

85

AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

Haak, Hein

86

Frequency selective infrared sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Frequency selective infrared sensors  

SciTech Connect

A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

89

MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL VARIABILITY ATLAS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect

Optical and near-infrared variability is a well-known property of young stellar objects. However, a growing number of recent studies claim that a considerable fraction of them also exhibit mid-infrared flux changes. With the aim of studying and interpreting variability on a decadal timescale, here we present a mid-infrared spectral atlas containing observations of 68 low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects. The atlas consists of 2.5-11.6 {mu}m low-resolution spectra obtained with the ISOPHOT-S instrument on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 1996 and 1998, as well as 5.2-14.5 {mu}m low-resolution spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph instrument on board the Spitzer Space Telescope between 2004 and 2007. The observations were retrieved from the ISO and Spitzer archives and were post-processed interactively by our own routines. For those 47 objects where multi-epoch spectra were available, we analyze mid-infrared spectral variability on annual and/or decadal timescales. We identify 37 variable candidate sources. Many stars show wavelength-independent flux changes, possibly due to variable accretion rates. In several systems, all exhibiting 10 {mu}m silicate emission, the variability of the 6-8 {mu}m continuum, and the silicate feature exhibit different amplitudes. A possible explanation is variable shadowing of the silicate-emitting region by an inner disk structure of changing height or extra silicate emission from dust clouds in the disk atmosphere. Our results suggest that mid-infrared variability, in particular, the wavelength-dependent changes, is more ubiquitous than was known before. Interpreting this variability is a new possibility for exploring the structure of the disk and its dynamical processes.

Kospal, A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Abraham, P.; Kun, M.; Moor, A. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Acosta-Pulido, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Dullemond, C. P. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Henning, Th.; Leinert, Ch. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Turner, N. J., E-mail: akospal@rssd.esa.int [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

INTERFEROMETRY ON MIRA IN THE MID-INFRARED: CYCLIC VARIABILITY OF THE CONTINUUM DIAMETER AND THE EFFECT OF SPECTRAL LINES ON APPARENT SIZE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND THE EFFECT OF SPECTRAL LINES ON APPARENT SIZE J. Weiner, D. D. S. Hale, and C. H. Townes Space Sciences2O gas. Subject headings: infrared: stars -- stars: AGB and post-AGB -- stars: atmospheres -- stars

California at Berkeley, University of

91

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

93

The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and Preliminary Assessments of Instrument Deployments in 2006 Dedecker, Ralph University of Wisconsin Demirgian, Jack Argonne National Laboratory Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Instruments One of the key operational instruments at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). This instrument provides the ARM program with surface-based observations of infrared spectrally resolved radiance from a vertically directed cone with better than 1% accuracy. The data from

94

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, S. A. Ackerman, H. E. Revercomb, H. Woolf, and H. Howell Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Inter- ferometer (AERI) have been analyzed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Fourier Transform Data Analysis Tools science team project under the direction of William L. Smith of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The data consist of observations of the downwelling infrared emission at the surface from gaseous atmospheric constituents and from cloud and particulate aerosols. The observations are at 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution over the

95

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 3, 14951508, 2003 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/3/1495/ Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Physics Trace gas measurements from infrared satellite for chemistry and climate applications C. Clerbaux1 that impact on the chemical composi- tion of the atmosphere and on the climate forcing: H2O, CO2, N2O, CH4, CFCs, O3, and CO. The atmospheric abundances obtained from the analysis of IMG/ADEOS measurements

96

Astronomy: Green Light for Infrared  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE new branch of astronomy based on the observation of celestial objects in infrared light has received a significant boost ... boost from the Science Research Council in the form of a grant to the infrared astronomy group at Imperial College. Although the grant of just over 27,000 is modest ...

Our Astronomy Correspondent

1969-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Conference on Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE half-yearly Conference of representatives of local authorities and other organisations co-operating with the Department of Scientific ... of atmospheric pollution was held in the offices of the Department on May 25. The Conference received from Dr. G. M. B. Dobson, chairman of the Atmospheric Pollution ...

1936-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

The erosion resistance of infrared transparent materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The erosion resistance of infrared transparent materials E.J. Coad C.S...discussed. erosion resistance|infrared materials|liquid impact...Keywords: erosion resistance; infrared materials; liquid impact...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Lateral conduction infrared photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photodetector for detecting infrared light in a wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m is disclosed. The photodetector has a mesa structure formed from semiconductor layers which include a type-II superlattice formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. Impurity doped regions are formed on sidewalls of the mesa structure to provide for a lateral conduction of photo-generated carriers which can provide an increased carrier mobility and a reduced surface recombination. An optional bias electrode can be used in the photodetector to control and vary a cut-off wavelength or a depletion width therein. The photodetector can be formed as a single-color or multi-color device, and can also be used to form a focal plane array which is compatible with conventional read-out integrated circuits.

Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

100

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

102

Forward looking infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

looking infrared Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Forward looking infrared Author Wikipedia Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI...

103

A generalized algorithm for retrieving cloudy sky skin temperature from satellite thermal infrared radiances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized algorithm for retrieving cloudy sky skin temperature from satellite thermal infrared Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Abstract. A physical algorithm that of Jin [2000]. Two neighboring pixels over the same land cover have a difference in temperature largely

Jin, Menglin

104

Trends and Inferred Emissions of Atmospheric High Molecular Weight Perfluorocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and octadecafluorooctane (C8F18). Their atmospheric histories are based on measurements of 36 Northern Hemisphere and 468F18. Based on our observations, the 2011 globally averaged dry air mole fractions of these high12, 0.27 ppt for C6F14, 0.12 ppt for C7F16 and 0.09 ppt for C8F18. Newly measured infrared absorption

105

Atmospheric Physics and Earth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...has been used by atmospheric modelers as a vertical...Ackerman, in Atmospheric Physics from Spacelab...shut-tle allows recovery of the film, we...dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. To avoid water condensation on the optical...

M. HERS

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

106

* The far-infrared (λ > 15 µm) is an important  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrared (λ > 15 µm) is an important infrared (λ > 15 µm) is an important component of the overall radiation budget of the Earth, accounting for approximately half of the outgoing infrared radiation to space. * Dominated by the pure rotation band of water vapor, the maximum mid-to-upper tropospheric cooling also occurs in the far-IR (left panel). * ARM science team research has resulted in enormous improvements in the treatment of radiation in climate models (e.g. Tobin et al. 1999; right panel). Tropical atmosphere cooling rates calculated using modern LBLRTM calculations(left panel) and differences between current and early ARM (1995/1996) calculations. At the conclusion of the 1997 SHEBA campaign, some spectral differences between Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) measurements and

107

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NEAR-INFRARED LINEAR POLARIZATION OF ULTRACOOL DWARFS  

SciTech Connect

We report on near-infrared J- and H-band linear polarimetric photometry of eight ultracool dwarfs (two late-M, five L0-L7.5, and one T2.5) with known evidence for photometric variability due to dust clouds, anomalous red infrared colors, or low-gravity atmospheres. The polarimetric data were acquired with the LIRIS instrument on the William Herschel Telescope. We also provide mid-infrared photometry in the interval 3.4-24 {mu}m for some targets obtained with Spitzer and WISE, which has allowed us to confirm the peculiar red colors of five sources in the sample. We can impose modest upper limits of 0.9% and 1.8% on the linear polarization degree for seven targets with a confidence of 99%. Only one source, 2MASS J02411151-0326587 (L0), appears to be strongly polarized (P {approx} 3%) in the J band with a significance level of P/{sigma}{sub P} {approx} 10. The likely origin of its linearly polarized light and rather red infrared colors may reside in a surrounding disk with an asymmetric distribution of grains. Given its proximity (66 {+-} 8 pc), this object becomes an excellent target for the direct detection of the disk.

Zapatero Osorio, M. R. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Bejar, V. J. S.; Rebolo, R.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Pena Ramirez, K. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/. Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Goldman, B. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Caballero, J. A., E-mail: mosorio@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: vbejar@iac.es, E-mail: rrl@iac.es, E-mail: jaa@iac.es, E-mail: amt@iac.es, E-mail: karla@iac.es, E-mail: goldman@mpia.de, E-mail: caballero@cab.inta-csic.es [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

The atmosphere of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations of Venus take a special position in planetary researches. It was just the atmosphere of Venus where first measurements in situ were carried out by means of the equipment delivered by a space pr...

V. I. Moroz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Atmospheric Dynamics of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres has come of age in the last decade, as astronomical techniques now allow for albedos, chemical abundances, temperature profiles and maps, rotation periods and even wind speeds to be measured. Atmospheric dynamics sets the background state of density, temperature and velocity that determines or influences the spectral and temporal appearance of an exoplanetary atmosphere. Hot exoplanets are most amenable to these characterization techniques; in the present review, we focus on highly-irradiated, large exoplanets (the "hot Jupiters"), as astronomical data begin to confront theoretical questions. We summarize the basic atmospheric quantities inferred from the astronomical observations. We review the state of the art by addressing a series of current questions and look towards the future by considering a separate set of exploratory questions. Attaining the next level of understanding will require a concerted effort of constructing multi-faceted, multi-wavelength dat...

Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site? Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site? D. D. Turner and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Low level haze is often observed during the night and early morning hours in many locations. This haze is typically formed during quiescent conditions by radiative cooling of the surface, which lowers the ambient temperature and consequently increases the near-surface relative humidity (RH). Many aerosols start to deliquesce around 75% relative humidity (RH) (depending on their chemical composition), and thus if the near surface RH increases above this level, haze will form. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's ultimate goal, stated simply, is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in global climate models. Global climate models typically do not

112

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment Infrared Cloud Imager Deployment at the North Slope of Alaska During Early 2002 J. A. Shaw and B. Thurairajah Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. Edqvist National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. Mizutani Communications Research Laboratory Koganei, Tokyo, Japan Introduction Starting in February 2002, we deployed a new cloud-radiation sensor called the infrared cloud imager (ICI) at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site near Barrow, Alaska (71.32 N, 156.62 W). ICI records radiometrically calibrated images of the thermal infrared sky radiance in the 8µm to 14 µm wavelength band, from which spatial cloud statistics and spatially resolved cloud radiance can be determined.

113

SILICON ABUNDANCES IN NEARBY STARS FROM THE Si I INFRARED LINES  

SciTech Connect

We have used high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio infrared spectra from the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea. Line formation calculations of Si I infrared lines in the atmospheres of nearby stars are presented. All abundance results of [Si/Fe] are derived from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and NLTE statistical equilibrium calculations and spectrum synthesis methods. We found that NLTE effects for Si I infrared lines are important even for metal-rich stars (>0.1 dex), and the NLTE effects may depend on the surface gravities. A good agreement of silicon abundances between the optical and infrared lines is obtained when the NLTE effects are included, while a large difference is found for the LTE results. The derived silicon abundances are overabundant for metal-poor stars.

Shi, J. R.; Tan, K. F.; Zhao, G. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Takada-Hidai, M. [Liberal Arts Education Center, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hu, S. M.; Cao, C., E-mail: sjr@bao.ac.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Shandong University at Weihai 264209 (China)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Near-infrared induced optical quenching effects on mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect

In space communications, atmospheric absorption and Rayleigh scattering are the dominant channel impairments. Transmission using mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths offers the benefits of lower loss and less scintillation effects. In this work, we report the telecom wavelengths (1.55??m and 1.3??m) induced optical quenching effects on MIR quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), when QCLs are operated well above their thresholds. The QCL output power can be near 100% quenched using 20?mW of near-infrared (NIR) power, and the quenching effect depends on the input NIR intensity as well as wavelength. Time resolved measurement was conducted to explore the quenching mechanism. The measured recovery time is around 14?ns, which indicates that NIR generated electron-hole pairs may play a key role in the quenching process. The photocarrier created local field and band bending can effectively deteriorate the dipole transition matrix element and quench the QCL. As a result, MIR QCLs can be used as an optical modulator and switch controlled by NIR lasers. They can also be used as converters to convert telecom optical signals into MIR optical signals.

Guo, Dingkai, E-mail: dingk1@umbc.edu; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Chen, Xing [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Cai, Hong [Center of Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Johnson, Anthony M.; Choa, Fow-Sen [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Center of Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

High-power parametric conversion from near-infrared to short-wave infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-power parametric conversion from near-infrared to short-wave infrared Adrien Billat,1,* Steevy.billat@epfl.ch Abstract: We report the design of an all-fiber continuous wave Short-Wave Infrared source capable to output.4370) Nonlinear optics, fibers; (140.3070) Infrared and far-infrared lasers. References and links 1. M. N

Dalang, Robert C.

116

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

117

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

118

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

119

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

120

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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121

Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown Dwarfs are the coolest class of stellar objects known to date. Our present perception is that Brown Dwarfs follow the principles of star formation, and that Brown Dwarfs share many characteristics with planets. Being the darkest and lowest mass stars known makes Brown Dwarfs also the coolest stars known. This has profound implication for their spectral fingerprints. Brown Dwarfs cover a range of effective temperatures which cause brown dwarfs atmospheres to be a sequence that gradually changes from a M-dwarf-like spectrum into a planet-like spectrum. This further implies that below an effective temperature of atmospheres of objects marking the boundary between M-Dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Recent developments have sparked the interest in plasma processes in such very cool atmospheres: sporadic and quiescent radio emission has been observed in combination with decaying Xray-activity indicators across the fully convective boundary.

Helling, Christiane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.F. Keeling, S.C. Piper, A.F. Bollenbacher and J.S. Walker Carbon Dioxide Research Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California La Jolla, California 92093-0444, U.S.A. Period of Record 1958-2008 Methods Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5

123

Cloud features and zonal wind measurements of Saturn's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud features and zonal wind measurements of Saturn's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS D. S Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), focusing on the meteorology of the features seen in the 5 mm spectral window. We present VIMS mosaics and discuss the morphology and general

Choi, David S.

124

Response of the middle atmosphere to CO2 doubling: results from the Canadian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ontario, Canada Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada #Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Manuscript received 2 an increase in solar heating and a decrease in infrared cooling, with the latter accounting for up to 15

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

125

Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality  

We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that it does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.

Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure (bars) N2 82%; Ar 12%; CH4 6%CO2 96.5%; N2 3.5%Atmospheric composition 26177Orbital inclination (1992) orbiter ­ Winds from cloud-tracking and probe drifts ­ IR temperatures, solar-fixed tides, polar-Huygens mission (from 2005) ­ Doppler wind descent profile ­ IR temperature and composition maps ­ Visible, IR

Read, Peter L.

127

Intrinsic near-infrared spectroscopic markers of breast tumors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle on the red and near-infrared optical properties of thecancer imaging using near-infrared optical measurements andet al. / Intrinsic near-infrared spectroscopic markers of

Kukreti, Shwayta; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Gratton, Enrico

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present the AKARI near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 36 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) at z = 0.01-0.4. We measure the NIR spectral features including the strengths of 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and hydrogen recombination lines (Br{alpha} and Br{beta}), optical depths at 3.1 and 3.4 {mu}m, and NIR continuum slope. These spectral features are used to identify optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that half of the (U)LIRGs optically classified as non-Seyferts show AGN signatures in their NIR spectra. Using a combined sample of (U)LIRGs with NIR spectra in the literature, we measure the contribution of buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity from the spectral energy distribution fitting to the IRAS photometry. The contribution of these buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity is 5%-10%, smaller than the typical AGN contribution of (U)LIRGs including Seyfert galaxies (10%-40%). We show that NIR continuum slopes correlate well with WISE [3.4]-[4.6] colors, which would be useful for identifying a large number of buried AGNs using the WISE data.

Lee, Jong Chul; Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [CEA Saclay/Service d'Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kim, Minjin; Lee, Joon Hyeop, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jclee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: mkim@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: jhl@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

130

ATMOSPHERIC ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud hydrometeors (water drops, ice particles, and, particularlyATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259 Simulations of drop fall turbulence. The model permits us to generate different realizations of the random velocity field component

Mark, Pinsky

131

Astronomy: Bright Future for Infrared  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ALTHOUGH the prediction of what is likely to happen in astronomy in the future is a hazardous undertaking just now, it seems increasingly obvious in ... is a hazardous undertaking just now, it seems increasingly obvious in astronomical circles that infrared astronomy is going to be an important field of investigation during the next few years. ...

Our Astronomy Correspondent

1968-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared emitting device and method. The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Dawson, L. Ralph (Albuquerque, NM); Howard, Arnold J. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

INSTRUMENTATION FOR FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform spectrometers developed in three distinct spectral regions in the early 1960s. Pierre Connes and his coworkers in France developed remarkably sophisticated step-scan interferometers that permitted near-infrared spectra to be measured with a resolution of better than 0.0 1 cm{sup {minus}1}. These instruments may be considered the forerunners of the step-scan interferometers made by Bruker, Bio-Rad (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Nicolet although their principal application was in the field of astronomy. Low-resolution rapid-scanning interferometers were developed by Larry Mertz and his colleagues at Block Engineering (Cambridge, MA, USA) for remote sensing. Nonetheless, the FT-IR spectrometers that are so prevalent in chemical laboratories today are direct descendants of these instruments. The interferometers that were developed for far-infrared spectrometry in Gebbie's laboratory ,have had no commercial counterparts for at least 15 years. However, it could be argued that these instruments did as much to demonstrate the power of Fourier transform spectroscopy to the chemical community as any of the instruments developed for mid- and near-infrared spectrometry. Their performance was every bit as good as today's rapid-scanning interferometers. However, the market for these instruments is so small today that it has proved more lucrative to modify rapid-scanning interferometers that were originally designed for mid-infrared spectrometry than to compete with these instruments with slow continuous scan or step-scan interferometers.

GRIFFITHS, P.R.; HOMES, C.

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Industrial Use of Infrared Inspections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but in the final analysis it comes down to the fact that the industrial management responsible for the operations and production budgets did not, and in many cases, still does not understand the economic benefits to the company that infrared industrial inspections...

Duch, A. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

About EffectiveŽ Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in "Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range V. N. Uzhegov, D. M. Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important factors affecting the radiation budget of the space - atmosphere - underlying surface system in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges. It is extremely important to take into account the contribution of this component into the extinction of solar radiation under cloudless sky conditions. Sometimes it is important to know not only the total value of the aerosol component of extinction, but also to have the possibility to estimate the "effective" height of

136

What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

138

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents Siavash Yazdanfar,a, * Chulmin Joo,a Chun limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared NIR fluorescent Engineers. DOI: 10.1117/1.3420209 Keywords: two-photon microscopy; ultrafast fiber lasers; near-infrared

Larson-Prior, Linda

142

Category:Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared page? For detailed information on Long-Wave Infrared as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Long-Wave Infrared Add.png Add a new Long-Wave Infrared...

