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Sample records for atmospheric boundary layer

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP ... Lead Scientist : David Turner For data sets, see below. Abstract Boundary layer turbulence ...

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17, Turner, SGP Comments? We would ... Lead Scientist : David Turner For data sets, see below. Abstract Instruments were deployed ...

  3. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (BER) (SC-23) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Atmospheric System Research Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview ...

  4. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  5. Boundary Layer The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is sponsoring a 20-month field study on Graciosa Island in the Azores. Scientists involved in the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer field campaign are using the ARM Mobile Facility-a portable climate observatory-to study low-level clouds and aerosol in a marine environment. Collaborators from the Regional

  6. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary layer experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, P.; Bonin, T. A.; Newman, J. F.; Turner, D. D.; Chilson, P. B.; Wainwright, C. E.; Blumberg, W. G.; Mishra, S.; Carney, M.; Jacobsen, E. P.; Wharton, Sonia; Newsom, Rob K.

    2015-10-23

    This paper presents an overview of the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE), which included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was conducted as a collaborative effort between the University of Oklahoma (OU), the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the ARM program. LABLE can be considered unique in that it was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost, multi-agency collaboration. Graduate students served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments aimed at examining boundary-layer processes. The main objective of LABLE was to study turbulent phenomena in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere over heterogeneous terrain using a variety of novel atmospheric profiling techniques. Several instruments from OU and LLNL were deployed to augment the suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the ARM site. The complementary nature of the deployed instruments with respect to resolution and height coverage provides a near-complete picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper provides an overview of the experiment including i) instruments deployed, ii) sampling strategies, iii) parameters observed, and iv) student involvement. To illustrate these components, the presented results focus on one particular aspect of LABLE, namely the study of the nocturnal boundary layer and the formation and structure of nocturnal low-level jets. During LABLE, low-level jets were frequently observed and they often interacted with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances such as frontal passages.

  7. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  8. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  9. Estimations of atmospheric boundary layer fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzvi Galchen; Mei Xu ); Eberhard, W.L. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. Here the authors present results on doppler LIDAR measurements used to measure a range of turbulence parameters in the region of the unstable planetary boundary layer (PBL). The parameters include, averaged velocities, cartesian velocities, variances in velocities, parts of the covariance associated with vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum, and third moments of the vertical velocity. They explain their analysis technique, especially as it relates to error reduction of the averaged turbulence parameters from individual measurements with relatively large errors. The scales studied range from 150m to 12km. With this new diagnostic they address questions about the behavior of the convectively unstable PBL, as well as the stable layer which overlies it.

  10. Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

    2007-12-01

    Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

  11. Boundary Layer Structure:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary Layer Structure: a comparison between methods and sites Thiago Biscaro Suzane de Sá Jae-In Song Shaoyue "Emily" Qiu Mentors: Virendra Ghate and Ewan O'Connor July 24 2015 1 st ever ARM Summer Training Outline * IntroducQon * Methodology * Results - SGP - MAO - Comparison between the 2 sites * Conclusions INTRODUCTION Focus: esQmates of PBL height Boundary Layer: "The boUom layer of the troposphere that is in contact with the surface of the earth." (AMS, Glossary of

  12. ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Planetary boundary layer height Top of the planetary boundary layer; also known as depth or height of the mixing layer. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each

  13. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C.

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  14. Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary Layer Cloud Turbulence Characteristics Virendra Ghate Bruce Albrecht Parameter Observational Readiness (/10) Modeling Need (/10) Cloud Boundaries 9 9 Cloud Fraction Variance Skewness Up/Downdraft coverage Dominant Freq. signal Dissipation rate ??? Observation-Modeling Interface

  15. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O.; McInnes, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  16. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  17. A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection Neggers, Roel European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Category: Modeling A new convective boundary layer...

  18. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  19. Clear-sky and Cloudy Boundary Layers Virendra P. Ghate Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clear-sky and Cloudy Boundary Layers Virendra P. Ghate Argonne National Laboratory Define Boundary Layer Stull (1988) defined the atmospheric boundary layer as "the part of the troposphere that is directly influenced by the presence of the earth's surface, and responds to surface forcings with a time scale of about an hour or less." Typical Boundary Layer Depths and time-scales Scenario Time/Length scale Clear-air Convective 30 mins/1 km Cumulus Topped Boundary Layer 30 mins/1 km

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Abstract Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at

  1. Thick diffusion limit boundary layer test problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, T. S.; Warsa, J. S.; Chang, J. H.; Adams, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    We develop two simple test problems that quantify the behavior of computational transport solutions in the presence of boundary layers that are not resolved by the spatial grid. In particular we study the quantitative effects of 'contamination' terms that, according to previous asymptotic analyses, may have a detrimental effect on the solutions obtained by both discontinuous finite element (DFEM) and characteristic-method (CM) spatial discretizations, at least for boundary layers caused by azimuthally asymmetric incident intensities. Few numerical results have illustrated the effects of this contamination, and none have quantified it to our knowledge. Our test problems use leading-order analytic solutions that should be equal to zero in the problem interior, which means the observed interior solution is the error introduced by the contamination terms. Results from DFEM solutions demonstrate that the contamination terms can cause error propagation into the problem interior for both orthogonal and non-orthogonal grids, and that this error is much worse for non-orthogonal grids. This behavior is consistent with the predictions of previous analyses. We conclude that these boundary layer test problems and their variants are useful tools for the study of errors that are introduced by unresolved boundary layers in diffusive transport problems. (authors)

  2. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  3. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  4. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  5. ARM - PI Product - Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsPlanetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of

  6. "Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: "Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites" Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Lidar Investigations ...

  7. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL (Dataset) | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, ... thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes. ...

  8. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    large-scale forcings Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary ... The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying ...

  9. Simulation of High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layers | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility A visualization of the velocity in a boundary layer at Reynolds numbers up to 2100 shows the growth of the turbulence structures out into the free stream as it evolves downstream (to the right) and the intermittent uneven boundary of the turbulent region. Juan Sillero, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. Simulation of High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layers PI Name: Robert Moser PI Email: rmoser@ices.utexas.edu Institution: University of Texas at Austin

  10. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe Gurlui, Silviu Octavian; Cazacu, Marius Mihai; Timofte, Adrian

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  11. Stable Boundary Layer Education Field Campaign Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary DD Turner March 2016 DISCLAIMER This report was ... (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary DD Turner, National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...

  12. Size distributions of boundary-layer clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, R.; Berg, L.; Modzelewski, H.

    1996-04-01

    Scattered fair-weather clouds are triggered by thermals rising from the surface layer. Not all surface layer air is buoyant enough to rise. Also, each thermal has different humidities and temperatures, resulting in interthermal variability of their lifting condensation levels (LCL). For each air parcel in the surface layer, it`s virtual potential temperature and it`s LCL height can be computed.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Stable Boundary Layer Education (StaBLE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsStable Boundary Layer Education (StaBLE) Campaign Links Final Campaign Summary ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Stable Boundary Layer Education (StaBLE) 2011.10.01 - 2014.05.31 Lead Scientist : David Turner For data sets, see below. Abstract The properties and processing in the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, which makes it difficult to represent

  14. Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Observations in the Azores (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Observations in the Azores Citation Details ... Publication Date: 2012-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1059795 Report Number(s): BNL--98829-2012-JA Journal ID: ISSN ...

  15. Microsoft Word - Group 1 Boundary Layer(RS).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planetary Boundary Layer Height: A Comparison of Estimation Methods and Sites Report Participants: Thiago Biscaro, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Brazil Suzane S. de Sá, Harvard University Jae-In Song, Yonsei University, Korea Instructors: Virendra Ghate, Argonne National Laboratory Ewan O'Connor, Finnish Meteorological Institute, University of Reading July 2015 Group 1, July 2015, ARM Summer Training and Science Applications 1 1.0 Planetary Boundary Layer Height: A Comparison of

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar 2005.05.21 - 2005.05.24 Lead Scientist : Michael Dobbs Abstract Overflights Underway at ACRF Southern Great Plains Site (M.Dobbs/J.Liljegren) Science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted flights over the Central

  17. “Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David

    2015-01-13

    Project goals; Characterize the aerosol and ice vertical distributions over the ARM NSA site, and in particular to discriminate between elevated aerosol layers and ice clouds in optically thin scattering layers; Characterize the water vapor and aerosol vertical distributions over the ARM Darwin site, how these distributions vary seasonally, and quantify the amount of water vapor and aerosol that is above the boundary layer; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; Use the high temporal resolution Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds; and Use the high temporal Raman lidar data to continue to characterize the turbulence within the convective boundary layer and how the turbulence statistics (e.g., variance, skewness) is correlated with larger scale variables predicted by models.

  18. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  19. Lidar Investigations of Aerosol, Cloud, and Boundary Layer Properties Over the ARM ACRF Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.; Ferrare, Richard

    2015-01-13

    The systematic and routine measurements of aerosol, water vapor, and clouds in the vertical column above the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites from surface-based remote sensing systems provides a unique and comprehensive data source that can be used to characterize the boundary layer (i.e., the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere) and its evolution. New algorithms have been developed to provide critical datasets from ARM instruments, and these datasets have been used in long-term analyses to better understand the climatology of water vapor and aerosol over Darwin, the turbulent structure of the boundary layer and its statistical properties over Oklahoma, and to better determine the distribution of ice and aerosol particles over northern Alaska.

  20. Characterization of Radar Boundary Layer Data Collected During the 2001 Multi-Frequency Radar IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Radar Boundary Layer Data Collected During the 2001 Multi-Frequency Radar IOP A. Khandwalla, N. Majurec, and S. M. Sekelsky University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts C. R. Williams and K. S. Gage National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Ground-based radar measurements of insect clutter at Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) were collected over an extended period during the 2001 multi-frequency radar (MFR)

  1. Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary Layer Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method over the Southern Great Plains Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary Layer Budget Method over the Southern Great Plains Williams, Ian University of Chicago Riley, William Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berry, Joseph Carnegie Inst.of Washington Torn, Margaret Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Fischer, Marc Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Category: Atmospheric State and Surface Concentration gradients of CO2 and H2O at the transition between the

  2. Edge Plasma Boundary Layer Generated By Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2010-11-22

    This paper describes the structure of the electric current generated by external kink modes at the plasma edge using the ideally conducting plasma model. It is found that the edge current layer is created by both wall touching and free boundary kink modes. Near marginal stability, the total edge current has a universal expression as a result of partial compensation of the ?-functional surface current by the bulk current at the edge. The resolution of an apparent paradox with the pressure balance across the plasma boundary in the presence of the surface currents is provided.

  3. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus Clouds Virendra Ghate Bruce Albrecht and Pavlos Kollias Why BL Stratocumulus?? * Extensive Coverage - Cover ~24% of earth's surface - Persist of long time-scales * Impact on radiation budget - High SW albedo compared to land or ocean Klein and Hartmann 1993 But Why Continental Clouds? * They do exist - Monthly cloud fraction can vary from 10% to 23% * Impact on pollution & Diurnal Cycle - Affect pollutant venting out of BL & Aerosol

  4. Improving Subtropical Boundary Layer Cloudiness in the 2011 NCEP GFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, J. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Ruiyu N.; Han, J.

    2014-09-23

    The current operational version of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) shows significant low cloud bias. These biases also appear in the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is developed from the GFS. These low cloud biases degrade seasonal and longer climate forecasts, particularly of short-wave cloud radiative forcing, and affect predicted sea surface temperature. Reducing this bias in the GFS will aid the development of future CFS versions and contributes to NCEP's goal of unified weather and climate modelling. Changes are made to the shallow convection and planetary boundary layer parameterisations to make them more consistent with current knowledge of these processes and to reduce the low cloud bias. These changes are tested in a single-column version of GFS and in global simulations with GFS coupled to a dynamical ocean model. In the single-column model, we focus on changing parameters that set the following: the strength of shallow cumulus lateral entrainment, the conversion of updraught liquid water to precipitation and grid-scale condensate, shallow cumulus cloud top, and the effect of shallow convection in stratocumulus environments. Results show that these changes improve the single-column simulations when compared to large eddy simulations, in particular through decreasing the precipitation efficiency of boundary layer clouds. These changes, combined with a few other model improvements, also reduce boundary layer cloud and albedo biases in global coupled simulations.

  5. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  6. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Boundary Layer RHI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Boundary Layer RHI Scan X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Boundary Layer RHI Scan Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph Hardin ; ...

  7. Characterization of structural response to hypersonic boundary-layer transition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Riley, Zachary B.; Deshmukh, Rohit; Miller, Brent A.; McNamara, Jack J.; Casper, Katya M.

    2016-05-24

    The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerodynamic heating, and surface conditions makes the potential for interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important and challenging area of study in high-speed flows. This paper phenomenologically explores this interaction using a fundamental two-dimensional aerothermoelastic model under the assumption of an aluminum panel with simple supports. Specifically, an existing model is extended to examine the impact of transition onset location, transition length, and transitional overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure on the structural response of surface panels. Transitional flow conditions are found to yield significantly increased thermal gradients, and theymore » can result in higher maximum panel temperatures compared to turbulent flow. Results indicate that overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure reduces the flutter onset time and increases the strain energy accumulated in the panel. Furthermore, overshoot occurring near the midchord can yield average temperatures and peak displacements exceeding those experienced by the panel subject to turbulent flow. Lastly, these results suggest that fully turbulent flow does not always conservatively predict the thermo-structural response of surface panels.« less

  8. RACORO long-term, systematic aircraft observations of boundary layer clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; McFarquhar, G.; Ogren, J.; Turner, D. D.; Comstock, J. M.; Feingold, G.; Long, C. N.; Jonsson, H. H.; Bucholtz, A.; Collins, D. R.; Diskin, G.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, R. P.; Woods, R. K.; Hubbe, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Schmid, B.

    2010-06-27

    Our knowledge of boundary layer cloud processes is insufficient to resolve pressing scientific problems. Boundary layer clouds often have liquid-water paths (LWPs) less than 100 gm{sup 2}, which are defined here as being 'thin' Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD). This type of cloud is common globally, and the Earth's radiative energy balance is particularly sensitive to small changes in their optical properties. However, it is difficult to retrieve accurately their cloud properties via remote sensing because they are tenuous and often occur in partly cloudy skies. This interferes with our ability to obtain the routine, long-term statistics needed to improve their representation in climate models. To address this problem, in-situ data are needed to investigate cloud processes and to evaluate and refine existing retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign conducted long-term, systematic flights in boundary layer, liquid-water clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 22 January and 30 June 2009. This was the first time that a long-term aircraft campaign was undertaken for systematic in-situ sampling of cloud properties. Using the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft equipped with a comprehensive set of instruments to measure solar and thermal radiation, cloud microphysics, aerosol properties and atmospheric state, the RACORO team logged an unprecedented 59 flights and 259 research hours above the SGP site. Data gathered during the RACORO campaign will provide researchers with a statistically relevant data set of boundary-layer cloud and aerosol properties for future study. These data can be used to validate retrieval algorithms and support process studies and model simulations of boundary layer clouds and, in particular, CLOWD-type clouds. In addition to cloud observations, complementary clear-sky flight patterns were conducted to map the surface

  9. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J. ); Raman, S. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  10. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1992-08-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta`s Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  11. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by A-train satellites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Tao; Wang, Zhien; Zhang, Damao; Chen, Bing

    2016-05-13

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the marine low cloud processes, and the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere. This study examines the MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region and further explores the controlling factors of MBL structure over the global oceans with a new 4-year satellite-based data set. The MBL top (boundary layer height, BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH) were identified using the MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations). Results showed that the MBL is generally decoupled with MLH ∕ BLHmore » ratio ranging from  ∼  0.5 to  ∼  0.8 over the eastern Pacific Ocean region. The MBL decoupling magnitude is mainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS), which in turn controls the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops also show dependence on EIS. This may be related to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in the MBL. Further analysis indicates that the MBL shows a similar decoupled structure for clear-sky and cumulus-cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.« less

  12. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by A-train satellites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Tao; Wang, Zhien; Zhang, Damao; Chen, Bing

    2016-05-13

    Here, the marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the marine low cloud processes, and the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere. This study examines the MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region and further explores the controlling factors of MBL structure over the global oceans with a new 4-year satellite-based data set. The MBL top (boundary layer height, BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH) were identified using the MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations). Results showed that the MBL is generally decoupled withmore » MLH/BLH ratio ranging from ~0.5 to ~0.8 over the eastern Pacific Ocean region. The MBL decoupling magnitude is mainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS), which in turn controls the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops also show dependence on EIS. This may be related to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in the MBL. Further analysis indicates that the MBL shows a similar decoupled structure for clear-sky and cumulus-cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.« less

  13. Sensitivity of Boundary-layer and Deep Convective Cloud Simulations to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Resolution Sensitivity of Boundary-layer and Deep Convective Cloud Simulations to Vertical Resolution Cheng, Anning Langley Research Center Xu, Kuan-Man NASA Langley Research Center Category: Modeling This study investigates the effects of vertical resolution on the simulation of boundary-layer and deep convective clouds using a cloud resolving model (CRM). A CRM usually uses a vertical grid spacing less than 100 m to simulate boundary layer clouds such as shallow cumuli and

  14. Simulation of Post-Frontal Boundary Layers Observed During the ARM 2000 Cloud IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation of Post-Frontal Boundary Layers Observed During the ARM 2000 Cloud IOP D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma M. Poellot University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota Introduction Large-eddy simulation (LES) models have been widely employed in the study of radiatively forced cloud topped boundary layers (CTBL). These boundary layers are typically well mixed and characterized by a sharp jump

  15. Further development and testing of a second-order bulk boundary layer model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasner, R.D.

    1993-05-03

    A one-layer bulk boundary layer model is developed. The model predicts the mixed layer values of the potential temperature, mixing ratio, and u- and v-momentum. The model also predicts the depth of the boundary layer and the vertically integrated turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). The TKE is determined using a second-order closure that relates the rate of dissipation to the TKE. The fractional area covered by rising motion sigma and the entrainment rate (E) are diagnostically determined. The model is used to study the clear convective boundary layer (CBL) using data from the Wangara, Australia boundary layer experiment. The Wangara data is also used as an observation base to validate model results. A further study is accomplished by simulating the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over an ocean surface. This study is designed to find the steady-state solutions of the prognostic variable.

  16. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. ... University of Oklahoma Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Publication Date: ...

  17. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; McFarquhar, Greg; Ogren, John A.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Feingold, G.; Long, Charles N.; Jonsson, Haf; Bucholtz, Anthony; Collins, Donald R.; Diskin, G. S.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, Paul; Woods, Roy; Andrews, Elizabeth; Yang, Hee-Jung; Chiu, Christine J.; Hartsock, Daniel; Hubbe, John M.; Lo, Chaomei; Marshak, A.; Monroe, Justin; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami

    2012-06-30

    A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in-situ statistical characterization of boundary-layer clouds needed to investigate cloud processes and refine retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign operated over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site from 22 January to 30 June 2009, collecting 260 h of data during 59 research flights. A comprehensive payload aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft measured cloud microphysics, solar and thermal radiation, aerosol properties, and atmospheric state parameters. Proximity to the SGP's extensive complement of surface measurements provides ancillary data that supports modeling studies and enables evaluating a variety of surface retrieval algorithms. The five-month duration enabled sampling a range of conditions associated with the seasonal transition from winter to summer. Although about two-thirds of the cloud flights occurred in May and June, boundary-layer cloud fields were sampled under a variety of environmental and aerosol conditions, with about 75% of the flights occurring in cumulus and stratocumulus. Preliminary analyses show how these data are being used to analyze cloud-aerosol relationships, determine the aerosol sizes that are responsible for nucleating cloud drops, characterize the horizontal variability of the cloud radiative impacts, and evaluate air-borne and surface-based cloud property retrievals. We discuss how conducting an extended-term campaign requires a simplified operating paradigm that is different from that used for typical, short-term, intensive aircraft field programs.

  18. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  19. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; et al

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore » and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  20. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O’Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-03-01

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009-December 2010) 39 comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric 40 Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is 41 to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the 42 marine boundary layer. 43 Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the 44 Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and 45 cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus 46 occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar 47 echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-48 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide 49 range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of 50 sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way 51 interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation 52 and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. 53 The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety 54 of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they 55 reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, 56 but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to 57 be a long-term ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  1. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Zhou, Xiaoli 1 ; Kollias, Pavlos 1 ; Lewis, Ernie R. 2 + Show Author Affiliations McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences ...

  2. Applications of large-eddy simulation: Synthesis of neutral boundary layer models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohmstede, W.D.

    1987-12-01

    The object of this report is to describe progress made towards the application of large-eddy simulation (LES), in particular, to the study of the neutral boundary layer (NBL). The broad purpose of the study is to provide support to the LES project currently underway at LLNL. The specific purpose of this study is to lay the groundwork for the simulation of the SBL through the establishment and implementation of model criteria for the simulation of the NBL. The idealistic NBL is never observed in the atmosphere and therefore has little practical significance. However, it is of considerable theoretical interest for several reasons. The report discusses the concept of Rossby-number similarity theory as it applies to the NBL. A particular implementation of the concept is described. Then, the results from prior simulations of the NBL are summarized. Model design criteria for two versions of the Brost LES (BLES) model are discussed. The general guidelines for the development of Version 1 of the Brost model (BV1) were to implement the model with a minimum of modifications which would alter the design criteria as established by Brost. Two major modifications of BLES incorporated into BV1 pertain to the initialization/parameterization of the model and the generalization of the boundary conditions at the air/earth interface. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by space-based Lidar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, T.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, D.

    2015-12-03

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere and to the marine low cloud processes. This paper explores MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region with a new 4 year satellite-based dataset. The MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) was used to identify the MBL top (BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH). Results showed that MBL is generally decoupled with MLH / BLH ratio ranging from ? 0.5 to ? 0.8 and the MBL decoupling magnitude ismoremainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS) that affects the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops, which may relate to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in MBL, also show dependence on EIS. Further analysis indicated that the MBL shows similar decoupled structure for clear sky and cumulus cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.less

  4. Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics N. Kitova and M. A. Mikhalev Institute of Electronics Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Sofia 1784, Bulgaria K. Ivanova Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania M. Ausloos Institute of Physics University of Liège Liège, Belgium T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud dynamics is

  5. Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation

  6. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W.

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  7. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while

  8. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  9. Investigation of Rossby-number similarity in the neutral boundary layer using large-eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohmstede, W.D.; Cederwall, R.T.; Meyers, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    One special case of particular interest, especially to theoreticians, is the steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, autobarotropic (PLB), hereafter referred to as the neutral boundary layer (NBL). The NBL is in fact a 'rare' atmospheric phenomenon, generally associated with high-wind situations. Nevertheless, there is a disproportionate interest in this problem because Rossby-number similarity theory provides a sound approach for addressing this issue. Rossby-number similarity theory has rather wide acceptance, but because of the rarity of the 'true' NBL state, there remains an inadequate experimental database for quantifying constants associated with the Rossby-number similarity concept. Although it remains a controversial issue, it has been proposed that large-eddy simulation (LES) is an alternative to physical experimentation for obtaining basic atmospherc 'data'. The objective of the study reported here is to investigate Rossby-number similarity in the NBL using LES. Previous studies have not addressed Rossby-number similarity explicitly, although they made use of it in the interpretation of their results. The intent is to calculate several sets of NBL solutions that are ambiguous relative to the their respective Rossby numbers and compare the results for similarity, or the lack of it. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasing Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.

  11. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive coverage of low clouds over the subtropical eastern oceans greatly impacts the current climate. In addition, the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols is a major source of uncertainty, which thwarts accurate prediction of future climate change. Low clouds are poorly simulated in climate models, partly due to inadequate long-term simultaneous observations of their macrophysical and microphysical structure, radiative effects, and associated aerosol distribution in regions where their impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling, boundary layer turbulence, and precipitation (much of which evaporates before reaching the ocean surface and is closely connected to the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei). These couplings have been documented as a result of past field programs and model studies. However, extensive research is still required to achieve a quantitative understanding sufficient for developing parameterizations, which adequately predict aerosol indirect effects and low cloud response to climate perturbations. This is especially true of the interactions between clouds, aerosol, and precipitation. These processes take place in an ever-changing synoptic environment that can confound interpretation of short time period observations.

  12. Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; Li, Dan

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ricr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ricr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ricr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ricr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ricr increases. The influence of Ricr on surface air temperature and specific humidity is not significant. The increasingmore » Ricr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ricr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ricr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.« less

  13. Temporal variability of the trade wind inversion: Measured with a boundary layer vertical profiler. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindinger, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    This study uses Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) data, from the summer of 1991, to show a boundary layer wind profiler can be used to measure the trade wind inversion. An algorithm has been developed for the profiler that objectively measures the depth of the moist oceanic boundary layer. The Hilo inversion, measured by radiosonde, is highly correlated with the moist oceanic boundary layer measured by the profiler at Paradise Park. The inversion height on windward Hawaii is typically 2253 + or - 514 m. The inversion height varies not only on a daily basis, but on less than an hourly basis. It has a diurnal, as well as a three to four day cycle. There appears to be no consistent relationship between inversion height and precipitation. Currently, this profiler is capable of making high frequency (12 minute) measurements of the inversion base variation, as well as other features.

  14. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; Li, Zhijin; Xie, Shaocheng; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Zhang, Minghua; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, ?, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.

  15. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; Li, Zhijin; Xie, Shaocheng; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Zhang, Minghua; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.

  16. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functionsmore » for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.« less

  17. Direct Simulation of a Zero-pressure-gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer up

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Reθ = 6650 | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility a Zero-pressure-gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer up to Reθ = 6650 Authors: Sillero, J., Jiménez, J., Moser, R.D., Malaya, N.P A direct simulation of an incompressible zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate is performed in Reθ = 1100-6650 (Reτ ≈ 2025), matching the range of the available numerical channels. The logarithmic region and the separation of scales are clearly observed. Proper turbulent inflow

  18. Hybrid OpenMP-MPI Turbulent Boundary Layer Code Over 32k Cores | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility OpenMP-MPI Turbulent Boundary Layer Code Over 32k Cores Authors: Sillero, J., Borrell, G., Jimenez, J., Moser, RD A hybrid OpenMP-MPI code has been developed and optimized for Blue Gene/P in order to perform a direct numerical simulation of a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers. OpenMP is becoming the standard application programming interface for shared memory platforms, offering simplicity and portability. For architectures

  19. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only a relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.

  20. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore » relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  1. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  3. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Kollias, Pavlos; Lewis, Ernie R.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporated before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)

  4. Turbulent kinetics of a large wind farm and their impact in the neutral boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Na, Ji Sung; Koo, Eunmo; Munoz-Esparza, Domingo; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Linn, Rodman; Lee, Joon Sang

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution large-eddy simulation of the flow over a large wind farm (64 wind turbines) is performed using the HIGRAD/FIRETEC-WindBlade model, which is a high-performance computing wind turbine–atmosphere interaction model that uses the Lagrangian actuator line method to represent rotating turbine blades. These high-resolution large-eddy simulation results are used to parameterize the thrust and power coefficients that contain information about turbine interference effects within the wind farm. Those coefficients are then incorporated into the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model in order to evaluate interference effects in larger-scale models. In the high-resolution WindBlade wind farm simulation, insufficient distance between turbines creates the interference between turbines, including significant vertical variations in momentum and turbulent intensity. The characteristics of the wake are further investigated by analyzing the distribution of the vorticity and turbulent intensity. Quadrant analysis in the turbine and post-turbine areas reveals that the ejection motion induced by the presence of the wind turbines is dominant compared to that in the other quadrants, indicating that the sweep motion is increased at the location where strong wake recovery occurs. Regional-scale WRF simulations reveal that although the turbulent mixing induced by the wind farm is partly diffused to the upper region, there is no significant change in the boundary layer depth. The velocity deficit does not appear to be very sensitive to the local distribution of turbine coefficients. However, differences of about 5% on parameterized turbulent kinetic energy were found depending on the turbine coefficient distribution. Furthermore, turbine coefficients that consider interference in the wind farm should be used in wind farm parameterization for larger-scale models to better describe sub-grid scale turbulent processes.