143

The changing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

145

Why Scanning Instruments Are a Necessity for Constraining Temperature and Humidity Fields in the Lower Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of different ground-based measurement strategies for constraining thermodynamic variables in the troposphere, particularly at the mesoscale, is investigated. First, a preliminary assessment of the capability of pure-vertical sounders ...

David Themens; Frdric Fabry

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility R. O. Knuteson, R. G. Dedecker, W. F. Feltz, B. J. Osbourne, H. E. Revercomb, and D. C. Tobin Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) has developed, under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funding, a model for the infrared land surface emissivity (LSE) in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Central Facility (CF) in North Central Oklahoma. The UW-Madison LSE model is part of the ARM best

147

Computer modeling of infrared head-on emission from missile noses  

SciTech Connect

A computer model that takes into account the effect of aerodynamic and solar heating, sky irradiation, and radiative cooling on infrared emission from missile noses is presented. The heat transfer equation was solved with numerical techniques both in the steady-state (constant sped and altitude flight of cruise missiles) and in the nonstationary regime (quickly variable speed and altitude of short to medium range ballistic missiles) to give the temperature distribution on the skin surface. The corresponding head-on absolute infrared emission in the 3 to 5 {mu}m spectral bands was computed as a function of time of flight and missile altitude. Results show a strong dependence of temperature on the skin material, on the character of the aerodynamic flow (laminar or turbulent boundary layer), and on the physical characteristics of the atmosphere. By varying these parameters into reasonable ranges, infrared emissions spanning over more than an order of magnitude were obtained.

Tofani, A. (Officine Galileo SpA, Via Einstein 35, 50013 Campi Bisenzio, Florence (IT))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Definition: Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Near Infrared Surveys Near infrared surveys refer to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the region just outside wavelengths detectable by the human eye. Near infrared wavelengths are generally considered to be between approximately 0.75-1.4 micrometers. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Infrared (IR) light is electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometres (nm) to 1 mm. This range of wavelengths corresponds to a frequency range of approximately 430 THz down to 300 GHz, and includes most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature. Infrared light is emitted or absorbed by molecules

149

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

150

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site C. M. R. Platt and R. T. Austin Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado C. M. R. Platt and J. A. Bennett Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Atmospheric Research Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Abstract The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (CSIRO/ARM) Program Mark II infrared (IR) filter radiometer operated continuously at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site for a period of five weeks. Data of high quality were obtained by remote operation and data transfer with no evidence of spurious

151

Infrared emitting device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The infrared emitting device comprises a III-V compound semiconductor substrate upon which are grown a quantum-well active region having a plurality of quantum-well layers formed of a ternary alloy comprising InAsSb sandwiched between barrier layers formed of a ternary alloy having a smaller lattice constant and a larger energy bandgap than the quantum-well layers. The quantum-well layers are preferably compressively strained to increase the threshold energy for Auger recombination; and a method is provided for determining the preferred thickness for the quantum-well layers. Embodiments of the present invention are described having at least one cladding layer to increase the optical and carrier confinement in the active region, and to provide for waveguiding of the light generated within the active region. Examples have been set forth showing embodiments of the present invention as surface- and edge-emitting light emitting diodes (LEDs), an optically-pumped semiconductor laser, and an electrically-injected semiconductor diode laser. The light emission from each of the infrared emitting devices of the present invention is in the midwave infrared region of the spectrum from about 2 to 6 microns. 8 figs.

Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Baucom, K.C.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

A DETAILED MODEL ATMOSPHERE ANALYSIS OF COOL WHITE DWARFS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present optical spectroscopy and near-infrared photometry of 126 cool white dwarfs (WDs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our sample includes high proper motion targets selected using the SDSS and USNO-B astrometry and a dozen previously known ultracool WD candidates. Our optical spectroscopic observations demonstrate that a clean selection of large samples of cool WDs in the SDSS (and the SkyMapper, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope data sets) is possible using a reduced proper motion diagram and a tangential velocity cut-off (depending on the proper motion accuracy) of 30 km s{sup -1}. Our near-infrared observations reveal eight new stars with significant absorption. We use the optical and near-infrared photometry to perform a detailed model atmosphere analysis. More than 80% of the stars in our sample are consistent with either pure hydrogen or pure helium atmospheres. However, the eight stars with significant infrared absorption and the majority of the previously known ultracool WD candidates are best explained with mixed hydrogen and helium atmosphere models. The age distribution of our sample is consistent with a Galactic disk age of 8 Gyr. A few ultracool WDs may be as old as 12-13 Gyr, but our models have problems matching the spectral energy distributions of these objects. There are only two halo WD candidates in our sample. However, trigonometric parallax observations are required for accurate mass and age determinations and to confirm their membership in the halo.

Kilic, Mukremin [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Leggett, S. K. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tremblay, P.-E.; Bergeron, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Von Hippel, Ted [Physics Department, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States); Harris, Hugh C.; Munn, Jeffrey A. [U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Williams, Kurtis A. [Department of Astronomy, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gates, Evalyn [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Farihi, J., E-mail: mkilic@cfa.harvard.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos ... In the positive ion mode, protonated water hydrates (H3O+(H2O)n) generated by the corona discharge in the chamber diluent air were responsible for the protonation of analytes, and the ions that were mass analyzed were mainly protonated molecules ([M + H]+) and their protonated homo- and heterodimers. ... Methyl nitrite, 2-propyl nitrite and N2O5 were prepared and stored as described previously,(8, 10) and O3 in O2 diluent was generated using a Welsbach T-408 ozone generator. ...

Sara M. Aschmann; Ernesto C. Tuazon; William D. Long; Roger Atkinson

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Frontiers in Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers in Global Change Frontiers in Global Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Dr. Thanos Nenes Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component of Climate Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Professor & Georgia Power Faculty Scholar, School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Thursday, August 1, 2013 EMSL Auditorium 10:00AM The effect of human activities on climate is one of the most important issues facing society. Humans influence climate in many ways. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) tend to warm climate, by reducing the amount of infrared radiation that is emitted to space. Increased levels of suspended atmospheric particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic

155

Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earths surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earths energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

158

ARM - Evolution of the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provides clues as to the composition of the early atmosphere. Volcanic emissions include nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and trace gases such as argon. Although oxygen,...

159

Infrared emission spectroscopic study of brucite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both infrared absorption and emission spectroscopy have been used to assign the vibrational bands of brucite. IR absorption bands are observed in the hydroxyl stretching region at 3698 and 3248 cm?1. Low frequency bands are observed at 627, 565 and 440 cm?1. Naturally occurring brucites are contaminated with other magnesium minerals which are easily identified by the infrared spectra. Infrared emission bands are observed at 3686, 3571, 3251 and 2940 cm?1. The intensity of these bands decreases upon thermal treatment corresponding to the dehydration and dehydroxylation of the brucite. Low frequency infrared emission bands are observed at 876, 706, 622 and 559 cm?1. Dehydroxylation of the brucite may be followed by the loss of intensity of the hydroxyl vibrations during thermal treatment. Importantly infrared emission spectroscopy enables the study of the dehydroxylation in situ at the elevated temperatures. Infrared emission also confirms the absorption bands assigned to brucite.

Ray L Frost; J.Theo Kloprogge

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Dusty Galactic Nuclei PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van het doctoraat in de Wiskunde en Natuurwetenschappen aan de Rijksuniversiteit Groningen op

Spoon, Henrik

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is...

162

Exposure Time Calculator for Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph: IGRINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an exposure-time calculator (ETC) for the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). The signal and noise values are calculated by taking into account the telluric background emission and absorption, the emission and transmission of the telescope and instrument optics, and the dark current and read noise of the infrared detector arrays. For the atmospheric transmission, we apply models based on the amount of precipitable water vapor along the line of sight to the target. The ETC produces the expected signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for each resolution element, given the exposure-time and number of exposures. In this paper, we compare the simulated continuum S/N for the early-type star HD 124683 and the late-type star GSS 32, and the simulated emission line S/N for the H2 rovibrational transitions from the Iris Nebula NGC 7023 with the observed IGRINS spectra. The simulated S/N from the ETC is overestimate by 10 - 15 % for the sample continuum targets.

Le, Huynh Anh N; Jaffe, Daniel T; Lee, Jae-Joon; Im, Myungshin; Kaplan, Kyle; Seifahrt, Andreas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

Johnson, Robert E.

165

THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): A SOUNDING ROCKET PAYLOAD TO STUDY THE NEAR INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT  

SciTech Connect

The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown four times, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the subsequent flights, and the scientific data from these flights are currently being analyzed.

Zemcov, M.; Bock, J.; Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P. [Department of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Arai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T. [Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Battle, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cooray, A. [Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Keating, B.; Renbarger, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Kim, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Sullivan, I. [Department of Physics, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Suzuki, K., E-mail: zemcov@caltech.edu [Instrument Development Group of Technical Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

167

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells J illuminated with near-infrared NIR radiation at frequency nir and intense far-infrared FIR radiation from and quenching of photoluminescence PL .8,9 The nonlinear interaction of FIR and near-infrared NIR radiation

Kono, Junichiro

168

STh3M.6.pdf CLEO:2014 2014 OSA Silicon Chip Based Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Optical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STh3M.6.pdf CLEO:2014 © 2014 OSA Silicon Chip Based Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Optical near-infrared and mid-infrared with detection limit down to 1ppb. Strip waveguide, slot waveguide and PC-based chip integrated optical absorption spectroscopy devices are compared in near-infrared

Chen, Ray

169

Astronomy: Lowering Sights in the Infrared  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Imperial College, London, into a fully-equipped instrument has now been passed by the Astronomy Policy and Grants Committee of the Science Research Council. In this way an infrared ... Science Research Council. In this way an infrared telescope that is able to do valuable astronomy from a site with good seeing conditions could be available to British astronomers by next ...

Our Astronomy Correspondent

1970-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect

We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

Chen, P. S. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory and Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, X. H., E-mail: iraspsc@yahoo.com.cn, E-mail: yangxh@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Long-Wave Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Wave Infrared Long-Wave Infrared Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Long-Wave Infrared Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Long-Wave Infrared: Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) refers to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the 8 to 15 µm wavelength range. LWIR surveys are sometimes referred to as "thermal imaging" and can be used to identify relatively warm features

172

FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrologyall specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

Definition: Multispectral Thermal Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrared Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Multispectral Thermal Infrared This wavelength range senses heat energy from the Earth's surface. It can be used to sense surface temperature, including anomalies associated with active geothermal or volcanic systems. Both multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing observations are available. This range can also be used to map mineralogy associate with common rock-forming silicates.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_infrared_spectroscopy ↑ http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Multispectral_Thermal_Infrared&oldid=601561

174

Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

Price, J.M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrologyall specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNLs Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and waveguide couplers. Optical metrology tools were also developed to characterize optical waveguide structures and LWIR optical components.

Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Review article reached the International Reviews in Physical Chemistry most read list NULL...

177

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Assessment within an Atmospheric Infrared Cloudy Assessment within an Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Pixel by Combining Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Ground-Based Lidar and Radar Measurements L. Adhikari and Z. Wang University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming D. Whiteman National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Water vapor is an important component of the atmosphere in terms of its effects on the global radiation budget through its interaction with both the terrestrial long wave radiation and short wave solar radiation through cloud formation. It is one of the most radiatively active constituent of the atmosphere, ranging from shortwave solar radiances through the broadband infrared (Soden and Bretherton 1993) to

178

Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermal infrared detectors based on MEMS bimorph beams have the potential to exceed the performance of current uncooled thermal infrared cameras both in terms of (more)

Warren, Clinton Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman Spectroscopy. High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman...

180

NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NDE of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Using Infrared Thermography Monica A. STARNES that infrared thermography is a promising nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method considering testing speed

Entekhabi, Dara

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181

A high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model for simulating multi-layered clouds and aerosols in the infrared spectral region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fast and flexible model is developed to simulate the transfer of thermal infrared radiation at wavenumbers from 700 to 1300 cm?1 with a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm?1 for scattering/absorbing atmospheres. In a single run and at multiple user-...

Chenxi Wang; Ping Yang; Xu Liu

182

Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... preliminary work. The absence of levels of a higher order suggests that the contribution of radon from this source does not represent a significant addition to the total atmospheric level. ... Domestic 0.70

W. ANDERSON; R. C. TURNER

1956-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

Doubling of atmospheric methane supported  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric methane over the past 27,000 years was measured by analyzing air trapped in glacial ice in Greenland and Antarctica. Atmospheric concentrations were stable over that period until about 200 years b.p. In the last 200 years they have more than doubled. This change in concentration is correlated with the increase in human population; the implications for climate modification are discussed. 1 figure, 3 references.

Kerr, R.A.

1984-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine

187

Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys (Redirected from Thermal And-Or Near Infrared) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Near Infrared Surveys Details Activities (18) Areas (14) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 450.0045,000 centUSD 0.45 kUSD 4.5e-4 MUSD 4.5e-7 TUSD / sq. mile Median Estimate (USD): 800.0080,000 centUSD 0.8 kUSD 8.0e-4 MUSD 8.0e-7 TUSD / sq. mile High-End Estimate (USD): 1,350.00135,000 centUSD 1.35 kUSD 0.00135 MUSD 1.35e-6 TUSD / sq. mile

188

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Synchrotron Infrared Unveils a Mysterious Microbial Community Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 A cold sulfur spring in Germany is the only place where archaea are known to dominate bacteria in a microbial community. How this unique community thrives and the lessons it may hold for understanding global carbon and sulfur cycles are beginning to emerge from research by the University of Regensburg's Christine Moissl-Eichinger and her colleagues, including Advanced Light Source guest Alex Probst. Crucial microbial biochemistry was done at Berkeley Lab by Hoi-Ying Holman, director of the Berkeley Synchrotron Infrared Structural Biology facility, and her staff at the ALS, and by Phylochip inventors Todd DeSantis and Gary Anderson.

189

Synthesis and characterization of infrared quantum dots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the development of synthetic methods to create application ready quantum dots (QDs) in the infrared for biological imaging and optoelectronic devices. I concentrated primarily on controlling the size ...

Harris, Daniel Kelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Applying near-infrared spectroscopy (nirs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigated. A recently developed optical imaging technique called near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) shows promise for being an acceptable alternative to invasive imaging techniques. NIRS measures correlates of neural activity by assessing hemoglobin...

Wruck, Eric Michael

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

192

Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981, CSIRO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » CO2 » Concentrations from Aircraft for Atmospheric Trace Gases » CO2 » Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981 Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981, CSIRO Monitoring Program DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp007 data Data (NDP-007) PDF PDF Investigators D. J. Beardsmore and G. I. Pearman Methods From 1972 through 1981, air samples were collected in glass flasks from aircraft at a variety of latitudes and altitudes over Australia, New Zealand, and Antarctica. The samples were analyzed for CO2 concentrations with nondispersive infrared gas analysis. The resulting data contain the sampling dates, type of aircraft, flight number, flask identification number, sampling time, geographic sector, distance in kilometers from the listed distance measuring equipment (DME) station, station number of the

193

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

194

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

195

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

196

Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

Venot, Olivia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

198

Characteristic evaluation of a near-infrared Fabry-Perot filter for the InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph (IRIM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characteristic evaluation of a near-infrared Fabry-P´erot filter for the InfraRed Imaging solar two-dimensional narrow-band spectro-polarimeter working in the near infrared from 1.0 µm to 1.7 µm, this paper outlines a set of methods to evaluate the near infrared Fabry-P´erot etalon. Two

199

SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

Russell, Lynn

200

Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery Linked Environments for Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unidata Program Center #12;Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery The Team: 9 institutions and 105 MethodologyTraditional NWP Methodology STATIC OBSERVATIONS Radar Data Mobile Mesonets Surface Observations Satellites The Process is Entirely Prescheduled and Serial; It Does NOT Respond to the Weather! The Process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17431758 Impact of urban heat island on regional atmospheric pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and spatial distribution of atmospheric pollutants over the Paris region. One anticyclonic episode from Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Regional atmospheric pollution; Urban area micrometeorology are large sources of atmospheric pollutants. Their spatial distribution and their temporal evolution can

Ribes, Aurélien

202

Follow-Up Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies observed by ISO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present low resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of an unbiased sample of 24 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), selected from samples previously observed spectroscopically in the mid-infrared with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Qualitatively, the near-infrared spectra resemble those of starbursts. Only in one ULIRG, IRAS 04114-5117E, do we find spectroscopic evidence for AGN activity. The spectroscopic classification in the near-infrared is in very good agreement with the mid-infrared one. For a subset of our sample for which extinction corrections can be derived from Pa-alpha and Br-gamma, we find rather high Pa-alpha luminosities, in accordance with the powering source of these galaxies being star formation.[Fe] emission is strong in ULIRGs and may be linked to starburst and superwind activity. Additionally, our sample includes two unusual objects. The first, IRAS F00183-7111, exhibits extreme [Fe] emission and the second, IRAS F23578-5307, is according to our knowledge one of the most luminous infrared galaxies in H2 rotation-vibration emission.

H. Dannerbauer; D. Rigopoulou; D. Lutz; R. Genzel; E. Sturm; A. F. M. Moorwood

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Statistical equilibrium of silicon in the solar atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistical equilibrium of neutral and ionised silicon in the solar photosphere is investigated. Line formation is discussed and the solar silicon abundance determined. High-resolution solar spectra were used to determine solar $\\log gf\\epsilon_{\\rm Si}$ values by comparison with Si line synthesis based on LTE and NLTE level populations. The results will be used in a forthcoming paper for differential abundance analyses of metal-poor stars. A detailed analysis of silicon line spectra leads to setting up realistic model atoms, which are exposed to interactions in plane-parallel solar atmospheric models. The resulting departure coefficients are entered into a line-by-line analysis of the visible and near-infrared solar silicon spectrum. The statistical equilibrium of \\ion{Si}{i} turns out to depend marginally on bound-free interaction processes, both radiative and collisional. Bound-bound interaction processes do not play a significant role either, except for hydrogen collisions, which have to be chosen adequately for fitting the cores of the near-infrared lines. Except for some near-infrared lines, the NLTE influence on the abundances is weak. Taking the deviations from LTE in silicon into account, it is possible to calculate the ionisation equilibrium from neutral and ionised lines. The solar abundance based on the experimental $f$-values of Garz corrected for the Becker et al.'s measurement is $7.52 \\pm 0.05$. Combined with an extended line sample with selected NIST $f$-values, the solar abundance is $7.52 \\pm 0.06$, with a nearly perfect ionisation equilibrium of $\\Delta\\log\\epsilon_\\odot(\\ion{Si}{ii}/\\ion{Si}{i}) = -0.01$.