  5. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Kollias, Pavlos; Lewis, Ernie R.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporatedmore » before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)« less

  6. Turbulent kinetics of a large wind farm and their impact in the neutral boundary layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Na, Ji Sung; Koo, Eunmo; Munoz-Esparza, Domingo; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Linn, Rodman; Lee, Joon Sang

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution large-eddy simulation of the flow over a large wind farm (64 wind turbines) is performed using the HIGRAD/FIRETEC-WindBlade model, which is a high-performance computing wind turbine–atmosphere interaction model that uses the Lagrangian actuator line method to represent rotating turbine blades. These high-resolution large-eddy simulation results are used to parameterize the thrust and power coefficients that contain information about turbine interference effects within the wind farm. Those coefficients are then incorporated into the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model in order to evaluate interference effects in larger-scale models. In the high-resolution WindBlade wind farm simulation, insufficient distance between turbines createsmore » the interference between turbines, including significant vertical variations in momentum and turbulent intensity. The characteristics of the wake are further investigated by analyzing the distribution of the vorticity and turbulent intensity. Quadrant analysis in the turbine and post-turbine areas reveals that the ejection motion induced by the presence of the wind turbines is dominant compared to that in the other quadrants, indicating that the sweep motion is increased at the location where strong wake recovery occurs. Regional-scale WRF simulations reveal that although the turbulent mixing induced by the wind farm is partly diffused to the upper region, there is no significant change in the boundary layer depth. The velocity deficit does not appear to be very sensitive to the local distribution of turbine coefficients. However, differences of about 5% on parameterized turbulent kinetic energy were found depending on the turbine coefficient distribution. Furthermore, turbine coefficients that consider interference in the wind farm should be used in wind farm parameterization for larger-scale models to better describe sub-grid scale turbulent processes.« less

  7. Retrieval of Urban Boundary Layer Structures from Doppler Lidar Data. Part I: Accuracy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Quanxin; Lin, Ching Long; Calhoun, Ron; Newsom, Rob K.

    2008-01-01

    Two coherent Doppler lidars from the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Arizona State University (ASU) were deployed in the Joint Urban 2003 atmospheric dispersion field experiment (JU2003) held in Oklahoma City. The dual lidar data are used to evaluate the accuracy of the four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) method and identify the coherent flow structures in the urban boundary layer. The objectives of the study are three-fold. The first objective is to examine the effect of eddy viscosity models on the quality of retrieved velocity data. The second objective is to determine the fidelity of single-lidar 4DVAR and evaluate the difference between single- and dual-lidar retrievals. The third objective is to correlate the retrieved flow structures with the ground building data. It is found that the approach of treating eddy viscosity as part of control variables yields better results than the approach of prescribing viscosity. The ARL single-lidar 4DVAR is able to retrieve radial velocity fields with an accuracy of 98% in the along-beam direction and 80-90% in the cross-beam direction. For the dual-lidar 4DVAR, the accuracy of retrieved radial velocity in the ARL cross-beam direction improves to 90-94%. By using the dual-lidar retrieved data as a reference, the single-lidar 4DVAR is able to recover fluctuating velocity fields with 70-80% accuracy in the along-beam direction and 60-70% accuracy in the cross-beam direction. Large-scale convective roll structures are found in the vicinity of downtown airpark and parks. Vortical structures are identified near the business district. Strong updrafts and downdrafts are also found above a cluster of restaurants.

  8. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, C.L.

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  9. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmore » under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m−2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m−2.« less

  10. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore » using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m-2.« less

  11. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  12. Highly mobile type II twin boundary in Ni-Mn-Ga five-layered martensite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sozinov, A.; Lanska, N.; Soroka, A.; Straka, L.

    2011-09-19

    Twin relationships and stress-induced reorientation were studied in Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.14}Ga{sub 0.86} single crystal with five-layered modulated martensite crystal structure. Very low twinning stress of about 0.1 MPa was found for twin boundaries which deviated a few degrees from the (011) crystallographic plane. However, twin boundaries oriented exactly parallel to the (011) plane exhibited considerably higher level of twinning stress, above 1 MPa. X-ray diffraction experiments and calculations based on approximation of the martensite crystal lattice as a tetragonal lattice with a slight monoclinic distortion identified the two different kinds of twin interfaces as type II and type I twin boundaries.

  13. Experimental investigation of sound generation by a protuberance in a laminar boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, M.; Asai, M.; Inasawa, A. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Sound radiation from a two-dimensional protuberance glued on the wall in a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally at low Mach numbers. When the protuberance was as high as the boundary-layer thickness, a feedback-loop mechanism set in between protuberance-generated sound and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves generated by the leading-edge receptivity to the upstream-propagating sound. Although occurrence of a separation bubble immediately upstream of the protuberance played important roles in the evolution of instability waves into vortices interacting with the protuberance, the frequency of tonal vortex sound was determined by the selective amplification of T-S waves in the linear instability stage upstream of the separation bubble and was not affected by the instability of the separation bubble.

  14. Problems of laminar-turbulent transition control in a boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, A.V.; Levchenko, V. I.; Tumin, A.M. Moscow Physical-Technical Institute, )

    1991-03-01

    The overview of laminar-turbulent transition control compares different methods of transition control for swept-wing streams. The types of unstable disturbances in boundary layer are listed, and flow stabilization is described in terms of small disturbances. The control of the transition zone is based on the description of background disturbances, their transition into instability waves, and their linear and nonlinear amplifications. Specific references cite the applications to Tollmien-Schlichting waves, crossflow instability near an aircraft's leading edge, and unstable disturbances in a boundary layer over a curved surface. Methods of active control or wave cancellation to deal with the problem are listed including localized periodic heating, the introduction of vibrations, or the use of suction-blowing. The results of the comparative overview are of interest to aircraft and other aerospace applications to reduce drag and improve fuel efficiency. 111 refs.

  15. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL

  16. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore » observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds

  17. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  18. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; et al

    2016-04-25

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle – an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotopemore » observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from –40.2 to –15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from –278.7 to –113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( > 25 mmol mol–1) indicate that regional

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Atmospheric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Modes of Drizzling Stratus at the ARM SGP Site Kollias, Pavlos RSMASUniversity of Miami Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami The representation of boundary layer clouds ...

  20. An enriched finite element model with q-refinement for radiative boundary layers in glass cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, M. Shadi; Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon; Laghrouche, Omar

    2014-02-01

    Radiative cooling in glass manufacturing is simulated using the partition of unity finite element method. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary simplified P{sub 1} approximation for the radiation in non-grey semitransparent media. To integrate the coupled equations in time we consider a linearly implicit scheme in the finite element framework. A class of hyperbolic enrichment functions is proposed to resolve boundary layers near the enclosure walls. Using an industrial electromagnetic spectrum, the proposed method shows an immense reduction in the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve a certain accuracy compared to the conventional h-version finite element method. Furthermore the method shows a stable behaviour in treating the boundary layers which is shown by studying the solution close to the domain boundaries. The time integration choice is essential to implement a q-refinement procedure introduced in the current study. The enrichment is refined with respect to the steepness of the solution gradient near the domain boundary in the first few time steps and is shown to lead to a further significant reduction on top of what is already achieved with the enrichment. The performance of the proposed method is analysed for glass annealing in two enclosures where the simplified P{sub 1} approximation solution with the partition of unity method, the conventional finite element method and the finite difference method are compared to each other and to the full radiative heat transfer as well as the canonical Rosseland model.

  1. Boundary layer modeling of reactive flow over a porous surface with angled injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shiling; Fotache, Catalin G.; Hautman, Donald J.; Ochs, Stuart S. [United Technologies Research Center, MS 129-29, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Chao, Beei-Huan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    An analytical model was developed to investigate the dynamics of nonpremixed flames in a shear layer established between a mainstream flow of fuel-rich combustion products and a porous surface with an angled injection of air. In the model, a one-step overall chemical reaction was employed, together with boundary layer conservation equations solved using similarity solutions. Parametric studies were performed to understand the effects of equivalence ratio, temperature, and mass flow rate of the fuel and air streams on the flame standoff distance, surface temperature, and heat flux at the surface. The analytical model predictions were compared with computational fluid dynamics results obtained using the FLUENT commercial code for both the laminar and the turbulent flow models. Qualitative agreement in surface temperature was observed. Finally, the flame stability limits predicted by the model were compared with available experimental data and found to agree qualitatively, as well. (author)

  2. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The wavesmore » grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.« less

  3. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The waves grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.

  4. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W.

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  5. Model of the boundary layer of a vacuum-arc magnetic filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Grondona, D.; Della Torre, H.; Kelly, H.

    2013-03-21

    A model is developed to describe the electrostatic boundary layer in a positively biased magnetic filter in filtered arcs with low collisionality. The set of equations used includes the electron momentum equation, with an anomalous collision term due to micro-instabilities leading to Bohm diffusion, electron mass conservation, and Poisson equation. Analytical solutions are obtained, valid for the regimes of interest, leading to an explicit expression to determine the electron density current to the filter wall as a function of the potential of the filter and the ratio of electron density at the plasma to that at the filter wall. Using a set of planar and cylindrical probes it is verified experimentally that the mentioned ratio of electron densities remains reasonably constant for different magnetic field values and probe bias, which allows to obtain a closed expression for the current. Comparisons are made with the experimentally determined current collected at different sections of a positively biased straight filter.

  6. Pulsed Plasma with Synchronous Boundary Voltage for Rapid Atomic Layer Etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2014-05-13

    Atomic Layer ETching (ALET) of a solid with monolayer precision is a critical requirement for advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current plasma etching techniques do not have the level of control or damage-free nature that is needed for patterning delicate sub-20 nm structures. In addition, conventional ALET, based on pulsed gases with long reactant adsorption and purging steps, is very slow. In this work, novel pulsed plasma methods with synchronous substrate and/or “boundary electrode” bias were developed for highly selective, rapid ALET. Pulsed plasma and tailored bias voltage waveforms provided controlled ion energy and narrow energy spread, which are critical for highly selective and damage-free etching. The broad goal of the project was to investigate the plasma science and engineering that will lead to rapid ALET with monolayer precision. A combined experimental-simulation study was employed to achieve this goal.

  7. Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAAs High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

  8. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude

  9. Mass spectrometers for studying the ionic and neutral composition of the upper layers of the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutov, M.D.

    1984-04-01

    The investigation of the ionic and neutral composition of the upper layers of the atmosphere and outer space which is of interest for solving theoretical and applied problems of astrophysics, geophysics, space biology, and other closely-tied areas of science is discussed. The upper layers of the atmosphere are of practical significance for launching rockets and artificial satellites, for which the nature of movement depends on the structure and composition of the atmosphere. The study of the chemical composition of the ionosphere, the degree of ionization of the upper layers of the atmosphere at different latitudes and different times of day, and the dependence of ionization on the action of ultraviolet and corpuscular radiation is necessary to study the processes of the propagation of radio waves, and to explain the chemical and photochemical reaction which cause the ionosphere to exist. The most modern methods of study the composition of the mass spectral method which is a direct method and is especially valuable at great altitudes to study the composition of the upper atmosphere is considered. The mass spectrometric method is the only one to analyze the composition of ionizing gases.

  10. Near-surface Density Currents Observed in the Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus-topped Marine Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, Matt C.; Yuter, S. E.; de Szoeke, S.; Brewer, W. A.; Miller, Matthew A.; Hall, Andrew M.; Burleyson, Casey D.

    2015-09-01

    Density currents (i.e. cold pools or outflows) beneath marine stratocumulus clouds are characterized using a 30-d data set of ship-based observations obtained during the 2008 Variability of American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) in the southeast Pacific. An objective method identifies 71 density current fronts using an air density criterion and isolates each density current’s core (peak density) and tail (dissipating) zone. Compared to front and core zones, most density current tails exhibited weaker density gradients and wind anomalies elongated about the axis of the mean wind. The mean cloud-level advection relative to the surface layer wind (1.9 m s-1) nearly matches the mean density current propagation speed (1.8 m s-1). The similarity in speeds allows drizzle cells to deposit tails in their wakes. Based on high-resolution scanning Doppler lidar data, prefrontal updrafts had a mean intensity of 0.91 m s-1, reached an average altitude of 800 m, and were often surmounted by low-lying shelf clouds not connected to the overlying stratocumulus cloud. Nearly 90% of density currents were identified when C-band radar estimated 30-km diameter areal average rain rates exceeded 1 mm d-1. Rather than peaking when rain rates are highest overnight, density current occurrence peaks between 0600 and 0800 local solar time when enhanced local drizzle co-occurs with shallow subcloud dry and stable layers. The dry layers may contribute to density current formation by enhancing subcloud evaporation of drizzle. Density currents preferentially occur in regions of open cells but also occur in regions of closed cells.

  11. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have

  12. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marxen, Olaf, E-mail: olaf.marxen@vki.ac.be [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States) [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States); Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chausse de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Gense (Belgium); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chausse de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Gense (Belgium)] [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chausse de Waterloo, 72, 1640 Rhode-St-Gense (Belgium); Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)] [Center for Turbulence Research, Building 500, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible NavierStokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This NavierStokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  13. An advective atmospheric mixed layer model for ocean modeling purposes: Global simulation of surface heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, jR., Benno Blumenthal, M.; Kushnir, Y.

    1995-08-01

    A simple model of the lowest layer of the atmosphere is developed for coupling to ocean models used to simulate sea surface temperature (SST). The model calculates the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat in terms of variables that an ocean model either calculates (SST) or is forced by (winds). It is designed to avoid the need to specify observed atmospheric data (other than surface winds), or the SST, in the surface flux calculations of ocean models and, hence, to allow a realistic representation of the feedbacks between SST and the fluxes. The modeled layer is considered to be either a dry convective layer or the subcloud layer that underlies marine clouds. The turbulent fluxes are determined through a balance of horizontal advection and diffusion, the surface flux and the flux at the mixed layer top, and, for temperature, radiative cooling. Reasonable simulations of the global distribution of latent and sensible heat flux are obtained. This includes the large fluxes that occur east of the Northern Hemisphere continents in winter that were found to be related to both diffusion (taken to be a parameterization of baroclinic eddies) and advection of cold, dry air from the continent. However, east of North America during winter the sensible heat flux is underestimated and, generally, the region of enhanced fluxes does not extend far enough east compared to observations. Reasons for these discrepancies are discussed and remedies suggested. 47 refs., 10 figs.

  14. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations. The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.