J. R. Shi; T. Gehren; K. Butler; L. I. Mashonkina; G. Zhao

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HICKS, B.B., A SIMULATION OF THE EDDY ACCUMULATION...CLOSURES IN 2ND-ORDER MODELING, JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC...Their advantag-es are rapid response, linear output...the measurement and modeling of surface fluxes are...the appli-cation of automated conditional sampling...

W. F. Dabberdt; D. H. Lenschow; T. W. Horst; P. R. Zimmerman; S. P. Oncley; A. C. Delany

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

205

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook followed a Code of Honor, which is stated in this very simple verse: An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal that knowledge for the benefit of society. Our most fundamental mission is to help students at all levels, from

206

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect

The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Definition: Forward-Looking Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forward-Looking Infrared Forward-Looking Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Forward-Looking Infrared Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) cameras flown from fixed-wing aircraft measure the amount of energy radiated in the infrared (7.5 - 13 micrometer) to detect detailed information on the land surface temperature distribution that might indicate areas of geothermal activity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Forward looking infrared (FLIR) cameras, typically used on military and civilian aircraft, use an imaging technology that senses infrared radiation. The sensors installed in forward-looking infrared cameras-as well as those of other thermal imaging cameras-use detection of infrared radiation, typically emitted from a heat source, to create a "picture"

209

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However, even though this class of devices is finding a growing number of applications, electronic processes in organic materials are still not well understood. A group of researchers from the University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The results of their study could help in the future development of sensors, large-area displays, and other plastic electronic components.

210

Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Near Infrared Surveys Details Activities (18) Areas (14) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 450.0045,000 centUSD 0.45 kUSD 4.5e-4 MUSD 4.5e-7 TUSD / sq. mile Median Estimate (USD): 800.0080,000 centUSD 0.8 kUSD 8.0e-4 MUSD 8.0e-7 TUSD / sq. mile High-End Estimate (USD): 1,350.00135,000 centUSD 1.35 kUSD 0.00135 MUSD 1.35e-6 TUSD / sq. mile Time Required Low-End Estimate: 6 weeks0.115 years

211

Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

Sopori, B.L.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

Surface modification of polymeric materials by cold atmospheric plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work we report the surface modification of different engineering polymers, such as, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). It was operated with Ar gas using 10kV, 37kHz, sine wave as an excitation source. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal treatment conditions and also to compare the polymer surface modification induced by plasma jet with the one obtained by another atmospheric pressure plasma source the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The samples were exposed to the plasma jet effluent using a scanning procedure, which allowed achieving a uniform surface modification. The wettability assessments of all polymers reveal that the treatment leads to reduction of more than 40 in the water contact angle (WCA). Changes in surface composition and chemical bonding were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-Transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that both detected incorporation of oxygen-related functional groups. Surface morphology of polymer samples was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and an increase of polymer roughness after the APPJ treatment was found. The plasma-treated polymers exhibited hydrophobic recovery expressed in reduction of the O-content of the surface upon rinsing with water. This process was caused by the dissolution of low molecular weight oxidized materials (LMWOMs) formed on the surface as a result of the plasma exposure.

K.G. Kostov; T.M.C. Nishime; A.H.R. Castro; A. Toth; L.R.O. Hein

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

214

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related to land and atmosphere and their coupled interactions. Students

Minnesota, University of

215

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

216

Lifetimes and time scales in atmospheric chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as for years with extensive forest fires. Moving beyond atmospheric chemistry, extension of this approach to Earth system models could yield surprises. The coupling across different components of the chemistry-climate system, such as atmospheric...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter  

SciTech Connect

Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri, E-mail: henri.benisty@institutoptique.fr; Greffet, Jean-Jacques [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut dOptique, CNRS, Universit Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bouchon, Patrick; Hadar, Riad [Office National dtudes et de Recherches Arospatiales, Chemin de la Hunire, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Visible and Near Infrared module of EChO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) is one of the modules of EChO, the Exoplanets Characterization Observatory proposed to ESA for an M-class mission. EChO is aimed to observe planets while transiting by their suns. Then the instrument had to be designed to assure a high efficiency over the whole spectral range. In fact, it has to be able to observe stars with an apparent magnitude Mv= 9-12 and to see contrasts of the order of 10-4 - 10-5 necessary to reveal the characteristics of the atmospheres of the exoplanets under investigation. VNIR is a spectrometer in a cross-dispersed configuration, covering the 0.4-2.5 micron spectral range with a resolving power of about 330 and a field of view of 2 arcsec. It is functionally split into two channels respectively working in the 0.4-1 and 1.0-2.5 micron spectral ranges. Such a solution is imposed by the fact the light at short wavelengths has to be shared with the EChO Fine Guiding System (FGS) devoted to the pointing of the stars under observation. The spectromete...

Adriani, A; Gambicorti, L; Focardi, M; Oliva, E; Farina, M; Di Giorgio, A M; Santoli, F; Pace, E; Piccioni, G; Filacchione, G; Pancrazzi, M; Tozzi, A; Micela, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composites using atmospheric plasma treatment. J. Appl.of polymer surfaces: atmospheric plasma versus vacuum plasmaA. Morgan, The effect of atmospheric plasma treatment on the

Williams, Thomas Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

Paul H. Wine

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Model Atmospheres for Low Field Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute model atmospheres and emergent spectra for low field (Bsolar abundance and iron atmospheres. We compare our results to high field magnetic atmospheres, available only for hydrogen. An application to apparently thermal flux from the low field millisecond pulsar PSR J0437--4715 shows that H atmospheres fit substantially better than Fe models. We comment on extension to high fields and the implication of these results for neutron star luminosities and radii.

Mohan Rajagopal; Roger Romani

1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

On the energy content of the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of the content of sensible heat, potential energy, and latent heat in the atmosphere between...

Stefan L. Hastenrath

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Temporal Scales of Tropospheric CO2, Precipitation, and Ecosystem Responses in the Central U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations are measured with an open path infrared gas analyzer with wind speeds from a sonic anemometer at 20 hz. Data are collected by a Campbell Scientific CR 3000 Datalog- ger. The data are processed in a standard way (see Baum et al. (2008) for details... on the post-processing algorithm), including a coordinate rotation using the planer fit method (Wilczak et al., 2001) as well as the standard corrections for density (Webb 3.2 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder 19 et al., 1980) and sonic-anemometer derived estimates...

Cochran, Ferdouz V.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radar Measurement of the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Upper Atmosphere James C. G...two decades large radars have...of the upper atmosphere. These radars...ionospheric plasma, all as functions...ionospheric plasma by detection...is wasted. Atmospheric radar scientists...305 m and an area of 73,000...frequency of 430 MHz. The radar...

James C. G. Walker

1979-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RADIATIVE-TRANSFER DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC WATER-VAPOR - GLOBAL...giving rise to atmospheric mo-tions that...heat release by condensation as moist air...and because the atmospheric motions that...to thE1tfrof water in a leaky bucket...

J. Hansen; D. Johnson; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; P. Lee; D. Rind; G. Russell

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Instrumental Requirements for Global Atmospheric Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC CH2O, O3, AND NO2...AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC OH, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL...HYDROGEN-CHLORIDE AND WATER AT ANTARCTIC STRATOSPHERIC...TOON, O.B., CONDENSATION OF HNO3 AND HCL IN...requirements for global atmospheric chemistry. | The field...

D. L. Albritton; F. C. Fehsenfeld; A. F. Tuck

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Space plasma influences on the Earth's atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 129 0.2 0.6 1.0...Lond. A (2003) Space plasma and the Earth's atmosphere 131 the size and the...satellites probing the space-plasma and atmospheric environments, they provide...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...1978012175 air atmosphere biosphere carbon...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth, which...synchronization rate of 16 khz and the picture...the interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

Ward, Bess

232

Ch4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than red light. #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum 8% 47% 45% 100% solar radiation #12;Blue Sky, Red;Energy Pathways #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Atmosphere or performing any work. #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Transmission

Pan, Feifei

233

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 ­ 10:50, 212B ACRC) 491-8587 Teaching Assistant: Lauren Potter Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 11 Lepotter, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical composition; 2) Explain the chemical

234

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry Monday and Wednesday, 9 ­ 9:50, 212B ACRC Instructor: Prof) Understand quantitatively how emissions, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical to Atmospheric Chemistry, D.J. Jacob Princeton University Press, 1999 PDF versions of the chapters can

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

235

Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 5- (DRAFT) Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants Guy Landrieu INERIS Institut, Stuttgart : Germany (1995)" #12;INERIS: Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants (DRAFT may 1995) Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants Summary 1 Introduction 2 Background 3 Harmfulness

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Atmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmospheric chemistry/air quality, boundary layer and air pollution meteorology, regional/global climatology MODELING OF MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS AT URBAN AND REGIONAL SCALES Our atmosphere is a complex systemAtmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS) (http

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

238

A brief history of infrared astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) is a project funded by NASA and the German Space Agency DLR, to put a 2.5 m telescope into a Boeing 747-SP. SOFIA will have a set of observatory instruments for all astronomers to use, and is due to start flights in 2002......

Helen J Walker

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are neutralized and then discharged as wastewater. The high salinity of the wastewater from the peeling process, producing less wastewater and preserving product quality. Infrared drypeeling is expected to reduce: rkapoor@energy.state.ca.us Dr. Zhongli Pan University of California, Davis Phone: (510) 5595861

240

SiGeC Near Infrared Photodetectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A near infrared waveguide photodetector in Si-based ternary Si???x??yGexCy alloy was demonstrated for 0.85~1.06 m wavelength fiber-optic interconnection system applications. Two sets of detectors with active absorption ...

Li, Baojun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect of CaCl2. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect...

242

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles Angela M. Monateri at the infrared image from an automobile. ·The camera was set up with a FEAT 3000 unit to compare emissions vs

Denver, University of

243

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer...

244

Matching of Infrared Emitters with Textiles For Improved Energy Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the infrared absorptivity of fabrics over the wavelength spectrum of 0.7 to 25 microns (the range of operation of commercial infrared emitters). Since the operating ranges for several system components (detectors, beam splitters and sources) are much narrower...

Carr, W. W.; Williamson, V. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Do, B. T.

245

Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.  

SciTech Connect

Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ground-based All-sky Mid-infrared and Visible Imagery for Purposes of Characterizing Cloud Properties  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA), a multi-purpose visible and infrared sky imaging and analysis instrument whose primary functionality is to provide radiometrically calibrated imagery in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric window. This functionality enables the determination of diurnal hemispherical cloud fraction (HCF) and estimates of sky/cloud temperature from which one can derive estimates of cloud emissivity and cloud height. This paper describes the calibration methods and performance of the ASIVA instrument with particular emphasis on data products being developed for the meteorological community. Data presented here were collected during a field campaign conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility from May 21 to July 27, 2009. The purpose of this campaign was to determine the efficacy of IR technology in providing reliable nighttime HCF data. Significant progress has been made in the analysis of the campaign data over the past several years and the ASIVA has proven to be an excellent instrument for determining HCF as well as several other important cloud properties.

Klebe, Dimitri; Blatherwick, R. D.; Morris, Victor R.

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

Infrared Properties of Close Pairs of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss spectroscopy and infrared photometry for a complete sample of ~ 800 galaxies in close pairs objectively selected from the CfA2 redshift survey. We use 2MASS to compare near infrared color-color diagrams for our sample with the Nearby Field Galaxy Sample and with a set of IRAS flux-limited pairs from Surace et al. We construct a basic statistical model to explore the physical sources of the substantial differences among these samples. The model explains the spread of near infrared colors and is consistent with a picture where central star formation is triggered by the galaxy-galaxy interaction before a merger occurs. For 160 galaxies we report new, deep JHK photometry within our spectroscopic aperture and we use the combined spectroscopic and photometric data to explore the physical conditions in the central bursts. We find a set of objects with H-K >= 0.45 and with a large F(FIR)/F(H). We interpret the very red H-K colors as evidence for 600-1000 K dust within compact star-forming regions, perhaps similar to super-star clusters identified in individual well-studied interacting galaxies. The galaxies in our sample are candidate ``hidden'' bursts or, possibly, ``hidden'' AGN. Over the entire pair sample, both spectroscopic and photometric data show that the specific star formation rate decreases with the projected separation of the pair. The data suggest that the near infrared color-color diagram is also a function of the projected separation; all of the objects with central near infrared colors indicative of bursts of star formation lie at small projected separation.

Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Elizabeth J. Barton; Thomas H. Jarrett; Lisa J. Kewley

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

249

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

250

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

251

ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY ESTIMATION USING SATELLITE PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current atmospheric density models are not capable enough to accurately model the atmospheric density, which varies continuously in the upper atmosphere mainly due to the changes in solar and geomagnetic activity. Inaccurate atmospheric modeling...

Arudra, Anoop Kumar

2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

Efficient Synthesis and Properties of Novel Near-Infrared Electrochromic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Synthesis and Properties of Novel Near-Infrared Electrochromic Anthraquinone Imides@pku.edu.cn Received December 13, 2007 ABSTRACT An efficient synthesis of novel near-infrared electrochromic 6 are electrochromic and absorb intensely in the near-infrared range of 700-1600 nm upon electrochemical reduction

Wan, Xin-hua

253

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD the barrier to linearity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD 3 above the barrier to linearity BY JENNIFER L. GOTTFRIED, transitions of HC 3 above the barrier to linearity have been observed. A highly sensitive near-infrared-adiabatic and radiative corrections is revealed. Keywords: HD 3 ; near-infrared spectroscopy; barrier to linearity 1

Oka, Takeshi

254

Can Gender Be Predicted from Near-Infrared Face Images?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Gender Be Predicted from Near-Infrared Face Images? Arun Ross and Cunjian Chen Lane Department spectrum (VIS). We explore the possibility of predicting gender from face images ac- quired in the near-infrared cross-spectral gender prediction. Keywords: Biometrics, Faces, Gender, Near-Infrared, Cross-Spectral. 1

Ross, Arun Abraham

255

Multicontrast photoacoustic in vivo imaging using near-infrared fluorescent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multicontrast photoacoustic in vivo imaging using near-infrared fluorescent proteins Arie Krumholz1 the application of two spectrally distinct near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFP670 and iRFP720, engineered-tissue PAT, probes absorbing in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range are desirable. In the NIR optical

Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

256

Near-infrared light scattering by particles in coastal waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-infrared light scattering by particles in coastal waters David Doxaran* , Marcel Babin extend over the near-infrared spectral region to up to 870 nm. The measurements were conducted in three in the near-infrared very closely matched a - spectral dependence, which is expected when the particle size

Babin, Marcel

257

Plant Growth Measurement Techniques Using Near-Infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant Growth Measurement Techniques Using Near-Infrared Imagery Amr Aboelela John Barron Dept, for measuring plant growth for corn seedlings and Caster Oil Bean leaves. A near-infrared camera, which allows to hypothesize where growth might be taking place. Keywords: Near-Infrared Imagery, Corn Seedling stem

Barron, John

258

COMMUNICATIONS Near-infrared femtosecond photoionization/dissociation of cyclic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNICATIONS Near-infrared femtosecond photoionization/dissociation of cyclic aromatic, phenanthrene, and anthracene. The near-infrared ionization process leads to the production of intact molecular of femtoseconds in simple cluster systems.12­15 Here we report the near-infrared 780 nm photoioniza- tion

Levis, Robert J.

259

Illumination Invariant Face Recognition Using Near-Infrared Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Illumination Invariant Face Recognition Using Near-Infrared Images Stan Z. Li, Senior Member, IEEE-user applications. First, we present an active near infrared (NIR) imaging system that is able to produce face groups. Index Terms--Biometrics, face recognition, near infrared (NIR), illumination invariant, local

Fan, Guoliang

260

innovative techniques Near-infrared spiroximetry: noninvasive measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovative techniques Near-infrared spiroximetry: noninvasive measurements of venous saturationO2 ) in tissues using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). This method is based on the respiration-induced oscillations of the near-infrared ab- sorption in tissues, and we call it spiroximetry (the prefix spiro means

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Comments on the "Proof of the atmospheric greenhouse effect" by Arthur B. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper it is shown that Smith (2008) used inappropriate and inconsistent formulations in averaging various quantities over the entire surface of the Earth considered as a sphere. Using two instances of averaging procedures as customarily applied in studies on turbulence, it is shown that Smith's formulations are highly awkward. Furthermore, Smith's discussion of the infrared absorption in the atmosphere is scrutinized and evaluated. It is shown that his attempt to refute the criticism of Gerlich and Tscheuschner (2007, 2009) on the so-called greenhouse effect is rather fruitless.

Kramm, Gerhard; Zelger, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

We performed a near-infrared spectroscopic survey toward an area of {approx}10 deg{sup 2} of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the infrared satellite AKARI. Observations were carried out as part of the AKARI Large-area Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LSLMC). The slitless multi-object spectroscopic capability of the AKARI/IRC enabled us to obtain low-resolution (R {approx} 20) spectra in 2-5 {mu}m for a large number of point sources in the LMC. As a result of the survey, we extracted about 2000 infrared spectra of point sources. The data are organized as a near-infrared spectroscopic catalog. The catalog includes various infrared objects such as young stellar objects (YSOs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, supergiants, and so on. It is shown that 97% of the catalog sources have corresponding photometric data in the wavelength range from 1.2 to 11 {mu}m, and 67% of the sources also have photometric data up to 24 {mu}m. The catalog allows us to investigate near-infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their infrared spectral energy distributions. In addition, it is estimated that about 10% of the catalog sources are observed at more than two different epochs. This enables us to study a spectroscopic variability of sources by using the present catalog. Initial results of source classifications for the LSLMC samples are presented. We classified 659 LSLMC spectra based on their near-infrared spectral features by visual inspection. As a result, it is shown that the present catalog includes 7 YSOs, 160 C-rich AGBs, 8 C-rich AGB candidates, 85 O-rich AGBs, 122 blue and yellow supergiants, 150 red super giants, and 128 unclassified sources. Distributions of the classified sources on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the text. Continuous wavelength coverage and high spectroscopic sensitivity in 2-5 {mu}m can only be achieved by space observations. This is an unprecedented large-scale spectroscopic survey toward the LMC in the near-infrared. A large number of near-infrared spectral data provided by the survey possess scientific potential that can be applied to various studies. In this paper, we present the details of the spectroscopic survey and the catalog, and discuss its scientific applications.

Shimonishi, Takashi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Nada Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Sakon, Itsuki [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ita, Yoshifusa [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kaneda, Hidehiro, E-mail: shimonishi@penguin.kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CALIBRATION OF THE MID-INFRARED TULLY-FISHER RELATION  

SciTech Connect

Distance measures on a coherent scale around the sky are required to address the outstanding cosmological problems of the Hubble constant and of departures from the mean cosmic flow. The correlation between galaxy luminosities and rotation rates can be used to determine the distances to many thousands of galaxies in a wide range of environments potentially out to 200 Mpc. Mid-infrared (3.6 {mu}m) photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope is particularly valuable as a source of luminosities because it provides products of uniform quality across the sky. From a perch above the atmosphere, essentially the total magnitude of targets can be registered in exposures of a few minutes. Extinction is minimal and the flux is dominated by the light from old stars, which is expected to correlate with the mass of the targets. In spite of the superior photometry, the correlation between mid-infrared luminosities and rotation rates extracted from neutral hydrogen profiles is slightly degraded from the correlation found with I-band luminosities. A color correction recovers a correlation that provides comparable accuracy to that available at the I band ({approx}20% 1{sigma} in an individual distance) while retaining the advantages identified above. Without color correction, the relation between linewidth and [3.6] magnitudes is M {sup b,i,k,a}{sub [3.6]} = -20.34 - 9.74(logW{sup i}{sub mx} - 2.5). This description is found with a sample of 213 galaxies in 13 clusters that define the slope and 26 galaxies with Cepheid or tip of the red giant branch distances that define the zero point. A color-corrected parameter M{sub C{sub [{sub 3{sub .{sub 6{sub ]}}}}}} is constructed that has reduced scatter: M{sub C{sub [{sub 3{sub .{sub 6{sub ]}}}}}}= -20.34 - 9.13 (logW{sub mx}{sup i}-2.5). Consideration of the seven calibration clusters beyond 50 Mpc, outside the domain of obvious peculiar velocities, provides a preliminary Hubble constant estimate of H{sub 0} = 74 {+-} 4 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}.

Sorce, Jenny G.; Courtois, Helene M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon I, Lyon (France); Tully, R. Brent [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, HI 96822 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Scowcroft, Victoria; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Persson, S. Eric; Monson, Andy [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Rigby, Jane, E-mail: j.sorce@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

C/O RATIO AS A DIMENSION FOR CHARACTERIZING EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, infrared observations of exoplanetary atmospheres have typically been interpreted using models that assumed solar elemental abundances. With the chemical composition fixed, attempts have been made to classify hot Jupiter atmospheres on the basis of stellar irradiation. However, recent observations have revealed deviations from predictions based on such classification schemes, and chemical compositions retrieved from some data sets have also indicated non-solar abundances. The data require a two-dimensional (2D) characterization scheme with dependence on both irradiation and chemistry. In this work, we suggest the carbon-to-oxygen (C/O) ratio as an important second dimension for characterizing exoplanetary atmospheres. In hot-hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, the C/O ratio critically influences the relative concentrations of several spectroscopically dominant species. Between a C/O of 0.5 (solar value) and 2, the H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} abundances can vary by several orders of magnitude in the observable atmosphere, and new hydrocarbon species such as HCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} become prominent for C/O {>=} 1, while the CO abundance remains almost unchanged. Furthermore, a C/O {>=} 1 can preclude a strong thermal inversion due to TiO and VO in a hot Jupiter atmosphere, since TiO and VO are naturally underabundant for C/O {>=} 1. We, therefore, suggest a new 2D classification scheme for hydrogen-dominated exoplanetary atmospheres with irradiation (or temperature) and C/O ratio as the two dimensions. We define four classes in this 2D space (O1, O2, C1, and C2) with distinct chemical, thermal, and spectral properties. Based on the most recent observations, we characterize the thermal structure and C/O ratios of six hot Jupiters (XO-1b, CoRoT-2b, WASP-14b, WASP-19b, WASP-33b, and WASP-12b) in the framework of our proposed 2D classification scheme. While the data for several systems in our sample are consistent with C-rich atmospheres, new observations are required to conclusively constrain their C/O ratios in the day side as well as the terminator regions of their atmospheres. We discuss how observations using existing and forthcoming facilities can constrain C/O ratios in exoplanetary atmospheres.

Madhusudhan, Nikku, E-mail: Nikku.Madhusudhan@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Simple model to estimate the contribution of atmospheric CO2 to the Earths greenhouse effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how the CO2 contribution to the Earths greenhouse effect can be estimated from relatively simple physical considerations and readily available spectroscopic data. In particular we present a calculation of the climate sensitivity (that is the increase in temperature caused by a doubling of the concentration of CO2) in the absence of feedbacks. Our treatment highlights the important role played by the frequency dependence of the CO2absorptionspectrum. For pedagogical purposes we provide two simple models to visualize different ways in which the atmosphere might return infrared radiation back to the Earth. The more physically realistic model based on the Schwarzschild radiative transfer equations uses as input an approximate form of the atmospheres temperature profile and thus includes implicitly the effect of heat transfer mechanisms other than radiation.

Derrek J. Wilson; Julio Gea-Banacloche

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect

A {gamma}-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250 C at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region there between. A jet of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, G.S.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Quantum-cascade lasers enable infrared sensors  

SciTech Connect

Quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are semiconductor-injection lasers based on intersubband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well heterostructure. They are designed using band-structure engineering and grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The emission wavelength of a QCL is primarily a function of quantum-well thickness--thinner quantum wells lead to shorter wavelengths--and is essentially independent of the material bandgap. Quantum-cascade lasers can be designed to operate at any wavelength from 3.5 m (infrared) to 67 m (terahertz region) and are continuously tunable through ranges of a few inverse centimeters.1, 2, 3 This capability makes them well suited for spectroscopy in the infrared (see Laser Focus World, August 1999, p. 40).

Schultz, John F. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Visualizing infrared phenomena with a webcam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of light (electromagnetic radiation) outside of the visible spectrum is an abstract concept for students in an introductory science class. When students are presented with demonstrations or experiments meant to explore this portion of the spectrum the equipment involved often hides the phenomena. A simple modification to a standard inexpensive web camera (webcam) can take advantage of the sensitivity of the charged-coupled-device (CCD) to the infrared (IR) portion of the spectrum allowing students to visualize many IR phenomena. This note reports how such a modified webcam can be used in lecture demonstrations and laboratory activities to study infrared phenomena including an IR light emitting diode(LED) the IR component of different light sources IR spectroscopy and blackbody radiation. As a final example the modified camera can be employed to view the charcoal under-drawing of a painting created for this paper and used in our classroom demonstrations.

N. A. Gross; M. Hersek; A. Bansil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1. Near Infrared radiation and its interaction with materials ................................... 7 2.1.1. Atomic response to photon absorption .............................................................. 10 2.1.2. Electronic absorption processes... absorption, this extinction of the incident light by atoms is called Raleigh scattering. 10 2.1.1. Atomic response to photon absorption The simple first order explanation of the interaction of atoms with photons was made by Einstein. No explicit quantum...

Bahrami, Amir

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Far-infrared attenuation in glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of quasilocal vibrations on the far-infrared spectra of glasses is investigated under the supposition that the quasilocal vibrations are directly inactive in the attenuation. It is shown that taking into account phonon-quasilocal-vibration coupling and both medium- and short-range structure of the inhomogeneities of a photon-phonon coupling parameter can give rise to an attenuation curve similar to one observed for a-SiO2 and related materials.

Lev I. Deich

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

THE INFRARED COLORS OF THE SUN  

SciTech Connect

Solar infrared colors provide powerful constraints on the stellar effective temperature scale, but they must be measured with both accuracy and precision in order to do so. We fulfill this requirement by using line-depth ratios to derive in a model-independent way the infrared colors of the Sun, and we use the latter to test the zero point of the Casagrande et al. effective temperature scale, confirming its accuracy. Solar colors in the widely used Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and WISE W1-4 systems are provided: (V - J){sub Sun} = 1.198, (V - H){sub Sun} = 1.484, (V - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 1.560, (J - H){sub Sun} = 0.286, (J - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.362, (H - K{sub s} ){sub Sun} = 0.076, (V - W1){sub Sun} = 1.608, (V - W2){sub Sun} = 1.563, (V - W3){sub Sun} = 1.552, and (V - W4){sub Sun} = 1.604. A cross-check of the effective temperatures derived implementing 2MASS or WISE magnitudes in the infrared flux method confirms that the absolute calibration of the two systems agrees within the errors, possibly suggesting a 1% offset between the two, thus validating extant near- and mid-infrared absolute calibrations. While 2MASS magnitudes are usually well suited to derive T{sub eff}, we find that a number of bright, solar-like stars exhibit anomalous WISE colors. In most cases, this effect is spurious and can be attributed to lower-quality measurements, although for a couple of objects (3% {+-} 2% of the total sample) it might be real, and may hint at the presence of warm/hot debris disks.

Casagrande, L.; Asplund, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Ramirez, I. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Melendez, J., E-mail: luca@mso.anu.edu.au [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo, 05508-900 SP (Brazil)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

DeSalvo, Riccardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is growing need for the development of electronic devices based on organic polymer materials. Organic field-effect transistors (FETs) are ideal for special applications that require large areas, light weight, and structural flexibility. They also have the advantage of being easy to mass-produce at very low cost. However, even though this class of devices is finding a growing number of applications, electronic processes in organic materials are still not well understood. A group of researchers from the University of California and the ALS has succeeded in probing the intrinsic electronic properties of the charge carriers in organic FETs using infrared spectromicroscopy. The results of their study could help in the future development of sensors, large-area displays, and other plastic electronic components.

274

Application of infrared imaging in ferrocyanide tanks  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the feasibility of using infrared imaging techniques and scanning equipment to detect potential hot spots within ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. A hot spot is defined as a volumetric region within a waste tank with an excessively warm temperature that is generated by radioactive isotopes. The thermal image of a hot spot was modeled by computer. this model determined the image an IR system must detect. Laboratory and field tests of the imaging system are described, and conclusions based on laboratory and field data are presented. The report shows that infrared imaging is capable of detecting hot spots in ferrocyanide waste tanks with depths of up to 3.94 m (155 in.). The infrared imaging system is a useful technology for initial evaluation and assessment of hot spots in the majority of ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The system will not allow an exact hot spot and temperature determination, but it will provide the necessary information to determine the worst-case hot spot detected in temperature patterns. Ferrocyanide tanks are one type of storage tank on the Watch List. These tanks are identified as priority 1 Hanford Site Tank farm Safety Issues.

Morris, K.L.; Mailhot, R.B. Jr.; McLaren, J.M.; Morris, K.L.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Infrared Jet in 3C31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of infrared emission from the jet of the nearby FR I radio galaxy 3C 31. The jet was detected with the IRAC instrument on Spitzer at 4.5 micron, 5.8 micron, and 8.0 micron out to 30" (13 kpc) from the nucleus. We measure radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray fluxes in three regions along the jet determined by the infrared and X-ray morphology. Radio through X-ray spectra in these regions demonstrate that the emission can be interpreted as synchrotron emission from a broken power-law distribution of electron energies. We find significant differences in the high energy spectra with increasing distance from the nucleus. Specifically, the high energy slope increases from 0.86 to 1.72 from 1 kpc to 12 kpc along the jet, and the spectral break likewise increases in frequency along the jet from 10-100's of GHz to ~20 THz. Thus the ratio of IR to X-ray flux in the jet increases by at least an order of magnitude with increasing distance from the nucleus. We argue that these changes cannot simply ...

Lanz, Lauranne; Kraft, Ralph P; Birkinshaw, Mark; Lal, Dharam V; Forman, William R; Jones, Christine; Worrall, Diana M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A calibrated laser pulse propagating through the atmosphere produces a flash of Rayleigh scattered light with an intensity that can be calculated very accurately when atmospheric conditions are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper we present the absolute calibration system being constructed and tested for the VERITAS project.

N. Shepherd; J. H. Buckley; O. Celik; J. Holder; S. LeBohec; H. Manseri; F. Pizlo; M. Roberts

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

277

What we can learn from atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics potential of future measurements of atmospheric neutrinos is explored. Observation of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ driven sub-dominant effects and $\\theta_{13}$ driven large matter effects in atmospheric neutrinos can be used to study the deviation of $\\theta_{23}$ from maximality and its octant. Neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined extremely well due to the large matter effects. New physics can be constrained both in standard atmospheric neutrino experiments as well as in future neutrino telescopes.

Sandhya Choubey

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Atmospheric Monitoring System of the JEM-EUSO Space Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Atmospheric Monitoring System (AMS) is a mandatory and key device of a space-based mission which aims to detect Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) and Extremely-High Energy Cosmic Rays (EHECR) from Space. JEM-EUSO has a dedicated atmospheric monitoring system that plays a fundamental role in our understanding of the atmospheric conditions in the Field of View (FoV) of the telescope. Our AMS consists of a very challenging space infrared camera and a LIDAR device, that are being fully designed with space qualification to fulfil the scientific requirements of this space mission. The AMS will provide information of the cloud cover in the FoV of JEM-EUSO, as well as measurements of the cloud top altitudes with an accuracy of 500 m and the optical depth profile of the atmosphere transmittance in the direction of each air shower with an accuracy of 0.15 degree and a resolution of 500 m. This will ensure that the energy of the primary UHECR and the depth of maximum development of the EAS ( Extensive Air Shower)...

Frias, M D Rodriguez; Bozzo, E; del Peral, L; Neronov, A; Wada, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of substrates and then further process into optoelectronic materials using rapid thermal processing. You can read more on the rationale for developing this platform and its capabilities. Contact Maikel van Hest for more details on these capabilities. The Atmospheric Processing platform will allow deposition in any sequence and is applicable to activities in all Technology Roadmaps, which include

280

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Atmospheric Pressure Discharges: Traveling Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave sustained, atmospheric pressure plasmas are finding an increasing number of applications ... interest in the developing and investigating of appropriate plasma sources [1, 2].

Z. Zakrzewski; M. Moisan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

283

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Atmosphere to Electrons Program Overview Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation provides an introduction to the Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) initiative, including objectives, program areas, and a general timeline of activities.

286

A brief history of infrared astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as possible, going to high mountains, flying balloons or aircraft, or going into space...to measure the corona when the Sun's disk was obscured, during a total eclipse of...astronomers beat the atmosphere was by flying to high altitudes. The C-141A jet transport......

Helen J Walker

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

Zhuang, Qianlai

288

Microwave imaging of Saturn's deep atmosphere and rings  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of microwave images of Saturn's atmosphere and rings is presented. Interferometer observations at wavelengths of 0.27, 2.01, 6.17, and 20.13 cm, and precise application of synthesis imaging techniques yielded brightness and polarization maps of unsurpassed resolution and sensitivity. Linear polarization is detected from the ring ansea, and brightness variations in the deep atmosphere and the rings are revealed. The disk-integrated spectrum of Saturn is interpreted within the context of a radiative transfer model that requires the NH{sub 3} mixing ratio to take on a value of 0.9 to 1.1 x 10{sup -} directly below the ammonia ice cloud at a pressure of 1.4 bar. The NH{sub 3} mixing ratio increases with depth to a value of 5.0 to 6.5 x 10{sup -} at a pressure of 6 bar. The variation of NH{sub 3} with depth can be entirely accounted for by the presence of 11 to 14 times solar abundance of H{sub 2}S, which reacts with NH{sub 3} to produce a substantial NH{sub 4}SH cloud. Latitudinal variations in brightness temperature indicate that the saturated vapor abundance of ammonia decreases by 50 percent from equator to pole within the cloud deck. At greater depths, the latitudinal variations of ammonia are consistent with alternating zones of concentration and depletion caused by vertical motions. An apparent depletion in northern mid-lattitudes is well-correlated with a decrease in infrared opacity and depressed cloud top levels, indicating deep-seated downwelling. The size, composition, and shape of particles comprising the rings of Saturn are constrained by modeling the emission, scattering, and extinction of radiation by the rings. Azimuthal variations in brightness and linear polarization favor a model in which the particles are irregularly shaped.

Grossman, A.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate June 2013. [1] Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating). Here we used a process-based biogeochemistry model to quantify soil consumption during the 20th and 21

290

Atmospheric Science The Earth's atmosphere, a layered sphere of gas extending  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

division study the composition, structure, chemical, and physical processes of the Earth's atmosphere. The division's four interrelated groups focus on satellite, airborne, and ground-based observations processes such as atmospheric dynamics, chemistry, and radiation on Earth and other planets. Our atmospheric

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

291

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scanning Radiometer Data D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction A system of two scanning radiometers has been developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) and deployed on the NOAA Ron H. Brown (RHB) Research Vessel (RV) during the Nauru99 cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific,

292

Open-Air, Broad-Bandwidth Trace-Gas Sensing with a Mid-Infrared Optical Frequency Comb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mid-Infrared frequency comb is produced via an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an amplified 100 MHz Yb:fiber mode-locked laser. We use this source to make measurements of the concentration of the atmospherically-relevant species of CH4 and H2O over a bandwidth of 100 nm centered at 3.25 um. Multiple absorption lines for each species are detected with millisecond acquisition time using a virtually-imaged phased array (VIPA) spectrometer. The measured wavelength-dependent absorption profile is compared to and fitted by a model, yielding quantitative values of the atmospheric concentration of both CH4 and H2O in a controlled indoor environment, as well as over a 26 m open air outdoor path.

Nugent-Glandorf, Lora; Diddams, Scott A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Radio Frequency Signals in Jupiter's Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IMAGE OF A LARGE UPWARD ELECTRICAL-DISCHARGE...RINNERT K , HDB ATMOSPHERIC ELEC 27 ( 1995...MEASUREMENTS OF THE RF CHARACTERISTICS...JUPITER PLASMA-WAVE OBSERVATIONS...OBSERVATIONS OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC OPTICAL FLASHES...Solar and thermal radiation...relatively large at the beginning...and about non-radiative...sensitive area of 6...

L. J. Lanzerotti; K. Rinnert; G. Dehmel; F. O. Gliem; E. P. Krider; M. A. Uman; J. Bach

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth...interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies of 500 Mhz, this amounts...chang-ing the atmospheric carbon dioxide...in the polar areas. Although...The shaded area indicates the...per-missible atmospheric CO2 level might...emission rates are largest between 2000...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 8629EEC7C72DEEE5.1256/qj.05.87 Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation By S. POLAVARAPU1,2, T. G. SHEPHERD2 Data assimilation is employed at operational weather forecast centres to combine measurements and model

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

297

Atmospheric muon background in the ANTARES detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An evaluation of the background due to atmospheric muons in the ANTARES high energy neutrino telescope is presented. Two different codes for atmospheric shower simulation have been used. Results from comparisons between these codes at sea level and detector level are presented. The first results on the capability of ANTARES to reject this class of background are given.