  15. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more » The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  16. Collaborative Research: ARM observations for the development and evaluation of models and parameterizations of cloudy boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Bruce,

    2013-07-12

    This is a collaborative project with Dr. Ping Zhu at Florida International University. It was designed to address key issues regarding the treatment of boundary layer cloud processes in climate models with UM’s research focusing on the analyses of ARM cloud radar observations from MMCR and WACR and FIU’s research focusing on numerical simulations of boundary layer clouds. This project capitalized on recent advancements in the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) processing and the development of the WACR (at the SGP) to provide high temporal and spatial resolution Doppler cloud radar measurements for characterizing in-cloud turbulence, large-eddy circulations, and high resolution cloud structures of direct relevance to high resolution numerical modeling studies. The principal focus of the observational component of this collaborative study during this funding period was on stratocumulus clouds over the SGP site and fair-weather cumuli over the Nauru site. The statistical descriptions of the vertical velocity structures in continental stratocumulus clouds and in the Nauru shallow cumuli that are part of this study represents the most comprehensive observations of the vertical velocities in boundary layer clouds to date and were done in collaboration with Drs. Virendra Ghate and Pavlos Kollias.

  17. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  18. DOE/SC-ARM-14-034 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TA Bonin S Mishra JF Newman M Carney DD Turner EP Jacobsen PB Chilson S Wharton CE ... TA Bonin S Mishra JF Newman M Carney DD Turner EP Jacobsen PB Chilson S Wharton CE ...

  19. Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results

  20. Characterization of particle cloud droplet activity and composition in the free troposphere and the boundary layer during INTEX-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Dunlea, E. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A. D.

    2010-07-20

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distributions, and submicron aerosol composition were made as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign during spring 2006. Measurements were conducted from an aircraft platform over the northeastern Pacific and western North America with a focus on how the transport and evolution of Asian pollution across the Pacific Ocean affected CCN properties. A broad range of air masses were sampled and here we focus on three distinct air mass types defined geographically: the Pacific free troposphere (FT), the marine boundary layer (MBL), and the polluted continental boundary layer in the California Central Valley (CCV). These observations add to the few observations of CCN in the FT. CCN concentrations showed a large range of concentrations between air masses, however CCN activity was similar for the MBL and CCV ({kappa} {approx} 0.2-0.25). FT air masses showed evidence of long-range transport from Asia and CCN activity was consistently higher than for the boundary layer air masses. Bulk chemical measurements predicted CCN activity reasonably well for the CCV and FT air masses. Decreasing trends in {kappa} with organic mass fraction were observed for the combination of the FT and CCV air masses and can be explained by the measured soluble inorganic chemical components. Changes in hygroscopicity associated with differences in the non-refractory organic composition were too small to be distinguished from the simultaneous changes in inorganic ion composition in the FT and MBL, although measurements for the large organic fractions (0.6-0.8) found in the CCV showed values of the organic fraction hygroscopicity consistent with other polluted regions ({kappa}{sub org} {approx} 0.1-0.2). A comparison of CCN-derived {kappa} (for particles at the critical diameter) to H-TDMA-derived {kappa} (for particles at 100 nm diameter) showed similar trends, however the CCN-derived {kappa

  1. Suppressed grain-boundary scattering in atomic layer deposited Nb:TiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Karppinen, Maarit; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Shigematsu, Kei; Sano, Masahito

    2015-11-09

    We have fabricated high-quality thin films of the transparent conducting anatase Nb:TiO{sub 2} on glass substrates through atomic layer deposition, and a subsequent reductive heat treatment of the as-deposited amorphous films. Hall-effect measurements and Drude-fitting of the Vis-NIR spectra indicate that for lightly doped films deposited at temperatures around 170 °C, grain boundary scattering becomes negligible and the mobility is predominately limited by phonon-electron scattering inherent to the anatase lattice and by impurities. Simultaneously, such lighter doping leads to reduced plasma absorption, thereby improving material's performance as a transparent conductor.

  2. TRANSPORT OF HEAT, WATER VAPOR AND CARBON DOXIDE BY LONG PERIOD EDDIES IN THE STABLE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurzeja, R.

    2010-07-26

    The vertical transport of heat and trace chemicals for a night in April has been studied with a wavelet analysis and conventional one-hour averages. It was found that for the night of April 20, 2009, turbulent kinetic energy, heat and trace chemicals were transported directed downward from the jet core. The most significant periods for this transport were less than 5 minutes and greater than one hour with intermittent transport taking place in the 5 min to 1 hour time frame. The nocturnal boundary layer is characterized by turbulent intermittency, long period oscillations, and a slow approach to equilibrium, (Mahrt, 1999). Although turbulence is usually maintained by surface friction, downward transport from low-level jets can also play an important role in turbulence maintenance and in the transport of scalars, Mahrt (1999), Banta et al. (2006). The eddy covariance flux measurement technique assumes continuous turbulence which is unusual in the stable boundary because significant flux transport occurs via turbulent eddies whose periods are long compared with the averaging time (Goulden et al., 1996). Systematic error in eddy flux measurements is attributed mainly to the neglect of long period eddies. Banta et al. (2006) noted that observations of turbulence below the low level jet suggested that while upward transport of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is common, downward transport from the jet can also occur. They found that in the CASES 99 experiments that turbulence scaled well with the strength of the low-level jet, and that surface cooling was more important than surface roughness. Because nocturnal turbulence is intermittent and non-stationary, the appropriate averaging time for calculation of TKE and EC fluxes is not obvious. Wavelet analysis is, thus, a more suitable analysis tool than conventional Fourier analysis.

  3. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert

    2013-05-31

    The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP‐MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

  4. Ellipsometry characterization of polycrystalline ZnO layers with the modeling of carrier concentration gradient: Effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sago, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Hideto; Iigusa, Hitoshi; Utsumi, Kentaro

    2014-04-07

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has been applied to study the effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture on the carrier transport properties of Al-doped ZnO layers fabricated by dc and rf magnetron sputtering. In the SE analysis, the variation in the free carrier absorption toward the growth direction, induced by the ZnO grain growth on foreign substrates, has been modeled explicitly by adopting a multilayer model in which the optical carrier concentration (N{sub opt}) varies continuously with a constant optical mobility (?{sub opt}). The effect of the grain boundary has been studied by comparing ?{sub opt} with Hall mobility (?{sub Hall}). The change in ?{sub Hall}/?{sub opt} indicates a sharp structural transition of the ZnO polycrystalline layer at a thickness of d???500?nm, which correlates very well with the structure confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In particular, below the transition thickness, the formation of the high density grain boundary leads to the reduction in the ?{sub Hall}/?{sub opt} ratio as well as N{sub opt}. As a result, we find that the thickness dependence of the carrier transport properties is almost completely governed by the grain boundary formation. On the other hand, when the ZnO layer is exposed to wet air at 85?C, ?{sub Hall} reduces drastically with a minor variation of ?{sub opt} due to the enhanced grain boundary scattering. We have also characterized textured ZnO:Al layers prepared by HCl wet etching by SE. The analysis revealed that the near-surface carrier concentration increases slightly after the etching. We demonstrate that the SE technique can be applied to distinguish various rough textured structures (size???1??m) of the ZnO layers prepared by the HCl etching.

  5. Boundary Layer Lubrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  6. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  7. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  8. Effect of radiation and magnetohydrodynamic free convection boundary layer flow on a solid sphere with Newtonian heating in a micropolar fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkasasbeh, Hamzeh Taha Sarif, Norhafizah Md Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Tahar, Razman Mat; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, the effect of radiation on magnetohydrodynamic free convection boundary layer flow on a solid sphere with Newtonian heating in a micropolar fluid, in which the heat transfer from the surface is proportional to the local surface temperature, is considered. The transformed boundary layer equations in the form of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme known as the Keller-box method. Numerical solutions are obtained for the local wall temperature and the local skin friction coefficient, as well as the velocity, angular velocity and temperature profiles. The features of the flow and heat transfer characteristics for various values of the Prandtl number Pr, micropolar parameter K, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter N{sub R}, the conjugate parameter γ and the coordinate running along the surface of the sphere, x are analyzed and discussed.

  9. Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate

  10. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF THE DWARF NOVA RU Peg IN QUIESCENCE: PROBE OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balman, Soelen; Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward M.; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Schlegel, Eric; Barrett, Paul E.; Szkody, Paula E-mail: patrick.godon@villanova.edu E-mail: juness@sciops.esa.int E-mail: barrett.paul@usno.navy.mil

    2011-11-10

    We present an analysis of X-ray and UV data obtained with the XMM-Newton Observatory of the long-period dwarf nova RU Peg. RU Peg contains a massive white dwarf (WD), possibly the hottest WD in a dwarf nova (DN), it has a low inclination, thus optimally exposing its X-ray emitting boundary layer (BL), and has an excellent trigonometric parallax distance. We modeled the X-ray data using XSPEC assuming a multi-temperature plasma emission model built from the MEKAL code (i.e., CEVMKL). We obtained a maximum temperature of 31.7 keV, based on the European Photon Imaging Camera MOS1, 2 and pn data, indicating that RU Peg has an X-ray spectrum harder than most DNe, except U Gem. This result is consistent with and indirectly confirms the large mass of the WD in RU Peg. The X-ray luminosity we computed corresponds to a BL luminosity for a mass accretion rate of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming M{sub wd} = 1.3 M{sub sun}), in agreement with the expected quiescent accretion rate. The modeling of the O VIII emission line at 19 A as observed by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer implies a projected stellar rotational velocity v{sub rot}sin i = 695 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the line is emitted from material rotating at {approx}936-1245 km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 34 Degree-Sign -48 Degree-Sign) or about 1/6 of the Keplerian speed; this velocity is much larger than the rotation speed of the WD inferred from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum. Cross-correletion analysis yielded an undelayed (time lag {approx} 0) component and a delayed component of 116 {+-} 17 s where the X-ray variations/fluctuations lagged the UV variations. This indicates that the UV fluctuations in the inner disk are propagated into the X-ray emitting region in about 116 s. The undelayed component may be related to irradiation effects.

  11. Reynolds number scaling of the influence of boundary layers on the global behavior of laboratory quasi-Keplerian flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edlund, E. M.; Ji, H.

    2015-10-06

    Here, we present fluid velocity measurements in a modified Taylor-Couette device operated in the quasi-Keplerian regime, where it is observed that nearly ideal flows exhibit self-similarity under scaling of the Reynolds number. In contrast, nonideal flows show progressive departure from ideal Couette as the Reynolds number is increased. We present a model that describes the observed departures from ideal Couette rotation as a function of the fluxes of angular momentum across the boundaries, capturing the dependence on Reynolds number and boundary conditions.

  12. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoye, Robert L. Z. E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L. E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; Muoz-Rojas, David; Nelson, Shelby F.; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  13. On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

  14. Interface boundary conditions for dynamic magnetization and spin wave dynamics in a ferromagnetic layer with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostylev, M.

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we derive the interface exchange boundary conditions for the classical linear dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic layers with the interface Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (IDMI). We show that IDMI leads to pinning of dynamic magnetization at the interface. An unusual peculiarity of the IDMI-based pinning is that its scales as the spin-wave wave number. We incorporate these boundary conditions into an existing numerical model for the dynamics of the Damon-Eshbach spin wave in ferromagnetic films. IDMI affects the dispersion and the frequency non-reciprocity of the travelling Damon-Eshbach spin wave. For a broad range of film thicknesses L and wave numbers, the results of the numerical simulations of the spin wave dispersion are in a good agreement with a simple analytical expression, which shows that the contribution of IDMI to the dispersion scales as 1/L, similarly to the effect of other types of interfacial anisotropy. Suggestions to experimentalists how to detect the presence of IDMI in a spin wave experiment are given.

  15. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  16. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the OpenFOAM-based Flow Solver of the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA): Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Sang, L.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver such that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with somepreliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simply set of hills.

  17. VARIATIONS OF SOLAR ELECTRON AND PROTON FLUX IN MAGNETIC CLOUD BOUNDARY LAYERS AND COMPARISONS WITH THOSE ACROSS THE SHOCKS AND IN THE RECONNECTION EXHAUSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Zuo, P. B.; Guo, J. P.; Xu, X. J.; Li, Z.

    2012-04-10

    The magnetic cloud boundary layer (BL) is a dynamic region formed by the interaction of the magnetic cloud (MC) and the ambient solar wind. In the present study, we comparatively investigate the proton and electron mean flux variations in the BL, in the interplanetary reconnection exhaust (RE), and across the MC-driven shock by using the Wind data from 1995 to 2006. In general, the proton flux has higher increments at lower energy bands compared with the ambient solar wind. Inside the BL, the core electron flux increases quasi-isotropically and the increments decrease monotonously with energy from {approx}30% (at 18 eV) to {approx}10% (at 70 eV); the suprathermal electron flux usually increases in either parallel or antiparallel direction; the correlation coefficient of electron flux variations in parallel and antiparallel directions changes sharply from {approx}0.8 below 70 eV to {approx}0 above 70 eV. Similar results are also found for RE. However, different phenomena are found across the shock where the electron flux variations first increase and then decrease with a peak increment (>200%) near 100 eV. The correlation coefficient of electron flux variations in parallel and antiparallel directions is always around 0.8. The similar behavior of flux variations in BL and RE suggests that reconnection may commonly occur in BL. Our work also implies that the strong energy dependence and direction selectivity of electron flux variations, which were previously thought to have not enough relevance to magnetic reconnection, could be considered as an important signature of solar wind reconnection in the statistical point of view.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J., ed

    1999-09-27

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.

  19. Pyramidal inversion domain boundaries revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remmele, T.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.; Fornari, R.; Strassburg, M.

    2011-10-03

    The structure of pyramidal inversion domain boundaries in GaN:Mg was investigated by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. The analysis shows the upper (0001) boundary to consist of a single Mg layer inserted between polarity inverted GaN layers in an abcab stacking. The Mg bound in these defects is at least one order of magnitude lower than the chemical Mg concentration. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements show that up to 27% of the Mg acceptors is electrically compensated.

  20. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  1. Data Assimilation J. S. Van Baelen(a) National Center for Atmospheric Research(b)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Van Baelen(a) National Center for Atmospheric Research(b) Boulder, CO 80307-3000 Introduction of wind profilers to provide accurate estimates of the momentum and heat fluxes might be their most important contribution yet to the field of atmospheric dynamic studies, especially when those measurements can be ingested into circulation models. In particular, flux measurements in the planetary boundary layer can provide critically needed information on the pel turbulent structures and their effect

  2. Stable Boundary Layer Education Field Campaign Summary

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (derived from the temperature) and water vapor mixing ratio retrieved from the AERI ... The other panels show time- height cross sections of potential temperature, water vapor ...