S. Cecchini; E. Korolkova; A. Margiotta; L. Thompson

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... MEASUREMENTS of the radon content of the atmosphere were made so long ago as 1905 by Eve1-2 in ... whole seemed to support the original suggestion of Elster and Geitel6 in 1903 that the radon in the atmosphere arises mainly from the soil. These workers noted that the highest ...

W. ANDERSON; W. V. MAYNEORD; R. C. TURNER

1954-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions of Agriculture Forest Service coordinator. 1997. Atmospheric and biospheric interactions of gases and energy in the Pacific region century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past

Standiford, Richard B.

300

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland Research Applications Laboratory National Center for Atmospheric Research 2007-08 Program on Risk Analysis, Extreme Events and Decision Theory, opening workshop 16-19 September, North Carolina #12;Extremes · Interest in making inferences about large, rare, extreme phenomena

Gilleland, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MULTISCALE THERMAL-INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF THE MAUNA LOA CALDERA, HAWAII  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, most thermal infrared measurements of natural scenes have been made at disparate scales, typically 10{sup {minus}3}-10{sup {minus}2} m (spectra) and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} m (satellite images), with occasional airborne images (10{sup 1} m) filling the gap. Temperature and emissivity fields are spatially heterogeneous over a similar range of scales, depending on scene composition. A common problem for the land surface, therefore, has been relating field spectral and temperature measurements to satellite data, yet in many cases this is necessary if satellite data are to be interpreted to yield meaningful information about the land surface. Recently, three new satellites with thermal imaging capability at the 10{sup 1}-10{sup 2} m scale have been launched: MTI, TERRA, and Landsat 7. MTI acquires multispectral images in the mid-infrared (3-5{micro}m) and longwave infrared (8-10{micro}m) with 20m resolution. ASTER and MODIS aboard TERRA acquire multispectral longwave images at 90m and 500-1000m, respectively, and MODIS also acquires multispectral mid-infrared images. Landsat 7 acquires broadband longwave images at 60m. As part of an experiment to validate the temperature and thermal emissivity values calculated from MTI and ASTER images, we have targeted the summit region of Mauna Loa for field characterization and near-simultaneous satellite imaging, both on daytime and nighttime overpasses, and compare the results to previously acquired 10{sup {minus}1} m airborne images, ground-level multispectral FLIR images, and the field spectra. Mauna Loa was chosen in large part because the 4x6km summit caldera, flooded with fresh basalt in 1984, appears to be spectrally homogeneous at scales between 10{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup 2} m, facilitating the comparison of sensed temperature. The validation results suggest that, with careful atmospheric compensation, it is possible to match ground measurements with measurements from space, and to use the Mauna Loa validation site for cross-comparison of thermal infrared sensors and temperature/emissivity extraction algorithms.

L. BALICK; A. GILLESPIE; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors  

SciTech Connect

We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

Choi, K. K., E-mail: kwong.k.choi.civ@mail.mil; Sun, J.; Olver, K. [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A. [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

An infrared invisibility cloak composed of glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose to implement a nonmetallic low-loss cloak for the infrared range from identical chalcogenide glassresonators. Based on transformation optics for cylindrical objects our approach does not require metamaterial response to be homogeneous and accounts for the discrete nature of elementary responses governed by resonator shape illumination angle and inter-resonator coupling. Air fractions are employed to obtain the desired distribution of the cloak effective parameters. The effect of cloaking is verified by full-wave simulations of the true multiresonator structure. The feasibility of cloak fabrication is demonstrated by prototyping glass grating structures with the dimensions characteristic for the cloak resonators.

Elena Semouchkina; Douglas H. Werner; George B. Semouchkin; Carlo Pantano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Far-Infrared Absorptivity of Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple calculation of the far-infrared absorptivity of a strong-coupling metal in the normal state is presented which is valid in the anomalous-skin-effect (ASE) region. The form of the results is compared with that derived by an alternate procedure in a recent letter by the author. A discussion of electron-phonon renormalization effects in the ASE limit is then considered and, in particular, at frequencies below threshold (???D), an effective mass mP** is introduced which incorporates these effects.

H. Scher

1971-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. VI-5-3 Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency Yongzheng Shi Hongbing Chen Qi Xu Deying Li Zhonghua Wang Xiumu Fang...]. Infrared Technology,2002,01:34-37.(In Chinese) [6] Yangyang Wang. Research on surface temperature of building envelope measured by thermal infrared imager [J]. Hv & Ac, 2006, 02:84-88.(In Chinese) ...

Shi, Y.; Chen, H.; Xu, Q.; I, D.; Wang, Z.; Fang, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

Korsah, Kofi (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R (Farragut, TN) [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Principal component analysis and radiative transfer modelling of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......St, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia, Cyprus The mid-infrared spectra of...ULIRGs is a result of dust and gas reprocessing the optical and...densities (n HS) and assuming a gas-to-dust ratio of 150. The...information in IRS spectra, it is natural to use the PCs as a classification......

P. D. Hurley; S. Oliver; D. Farrah; L. Wang; A. Efstathiou

2012-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Abstract Infrared spectroscopy is particularly good at identifying awide variety of hydrothermally altered minerals with no samplepreparation, and is especially helpful in discrimination amongclay minerals. We have performed several promising pilot studieson geothermal drill core and cuttings that suggest the efficiencyof the technique to sample continuously and provide alterationlogs similar to geophysical logs. We have successfully identifiedlayered silicates, zeolites, opal, calcite, and iron oxides and

310

Hollow-core infrared fiber incorporating metal-wire metamaterial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infrared (IR) light is considered important for short-range wireless communication, thermal sensing, spectroscopy, material processing, medical surgery, astronomy etc. However, IR...

Yan, Min; Mortensen, Niels Asger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

On the Usage of Near-Infrared Spectral Reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the advent of near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA), there have been numerous attempts to give "traditional" spectroscopic explanations for the successful empirical and...

Kemeny, Gabor J; Wetzel, David L

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Posters Preliminary Analysis of Ground-Based Microwave and Infrared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Posters Preliminary Analysis of Ground-Based Microwave and Infrared Radiance Observations During the Pilot Radiation OBservation Experiment E. R. Westwater, Y. Han, J. H....

313

IR SNOM - Infrared Near-field Nanoimaging | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Utilizing a broadly-tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser for...

314

Infrared Absorption Spectra of ? and ?-Calcium Sulphate Hemihydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... E. G., Trans. Brit. Ceram. Soc., 66, 485 (1967).ASTM E 16864T General Techniques of Infrared Quantitative Analysis, section 5e.

D. A. BARTRAM

1969-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill...

316

Near infrared laser dyes for the detection of latent fingermarks .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The near infrared region (700 nm 2000 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum provides significant potential for fingermark detection. Many ubiquitous commercial surfaces give luminescent (more)

Chadwick, Scott Richard John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

318

Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: Reflection-absorption...

319

Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy. Abstract: Previous work on detection of low-volatility liquid organic (and...

320

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O'Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cell-Permeable Near-Infrared Fluorogenic Substrates for Imaging -Lactamase Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell-Permeable Near-Infrared Fluorogenic Substrates for Imaging -Lactamase Activity Bengang Xing,11 Several fluorogenic substrates for Bla have been reported,4,12 but none work for infrared or near-infrared fluorescence imaging. Infrared/near-infrared light is preferred in molecular imaging studies of living subjects

Xing, Bengang

322

Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres V. A. Sreckovic 1 Lj...applicable for the helium plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres described in Koester...study of DB white dwarf atmosphere plasma properties, helium plasmas......

V. A. Sreckovic; Lj. M. Ignjatovic; A. A. Mihajlov; M. S. Dimitrijevic

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

323

Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted so as to characterize atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic (pollution) and natural (sea saltAtomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy

Shapira, Yoram

324

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut; 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 3210 Mathematical: atmospheric pollution, tropospheric ozone, urban pollution peaks, adjoint modeling, sensitivity Citation

Menut, Laurent

325

Radon in atmospheric studies: a review  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of the isotopes of radon in space and time, their physical characteristics, and their behavior in the dynamics of the atmosphere have presented challenges for many decades. /sup 220/Rn, /sup 222/Rn and their daughters furnish a unique set of tracers for the study of transport and mixing processes in the atmosphere. Appropriate applications of turbulent diffusion theory yield general agreement with measured profiles. Diurnal and seasonal variations follow patterns set by consideration of atmospheric stability. /sup 222/Rn has been used successfully in recent studies of nocturnal drainage winds and cumulus convection. Good results have been obtained using /sup 222/Rn and its long-lived /sup 210/Pb daughter as tracers in the study of continent-to-ocean and ocean-to-continent air mass trajectories, /sup 220/Rn (thoron) because of its short half-life of only 55 seconds has been used to measure turbulent diffusion within the first few meters of the earth's surface and to study the influence of meteorological variables on the rate of exhalation from the ground. Radon daughters attach readily to atmospheric particulate matter which makes it possible to study these aerosols with respect to size spectra, attachment characteristics, removal by gravitation and precipitation, and residence times in the troposphere. The importance of ionization by radon and its daughters in the lower atmosphere and its effect on atmospheric electrical parameters is well known. Knowledge of the mobility and other characteristics of radon daughter ions has led to applications in the study of atmospheric electrical environments under fair weather and thunderstorm conditions and in the formation of condensation nuclei. The availability of increasingly sophisticated analytical tools and atmospheric measurement systems can be expected to add much to our understanding of radon and its daughters as trace components of the atmospheric environment in the years ahead.

Wilkening, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Combining multivariate analysis and monosaccharide composition modeling to identify plant cell wall variations by Fourier Transform Near Infrared spectroscopy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19. Wetzel DL: Near-infrared reflectance analysis - sleepertreatments of raw near-infrared signal in the measurement ofusing transmittance near-infrared spectroscopy. J Agric Food

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Combining multivariate analysis and monosaccharide composition modeling to identify plant cell wall variations by Fourier Transform Near Infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19. Wetzel DL: Near-infrared reflectance analysis - sleepertreatments of raw near-infrared signal in the measurement ofusing transmittance near-infrared spectroscopy. J Agric Food

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: AIRS retrievals of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIRS retrievals of atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity - AIRS retrievals of atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity - comparisons with radiosondes and ship-based remote sensing during AEROSE Minnett, Peter University of Miami Szczodrak, Malgorzata University of Miami Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Nalli, Nicholas NOAA/NESDIS The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has determined that significantly improving weather forecasting would require global temperature and moisture soundings with at least the accuracy of the current radiosondes. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on board of the NASA EOS Aqua satellite, launched in 2002, is designed to provide high-accuracy atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity. The validation of the AIRS atmospheric profile retrieval scheme is a continuing

329

Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmosphere Model Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model CCSM-sprabhat.png Global warming will likely change the statistics of tropical cyclones and hurricanes. In this...

330

Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

331

Intense and Highly Energetic Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Arrays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis documents the efforts taken to produce highly ionized and concentrated atmospheric pressure plasma using an arrayed atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system. The (more)

Furmanski, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

333

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national economies; Recognizing that significant interrelated, atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial global, terrestrial and atmospheric ecosystem studies should focus on the structure and processes of the environment

334

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of...

335

THE LAS CAMPANAS INFRARED SURVEY. III. THE H-BAND IMAGING SURVEY AND THE NEAR-INFRARED AND OPTICAL PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE LAS CAMPANAS INFRARED SURVEY. III. THE H-BAND IMAGING SURVEY AND THE NEAR-INFRARED AND OPTICAL on broadband optical and near-infrared photometry, is designed to robustly identify a statistically significant-reduction techniques, and object identification procedures. We present sam- ple near-infrared and optical photometric

Goddard III, William A.

336

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Seasonal Dependance of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal Dependance of the Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity Seasonal Dependance of the Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Satellite observations have been used to derive a seasonal dependance of the infrared land surface emissivity in the vicinity of the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility site. In particular, the observations of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua platform have been used over the two year period from Sept 2002 to Sept 2004 to derive spectra of IR land surface emissivity across the IR window regions. These satellite observations have been used to empirically fit the

337

Instrumentation for Far-infrared Spectroscopy Peter R. Griffiths1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at one end with an infrared transparent window (A) through which radiation reaches a thin absorbing film- and Far-Infrared Spectroscopy Window Incident radiation A B Absorbing film Pneumatic chamber Ballasting passes through the window onto a blackened film, causing the pressure of the gas in the pneumatic chamber

Homes, Christopher C.

338

Detection Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Emplacement Using Infrared Image  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to detect an improvised explosive device (IED) by using infrared thermography (IRT) technology. The detection of IED will be done automatically and accurately even the IED detection expert is not present. Combining the advantage ... Keywords: infrared imaging, improvised explosive device, image segmentation

Kamarul Hawari Ghazali, Mohd Shawal Jadin

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Free-standing inductive grid filter for infrared radiation rejection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a fabrication method for free-standing metal structures with high aspect ratios to manufacture inductive grid filters for infrared rejection. Deep grooves in thermally evaporated SiO"2 layer, fabricated by electron beam lithography and etching, ... Keywords: Inductive grid filter, Infrared rejection, Metallic nanostructures

Konstantins Jefimovs; Janne Laukkanen; Tuomas Vallius; Tero Pilvi; Mikko Ritala; Tomi Meilahti; Matti Kaipiainen; Marcos Bavdaz; Markku Leskel; Jari Turunen

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Near-infrared approaches for cell culture monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigated using near-infrared spectroscopy across the 2.0-2.5 mm spectral region. A system was developed using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and optical fibers to characterize glucose and lactate absorbance spectra in cell culture media...

Lee, Seung Joon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Multivariate classification of infrared spectra of cell and tissue samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multivariate classification techniques are applied to spectra from cell and tissue samples irradiated with infrared radiation to determine if the samples are normal or abnormal (cancerous). Mid and near infrared radiation can be used for in vivo and in vitro classifications using at least different wavelengths.

Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Howland D. T. (Albuquerque, NM); Thomas, Edward V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos, Stavros (Livermore, CA); Staggs, Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos; Stavros (Livermore, CA), Staggs; Michael C. (Tracy, CA)

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION Yingying Li , Wei Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University ABSTRACT Early detection of oil spill events is the key in detecting the early onset of a small-scale oil spill event. Based on an infrared oil-water contrast model

Yin, Wotao

345

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

346

Airborne Particles in Outdoor Air: Atmospheric Dust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For industrial products, in addition to the harmful effect like usual particles, the particular harmful effect of atmospheric dust especially metal particles is very large. For example, the light metal element...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mars Atmospheric Constellation Observatory (MACO) represents an innovative approach...2, and dust cycles together with the energy and momentum budgets. The mission concept is based on a constellation of satel...

E. R. Kursinski; W. Folkner; C. Zuffada

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Uraninite and Fullerene in Atmospheric Particulates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incineration, uranium mining, and atmospheric testing of nuclearweapons-burning power plants typically contain very small amounts of uranium ( concentrations, the form of the uranium has been unknown. Using a variety of advanced electron microscopy

Utsunomiya, Satoshi

349

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Plasma Effect on Cotton Nonwovens ... (22) Plasma II is more effective than Plasma I with the ability to develop homogeneous plasmas and eliminate boundary-layer air effects. ...

Sudheer Jinka; Uday Turaga; Vinitkumar Singh; Rachel L. Behrens; Cenk Gumeci; Carol Korzeniewski; Todd Anderson; Rory Wolf; Seshadri Ramkumar

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Adaptive control for Mars atmospheric flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landing accuracy requirements for a manned space vehicle make it necessary to ?y a controlled entry trajectory rather than a more robust ballistic entry trajectory used for some robotic missions. The large variations in Mars atmospheric properties make a...

Restrepo, Carolina Isabel

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Ballistic Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence on munition target scatter are determined from numerical simulations of ballistic trajectories through many realizations of realistic simulated turbulent wind fields. A technique is evaluated for correcting ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Charles Clough; Michael Padovani; Kelly Fling; Ward Boughers; W. Scott Walton

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Balanced Atmospheric Response to Squall Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a Squall line propagates through the atmosphere, it not only excite transient gravityinertia wave motion but also produces more permanent modifications to the large-scale balanced flow. Here we calculate this balanced response using the is ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Scott R. Fulton; Rolf F. A. Herttenstein

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric levels. Measurements in the free troposphere (FT) are particularly useful, because trace gas and particle

Honrath, Richard E.

356

Synopsis of Atmospheric Research under MAGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cold regions present a challenge to atmospheric and hydrologic research. Their low temperatures test the endurance of field workers and their instruments; their distance from large urban centers raises the cos...

Ming-ko Woo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Can the Infrared Radiation that Causes the Enhanced Greenhouse Effect Be Put to Better Use?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing levels of certain greenhouse gases (GHGs) most importantly CO 2 in the earths atmosphere lead to climate change and global warming as a result of these gases interacting with thermal infrared (TIR) radiation from earth to space. Here the option of modifying this radiation is analyzed which would result in modified TIR radiation that would interact less with atmospheric CO 2 . This alleviates the enhanced greenhouse effect and at the same time would allow for energy recovery as heat and/or power. Power production is of course limited by thermodynamics Second Law. It is shown that various options exist for TIR radiation modification which may be used to generate temperature gradients or temperature differences between volumes of (gases containing) CO 2 of sufficient optical thickness. This may be further exploited for power generation: a first simple case shows power generation of ?1? W ? per ? m 2 surface at a Carnot efficiency of ?7% using the sky and ground level surroundings as heat reservoirs.

Ron Zevenhoven

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Abstract Surface minerals of active geothermal systems have been mapped using visible-short wave infrared and mid wave and long wave imaging spectrometers separately. May and June 2008, the Prospectir sensor and SEBASS (Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System) were located on together on a roll compensated mount viewing through the same camera port in a Twin Otter. These two imaging spectrometers have similar Instantaneous Fields of View (IFOV) and together collect over 600 channels of spectral information from the visible to the long wave infrared.