  3. BOUndary Plasma Turbulence

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-25

    BOUT is a parallelized 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code. The principal calculations are the boundary plasma turbulence in a realistic magnetic geometry. BOUT uses fluid Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density, electron and ion temperature and Parallel mementum. With sources added in the core-edge region and sinks in the scrape-off-layer (SOL), BOUT follows the self-consistent profile evolution together with turbulence. BOUT also includes coupling to a magnetohyfrodynamic equlibrium (EFIT package) and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic edgemore » transport model (UEDGE package).« less

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data sets, see below. Abstract Uncertainty in vertical mixing between the surface layer, boundary layer, and free troposphere leads to significant uncertainty in determining...

  5. Atmospheric Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced by ...

  6. Containment atmosphere response to external sprays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.; Almenas, K.

    1995-09-01

    The application of external sprays to a containment steel shell can be an effective energy removal method and has been proposed in the passive AP-600 design. Reduction of the steel shell temperature in contact with the containment atmosphere enhances both heat and mass transfer driving forces. Large scale experimental data in this area is scarce, therefore the measurements obtained from the E series tests conducted at the German HDR facility deserve special attention. These long term tests simulated various severe accident conditions, including external spraying of the hemispherical steel shell. This investigation focuses upon the integral response of the HDR containment atmosphere during spray periods and upon methods by which lumped parameter system codes, like CONTAIN, model the underlying condensation phenomena. Increases in spray water flowrates above a minimum value were ineffective at improving containment pressure reduction since the limiting resistance for energy transfer lies in the noncondensable-vapor boundary layer at the inner condensing surface. The spray created an unstable condition by cooling the upper layers of a heated atmosphere and thus inducing global natural circulation flows in the facility and subsequently, abrupt changes in lighter-than-air noncondensable (J{sub 2}/He) concentrations. Modeling results using the CONTAIN code are outlined and code limitations are delineated.

  7. Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties and Dynamical Processes at Two Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Si...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties and Dynamical Processes at Two Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites in the Tropical Western Pacific J. M. Comstock, J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Upper tropospheric humidity plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of tropical cirrus clouds. Deep convection is crucial for the transport of water vapor from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and is

  8. ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

    The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

  9. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  10. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  11. Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. ...

  12. Doppler lidar for measurement of atmospheric wind fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzies, R.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of wind fields in the earth's troposphere with daily global coverage is widely considered as a significant advance for forecasting and transport studies. For optimal use by NWP (Numerical Weather Prediction) models the horizontal and vertical resolutions should be approximately 100 km and 1 km, respectively. For boundary layer studies vertical resolution of a few hundred meters seems essential. Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar has a unique capability to measure global winds in the troposphere with the high vertical resolution required. The lidar approach depends on transmission of pulses with high spectral purity and backscattering from the atmospheric aerosol particles or layered clouds to provide a return signal. Recent field measurement campaigns using NASA research aircraft have resulted in collection of aerosol and cloud data which can be used to optimize the Doppler lidar instrument design and measurement strategy. 5 refs.

  13. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuidema, P; Chiu, C; Fairall, CW; Ghan, SJ; Kollias, P; McFarguhar, GM; Mechem, DB; Romps, DM; Wong, H; Yuter, SE; Alvarado, MJ; DeSzoeke, SP; Feingold, G; Haywood, JM; Lewis, ER; McComiskey, A; Redemann, J; Turner, DD; Wood, R; Zhu, P

    2015-12-01

    Southern Africa is the world’s largest emitter of biomass-burning (BB) aerosols. Their westward transport over the remote southeast Atlantic Ocean colocates some of the largest atmospheric loadings of absorbing aerosol with the least examined of the Earth’s major subtropical stratocumulus decks. Global aerosol model results highlight that the largest positive top-of-atmosphere forcing in the world occurs in the southeast Atlantic, but this region exhibits large differences in magnitude and sign between reputable models, in part because of high variability in the underlying model cloud distributions. Many uncertainties contribute to the highly variable model radiation fields: the aging of shortwave-absorbing aerosol during transport, how much of the aerosol mixes into the cloudy boundary layer, and how the low clouds adjust to smoke-radiation and smoke-cloud interactions. In addition, the ability of the BB aerosol to absorb shortwave radiation is known to vary seasonally as the fuel type on land changes.

  14. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with the Immersed Boundary Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with the immersed boundary method is an extension of the open-source WRF Model available for wwww.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the gridding procedure and boundary conditions in the WRF model to improve WRF's ability to simutate the atmosphere in environments with steep terrain and additionally at high-resolutions.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Availability: User Registration Required Language: English Subject: 54 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Global Climate Change; ARM Mobile Facility (AMF); Marine boundary layer clouds; ...

  16. Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersal 3.2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-06-26

    ERAD (Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersal) is a 3D numerical transport and diffusion model, used to model the consequences associated with the buoyant (or nonbuoyant) dispersal of radioactive material It incorporates an integral plume rise model to simulate the buoyant rise of heated gases following an explosive detonation. treating buoyancy effects from time zero onward, eliminating the need for the stabilized doud assumption, and enabling the penetration of inversions. Modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer usesmore » contemporary parameterization based on scaling theories derived from observational, laboratory and numerical studies. A Monte Carlo stochastic process simulates particle dispersion. Results were validated for both dose and deposition against measurements taken during Operation Roller Coaster (a joint US-UK test performed at NTS). Meteorology is defined using a single vertical sounding containing wind speed and direction and temperature as a function of height. Post processing applies 50-year CEDE DCFs (either ICRP 26 or 60) to determine the contribution of the relevant dose pathways (inhalation, submersion, and ground shine) as well as the total dose received. Dose and deposition contours are overlaid on a fully integrated worldwide GIS and tabulates hearth effects (fatalities and casualties) to resident population. The software runs on a laptop and takes less than 2 minutes to process. The Municipal version of ERAD does not include the ability to model the mitigation effects of aqueous foam.« less

  17. Improved Meteorological Input for Atmospheric Release Decision support Systems and an Integrated LES Modeling System for Atmospheric Dispersion of Toxic Agents: Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, E; Simpson, M; Larsen, S; Gash, J; Aluzzi, F; Lundquist, J; Sugiyama, G

    2010-04-26

    When hazardous material is accidently or intentionally released into the atmosphere, emergency response organizations look to decision support systems (DSSs) to translate contaminant information provided by atmospheric models into effective decisions to protect the public and emergency responders and to mitigate subsequent consequences. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)-led Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC) is one of the primary DSSs utilized by emergency management organizations. IMAAC is responsible for providing 'a single piont for the coordination and dissemination of Federal dispersion modeling and hazard prediction products that represent the Federal position' during actual or potential incidents under the National Response Plan. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), locatec at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), serves as the primary operations center of the IMAAC. A key component of atmospheric release decision support systems is meteorological information - models and data of winds, turbulence, and other atmospheric boundary-layer parameters. The accuracy of contaminant predictions is strongly dependent on the quality of this information. Therefore, the effectiveness of DSSs can be enhanced by improving the meteorological options available to drive atmospheric transport and fate models. The overall goal of this project was to develop and evaluate new meteorological modeling capabilities for DSSs based on the use of NASA Earth-science data sets in order to enhance the atmospheric-hazard information provided to emergency managers and responders. The final report describes the LLNL contributions to this multi-institutional effort. LLNL developed an approach to utilize NCAR meteorological predictions using NASA MODIS data for the New York City (NYC) region and demonstrated the potential impact of the use of different data sources and data parameterizations on

  18. Development of an Immersed Boundary Method to Resolve Complex Terrain in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2007-09-04

    Flow and dispersion processes in urban areas are profoundly influenced by the presence of buildings which divert mean flow, affect surface heating and cooling, and alter the structure of turbulence in the lower atmosphere. Accurate prediction of velocity, temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy fields are necessary for determining the transport and dispersion of scalars. Correct predictions of scalar concentrations are vital in densely populated urban areas where they are used to aid in emergency response planning for accidental or intentional releases of hazardous substances. Traditionally, urban flow simulations have been performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes which can accommodate the geometric complexity inherent to urban landscapes. In these types of models the grid is aligned with the solid boundaries, and the boundary conditions are applied to the computational nodes coincident with the surface. If the CFD code uses a structured curvilinear mesh, then time-consuming manual manipulation is needed to ensure that the mesh conforms to the solid boundaries while minimizing skewness. If the CFD code uses an unstructured grid, then the solver cannot be optimized for the underlying data structure which takes an irregular form. Unstructured solvers are therefore often slower and more memory intensive than their structured counterparts. Additionally, urban-scale CFD models are often forced at lateral boundaries with idealized flow, neglecting dynamic forcing due to synoptic scale weather patterns. These CFD codes solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and include limited options for representing atmospheric processes such as surface fluxes and moisture. Traditional CFD codes therefore posses several drawbacks, due to the expense of either creating the grid or solving the resulting algebraic system of equations, and due to the idealized boundary conditions and the lack of full atmospheric physics. Meso-scale atmospheric boundary layer

  19. APIVT-Grown Silicon Thin Layers and PV Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T. H.; Ciszek, T. F.; Page, M. R.; Bauer, R. E.; Wang, Q.; Landry, M. D.

    2002-05-01

    Large-grained (5-20 ..mu..m) polycrystalline silicon layers have been grown at intermediate temperatures of 750-950C directly on foreign substrates without a seeding layer by iodine vapor transport at atmospheric pressure with rates as high as 3 mm/min. A model is constructed to explain the atypical temperature dependence of growth rate. We have also used this technique to grow high-quality epitaxial layers on heavily doped CZ-Si and on upgraded MG-Si substrates. Possible solar cell structures of thin-layer polycrystalline silicon on foreign substrates with light trapping have been examined, compared, and optimized by two-dimensional device simulations. The effects of grain boundary re-combination on device performance are presented for two grain sizes of 2 and 20 mm. We found that 104 cm/s recombination velocity is adequate for 20-m m grain-sized thin silicon, whereas a very low recombination velocity of 103 cm/s must be accomplished in order to achieve reasonable performance for a 2- mm grain-sized polycrystalline silicon device.

  20. Optimized capping layers for EUV multilayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bajt, Sasa; Folta, James A.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    2004-08-24

    A new capping multilayer structure for EUV-reflective Mo/Si multilayers consists of two layers: A top layer that protects the multilayer structure from the environment and a bottom layer that acts as a diffusion barrier between the top layer and the structure beneath. One embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of B.sub.4 C. Another embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of Mo. These embodiments have the additional advantage that the reflectivity is also enhanced. Ru has the best oxidation resistance of all materials investigated so far. B.sub.4 C is an excellent barrier against silicide formation while the silicide layer formed at the Si boundary is well controlled.

  1. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Klein, P. ; Bonin, T. A. ; Newman, J. F. ; Turner, D. D. ; Chilson, P. B. ; Wainwright, C. E. ; Blumberg, W. G. ; Mishra, S. ; Carney, M. ; Jacobsen, E. P. ; Wharton, ...

  2. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and ... cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g ...

  3. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facility AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths CLOWD Optical Radiative ... droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the ...

  4. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to ...

  5. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These couplings have been documented as a result of past field programs and model studies. However, extensive research is still required to achieve a quantitative understanding ...

  6. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative ... SURFACES; THERMAL RADIATION; USA; WATER RACORO Extended-Term; Aircraft ...

  7. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  8. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States) UCLA Joint Institute for Regional Earth System ...

  9. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies (GISS), New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States) ...

  10. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  11. Posters Triggering of Boundary Layer Cumulus Clouds Over a Heterogeneo...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distribution, and the parameters can be objectively determined with a relatively straightforward maximum-likelihood statistical fitting method. For the whole grid-cell domain,...

  12. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Stemmler, Jayson ; de Szoeke, Simone ; Yuter, Sandra ; Miller, Matthew ; Mechem, David ; Tselioudis, George ; Chiu, J. Christine ; Mann, Julian A. L. ; O'Connor, Ewan J. ; ...

  13. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jayson 1 ; deSzoeke, S. 5 ; Yuter, Sandra 6 ; Miller, Matthew 6 ; Mechem, David 7 ; Tselioudis, George 3 ; Chiu, Christine 8 ; Mann, Julia 8 ; O Connor, ...

  14. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Boundary-Layer Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The profiler was operated in Doppler beam swinging (DBS) mode while also processing the signal using interferometry . Radiosondes were launched from both the central facility and ...

  15. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso- to planetary-scale. Mechanics, parameterization, and variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Small, Justin

    2015-12-01

    Most climate models are currently run with grid spacings of around 100km, which, with today’s computing power, allows for long (up to 1000 year) simulations, or ensembles of simulations to explore climate change and variability. However this grid spacing does not resolve important components of the weather/climate system such as atmospheric fronts and mesoscale systems, and ocean boundary currents and eddies. The overall aim of this project has been to look at the effect of these small-scale features on the weather/climate system using a suite of high and low resolution climate models, idealized models and observations. High-resolution global coupled integrations using CAM/CESM were carried out at NCAR by the lead PI. At TAMU, we have complemented the work at NCAR by analyzing datasets from the high-resolution (28km) CESM integrations (Small et al., 2014) as well as very high resolution (9km, 3km) runs using a coupled regional climate (CRCM) carried out locally. The main tasks carried out were: 1. Analysis of surface wind in observations and high-resolution CAM/CCSM simulations 2. Development of a feature-tracking algorithm for studying midlatitude air-sea interaction by following oceanic mesoscale eddies and creating composites of the atmospheric response overlying the eddies. 3. Applying the Lagrangian analysis technique in the Gulf Stream region to compare data from observational reanalyses, global CESM coupled simulations, 9km regional coupled simulations and 3km convection-resolving regional coupled simulations. Our main findings are that oceanic mesoscale eddies influence not just the atmospheric boundary layer above them, but also the lower portions of the free troposphere above the boundary layer. Such a vertical response could have implications for a remote influence of Gulf Stream oceanic eddies on North Atlantic weather patterns through modulation of the storm track, similar to what has been noted in the North Pacific. The coarse resolution

  16. Overview of the first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment: Conversion of a ground-based lidar for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.N.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    The first Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) field experiment demonstrated an airborne high energy TEA CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar system for measurement of atmospheric wind fields and aerosol structure. The system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 during September 1995 in a series of checkout flights to observe several important atmospheric phenomena, including upper level winds in a Pacific hurricane, marine boundary layer winds, cirrus cloud properties, and land-sea breeze structure. The instrument, with its capability to measure three-dimensional winds and backscatter fields, promises to be a valuable tool for climate and global change, severe weather, and air quality research. In this paper, the authors describe the airborne instrument, assess its performance, discuss future improvements, and show some preliminary results from September experiments.