359

INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mNAL PERFORMANCE REPORT mNAL PERFORMANCE REPORT for INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS DE-FG05-85ER13439 1-AUG-1985 to 31-JUL-1994 Robert F. Curl and Graham P. Glass Principal Investigators Introduction This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study (by infrared absorption spectroscopy) of the chemical kinetic behavior of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. The work typically progressed from the detection and analysis of the infrared spectrum of combustion radical to the utilization of the infrared spectrum thus obtained in the investigation of chemical kinetics of the radical species. The methodology employed was infrared kinetic spectroscopy. In this technique the radical is produced by UV flash photolysis using an excimer laser and then

360

High-pressure Infrared Spectra of Tal and Lawsonite  

SciTech Connect

We present high-pressure infrared spectra of two geologically important hydrous minerals: talc, Mg3Si4O10(OH)2 and lawsonite, CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2{center_dot}H2O,{center_dot}at room temperature. For lawsonite, our data span the far infrared region from 150 to 550 cm-1 and extend to 25 GPa. We combine our new spectroscopic data with previously published high-pressure mid-infrared and Raman data to constrain the Gr{umlt u}neisen parameter and vibrational density of states under pressure. In the case of talc, we present high-pressure infrared data that span both the mid and far infrared from 150 to 3800 cm-1 covering lattice, silicate, and hydroxyl stretching vibrations to a maximum pressure of 30 GPa. Both phases show remarkable metastability well beyond their nominal maximum thermodynamic stability at simultaneous high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

Scott,H.; Liu, Z.; Hemley, R.; Williams, Q.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Infrared non-destructive evaluation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nondestructive evaluation and related system. The method includes arranging a test piece (14) having an internal passage (18) and an external surface (15) and a thermal calibrator (12) within a field of view (42) of an infrared sensor (44); generating a flow (16) of fluid characterized by a fluid temperature; exposing the test piece internal passage (18) and the thermal calibrator (12) to fluid from the flow (16); capturing infrared emission information of the test piece external surface (15) and of the thermal calibrator (12) simultaneously using the infrared sensor (44), wherein the test piece infrared emission information includes emission intensity information, and wherein the thermal calibrator infrared emission information includes a reference emission intensity associated with the fluid temperature; and normalizing the test piece emission intensity information against the reference emission intensity.

Baleine, Erwan; Erwan, James F; Lee, Ching-Pang; Stinelli, Stephanie

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Watson Published: Proceedings of the ninth international symposium on remote sensing of environment, April 15-19, p. 1919-1932., 1974 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Reconnaissance_From_Quantitative_Analysis_Of_Thermal_Infrared_Imagery&oldid=387504" Category:

363

Questioning the questions that have been asked about the infant brain using near-infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Questioning the questions that have been asked about the infant brain using near-infrared, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive diffuse; Near-infrared spectroscopy. "Sheddinglight"onascientificquestiontookonnew meaning when

Aslin, Richard N.

364

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

365

Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion  

SciTech Connect

In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Trace analysis of atmospheric organic bases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of atmospheric organic bases were investigated; the study included (1) the analysis of submarine charcoal filter bed samples for nitrogen bases and (2) the use of metallic tetraphenylporphines (TPP) as specific adsorbents for atmospheric... gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The isolation procedure provided acceptable reproducibi lity in the determination of trace amounts of nitrogen bases in the submarine environment. Several metallic TPP adsorbents were...

Clark, Dwayne C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nanoantennas for visible and infrared radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoantennas for visible and infrared radiation can strongly enhance the interaction of light with nanoscale matter by their ability to efficiently link propagating and spatially localized optical fields. This ability unlocks an enormous potential for applications ranging from nanoscale optical microscopy and spectroscopy over solar energy conversion, integrated optical nanocircuitry, opto-electronics and density-ofstates engineering to ultra-sensing as well as enhancement of optical nonlinearities. Here we review the current understanding of optical antennas based on the background of both well-developed radiowave antenna engineering and the emerging field of plasmonics. In particular, we address the plasmonic behavior that emerges due to the very high optical frequencies involved and the limitations in the choice of antenna materials and geometrical parameters imposed by nanofabrication. Finally, we give a brief account of the current status of the field and the major established and emerging lines of inves...

Biagioni, Paolo; Hecht, Bert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

Berdahl, P.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Nature Bulletin No. 554-A February 15, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF OUR ATMOSPHERE In Bulletin No. 542-A we described the atmosphere that surrounds the earth, held there by the pull of gravity, including the canopy of air immediately above us. That canopy is responsible for our weather and climates, shields us from the killing rays of the sun, and furnishes substances necessary for all life: oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Astronomers believe that none of the other planets -- excepting Mars, perhaps -- has an atmosphere anything like ours. The principal elements, free nitrogen (78 percent) and free oxygen (21 percent), apparently are rare in the universe. On the other hand, the earth's atmosphere contains only traces of free hydrogen and helium -- the two lightest gases -- whereas they are by far the most common elements elsewhere in the universe.

371

A Panoramic Mid-infrared Survey of Two Distant Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We present panoramic Spitzer MIPS 24um observations covering 9x9Mpc (25'x25') fields around two massive clusters, Cl0024+16 and MS0451-03, at z=0.39 and z=0.55. Our observations cover a very wide range of environments within these clusters, from high-density regions around the cores out to the turn-around radius. Cross-correlating the mid-infrared catalogs with deep optical and near-infrared imaging of these fields, we investigate the optical/near-infrared colors of the mid-infrared sources. We find excesses of mid-infrared sources with optical/near-infrared colors expected of cluster members in the two clusters and test this selection using spectroscopically confirmed 24um members. The much more significant excess is associated with Cl0024+16, whereas MS0451-03 has comparatively few mid-infrared sources. The mid-infrared galaxy population in Cl0024+16 appears to be associated with dusty star-forming galaxies (typically redder than the general cluster population by up to A_V~1-2 mags) rather than emission from dusty tori around active galactic nuclei (AGN) in early-type hosts. The inferred total-infrared star-formation rates in Cl0024+16 are typically >5x greater than those found from a similar Halpha survey, indicating significant obscured activity in the cluster population. We find evidence for strong evolution of the level of dust-obscured star-formation in dense environments out to z=0.5, analogous to the rise in fraction of optically-selected star-forming galaxies seen in clusters and the field out to similar redshifts. However, there are clearly significant cluster-to-cluster variations in the populations of mid-infrared sources, probably reflecting differences in the intracluster media and recent dynamical evolution of these systems.

J. E. Geach; Ian Smail; R. S. Ellis; S. M. Moran; G. P. Smith; T. Treu; J. -P. Kneib; A. C. Edge; T. Kodama

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - akari far-infrared observations Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

also have a capability for imaging... instruments, the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS; Kawada et al. 2007) and the Infrared Camera (IRC; Onaka et al... them highly suitable...

373

E-Print Network 3.0 - active infrared systems Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Renewable Energy ; Materials Science 71 A DEDICATED INFRARED SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE AT W. Barry, A. Biocca, J. M. Byrd Summary: on the Infrared Beamline",...

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial color infrared Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: electronic sensors and aerial color-infrared films both record visible and near-infrared wavelengths... of the Earth in other than natural colors. The result is...

375

Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscop...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscopy: From Monolayer Towards Single molecule sensitivity. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational...

376

Nanocrystalline Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles: Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and near-infrared shielding characteristics  

SciTech Connect

In order to further improve the near-infrared shielding properties of cesium tungsten bronze (Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}) for solar filter applications, Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles were prepared by solvothermal reaction method and the effects of nitrogen annealing on the microstructure and near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were investigated. The obtained Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectrophotometer. The results indicate that nanosheet-like Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles with hexagonal structure began to transform into nanorods after annealed at temperature higher than 600 C. The near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles could be further improved by N{sub 2} annealing at 500700 C. Particularly, the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples in the N{sub 2} atmosphere showed best near-infrared shielding properties. It was suggested that the excellent near-infrared shielding ability of the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples is correlated with its minimum O/W atomic ratio and most oxygen vacancies. Highlights: N{sub 2} annealing could further improve the near-infrared (NIR) shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}. Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and NIR shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were studied. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} exhibited minimum O/W ratio and most oxygen vacancies. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles exhibited best NIR shielding properties.

Liu, Jing-Xiao, E-mail: drliu-shi@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan); Shi, Fei; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qiang [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Atmospheric chemistry impacts and feedbacks on the global carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prediction. Issues to be addressed include the quantification of the impact of the atmospheric oxidation and the oxidative state of the atmosphere. The end goal is to create a model that can quantitatively predict is required to: Predict 3-D atmospheric CO2 production as a function of the CCSM3 atmospheric chemistry module

378

MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Upper-Ocean Currents How the atmosphere-ocean-land system/Salinity/Mass/Momentum Conservations #12; How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? It is the sun that sustains all living beings on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

379

Design of the Front End Electronics for the Infrared Camera of JEM-EUSO, and manufacturing and verification of the prototype model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) will be launched and attached to the Japanese module of the International Space Station (ISS). Its aim is to observe UV photon tracks produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays developing in the atmosphere and producing extensive air showers. The key element of the instrument is a very wide-field, very fast, large-lense telescope that can detect extreme energy particles with energy above $10^{19}$ eV. The Atmospheric Monitoring System (AMS), comprising, among others, the Infrared Camera (IRCAM), which is the Spanish contribution, plays a fundamental role in the understanding of the atmospheric conditions in the Field of View (FoV) of the telescope. It is used to detect the temperature of clouds and to obtain the cloud coverage and cloud top altitude during the observation period of the JEM-EUSO main instrument. SENER is responsible for the preliminary design of the Front End Electronics (FEE) of the Infrared Camera, based on an unco...

Maroto, Oscar; Carbonell, Jordi; Toms, Albert; Reyes, Marcos; Joven, Enrique; Martn, Yolanda; Ros, J A Morales de los; Del Peral, Luis; Fras, M D Rodrguez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

AKARI Observations of Brown Dwarfs. IV. Effect of Elemental Abundances to Near-Infrared Spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 {\\mu}m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of the CO_2 absorption band at 4.2 {\\mu}m in brown dwarf spectra by AKARI has made it possible to discuss CO_2 molecular abundance in brown dwarf atmospheres. In our previous studies, we found an excess in the 4.2 {\\mu}m CO_2 absorption band of three brown dwarf spectra, and suggested that these deviations were caused by high C and O elemental abundances in their atmospheres. To validate this hypothesis we construct a set of models of brown dwarf atmospheres with various elemental abundance patterns, and investigate the variations of the molecular composition, thermal structure and their effects to the near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 {\\mu}m. The 4.2 {\\mu}m CO_2 absorption band in some late-L and T dwarfs taken by AKARI are stronger or weaker than predictions by corresponding models with solar abundance. By comparing CO_2 band in the model spectra to the observed near-infrared spectra, we confirm possible elemental abundance variations among brown dwarfs. We find that the band strength ...

Sorahana, Satoko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the mass of Jupiter and R its radius. Assuming this is all converted to thermal energy, give a crudePhysics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES PLA.1 for discounting the less popular of these? Show that the energy liberated during the collapse of a sphere of mass

Read, Peter L.

382

Infrared imaging: A versatile NDT method for manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

The non-contact, non-invasive, highly adaptable nature of infrared technology offers many advantages over traditional non-destructive testing methods such as x-ray and ultrasound. Recent performance improvements accompanied by cost reductions are enabling broader implementation across a wide variety of industries. Most promising for future growth are application specific configurations packaged as integrated modules. Among the many industries that benefit from infrared technology, manufacturing has experienced the greatest gain. Environments including both continuous and batch manufacturing involve many critical thermal processes. Through the use of infrared imaging equipment, these processes can be easily monitored and optimized to ensure product quality and process efficiency.

West, L.M. [FLIR Systems, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride  

SciTech Connect

This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}. This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods.

Manuta, D.M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Infrared Imaging for Inquiry-Based Learning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on detecting long-wavelength infrared (IR) radiation emitted by the subject IR imaging shows temperature distribution instantaneously and heat flow dynamically. As a picture is worth a thousand words an IR camera has great potential in teaching heat transfer which is otherwise invisible. The idea of using IR imaging in teaching was first discussed by Vollmer et al. in 2001.13 IR cameras were then too expensive for most schools. Thanks to the growing need of home energy inspection using IR thermography the price of IR cameras has plummeted and they have become easy to use. As of 2011 the price of an entry-level handheld IR camera such as the FLIR I3 has fallen below $900 for educators. A slightly better version FLIR I5 was used to take the IR images in this paper. As easy to use as a digital camera the I5 camera automatically generates IR images of satisfactory quality with a temperature sensitivity of 0.1C. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how these affordable IR cameras can be used as a visualization inquiry and discovery tool. As the prices of IR cameras continue to drop it is time to give teachers an update about the educational power of this fascinating tool especially in supporting inquiry-based learning.

Charles Xie; Edmund Hazzard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

387

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

388

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

389

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

390

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

391

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

392

Detection of an Extrasolar Planet Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report high precision spectrophotometric observations of four planetary transits of HD 209458, in the region of the sodium resonance doublet at 589.3 nm. We find that the photometric dimming during transit in a bandpass centered on the sodium feature is deeper by (2.32 +/- 0.57) x 10^{-4} relative to simultaneous observations of the transit in adjacent bands. We interpret this additional dimming as absorption from sodium in the planetary atmosphere, as recently predicted from several theoretical modeling efforts. Our model for a cloudless planetary atmosphere with a solar abundance of sodium in atomic form predicts more sodium absorption than we observe. There are several possibilities that may account for this reduced amplitude, including reaction of atomic sodium into molecular gases and/or condensates, photoionization of sodium by the stellar flux, a low primordial abundance of sodium, or the presence of clouds high in the atmosphere.

David Charbonneau; Timothy M. Brown; Robert W. Noyes; Ronald L. Gilliland

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

394

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor in the NCAR Community Climate Evaluation of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor in the NCAR Community Climate Model, CCM3, Using Modeled and Observed HIRS Radiances Iacono, M.J., Delamere, J.S., Mlawer, E.J., and Clough, S.A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model, CCM3, is evaluated by comparing modeled, clear sky, brightness temperatures to those observed from space by the High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS). The climate model was modified to utilize a highly accurate longwave radiation model, RRTM, and a separate radiance module, both developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The radiance module

395

Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure by a Quenched Induction-Coupled Plasma Torch  

SciTech Connect

The technical feasibility of using an induction-coupled plasma (ICP) torch to synthesize ozone at atmospheric pressure is explored. Ozone concentrations up to ~250 ppm were produced using a thermal plasma reactor system based on an ICP torch operating at 2.5 MHz and ~11 kVA with an argon/oxygen mixture as the plasma-forming gas. A gaseous oxygen quench formed ozone by rapid mixing of molecular oxygen with atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The ozone concentration in the reaction chamber was measured by Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy over a wide range of experimental configurations. The geometry of the quench gas flow, the quench flow velocity, and the quench flow rate played important roles in determining the ozone concentration. The ozone concentration was sensitive to the torch RF power, but was insensitive to the torch gas flow rates. These observations are interpreted within the framework of a simple model of ozone synthesis.

A. Blutke; B.C. Stratton; D.R. Mikkelsen; J. Vavruska; R. Knight

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Cloud Features and Zonal Wind Measurements of Saturn's Atmosphere as Observed by Cassini/VIMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of data about Saturn's atmosphere from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), focusing on the meteorology of the features seen in the 5-micron spectral window. We present VIMS mosaics and discuss the morphology and general characteristics of the features backlit by Saturn's thermal emission. We have also constructed a zonal wind profile from VIMS feature tracking observation sequences using an automated cloud feature tracker. Comparison with previously constructed profiles from Voyager and Cassini imaging data reveals broad similarities, suggesting minimal vertical shear of the zonal wind. However, areas of apparent wind shear are present in the VIMS zonal wind profile at jet stream cores. In particular, our analysis shows that the equatorial jet reaches speeds exceeding 450 m/s, similar to speeds obtained during the Voyager era. This suggests that recent inferences of relatively slower jet speeds of ~275-375 m/s are confined to the upper troposphere and that the dee...

Choi, David S; Brown, Robert H; 10.1029/2008JE003254

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Abstract Remote sensing is a cost-effective tool that can be used to cover large areas for the purpose of geothermal exploration. A particular application is the use of satellite thermal infrared (TIR) imagery from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard an orbiting satellite. It can be used to search remotely for elevated surface temperatures, which may be associated with geothermal resources. The study region is in the central part of eastern California, with emphasis on the Coso geothermal field. Nighttime scenes are most

398

Gas imaging by infrared gas-correlation spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a new method for visualization of gas flows based on infrared absorption and gas-correlation techniques. This result is a gray-scale or false color-coded image showing the...

Sandsten, Jonas; Edner, Hans; Svanberg, Sune

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

CHEMICAL IMAGING OF LIVING CELLS BY SYNCHROTRON INFRARED MICROSPECTROMETRY  

SciTech Connect

Chemical mapping of proteins and lipids inside a single living cell and at a resolution of a few microns, has been performed using synchroton infrared microspectrometry. Modifications of the chemical distributions upon mitosis and necrosis has been investigated.

JAMIN,N.; DUMAS,P.; MONCUIT,J.; FRIDMAN,W.H.; TEILLAUD,J.L.; CARR,G.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Nutt,3 Keith P. Shine,4 Kevin Smith,5 and Timothy J. Wallington2 Received 17 July 2010; revised 21. Wallington (2010), Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned...

402

Infrared-Based Screening System Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) sensors or cameras, video images, and vehicle position sensors, and are generically known as infrared in enforcement was confirmed. Background -- Since 2007, ORNL has been involved in data collection efforts

403

Cryogenic far-infrared FabryPerot talon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small cryogenic FabryPerot talon was fabricated for the far-infrared region. This design used freestanding metal meshes for the reflecting elements. Using a combination of...

Peterson, D B; Pickett, H M

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Characterization of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum cascade lasers provide some of the highest output powers available for light in the mid-infrared range (from 3 to 8 m). As many of their applications require portability, designs that have a high wall-plug efficiency ...

Burghoff, David Patrick

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Infrared Trapping the "Greenhouse Effect"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Infrared Trapping ­ the "Greenhouse Effect" Goals ­ to look is the same as a 1.8 degree F change. #12;Last time - Greenhouse effect demo Selective absorption. Greenhouse

Toohey, Darin W.

406

Near-infrared wavefront sensing for the VLT interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The very large telescope (VLT) interferometer (VLTI) in its current operating state is equipped with high-order adaptive optics (MACAO) working in the visible spectrum. A low-order near-infrared wavefront sensor (IRIS) is available to measure non-common path tilt aberrations downstream the high-order deformable mirror. For the next generation of VLTI instrumentation, in particular for the designated GRAVITY instrument, we have examined various designs of a four channel high-order near-infrared wavefront sensor. Particular objectives of our study were the specification of the near-infrared detector in combination with a standard wavefront sensing system. In this paper we present the preliminary design of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor operating in the near-infrared wavelength range, which is capable of measuring the wavefronts of four telescopes simultaneously. We further present results of our design study, which aimed at providing a first instrumental concept for GRAVITY.

Stefan Hippler; Wolfgang Brandner; Yann Clnet; Felix Hormuth; Eric Gendron; Thomas Henning; Ralf Klein; Rainer Lenzen; Daniel Meschke; Vianak Naranjo; Udo Neumann; Jos Ricardo Ramos; Ralf-Rainer Rohloff; Frank Eisenhauer

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

407

Near infrared frequency dependence of high-order sideband generation  

SciTech Connect

The near infrared frequency dependence of high order sideband generation in InGaAs quantum wells is discussed. The NIR frequency dependence of the sidebands indicates that the HSG phenomenon is excitonic in nature.

Zaks, Benjamin; Banks, Hunter; Sherwin, Mark [Physics Department and the Institute for Terahertz Science and Technology, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Liu, Ren-Bao [Physics Department and Centre of Optical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

Thermal unfolding dynamics of proteins probed by nonlinear infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents spectroscopic approaches to study the thermal unfolding dynamics of proteins. The spectroscopic tool is nonlinear infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the protein amide I band. Among various nonlinear IR ...

Chung, Hoi Sung

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sequential optical pumping of a far-infrared ammonia laser  

SciTech Connect

We present a novel technique for resonantly pumping a continuous-wave far-infrared NH{sub 3} laser with a line-tunable mid-infrared NH{sub 3} laser that is optically pumped by a CO{sub 2} laser. In this two-step process we first convert 10-{mu}m CO{sub 2} laser photons into 11{endash}13-{mu}m NH{sub 3} laser photons, which are then converted into 60{endash}400-{mu}m photons in a far-infrared NH{sub 3} laser. Continuous-wave laser action on 10 far-infrared lines of {sup 15}NH{sub 3}, including four new ones, has been obtained with a single CO{sub 2} laser pump line. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

Tachikawa, M.; Evenson, K.M. [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

411

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

412

A sun glint heliostat for atmospheric spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple arrangement based upon sun glint the brilliant image of the sun behind a convex reflecting surface is used to produce a nearly stationary image of the sun. Using a telescopemirror this image is directed into a spectrometer and is spectrally analyzed for the purpose of remote sensing of trace species in our atmosphere. Typical data using a reflecting sphere are reported and discussed qualitatively in relation to the atmospheric absorbers between the sun and detector. The over?all uses of the system are described and some cautions concerning its limitations are discussed. Alternate geometries and possible variations of the system are described.

A. E. S. Green; R. A. Sutherland; G. Ganguli

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750.degree. C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5-3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Phenomenology of infrared finite gluon propagator and coupling constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on some recent solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for the infrared behavior of the gluon propagator and coupling constant, discussing their differences and proposing that these different behaviors can be tested through hadronic phenomenology. We discuss which kind of phenomenological tests can be applied to the gluon propagator and coupling constant, how sensitive they are to the infrared region of momenta and what specific solution is preferred by the experimental data.

A. A. Natale

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

Free-standing inductive grid filter for infrared radiation rejection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a fabrication method for free-standing metal structures with high aspect ratios to manufacture inductive grid filters for infrared rejection. Deep grooves in thermally evaporated SiO2 layer, fabricated by electron beam lithography and etching, were filled with iridium by atomic layer deposition technique. Characterization shows that the fabricated structures can suppress infrared radiation over two orders of magnitude while transmitting 40% of XUV radiation.

Konstantins Jefimovs; Janne Laukkanen; Tuomas Vallius; Tero Pilvi; Mikko Ritala; Tomi Meilahti; Matti Kaipiainen; Marcos Bavdaz; Markku Leskel; Jari Turunen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Optical analysis and alignment applications using the infrared Smartt interferometer  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using the infrared Smartt interferometer for optical analysis and alignment of infrared laser systems has been discussed previously. In this paper, optical analysis of the Gigawatt Test Facility at Los Alamos, as well as a deformable mirror manufactured by Rocketdyne, are discussed as examples of the technique. The possibility of optically characterizing, as well as aligning, pulsed high energy laser systems like Helios and Antares is discussed in some detail.

Viswanathan, V.K.; Bolen, P.D.; Liberman, I.; Seery, B.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Author's personal copy Soil total carbon analysis in Hawaiian soils with visible, near-infrared and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Soil total carbon analysis in Hawaiian soils with visible, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy Agriculture Hawaii Mid-infrared Soil carbon Visible near-infrared Accurate assessment of DRS for Ct prediction of Hawaiian ag- ricultural soils by creating visible, near-infrared (VNIR

Grunwald, Sabine

418

AN INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

At {approx} 400 pc, the Horsehead Nebula (B33) is the closest radiatively sculpted pillar to the Sun, but the state and extent of star formation in this structure is not well understood. We present deep near-infrared (IRSF/SIRIUS JHK {sub S}) and mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) observations of the Horsehead Nebula to characterize the star-forming properties of this region and to assess the likelihood of triggered star formation. Infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are used to identify young stars based on infrared excess emission and positions to the right of the zero-age main sequence, respectively. Of the 45 sources detected at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, three bona fide and five candidate young stars are identified in this 7' x 7' region. Two bona fide young stars have flat infrared spectral energy distributions and are located at the western irradiated tip of the pillar. The spatial coincidence of the protostars at the leading edge of this elephant trunk is consistent with the radiation-driven implosion model of triggered star formation. There is no evidence, however, for sequential star formation within the immediate {approx} 1.'5 (0.17 pc) region from the cloud/H II region interface.

Bowler, Brendan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Waller, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Megeath, S. Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Patten, Brian M. [National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Tamura, Motohide [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)], E-mail: bpbowler@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: william.waller@tufts.edu, E-mail: megeath@physics.utoledo.edu, E-mail: bpatten@nsf.gov, E-mail: motohide.tamura@nao.ac.jp

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Analysis with Single-Pass Fourier Transform Infrared Hollow Waveguide Gas Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hollow core optical fiber gas sensor has been developed in combination with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer operating in the spectral range of 4000500...

Kim, Seong-Soo; Menegazzo, Nicola; Young, Christina; Chan, James; Carter, Chance; Mizaikoff, Boris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Femtosecond measurements of near-infrared pulse induced mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect

We temporally resolved the ultrafast mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using a near-infrared pump/mid-infrared probe technique at room temperature. Two different femtosecond wavelength pumps were used with photon energy above and below the quantum well (QW) bandgap. The shorter wavelength pump modulates the mid-infrared probe transmission through interband transition assisted mechanisms, resulting in a high transmission modulation depth and several nanoseconds recovery lifetime. In contrast, pumping with a photon energy below the QW bandgap induces a smaller transmission modulation depth but much faster (several picoseconds) recovery lifetime, attributed to intersubband transition assisted mechanisms. The latter ultrafast modulation (>60?GHz) could provide a potential way to realize fast QCL based free space optical communication.

Cai, Hong; Liu, Sheng [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Center for Advanced Studied in Photonics Research (CASPR), UMBC, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Lalanne, Elaine [Center for Advanced Studied in Photonics Research (CASPR), UMBC, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen [Center for Advanced Studied in Photonics Research (CASPR), UMBC, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Department of CSEE, UMBC, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Wang, Xiaojun [AdTech Optics, Inc., City of Industry, California 91748 (United States); Johnson, Anthony M., E-mail: amj@umbc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Center for Advanced Studied in Photonics Research (CASPR), UMBC, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Department of CSEE, UMBC, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Spectral Variability from the Patchy Atmospheres of T and Y Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown dwarfs of a variety of spectral types have been observed to be photometrically variable. Previous studies have focused on objects at the L/T transition, where the iron and silicate clouds in L dwarfs break up or dissipate. However, objects outside of this transitional effective temperature regime also exhibit variability. Here, we present models for mid-late T dwarfs and Y dwarfs. We present models that include patchy salt and sulfide clouds as well as water clouds for the Y dwarfs. We find that for objects over 375 K, patchy cloud opacity would generate the largest amplitude variability within near-infrared spectral windows. For objects under 375 K, water clouds also become important and generate larger amplitude variability in the mid-infrared. We also present models in which we perturb the temperature structure at different pressure levels of the atmosphere to simulate hot spots. These models show the most variability in the absorption features between spectral windows. The variability is strongest a...

Morley, Caroline V; Fortney, Jonathan J; Lupu, Roxana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;2 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Contents 3 Heavy Snowfall regulations designed to elimi- nate human-caused haze in Big Bend and 155 other National Parks), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), among others. In support of BRAVO, NPS and CIRA scientists

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

423

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas Alexander Fridman · Microdischarge Interaction and Structuring in Dielectric Barrier Discharges · Kinetics of Blood Coagulation in Plasma · Surface Wound wire Area of DBD plasma region: ~104cm2 #12;7 Microdischarge Patterning (2D) R22 R23 R24 R26 R27 R28

Kaganovich, Igor

424

Sputtering and heating of Titan's upper atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Although, the plasma energy deposition...viable, but the plasma heating is inadequate...be true: another non-thermal process must be active...composition of the ambient plasma near Titan's orbit...used to test the atmospheric loss rate. Prior...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of solar composition studies. The first column labeled "radial" describes the overall structure of the workTHE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN Sterrekundig Instituut, Postbus 80 000, NL­3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract. This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low

Rutten, Rob

426

Atmospheric chemistry of gaseous diethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric reactivity of diethyl sulfate (DES) has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants (in cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DES with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by FTIR spectroscopy and are <3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and {le}2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}23}, respectively. The reactivity of DES toward OH radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from {ge}1 day with respect to reaction with water to >12 years with respect to ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DES within an urban air parcel is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmospheric species studied. No evidence has been found for the formation of DES or related compounds during the ozonolysis of olefins in the presence of SO{sub 2} and ethanol.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is no10 isotopic fractionation between the liquid phase and the generated moist "air". The water11., A microdrop generator for the calibration of.... 1. Introduction1 2 Water vapor is a key element in the globalAMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

428

Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

13 May 1971 research-article Wind Structure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer...semi-empirical laws for the variation of mean wind speed with height and for the statistical...provide some useful ordering of the mean wind profile characteristics in relation to...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

TETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, starting with the Greek and Roman cultures3'4.The cumulative deposition from anthropogenicsourcesin preTETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric lead contamination detected in Swedish lake sediments for pre-industrial atmospherictrace-metalcontaminationt''it is commonlyassumed that air pollution

Short, Daniel

430

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professor; Recipient, Teaching Innovation Prize; Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year Allison Mission to Comet 67P / Churyumov- Gerasimenko · Solar and Heliospheric Physics Group · STEREO Mission,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann

Eustice, Ryan

431

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Research areas Atmospheric Science/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved

Eustice, Ryan

432

1 - Solubility of Atmospheric Gases in Freshwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents tabular information on the standard air saturation concentration (moist air at 1atm) for oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gas in terms of ?mol/kg, mg/L, and mL/L; and in terms of Bunsen coefficients L real gas/(Latm); mg real gas/(LmmHg); and mg real gas/(LkPa) for 040C and freshwater conditions. Because the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is changing, solubility information is provided for 2010 (390?atm) and for 2030 (440?atm) based on projected atmospheric values. Tabular information is also provided to allow computation of standard air saturation concentrations of carbon dioxide gas directly as a function of atmospheric mole fraction. Conversion factors are presented to convert these concentrations to other commonly used units. Equations and tabular information are provided to compute air saturation concentration for moist air at local barometric pressure for the four atmospheric gases. Because of the importance of dissolved oxygen in biological processes, the air solubility concentration is also presented as a function of elevation for both metric and English elevations. Equations and tabular information are provided to allow conversion of concentrations in mg/L to partial pressures in mmHg. Sample problems are included for representative examples. Keywords gas solubility, freshwater, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, standard air solubility, air solubility, Bunsen coefficients, partial pressures

John Colt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

Pierce, Stephen

434

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

Barth, Jack

435

Nonlinear waves in the solar atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the intended application to solar physics deserves great effort...waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Figure 1 A typical...distance from the base of the solar atmosphere. The quantity is...The (a), (b) and (c) panels correspond to z=0, z=z...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

White Dwarf Spectra and Atmosphere Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the spectral classification of white dwarfs and some of the physical processes important for their understanding. In the major part of this paper we discuss the input physics and computational methods for one of the most widely used stellar atmosphere codes for white dwarfs.

Detlev Koester

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ch.6 Atmospheric and Oceanic Circulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference in air pressure. #12;Measure Air Pressure-- Mercury Barometer ·Seal the glass tube at one end of latitude. Meridional flows Zonal flows #12;Learning Objective Two: Air Pressure #12;Air Pressure Atmospheric pressure is the force per unit area exerted against a surface by the weight of air above

Pan, Feifei

438

Stereographic displays of atmospheric model data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system has been developed to display color stereographic time-lapsed sequences of outputs of three-dimensional atmospheric models. Contour lines and wind vectors derived from a model can be overlaid on a geostationary satellite image or displayed with ... Keywords: Computer graphics, Meteorology, Modeling display, Stereography

Mary desJardins; A. Frederick Hasler

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Magnetic Field in the Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication provides an overview of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere with the focus lying on the corona. The solar magnetic field couples the solar interior with the visible surface of the Sun and with its atmosphere. It is also responsible for all solar activity in its numerous manifestations. Thus, dynamic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and flares are magnetically driven. In addition, the field also plays a crucial role in heating the solar chromosphere and corona as well as in accelerating the solar wind. Our main emphasis is the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere so that photospheric and chromospheric magnetic structures are mainly discussed where relevant for higher solar layers. Also, the discussion of the solar atmosphere and activity is limited to those topics of direct relevance to the magnetic field. After giving a brief overview about the solar magnetic field in general and its global structure, we discuss in more detail the magnetic field in active regions, the quie...

Wiegelmann, Thomas; Solanki, Sami K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The effect of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared emission and near-infrared reflectance spectra of phyllosilicates and natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared emission and near-infrared reflectance-to-far-IR) emission (100­1400 cm?1 ; 7.1­100 lm) and near-infrared (NIR) reflectance (1.2­2.5 lm) spectra altered or melted. We characterized the effects of high temperatures on the mid-to-far-infrared (mid

Glotch, Timothy D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Indoor atmospheric corrosion of conventional weathering steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One year indoor atmospheric corrosion examinations have been carried out on two conventional weathering steels for a year, at two test sites, Tocumen and Sherman Breakwater in Panama. They are environmentally cla...

Juan A. Jan; Josefina Iglesias; Olga Adames

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Representing El Nio in Coupled OceanAtmosphere GCMs: The Dominant Role of the Atmospheric Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic modular approach to investigate the respective roles of the ocean and atmosphere in setting El Nio characteristics in coupled general circulation models is presented. Several state-of-the-art coupled models sharing either the same ...

E. Guilyardi; S. Gualdi; J. Slingo; A. Navarra; P. Delecluse; J. Cole; G. Madec; M. Roberts; M. Latif; L. Terray

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Atmospheric chemistry of hydrofluorocarbon 134a. Fate of the alkoxy radical CF{sub 3}O  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric chemistry of the alkoxy radical CF{sub 3}O produced in the photooxidation of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) 134a has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. CF{sub 3}O radicals are shown to react with methane and CF{sub 3}CFH{sub 2} to give CF{sub 3}OH. CF{sub 3}OH decomposes to give COF{sub 2} and HF. The rate constant for the reaction CF{sub 3}O + CF{sub 3}CFH{sub 2} (HFC-134a) {r_arrow} CF{sub 3}OH + CF{sub 3}CFH was determined to be k{sup 19} = (1.1 {plus_minus} 0.7) x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 297 K. The implications of our results for the atmospheric chemistry of CF{sub 3}O radicals and HFC-134a are discussed. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Sehested, J. [Riso National Lab. (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

On the potential of the EChO mission to characterise gas giant atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space telescopes such as EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) and JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) will be important for the future study of extrasolar planet atmospheres. Both of these missions are capable of performing high sensitivity spectroscopic measurements at moderate resolutions in the visible and infrared, which will allow the characterisation of atmospheric properties using primary and secondary transit spectroscopy. We use the NEMESIS radiative transfer and retrieval tool (Irwin et al. 2008, Lee et al. 2012) to explore the potential of the proposed EChO mission to solve the retrieval problem for a range of H2-He planets orbiting different stars. We find that EChO should be capable of retrieving temperature structure to ~200 K precision and detecting H2O, CO2 and CH4 from a single eclipse measurement for a hot Jupiter orbiting a Sun-like star and a hot Neptune orbiting an M star, also providing upper limits on CO and NH3. We provide a table of retrieval precisions for these quantities in ...

Barstow, Joanna K; Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil; Fletcher, Leigh N; Lee, Jae-Min

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Irradiated atmospheres of accreting magnetic white dwarfs with an application to the polar AM Herculis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a pilot study of atmospheres of accreting magnetic white dwarfs irradiated by intense fluxes at ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths. The model uses a standard LTE stellar atmosphere code which is expanded by introducing an angle-dependent external radiation source. The present results are obtained for an external source with the spectral shape of a 10000K blackbody and a freely adjustable spectral flux. The model provides an explanation for the observed largely filled-up Lyman lines in the prototype polar AM Herculis during its high states. It also confirms the hypotheses (i) that irradiation by cyclotron radiation and other radiation sources is the principle cause for the large heated polar caps surrounding the accretion spots on white dwarfs in polars and (ii) that much of the reprocessed light appears in the far ultraviolet and not in the soft X-ray regime as suggested in the original simple theories. We also briefly discuss the role played by hard X-rays in heating the polar cap.

M. Koenig; K. Beuermann; B. T. Gaensicke

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

446

Infrared Spectroscopic Data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), SDSS-III Data Release 10  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10 is the first spectroscopic release from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), including spectra and derived stellar parameters for more than 50,000 stars. APOGEE is an ongoing survey of ~100,000 stars accessing all parts of the Milky Way. By operating in the infrared (H-band) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, APOGEE is better able to detect light from stars lying in dusty regions of the Milky Way than surveys conducted in the optical, making this survey particularly well-suited for exploring the Galactic disk and bulge. APOGEE's high resolution spectra provide detailed information about the stellar atmospheres; DR10 provides derived effective temperatures, surface gravities, overall metallicities, and information on the abundances of several chemical elements. [copied from http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/irspec/

447

In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed species on mixed metal oxide catalysts for higher alcohol synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy was utilized to identify adsorbed species on Zn/Cu/Cr oxide and potassium carbonate-promoted Zn/Cu/Cr oxide catalysts at 285/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure. Adsorption of various molecules on catalysts provided information about the nature of the adsorbed species. As a result of CO/H/sub 2/ mixture, methanol and formaldehyde adsorption two types of species formed, namely a methoxy and a formate. The adsorption of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid at 285/sup 0/C revealed stable acetate species. Ethanol and acetaldehyde adsorption also produced an ethoxy species whose formation was much favored on promoted catalysts. 136 refs., 46 figs., 14 tabs.