  17. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  18. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  19. Atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI): Status and the aerosol explanation for extra window region emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revercomb, H.E.; Knuteson, R.O.; Best, F.A.; Dirkx, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    High spectral resolution observations of downwelling emission from 3 to 19 microns have been made by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Prototype at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiative Testbed (CART) site for over two years. The spectral data set from AERI provides a basis for improving clear sky radiative transfer; determining the radiative impact of clouds, including the derivation of cloud radiative properties; defining the influences of aerosols in the window regions; and retrieving boundary layer state properties, including temperature, water vapor, and other trace gases. The data stream of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated radiances is routinely provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to those science teams requesting it, and further information on the instrument and data characteristics is available in the ARM Science Team proceedings for 1993 and 1994 and in several conference publications. This paper describes the AERI status, calibration, field experiment wit a new AERI-01 and schedule, window region emissions, and future AERI plans.

  20. Unforced, Forced and Resonance-Forced Waves in a Spherical Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, Curt

    2015-10-27

    This technical report discusses a longstanding issue of atmospheric tides in weather-prediction and general circulation models (GCMs). Tidal signatures consistent with observations have appeared in the surface pressure output of GCMs since their inception (Hardy 1968, Hunt and Manabe 1968). Such models, however, are sufficiently complicated that the possibility of “getting the right answer for the wrong reasons” arises. Lindzen et al. (1968, hereafter LBK) showed that wave reflection at the upper boundary of a GCM can artificially enhance the tides. Covey et al. (2011, 2014) found that tidal output from a number of modern GCMs is surprisingly independent of their forcing. This finding is consistent with earlier suggestions that a compensating effect occurs in some models: lowering the model top reduces the forcing (solar heating of the ozone layer) but also enhances spurious wave reflection (Zwiers and Hamilton 1986, Hamilton et al. 2008).

  1. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  2. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  3. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  4. DOE Workshop; Pan-Gass Conference on the Representation of Atmospheric Processes in Weather and Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, PI Hugh

    2012-09-21

    This is the first meeting of the whole new GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) Atmospheric System Study (GASS) project that has been formed from the merger of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Project and the GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS). As such, this meeting will play a major role in energizing GEWEX work in the area of atmospheric parameterizations of clouds, convection, stable boundary layers, and aerosol-cloud interactions for the numerical models used for weather and climate projections at both global and regional scales. The representation of these processes in models is crucial to GEWEX goals of improved prediction of the energy and water cycles at both weather and climate timescales. This proposal seeks funds to be used to cover incidental and travel expenses for U.S.-based graduate students and early career scientists (i.e., within 5 years of receiving their highest degree). We anticipate using DOE funding to support 5-10 people. We will advertise the availability of these funds by providing a box to check for interested participants on the online workshop registration form. We will also send a note to our participants' mailing lists reminding them that the funds are available and asking senior scientists to encourage their more junior colleagues to participate. All meeting participants are encouraged to submit abstracts for oral or poster presentations. The science organizing committee (see below) will base funding decisions on the relevance and quality of these abstracts, with preference given to under-represented populations (especially women and minorities) and to early career scientists being actively mentored at the meeting (e.g. students or postdocs attending the meeting with their advisor).

  5. A moist aquaplanet variant of the Held–Suarez test for atmospheric model dynamical cores

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thatcher, Diana R.; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2016-04-04

    A moist idealized test case (MITC) for atmospheric model dynamical cores is presented. The MITC is based on the Held–Suarez (HS) test that was developed for dry simulations on “a flat Earth” and replaces the full physical parameterization package with a Newtonian temperature relaxation and Rayleigh damping of the low-level winds. This new variant of the HS test includes moisture and thereby sheds light on the nonlinear dynamics–physics moisture feedbacks without the complexity of full-physics parameterization packages. In particular, it adds simplified moist processes to the HS forcing to model large-scale condensation, boundary-layer mixing, and the exchange of latent and sensible heat betweenmore » the atmospheric surface and an ocean-covered planet. Using a variety of dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), this paper demonstrates that the inclusion of the moist idealized physics package leads to climatic states that closely resemble aquaplanet simulations with complex physical parameterizations. This establishes that the MITC approach generates reasonable atmospheric circulations and can be used for a broad range of scientific investigations. This paper provides examples of two application areas. First, the test case reveals the characteristics of the physics–dynamics coupling technique and reproduces coupling issues seen in full-physics simulations. In particular, it is shown that sudden adjustments of the prognostic fields due to moist physics tendencies can trigger undesirable large-scale gravity waves, which can be remedied by a more gradual application of the physical forcing. Second, the moist idealized test case can be used to intercompare dynamical cores. These examples demonstrate the versatility of the MITC approach and suggestions are made for further application areas. The new moist variant of the HS test can be considered a test case of intermediate complexity.« less

  6. A moist aquaplanet variant of the Held–Suarez test for atmospheric model dynamical cores

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thatcher, Diana R.; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2016-04-04

    A moist idealized test case (MITC) for atmospheric model dynamical cores is presented. The MITC is based on the Held–Suarez (HS) test that was developed for dry simulations on “a flat Earth” and replaces the full physical parameterization package with a Newtonian temperature relaxation and Rayleigh damping of the low-level winds. This new variant of the HS test includes moisture and thereby sheds light on the nonlinear dynamics–physics moisture feedbacks without the complexity of full-physics parameterization packages. In particular, it adds simplified moist processes to the HS forcing to model large-scale condensation, boundary-layer mixing, and the exchange of latent and sensible heat betweenmore » the atmospheric surface and an ocean-covered planet. Using a variety of dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), this paper demonstrates that the inclusion of the moist idealized physics package leads to climatic states that closely resemble aquaplanet simulations with complex physical parameterizations. This establishes that the MITC approach generates reasonable atmospheric circulations and can be used for a broad range of scientific investigations. This paper provides examples of two application areas. First, the test case reveals the characteristics of the physics–dynamics coupling technique and reproduces coupling issues seen in full-physics simulations. In particular, it is shown that sudden adjustments of the prognostic fields due to moist physics tendencies can trigger undesirable large-scale gravity waves, which can be remedied by a more gradual application of the physical forcing. Second, the moist idealized test case can be used to intercompare dynamical cores. These examples demonstrate the versatility of the MITC approach and suggestions are made for further application areas. Furthermore, the new moist variant of the HS test can be considered a test case of intermediate

  7. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso-to planetary-scale. Mechanisms, parameterization, and variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small, Richard; Bryan, Frank; Tribbia, Joseph; Park, Sungsu; Dennis, John; Saravanan, R.; Schneider, Niklas; Kwon, Young-Oh

    2015-06-11

    This project aims to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving ocean mesoscale activity and the corresponding response in the atmosphere. The main computational objectives are; i) to perform and assess Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations with the new Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) spectral element dynamical core; ii) use static mesh refinement to focus on oceanic fronts; iii) develop a new Earth System Modeling tool to investigate the atmospheric response to fronts by selectively filtering surface flux fields in the CESM coupler. The climate research objectives are 1) to improve the coupling of ocean fronts and the atmospheric boundary layer via investigations of dependency on model resolution and stability functions: 2) to understand and simulate the ensuing tropospheric response that has recently been documented in observations: and 3) to investigate the relationship of ocean frontal variability to low frequency climate variability and the accompanying storm tracks and extremes in high resolution simulations. This is a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of computational scientists, climate scientists and climate model developers. It specifically aims at DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  8. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  9. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  10. Evaluation of Mesoscale Atmospheric Model for Contrail Cirrus Simulations |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility of contrail-to-cirrus transition (INCITE 2012). Snapshot of potential temperature fluctuation in a turbulent atmosphere. The horizontal layers are due to atmospheric stratification. Flight altitude corresponds to Z=3000 m, the contrail extends vertically from Z=3000 to Z=25000 m. Evaluation of Mesoscale Atmospheric Model for Contrail Cirrus Simulations PI Name: Roberto Paoli PI Email: paoli@cerfacs.fr Institution: CERFACS Allocation Program: INCITE

  11. Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between

  12. ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Atmospheric Heat Budget shows where the atmospheric heat energy comes from and where it goes. Practically all this energy ultimately comes from the sun in the form of the ...

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan -

  14. A moist aquaplanet variant of the HeldSuarez test for atmospheric model dynamical cores

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thatcher, D. R.; Jablonowski, C.

    2015-09-29

    A moist idealized test case (MITC) for atmospheric model dynamical cores is presented. The MITC is based on the HeldSuarez (HS) test that was developed for dry simulations on a flat Earth and replaces the full physical parameterization package with a Newtonian temperature relaxation and Rayleigh damping of the low-level winds. This new variant of the HS test includes moisture and thereby sheds light on the non-linear dynamics-physics moisture feedbacks without the complexity of full physics parameterization packages. In particular, it adds simplified moist processes to the HS forcing to model large-scale condensation, boundary layer mixing, and the exchange ofmorelatent and sensible heat between the atmospheric surface and an ocean-covered planet. Using a variety of dynamical cores of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), this paper demonstrates that the inclusion of the moist idealized physics package leads to climatic states that closely resemble aquaplanet simulations with complex physical parameterizations. This establishes that the MITC approach generates reasonable atmospheric circulations and can be used for a broad range of scientific investigations. This paper provides examples of two application areas. First, the test case reveals the characteristics of the physics-dynamics coupling technique and reproduces coupling issues seen in full-physics simulations. In particular, it is shown that sudden adjustments of the prognostic fields due to moist physics tendencies can trigger undesirable large-scale gravity waves, which can be remedied by a more gradual application of the physical forcing. Second, the moist idealized test case can be used to intercompare dynamical cores. These examples demonstrate the versatility of the MITC approach and suggestions are made for further application areas. The new moist variant of the HS test can be considered a test case of intermediate complexity.less

  15. Improvement of Moist and Radiative Processes in Highly Parallel Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Validation and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, William M.; Hack, James J.; Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

    1997-02-24

    Research on designing an integrated moist process parameterization package was carried. This work began with a study that coupled an ensemble of cloud models to a boundary layer model to examine the feasibility of such a methodology for linking boundary layer and cumulus parameterization schemes. The approach proved feasible, prompting research to design and evaluate a coupled parameterization package for GCMS. This research contributed to the development of an Integrated Cumulus Ensemble-Turbulence (ICET) parameterization package. This package incorporates a higher-order turbulence boundary layer that feeds information concerning updraft properties and the variances of temperature and water vapor to the cloud parameterizations. The cumulus ensemble model has been developed, and initial sensitivity tests have been performed in the single column model (SCM) version of CCM2. It is currently being coupled to a convective wake/gust front model. The major function of the convective wake/gust front model is to simulate the partitioning of the boundary layer into disturbed and undisturbed regions. A second function of this model is to predict the nonlinear enhancement of surface to air sensible heat and moisture fluxes that occur in convective regimes due to correlations between winds and anomalously cold, dry air from downdrafts in the gust front region. The third function of the convective wake/gust front model is to predict the amount of undisturbed boundary layer air lifted by the leading edge of the wake and the height to which this air is lifted. The development of the wake/gust front model has been completed, and it has done well in initial testing as a stand-alone component. The current task, to be completed by the end of the funding period, is to tie the wake model to a cumulus ensemble model and to install both components into the single column model version of CCM3 for evaluation. Another area of parametrization research has been focused on the representation

  16. Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is an atmospheric general circulation model that solves equations for atmospheric dynamics and physics. CAM is an outgrowth of the Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and was developed as a joint collaborative effort between NCAR and several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. CAM contains several alternative approaches for advancing the atmospheric dynamics. One of these approaches uses a finite-volume method originally developed by personnel atmore » NASNGSFC, We have developed a scalable version of the finite-volume solver for massively parallel computing systems. FV-CAM is meant to be used in conjunction with the Community Atmosphere Model. It is not stand-alone.« less

  17. A New Ensemble of Perturbed-Input-Parameter Simulations by the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Brandon, S; Bremer, P T; Domyancis, D; Garaizar, X; Johannesson, G; Klein, R; Klein, S A; Lucas, D D; Tannahill, J; Zhang, Y

    2011-10-27

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is a fundamental challenge in the numerical simulation of Earth's weather and climate, and other complex systems. It entails much more than attaching defensible error bars to predictions: in particular it includes assessing low-probability but high-consequence events. To achieve these goals with models containing a large number of uncertain input parameters, structural uncertainties, etc., raw computational power is needed. An automated, self-adapting search of the possible model configurations is also useful. Our UQ initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced the most extensive set to date of simulations from the US Community Atmosphere Model. We are examining output from about 3,000 twelve-year climate simulations generated with a specialized UQ software framework, and assessing the model's accuracy as a function of 21 to 28 uncertain input parameter values. Most of the input parameters we vary are related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other sub-grid scale processes. Our simulations prescribe surface boundary conditions (sea surface temperatures and sea ice amounts) to match recent observations. Fully searching this 21+ dimensional space is impossible, but sensitivity and ranking algorithms can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination. Bayesian statistical constraints, employing a variety of climate observations as metrics, also seem promising. Observational constraints will be important in the next step of our project, which will compute sea surface temperatures and sea ice interactively, and will study climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  18. Atmosphere to Electrons

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Wind Forecast Improvement Project The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) is a public private partnership consortium including DOE, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...

  19. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25

    This report examines the complex interactions between atmospheric stability and turbine-induced wakes on downwind turbine wind speed and power production at a West Coast North American multi-MW wind farm. Wakes are generated when the upwind flow field is distorted by the mechanical movement of the wind turbine blades. This has two consequences for downwind turbines: (1) the downwind turbine encounters wind flows with reduced velocity and (2) the downwind turbine encounters increased turbulence across multiple length scales via mechanical turbulence production by the upwind turbine. This increase in turbulence on top of ambient levels may increase aerodynamic fatigue loads on the blades and reduce the lifetime of turbine component parts. Furthermore, ambient atmospheric conditions, including atmospheric stability, i.e., thermal stratification in the lower boundary layer, play an important role in wake dissipation. Higher levels of ambient turbulence (i.e., a convective or unstable boundary layer) lead to higher turbulent mixing in the wake and a faster recovery in the velocity flow field downwind of a turbine. Lower levels of ambient turbulence, as in a stable boundary layer, will lead to more persistent wakes. The wake of a wind turbine can be divided into two regions: the near wake and far wake, as illustrated in Figure 1. The near wake is formed when the turbine structure alters the shape of the flow field and usually persists one rotor diameter (D) downstream. The difference between the air inside and outside of the near wake results in a shear layer. This shear layer thickens as it moves downstream and forms turbulent eddies of multiple length scales. As the wake travels downstream, it expands depending on the level of ambient turbulence and meanders (i.e., travels in non-uniform path). Schepers estimates that the wake is fully expanded at a distance of 2.25 D and the far wake region begins at 2-5 D downstream. The actual distance traveled before the wake

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turbulent transport of heat and moisture in the atmospheric boundary layer. The observational results are then used to evaluate the boundary layer parameterization in the...

  1. Photovoltaic devices comprising zinc stannate buffer layer and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xuanzhi; Sheldon, Peter; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    A photovoltaic device has a buffer layer zinc stannate Zn.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 disposed between the semiconductor junction structure and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer to prevent formation of localized junctions with the TCO through a thin window semiconductor layer, to prevent shunting through etched grain boundaries of semiconductors, and to relieve stresses and improve adhesion between these layers.

  2. Photonic layered media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  3. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  4. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G.

    2008-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  5. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  6. Plasma Boundary Colloquium.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excitement at the Plasma Boundary Rob Goldston (with help from many) Fusion Plasma Physics is as Easy as 1-2-3 3)Manage the heat outflux 2)Hold onto the heat & amplify it by fusion 1)Inject heat into plasma Inject Heat into Plasma We put 40 MW of neutral beams into TFTR. Heating was ~ classical, with some *AE's, fishbones, etc. ITER needs ~ 2x more heating. Projections pretty reliable with multiple types of heating systems planned. Mike Williams Hold onto the heat... Empirical scaling

  7. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  8. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  9. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  10. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  11. Simulating atmosphere flow for wind energy applications with WRF-LES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D; Chow, F K; Kosovic, B; Lundquist, K A

    2008-01-14

    Forecasts of available wind energy resources at high spatial resolution enable users to site wind turbines in optimal locations, to forecast available resources for integration into power grids, to schedule maintenance on wind energy facilities, and to define design criteria for next-generation turbines. This array of research needs implies that an appropriate forecasting tool must be able to account for mesoscale processes like frontal passages, surface-atmosphere interactions inducing local-scale circulations, and the microscale effects of atmospheric stability such as breaking Kelvin-Helmholtz billows. This range of scales and processes demands a mesoscale model with large-eddy simulation (LES) capabilities which can also account for varying atmospheric stability. Numerical weather prediction models, such as the Weather and Research Forecasting model (WRF), excel at predicting synoptic and mesoscale phenomena. With grid spacings of less than 1 km (as is often required for wind energy applications), however, the limits of WRF's subfilter scale (SFS) turbulence parameterizations are exposed, and fundamental problems arise, associated with modeling the scales of motion between those which LES can represent and those for which large-scale PBL parameterizations apply. To address these issues, we have implemented significant modifications to the ARW core of the Weather Research and Forecasting model, including the Nonlinear Backscatter model with Anisotropy (NBA) SFS model following Kosovic (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005).We are also modifying WRF's terrain-following coordinate system by implementing an immersed boundary method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of complex terrain. Companion papers presenting idealized simulations with NBA-RSFS-WRF (Mirocha et al.) and IBM-WRF (K. A. Lundquist et al.) are also presented. Observations of flow

  12. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  13. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  14. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  15. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan Southern Africa is the world's largest emitter of biomass-burning (BB) aerosols. Their westward transport over the remote southeast Atlantic Ocean colocates some of the largest atmospheric loadings of absorbing aerosol with the least examined of the Earth's major subtropical

  16. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tooman, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  17. PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, ...

  18. Compliant layer chucking surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Spence, Paul A.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  19. Environmental boundaries to energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trivelpiece, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Public concern about the environment, health and safety consequences of energy technology has been growing steadily for more than two decades in the United States. This concern forms an important boundary condition as the United States seeks to develop a new National Energy Strategy. Furthermore, the international aspects of the energy/environment interface such as acid rain global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion are very prominent in US thinking. In fact, the energy systems of the world are becoming more closely coupled environmentally and otherwise. Now where is this coupling more important than that between the industrialized and developing world; the choices made by each will have profound effects on the other. The development of energy technologies compatible with both economic growth and improving and sustaining environmental quality represents a major R D challenge to the US and USSR. Decision about adoption of new technology and R D priorities can be improved by better measurements of how energy sources and uses are changing throughout the world and better methods to project the potential consequences of these decisions. Such projection require understanding relative risks of alternating existing and evolving technologies. All of these R D areas, technology improvement energy system monitoring and projection and comparative risk assessment are the topics of this seminar. Progress in each may be enhanced by collaboration and cooperation between our two countries. 7 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  1. Boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkilev, V. P.

    2013-04-15

    The boundary conditions for the subdiffusion equations are formulated using the continuous-time random walk model, as well as several versions of the random walk model on an irregular lattice. It is shown that the boundary conditions for the same equation in different models have different forms, and this difference considerably affects the solutions of this equation.

  2. Cloud Classes and Radiative Heating profiles at the Manus and Nauru Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, James H.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2009-10-07

    The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) is a convective regime; however, the frequency and depth of convection is dependant on dynamical forcing which exhibits variability on a range of temporal scales and also on location within the region. Manus Island, Papua New Guinea lies in the heart of the western Pacific warm pool region and exhibits frequent deep convection much of the time while Nauru, which lies approximately 20 degrees to the East of Manus, lies in a transition zone where the frequency of convection is dependent on the phase of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. Because of this difference in dynamical regime, the distribution of clouds and the associated radiative heating is quite different at the two sites. Individual cloud types: boundary layer cumulus, thin cirrus, stratiform convective outflow, do occur at both sites – but with different frequencies. In this study we compare cloud profiles and heating profiles for specific cloud types at these two sites using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF). Results of this comparison indicate that, while the frequency of specific cloud types differ between the two sites as one would expect, the characteristics of individual cloud classes are remarkably similar. This information could prove to be very useful for applying tropical ARM data to the broader region.

  3. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E.; Bates, T.S. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  4. Gradient zone-boundary control in salt-gradient solar ponds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizeable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  5. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, Otto A.; Stencel, Joseph R.

    1990-01-01

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  6. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

    1987-10-02

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  7. SDO OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AT CORONAL HOLE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Shuhong; Zhang Jun; Li Ting; Liu Yang E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yliu@quake.stanford.edu

    2011-05-01

    With the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate the coronal hole boundaries (CHBs) of an equatorial extension of the polar coronal hole. At the CHBs, many extreme-ultraviolet jets, which appear to be the signatures of magnetic reconnection, are observed in the 193 A images, and some jets occur repetitively at the same sites. The evolution of the jets is associated with the emergence and cancellation of magnetic fields. We note that both the east and west CHBs shift westward, and the shift velocities are close to the velocities of rigid rotation compared with those of the photospheric differential rotation. This indicates that magnetic reconnection at CHBs results in the evolution of CHBs and maintains the rigid rotation of coronal holes.

  8. Layered electrode for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swathirajan, Swathy; Mikhail, Youssef M.

    2001-01-01

    There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

  9. Spatially Resolved Mapping of Electrical Conductivity around Individual Domain (Grain) Boundaries in Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, An-Ping [ORNL; Clark, Kendal W [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Vlassiouk, Ivan V [ORNL; He, Guowei [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Feenstra, Randall [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)

    2013-01-01

    Graphene films can now be produced on the scale of up to meters. However, all large-scale graphene films contain topological defects that can significantly affect the characteristic transport behaviors of graphene. Here, we spatially map the structures and electronic transport near specific domain and grain boundaries in graphene, and evaluate effects of different types of defect on the electronic conductivity in epitaxial graphene grown on SiC and CVD graphene on Cu subsequently transferred to a SiO2 substrate. We use a combined approach with a multi-probe scanning tunneling potentiometry to investigate both structures and transport at individual grain boundaries and domain boundaries that are defined by coalesced grains, surface steps, and changes in layer thickness. It is found that the substrate step on SiC presents a significant potential barrier for electron transport of epitaxial graphene due to the reduced charge transport from the substrate at the step edges, monolayer-bilayer boundaries exhibit a high resistivity that can change depending on directions of the current across the boundary, and the resistivity of grain boundaries changes with the transition width of the disordered region between two adjacent grains in graphene. The detailed understanding of graphene defects will provide the feedback for controlled engineering of defects in large-scale graphene films.

  10. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  11. Solar interior and atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.N.; Livingston, W.C.; Matthews, M.S. National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ )

    1991-01-01

    The present work discusses nuclear energy generation in the solar interior, solar neutrino experiments, solar premain-sequence evolution, the computation of standard solar models, radiative-zone mixing, solar element separation by atomic diffusion, the observation and theory of solar oscillations, the solar internal rotation and magnetism implications of oscillations, solar gravity modes, and solar oscillation-mode excitation. Also discussed are the solar spectrum, the role of the solar photosphere and a radiative boundary, high spatial-resolution techniques for solar study, high-resolution observations of the solar granulation, large-scale velocity fields, the solar activity cycle, the magnetic fields of active regions and sunspots, the physics of flux tubes and filigrees, the heating of the solar chromosphere, the fine structure of the solar transition region, coronal activity, the coronal origins of the solar winds, and postmain sequence solar evolution.

  12. Property:Building/Boundaries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "BuildingBoundaries" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + Several buildings + Sweden Building 05K0002 + Part of a building +...

  13. CNEEC - Atomic Layer Deposition Tutorial by Stacey Bent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Layer Deposition

  14. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  15. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gero, Jonathan; Ermold, Brian; Gaustad, Krista; Koontz, Annette; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth’s atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols. The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3–19.2 μm (520–3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3–25.0 μm (400–3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  16. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow The boundary entropy log(g) of a critical ...

  17. ARM: Boundary-layer height data with CEIL (Dataset) | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Country of Publication: United States Availability: ORNL Language: English Subject: 54 ...

  18. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-132 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Height Value

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Figure 4 shows an example quicklook for a case classified as NRL by the Liu-Liang method. Here, there is only one panel as the wind speed and LLJ do not enter into the ...

  19. New method to determine planetary boundary layer depth | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Zhanqing Li College of Global Change and Earth System Science, State Laboratory of Earth Surface Process and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, China. zli@atmos.umd.edu ...

  20. Recollimation boundary layers as X-ray sources in young stellar jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnther, Hans Moritz; Li, Zhi-Yun; Schneider, P. C.

    2014-11-01

    Young stars accrete mass from circumstellar disks and, in many cases, the accretion coincides with a phase of massive outflows, which can be highly collimated. Those jets emit predominantly in the optical and IR wavelength range. However, in several cases, X-ray and UV observations reveal a weak but highly energetic component in those jets. X-rays are observed both from stationary regions close to the star and from knots in the jet several hundred AU from the star. In this article, we show semianalytically that a fast stellar wind that is recollimated by the pressure from a slower, more massive disk wind can have the right properties to power stationary X-ray emission. The size of the shocked regions is compatible with observational constraints. Our calculations support a wind-wind interaction scenario for the high-energy emission near the base of young stellar object jets. For the specific case of DG Tau, a stellar wind with a mass-loss rate of 5 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} and a wind speed of 800 km s{sup 1} reproduces the observed X-ray spectrum. We conclude that a stellar wind recollimation shock is a viable scenario to power stationary X-ray emission close to the jet launching point.

  1. Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (2009) ...

  2. Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline ...

  3. Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured Mn-Cu(111) Surface Title: Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured Mn-Cu(111) ...

  4. Small and Powerful: Pushing the Boundaries of Nano-Magnets |...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    and Powerful: Pushing the Boundaries of Nano-Magnets Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES ... Small and Powerful: Pushing the Boundaries of Nano-Magnets Newly discovered particles ...

  5. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    73: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

  6. Iterative solution of Hermite boundary integral equations (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Iterative solution of Hermite boundary integral equations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Iterative solution of Hermite boundary integral equations An efficient ...

  7. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the ...

  8. Layered seal for turbomachinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Morgan, Victor John; Weber, David Wayne

    2015-11-20

    The present application provides seal assemblies for reducing leakages between adjacent components of turbomachinery. The seal assemblies may include outer shims, and at least a portion of the outer shims may be substantially impervious. At least one of the outer shims may be configured for sealing engagement with seal slots of the adjacent components. The seal assemblies may also include at least one of an inner shim and a filler layer positioned between the outer shims. The at least one inner shim may be substantially solid and the at least one filler layer may be relatively porous. The seal assemblies may be sufficiently flexible to account for misalignment between the adjacent components, sufficiently stiff to meet assembly requirements, and sufficiently robust to operating meet requirements associated with turbomachinery.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites ...

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: AERI Thermodynamic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI radiances (including boundary facility AERI data) using RUC numerical model profiles to describe the above boundary layer atmospheric state. http:cimss.ssec.wisc.eduaeri...