Baysar, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp 1992.07.11 - 1993.02.28 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability Final data available. For data sets, see below. Summary IOP completed. Description The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) was conducted to better understand the structure of the coupled system of the warm pool of the western Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of participants from dozens of countries took part in this experiment from November 1, 1992 through February 28, 1993. Campaign Data Sets

449

BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H?-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface ...

Seager, Sara

450

Faculty-Led Study Abroad in Atmospheric Science Education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For several years the University of WisconsinMilwaukee's Atmospheric Science group has offered the faculty-led study abroad program Mexico: Air Pollution and Ancient Cultures. In this course, open to both atmospheric science majors and nonmajors as well ...

Jonathan D. W. Kahl; Julia G. Cern

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Trends and inferred emissions of atmospheric high molecular weight perfluorocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric observations and atmospheric observation-based global emission estimates are presented for the five high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C 4 F 1 0 ), dodecafluoropentane (C5 F1 2 ), ...

Ivy, Diane Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Muon diagnostics of the Earths atmosphere and magnetosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of distant monitoring of the Earths magnetosphere and atmosphere is described, which is based on the close correlation between the modulations in the flux of atmospheric muons detected at the Earths su...

N. S. Barbashina; V. V. Borog

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

454

Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Virtually Dry Snowball Earth Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hadley cell of a virtually dry snowball Earth atmosphere under equinox insolation is studied in a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. In contrast to the Hadley cell of modern Earth, momentum transport by dry convection, which ...

Aiko Voigt; Isaac M. Held; Jochem Marotzke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

457

ENSEMBLE VARIABILITY OF NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect

We present the properties of the ensemble variability V for nearly 5000 near-infrared active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the catalog of Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (13th Edition) and the SDSS-DR7 quasar catalog. From three near-infrared point source catalogs, namely, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), Deep Near Infrared Survey (DENIS), and UKIDSS/LAS catalogs, we extract 2MASS-DENIS and 2MASS-UKIDSS counterparts for cataloged AGNs by cross-identification between catalogs. We further select variable AGNs based on an optimal criterion for selecting the variable sources. The sample objects are divided into subsets according to whether near-infrared light originates by optical emission or by near-infrared emission in the rest frame; and we examine the correlations of the ensemble variability with the rest-frame wavelength, redshift, luminosity, and rest-frame time lag. In addition, we also examine the correlations of variability amplitude with optical variability, radio intensity, and radio-to-optical flux ratio. The rest-frame optical variability of our samples shows negative correlations with luminosity and positive correlations with rest-frame time lag (i.e., the structure function, SF), and this result is consistent with previous analyses. However, no well-known negative correlation exists between the rest-frame wavelength and optical variability. This inconsistency might be due to a biased sampling of high-redshift AGNs. Near-infrared variability in the rest frame is anticorrelated with the rest-frame wavelength, which is consistent with previous suggestions. However, correlations of near-infrared variability with luminosity and rest-frame time lag are the opposite of these correlations of the optical variability; that is, the near-infrared variability is positively correlated with luminosity but negatively correlated with the rest-frame time lag. Because these trends are qualitatively consistent with the properties of radio-loud quasars reported by some previous studies, most of our sample objects are probably radio-loud quasars. Finally, we also discuss the negative correlations seen in the near-infrared SFs.

Kouzuma, S. [School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University, Toyota 470-0393 (Japan); Yamaoka, H., E-mail: skouzuma@lets.chukyo-u.ac.jp, E-mail: yamaoka@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Surface Nanostructuring of Polysulfone Membranes by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization (APPIGP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large substrates. Various atmospheric plasma sources arePolymerization The atmospheric plasma source used in thisby Remote Atmospheric- Pressure Plasma. Ieee Transactions on

Kim, Soo Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sensitive multi-photon nonlinear laser spectroscopic methods for isotope analysis in atmospheric and environmental applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements in atmospheric pressure plasma. However, nonean atmospheric radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma (atmospheric atomizer. Also, the inductively coupled plasma

Lyons, Wendy Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric physics Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: atmospheric physics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:cpac.pku.edu.cn Summary: Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric infrared sounder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol size Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for about ten percent of all aerosols in the atmosphere. We... , can actually absorb solar energy and warm the atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosols are very important... by...

462

EARLY SCIENCE WITH SOFIA, THE STRATOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY FOR INFRARED ASTRONOMY  

SciTech Connect

The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory consisting of a specially modified Boeing 747SP with a 2.7 m telescope, flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft). Designed to observe at wavelengths from 0.3 {mu}m to 1.6 mm, SOFIA operates above 99.8% of the water vapor that obscures much of the infrared and submillimeter. SOFIA has seven science instruments under development, including an occultation photometer, near-, mid-, and far-infrared cameras, infrared spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. SOFIA, a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft und-Raumfahrt, began initial science flights in 2010 December, and has conducted 30 science flights in the subsequent year. During this early science period three instruments have flown: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and the occultation photometer HIPO. This Letter provides an overview of the observatory and its early performance.

Young, E. T.; Becklin, E. E.; De Buizer, J. M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Casey, S. C.; Helton, L. A. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marcum, P. M.; Roellig, T. L.; Temi, P. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, 202 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Guesten, R. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, Bonn (Germany); Dunham, E. W. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Rd., Flagstaff AZ 86001 (United States); Backman, D.; Burgdorf, M. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Caroff, L. J.; Erickson, E. F. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Davidson, J. A. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia (M013), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Gehrz, R. D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Harper, D. A. [Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, 373 W. Geneva St., Williams Bay, WI (United States); Harvey, P. M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); and others

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma has been derived. The result can be...

S. S. De; Bithika Ghosh; Manasi Mal; B. Ghosh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from a global 3D land.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since

Selin, Noelle Eckley

465

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from global modeling Noelle Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since industrialization Major anthropogenic

Selin, Noelle Eckley

466

The nature of moss and lower atmospheric seismology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TR (i.e. thermal interface between...perform lower atmospheric seismology...chromospheric plasma upwards at...despite the atmospheric seeing deformations...EUV-emitting plasma in its vicinity...tunnel some non-propagating...examples of lower atmospheric seismology...in the solar plasma. Figure 1...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Nonequilibrium atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation and growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mexico City area are shown...inorganic atmospheric aerosols...2005 ) A large organic aerosol source...photochemical and thermal studies of...Characteristic Group FrequenciesTables and...particle thermal speed...phase-equilibrium in the atmospheric system: Aerosol...Support, Non-U.S...Determination by plasma-based...implications for atmospheric chemistry...2002) A thermal disso-ciation...

Vronique Perraud; Emily A. Bruns; Michael J. Ezell; Stanley N. Johnson; Yong Yu; M. Lizabeth Alexander; Alla Zelenyuk; Dan Imre; Wayne L. Chang; Donald Dabdub; James F. Pankow; Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

New consideration of atmospheric refraction in laser ranging data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......atmosphere near the Earth. Atmospheric refraction increases...function based on the generator function method proposed...incorporated with the generator function theory and...which P is the total atmospheric pressure in millibars...partial pressure of water vapour in millibars......

Haojian Yan; Guangli Wang

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

469

Refined correlations between atmospheric and rapid polar motion excitations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......experiments, the atmospheric or geodetic excitation...a random number generator, and is regenerated...1990. Global water storage and polar...C.R., 1993. Atmospheric excitation computations...polar motion by atmospheric angular momentum...Global surface water-induced Rosen......

T. C. Stieglitz; S. R. Dickman

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER management decisions? II--WATERWATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere,Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems resource issues. #12;I-WATER: Vision and Goals ¤ I-WATER will provide a new generation of Ph.D. students

471

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7 Be concentrations Ilya G. Usoskin,1; published 21 March 2009. [1] Variations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in the global atmosphere the variations in the 7 Be concentration in the atmosphere for the period from 1 January to 28 February 2005

472

Numerical Analysis of Flow Characteristics of An Atmospheric Plasma Torch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Analysis of Flow Characteristics of An Atmospheric Plasma Torch You-Jae Kim, J.-G. HanCheon-dong, Suwon 440-746, KOREA Abstract The atmospheric plasma is regarded as an effective method for surface mathematical models used for simulating plasma characteristics inside an atmospheric plasma torch is carried

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University 104 CEOAS Admin Bldg Announcement College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Posting 0012926 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, Earth Systems History The College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS) at Oregon State University

474

Radon-222 Daughter Concentrations in Uranium Mine Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... undertaken to measure the concentrations of 210Pb and 210Po in uranium mine atmospheres at various radon daughter concentration levels, and to determine the amount of 210Pb in the mine atmosphere ... atmosphere relative to that which would be produced from the decay of the short-lived radon daughters deposited in the lungs. Radium-226 was also measured in air so as ...

RICHARD L. BLANCHARD

1969-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

475

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3 Contents Abstract 2 1 Introduction 6 1.1 Problem background

Learned, John

476

Singular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are presented for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001. The singular valuesSingular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models Wenyuan Liao and Adrian Sandu for atmospheric chemical transport models. The distinguishing feature of these models is the presence of stiff

Sandu, Adrian

477

AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley-Interscience, 2006AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols Tuesdays 9-9:50 AM, 212B ACRC Wednesdays, Lab, 1-4 PM, ACB 10 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 19 491

478

Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

Sandu, Adrian

479

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

480

European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to the Eastern Mediterranean during of European pollution are observed in the atmosphere (74 ( 13%). On the other hand, when the Persian Trough). This study demonstrates that atmospheric pollution over the East Mediterranean region during the summer

Einat, Aharonov

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA NOAA About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder houses the Earth System Research Lab, which supports a "reforecasting" project. The initiative involves running several decades of historical

482

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

483

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

484

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Velocity June 5-6, 2012 Jeremy Rishel Bruce Napier Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses: GENII Today's Presentation.... Will provide a high-level overview of the GENII codes. Will cover basic aspects of GENII's acute atmospheric transport model. Will review the GENII deposition model that is used to estimate the deposition velocity used in plume depletion. 2 GENII Development History 1988 - GENII V1 released ICRP-26/30/48 dosimetry 1990 - GENII V1.485 stabilized Current DOE Toolbox Version 1992 - GENII-S stochastic version 2004 - GENII V2 ICRP-72 age-dependent dosimetry Federal Guidance Report 13 risk factors

485

Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models  

SciTech Connect

Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

Rotman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a breakthrough in the studies of thermal radiation of neutron stars. Observations with modern space telescopes have provided a wealth of valuable information. Being correctly interpreted, this information can elucidate physics of superdense matter in the interiors of these stars. The theory of formation of thermal spectra of neutron stars is based on the physics of plasmas and radiative processes in stellar photospheres. It provides the framework for interpretation of observational data and for extracting neutron-star parameters from these data. This paper presents a review of the current state of the theory of surface layers of neutron stars and radiative processes in these layers, with the main focus on the neutron stars that possess strong magnetic fields. In addition to the conventional deep (semi-infinite) atmospheres, radiative condensed surfaces of neutron stars and "thin" (finite) atmospheres are also considered.

Potekhin, A Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Direct Use of Satellite Sounding Radiances in Numerical Weather Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1978, operational satellite soundings of the atmospheres temperature and humidity structure have been provided by the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TONS) on the TIROS-N/NOAA series of polar orbiti...

J. R. Eyre; E. Andersson; A. P. McNally

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Coastal Atmospheric Circulation around an Idealized Cape during Wind-Driven Upwelling Studied from a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study analyzes atmospheric circulation around an idealized coastal cape during summertime upwelling-favorable wind conditions simulated by a mesoscale coupled oceanatmosphere model. The domain resembles an eastern ocean boundary with a ...

Natalie Perlin; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Response of a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: Sensitivity to the Rate of Increase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled oceanatmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant ...

Ronald J. Stouffer; Syukuro Manabe

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

492

Atmosphere to Electrons Initiative Takes Shape  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since DOE launched its Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative last July, the A2e executive committee has been developing a comprehensive approach for working with multiple stakeholders (industry, national laboratories, international experts, and universities) over the next 5- to 7 years. In February, they held an external merit review to lay the groundwork for an A2e multi-year strategic research plan.

493

Thomson scattering measurements in atmospheric plasma jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron temperature and electron density in a dc plasma jet at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using Thomson laser scattering. Measurements performed at various scattering angles have revealed effects that are not accounted for by the standard scattering theory. Differences between the predicted and experimental results suggest that higher order corrections to the theory may be required, and that corrections to the form of the spectral density function may play an important role.

G. Gregori; J. Schein; P. Schwendinger; U. Kortshagen; J. Heberlein; E. Pfender

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal, Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Vibrational Assignments  

SciTech Connect

Glyoxal, methylglyoxal and 2,3-butanedione (diacetyl) are all known biomass burning effluents and suspected aerosol precursors. Pressure-broadened quantitative infrared spectra of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl vapors covering the 5206500 cm?1 range are reported at 0.11 cm?1 resolution, each with a composite spectrum derived from a minimum of ten different sample pressures for the compound, representing some of the first quantitative data for these analytes. The ordinate corresponds to a 1 meter optical pathlength and a mixing ratio of 1ppmv at 296 K. Many vibrational assignments for methylglyoxal are reported for the first time, as are some near-IR and far-IR bands of glyoxal and diacetyl. To complete the vibrational assignments, the quantitative far-infrared spectra (25 to 600 cm-1) of all three vapors are also reported, methylglyoxal for the first time. Density functional theory and ab initio MP2 theory are used to help assign vibrational modes. Potential bands useful for atmospheric monitoring are discussed.

Profeta, Luisa T.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Stephen D.

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

495

Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos High School L Al NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Presented at the PPPL Colloquium Sept. 17, 2008 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA LA-UR-08-06284 Outline of this talk *A discussion of ball lightning reports in nature *How can ball plasmas be made in the laboratory? *Detailed experiments on long lived free floating *Detailed experiments on long-lived free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas C i f l b b ll l i h "b ll *Comparison of laboratory ball plasmas with "ball lightning" *Summary U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA

496

Atmospheric and combustion chemistry of dimethyl ether  

SciTech Connect

It has been demonstrated that dimethyl ether (DME) is an ideal diesel fuel alternative. DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, combines good fuel properties with low exhaust emissions and low combustion noise. Large scale production of this fuel can take place using a single step catalytic process converting CH{sub 4} to DME. The fate of DME in the atmosphere has previously been studied. The atmospheric degradation is initiated by the reaction with hydroxyl radicals, which is also a common feature of combustion processes. Spectrokinetic investigations and product analysis were used to demonstrate that the intermediate oxy radical, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}O, exhibits a novel reaction pathway of hydrogen atom ejection. The application of tandem mass spectrometry to chemi-ions based on supersonic molecular beam sampling has recently been demonstrated. The highly reactive ionic intermediates are sampled directly from the flame and identified by collision activation mass spectrometry and ion-molecule reactions. The mass spectrum reflects the distribution of the intermediates in the flame. The atmospheric degradation of DME as well as the unique fuel properties of a oxygen containing compound will be discussed.

Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.; Larsen, E.; Sehested, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

497

The atmospheric reactivity of. alpha. -methyltetrahydrofuran  

SciTech Connect

Biomass-derived {alpha}-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) has been proposed as an automotive fuel additive. Since MTHF is a volatile organic compound, the environmental impact of evaporation to the atmosphere needs to be considered. The major loss process of MTHF in the atmosphere is expected to occur via reaction with hydroxyl radical; hence we have conducted a study of the kinetics of the reaction OH + MTHF {yields} products using both absolute (flash photolysis resonance fluorescence) and relative rate techniques. The absolute rate experiments were performed over the temperature range 240-400 K at total pressures of 35 Torr (4.7 kPa) argon; the relative rate experiments were conducted at 295 K in 740 Torr (99 kPa) synthetic air. The results from both techniques were in good agreement and yield k{sub 1} = (2.52 {plus minus} 0.74) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp-((650 {plus minus} 80)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, with k{sub 1} (298 K) = 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1}. The implications of these results for the atmospheric chemistry of MTHF are discussed.

Wallington, T.J.; Siegl, W.O. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (USA)); Liu, Renzhang; Zhang, Zhengyu; Huie, R.E.; Kurylo, M.J. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Lightning, atmospheric electricity and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Temperature records indicate that a global warming of 0.5{minus}0.7{degrees}C has occurred over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). Whether this trend is a result of increased trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere, or simply a result of natural variability; is still not known. These temperature trends are derived from thousands of observations worldwide. However, these observations are concentrated largely over continental areas, and then mainly in the northern hemisphere`s populated regions. This northern hemisphere continental bias results in large uncertainties in estimates of global temperature trends. Due to the increasing evidence that the present buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may result in an additional global warming of 1-5{degrees}C by the year 2050 (IPCC, 1990), it is increasingly important to find afternative methods to monitor fluctuations in global surface temperatures. As shown by two recent studies (Williams, 1992; Price, 1993), the global atmospheric electric circuit may provide a promising afternative for monitoring future climate change.

Price, C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

IONIZATION OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANET ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

Many extrasolar planets orbit close in and are subject to intense ionizing radiation from their host stars. Therefore, we expect them to have strong, and extended, ionospheres. Ionospheres are important because they modulate escape in the upper atmosphere and can modify circulation, as well as leave their signatures, in the lower atmosphere. In this paper, we evaluate the vertical location Z{sub I} and extent D{sub I} of the EUV ionization peak layer. We find that Z{sub I{approx}}1-10 nbar-for a wide range of orbital distances (a = 0.047-1 AU) from the host star-and D{sub I}/H{sub p{approx}}>15, where H{sub p} is the pressure scale height. At Z{sub I}, the plasma frequency is {approx}80-450 MHz, depending on a. We also study global ion transport, and its dependence on a, using a three-dimensional thermosphere-ionosphere model. On tidally synchronized planets with weak intrinsic magnetic fields, our model shows only a small, but discernible, difference in electron density from the dayside to the nightside ({approx}9 x 10{sup 13} m{sup -3} to {approx}2 x 10{sup 12} m{sup -3}, respectively) at Z{sub I}. On asynchronous planets, the distribution is essentially uniform. These results have consequences for hydrodynamic modeling of the atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets.

Koskinen, Tommi T. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ (United States); Cho, James Y-K. [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Achilleos, Nicholas; Aylward, Alan D., E-mail: tommi@lpl.arizona.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z