  11. ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research Conducting climate research focused on issues of national and global importance is one of the primary objectives of the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD)-a field division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. ORAU partners with ATDD-and in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as well as government agencies, universities, and private

  12. ARM - Sources of Atmospheric Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources of Atmospheric Carbon Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Sources of Atmospheric Carbon Atmospheric carbon represented a steady state system, where influx equaled outflow, before the Industrial Revolution. Currently, it is no longer a steady state system because the

  13. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined FuchsSondheimer surface scattering model and MayadasShatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

  14. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-12-09

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

  15. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    1997-01-01

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  16. Hierardlicsl Diagnosis V. V. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hierardlicsl Diagnosis V. V. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Systematic observations of the earth's ozone layer over the last ten years indicate a steady decrease of ozone content in the stratospheric maximum and, on the contrary, a increase of ozone concentrations in the troposphere. This trend is illustrated clearly by the results of 20 years' observations of high-altitude ozone concentration distribution in the troposphere

  17. Polyport atmospheric gas sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic

    1995-01-01

    An atmospheric gas sampler with a multi-port valve which allows for multi, sequential sampling of air through a plurality of gas sampling tubes mounted in corresponding gas inlet ports. The gas sampler comprises a flow-through housing which defines a sampling chamber and includes a gas outlet port to accommodate a flow of gases through the housing. An apertured sample support plate defining the inlet ports extends across and encloses the sampling chamber and supports gas sampling tubes which depend into the sampling chamber and are secured across each of the inlet ports of the sample support plate in a flow-through relation to the flow of gases through the housing during sampling operations. A normally closed stopper means mounted on the sample support plate and operatively associated with each of the inlet ports blocks the flow of gases through the respective gas sampling tubes. A camming mechanism mounted on the sample support plate is adapted to rotate under and selectively lift open the stopper spring to accommodate a predetermined flow of gas through the respective gas sampling tubes when air is drawn from the housing through the outlet port.

  18. Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  19. Cable twisting due to atmospheric icing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComber, P.; Druez, J.; Savadjiev, K.

    1995-12-31

    Samples of ice accretions collected on cables of overhead transmission lines have shown evidence of twisting of the cable during atmospheric icing. Previous work has attributed cable twisting to the torque created by the weight of an eccentric ice shape and by wind forces. However, testing of stranded cables and conductors has shown that such cables also twist when there is a change in tension in the cable span. This phenomenon is related to the interaction of the different strand layers under tension. When a cable is subjected to atmospheric icing, cable tension increases and this type of twisting should also be considered. In order to determine how the two types of twisting would compare on transmission lines, a numerical simulation was made using characteristics of a typical 35-mm stranded conductor. The twist angle was computed as a function of cable span, sag to span ratio and increasing ice loads. The simulation shows that for transmission lines, twisting due to varying tension will be significant. Since cable tension is influenced by wind speed and ambient temperature as well as ice load, this phenomenon, unless prevented, results in ice accretion more circular in shape and hence eventually in larger ice loads.

  20. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  1. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  2. A dominant role of oxygen additive on cold atmospheric-pressure He + O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Aijun; Liu, Dingxin E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiaohua E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Kong, Michael G.

    2014-08-15

    We present in this paper how oxygen additive impacts on the cold atmospheric-pressure helium plasmas by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. For the oxygen concentration [O{sub 2}]?>??0.1%, the influence of oxygen on the electron characteristics and the power dissipation becomes important, e.g., the electron density, the electron temperature in sheath, the electron-coupling power, and the sheath width decreasing by 1.6 to 16 folds with a two-log increase in [O{sub 2}] from 0.1% to 10%. Also the discharge mode evolves from the ? mode to the ? mode. The reactive oxygen species are found to peak in the narrow range of [O{sub 2}]?=?0.4%0.9% in the plasmas, similar to their power-coupling values. This applies to their wall fluxes except for those of O* and O{sub 2}{sup ?}. These two species have very short lifetimes, thus only when generated in boundary layers within several micrometers next to the electrode can contribute to the fluxes. The dominant reactive oxygen species and the corresponding main reactions are schematically presented, and their relations are quantified for selected applications.

  3. SC e-journals by Subject -- Astronomy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Space Science Astrophysics and Space Sciences Transactions (ASTRA) - OAJ Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics - OAJ Atmospheric Environment Boundary-Layer Meteorology Celestial ...

  4. Ozone in the free atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitten, R.C.; Prasad, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    Experts in the field discuss the state of the ozone layer - its elements, distribution, functions, and biological and climatic effects of perturbations.

  5. Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

    2010-02-27

    We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are

  6. Templated, layered manganese phosphate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-08-17

    A new crystalline maganese phosphate composition having an empirical formula: O). The compound was determined to crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3c1 with a=8.8706(4) .ANG., c=26.1580(2) .ANG., and V (volume)=1783 .ANG..sup.3. The structure consists of sheets of corner sharing Mn(II)O.sub.4 and PO.sub.4 tetrahedra with layers of (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N and water molecules in-between. The pronated (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N molecules provide charge balancing for the inorganic sheets. A network of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the inorganic sheets holds the structure together.

  7. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile Facility, GERB, and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST) Beginning in January 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) began supporting RADAGAST to provide the first well-sampled direct esti- mates of the energy balance across the atmosphere. The experiment is part of an ongoing international study of the West African monsoon system and Saharan dust storms. Stationed outside the Niger Meteo- rological Office at the Niamey International Airport, the AMF is located

  9. On the interaction of solutes with grain boundaries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Berbenni, Stephane

    2015-11-01

    Solute segregation to grain boundaries is considered by modeling solute atoms as misfitting inclusions within a disclination structural unit model describing the grain boundary structure and its intrinsic stress field. The solute distribution around grain boundaries is described through Fermi–Dirac statistics of site occupancy. The susceptibility of hydrogen segregation to symmetric tilt grain boundaries is discussed in terms of the misorientation angle, the defect type characteristics at the grain boundary, temperature, and the prescribed bulk hydrogen fraction of occupied sites. Through this formalism, it is found that hydrogen trapping on grain boundaries clearly correlates with the grain boundary structure (i.e.more » type of structural unit composing the grain boundary), and the associated grain boundary misorientation. Specifically, for symmetric tilt grain boundaries about the [001] axis, grain boundaries composed of both B and C structural units show a lower segregation susceptibility than other grain boundaries. A direct correlation between the segregation susceptibility and the intrinsic net defect density is provided through the Frank–Bilby formalism. Moreover, the present formulation could prove to be a simple and useful model to identify classes of grain boundaries relevant to grain boundary engineering.« less

  10. On the interaction of solutes with grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Berbenni, Stephane

    2015-11-01

    Solute segregation to grain boundaries is considered by modeling solute atoms as misfitting inclusions within a disclination structural unit model describing the grain boundary structure and its intrinsic stress field. The solute distribution around grain boundaries is described through Fermi–Dirac statistics of site occupancy. The susceptibility of hydrogen segregation to symmetric tilt grain boundaries is discussed in terms of the misorientation angle, the defect type characteristics at the grain boundary, temperature, and the prescribed bulk hydrogen fraction of occupied sites. Through this formalism, it is found that hydrogen trapping on grain boundaries clearly correlates with the grain boundary structure (i.e. type of structural unit composing the grain boundary), and the associated grain boundary misorientation. Specifically, for symmetric tilt grain boundaries about the [001] axis, grain boundaries composed of both B and C structural units show a lower segregation susceptibility than other grain boundaries. A direct correlation between the segregation susceptibility and the intrinsic net defect density is provided through the Frank–Bilby formalism. Moreover, the present formulation could prove to be a simple and useful model to identify classes of grain boundaries relevant to grain boundary engineering.

  11. Earth's mysterious atmosphere. ATLAS 1: Teachers guide with activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    One of our mission's primary goals is to better understand the physics and chemistry of our atmosphere, the thin envelope of air that provides for human life and shields us from the harshness of space. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the ATLAS 1 science instruments 296 km above Earth, so that they can look down into and through the various layers of the atmosphere. Five solar radiometers will precisely measure the amount of energy the Sun injects into Earth's environment. The chemistry at different altitudes will be measured very accurately by five other instruments called spectrometers. Much of our time in the cockpit of Atlantis will be devoted to two very exciting instruments that measure the auroras and the atmosphere's electrical characteristics. Finally, our ultraviolet telescope will probe the secrets of fascinating celestial objects. This Teacher's Guide is designed as a detective story to help you appreciate some of the many questions currently studied by scientists around the world. Many complex factors affect our atmosphere today, possibly even changing the course of global climate. All who live on Earth must recognize that they play an ever-growing role in causing some of these changes. People must solve this great atmospheric mystery if they are to understand all these changes and know what to do about them.

  12. Spherules from the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay at Gubbio, Italy: the problem of outcrop contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, A.

    1986-12-01

    Surficial outcrop contamination has occurred in some well-known stratigraphic sections of carbonate rocks in the northern Apennines. A critical case involves several contaminated clay partings, including the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay in the classic Bottaccione section near Gubbio, Italy. These clay layers contain shiny spherules which, in several recent studies, have been said to consist of volcanic glass and have been used to support the hypothesis that the terminal Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by widespread volcanism. Laboratory tests, however, indicate that these shiny spherules are made of HF-insoluble and combustible material and are therefore of recent biological origin. These objects were introduced into the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and other clay layers from the surrounding soil along with abundant detrital contaminants derived from erosion of the middle Miocene flysch exposed at the head of the Bottaccione Gorge. They are completely different from the altered and flattened microtektitelike spheroids that are found only in the iridium-rich Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and that provide strong evidence for a large impact.

  13. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  14. Evidence of preferential diffusion of impurities along grain boundaries in very pure niobium used for radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoine, C.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1997-02-01

    In order to overcome dissipation due to impurity segregation at grain boundaries, niobium cavities are submitted to a purification annealing (1300{degree}C{plus_minus}200{degree}C under vacuum) during which titanium is evaporated onto the Nb surface. The resulting titanium layer acts as a solid state getter reacting with light impurities (H, C, N, O), thereby removing these impurities from the bulk of the niobium. Preferential titanium diffusion along grain boundaries have been studied using proton-induced x-ray emission. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. The relationship between grain boundary structure, defect mobility, and grain boundary sink efficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Vernon, Louis J.; Martinez, Enrique; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-03-13

    Nanocrystalline materials have received great attention due to their potential for improved functionality and have been proposed for extreme environments where the interfaces are expected to promote radiation tolerance. However, the precise role of the interfaces in modifying defect behavior is unclear. Using long-time simulations methods, we determine the mobility of defects and defect clusters at grain boundaries in Cu. We find that mobilities vary significantly with boundary structure and cluster size, with larger clusters exhibiting reduced mobility, and that interface sink efficiency depends on the kinetics of defects within the interface via the in-boundary annihilation rate of defects. Thus,more » sink efficiency is a strong function of defect mobility, which depends on boundary structure, a property that evolves with time. Further, defect mobility at boundaries can be slower than in the bulk, which has general implications for the properties of polycrystalline materials. Finally, we correlate defect energetics with the volumes of atomic sites at the boundary.« less

  16. Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-11-20

    The Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) is a real-time emergency response modeling capability designed to advise Emergency Managers of the path, timing, and projected impacts from an atmospheric release. TRAC evaluates the effects of both radiological and non-radiological hazardous substances, gases and particulates. Using available surface and upper air meteorological information, TRAC realistically treats complex sources and atmospheric conditions, such as those found in mountainous terrain. TRAC calculates atmospheric concentration, deposition, and dose for more thanmore » 25,000 receptor locations within 80 km of the release point. Human-engineered output products support critical decisions on the type, location, and timing of protective actions for workers and the public during an emergency.« less

  17. (Chemistry of the global atmosphere)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marland, G.

    1990-09-27

    The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

  18. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  19. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-16-027 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  1. AUDIT REPORT Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility OAI-M-16-10 May 2016 U.S. ... Audit Report on the "Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility" ...

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-16-037 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    01 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-16-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-15-069 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  5. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion...

  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Name: National Oceanic and...

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER ...

  8. Search for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search DOE Data Explorer Search Results Page 1 of 70 Search for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" 697 results for: "atmospheric radiation ...

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research ...

  10. Segregation and Migration of the Oxygen Vacancies in the 3 (111) Tilt Grain Boundaries of Ceria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yuan, Fenglin; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2016-03-01

    In nanocrystalline materials, defect-grain boundary (GB) interaction plays a key role in determining the structure stability, as well as size-dependent ionic, electronic, magnetic and chemical properties. In this study, we systematically investigated using density functional theory segregation and migration of oxygen vacancies at the Σ3 [110] / (111) grain boundary of ceria. Three oxygen layers near the GB are predicted to be segregation sites for oxygen vacancies. Moreover, the presence of oxygen vacancies stabilizes this tilt GB at a low Fermi level and/or oxygen poor conditions. An atomic strain model was proposed to rationalize layer dependency of the relaxation energymore » for +2 charged oxygen vacancy. The structural origin of large relaxation energies at layers 1 and 2 was determined to be free-volume space that induces ion relaxation towards the GB. Our results not only pave the way for improving the oxygen transport near GBs of ceria, but also provide important insights into engineering the GB structure for better ionic, magnetic and chemical properties of nanocrystalline ceria.« less

  11. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Enzymes on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-01

    The use of Layer-by-layer techniques for immobilizing several types of enzymes, e.g. glucose oxidase (GOx), horse radish oxidases(HRP), and choline oxidase(CHO) on carbon nanotubes and their applications for biosenseing are presented. The enzyme is immobilized on the negatively charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and a enzyme layer. The sandwich-like layer structure (PDDA/enzyme/PDDA/CNT) formed by electrostatic assembling provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of enzyme and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The morphologies and electrocatalytic acitivity of the resulted enzyme film were characterized using TEM and electrochemical techniques, respectively. It was found that these enzyme-based biosensors are very sensitive, selective for detection of biomolecules, e.g. glucose, choline.

  12. Leakage pathway layer for solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Andy; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter; Sun, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Leakage pathway layers for solar cells and methods of forming leakage pathway layers for solar cells are described.

  13. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow You are accessing a document from ...

  14. Evolution of Grain Boundary Networks in Extreme Radiation Environments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Evolution of Grain Boundary Networks in Extreme Radiation Environments. Evolution of Grain Boundary Networks in Extreme Radiation Environments Research Our objective is to understand the characteristics of an "optimal" grain boundary (GB) network that minimizes microstructural evolution in radiation environments. Through our research we have elucidated that this optimal network requires a balance between two populations of grain boundaries: low free volume (low free energy)

  15. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production | Department of Energy Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production Report documenting the biological and engineering characteristics of five algal and bacterial hydrogen production systems selected by DOE and NREL for evaluation. Technoeconomic Boundary Analysis of Biological Pathways to Hydrogen Production (3.63 MB) More Documents & Publications Techno-Economic Boundary Analysis

  16. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. WILLIAMS

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  17. Method of deforming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a textured metallic substrate and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Dominic F.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and biaxially textured articles having a deformed epitaxial layer formed therefrom for use with high temperature superconductors, photovoltaic, ferroelectric, or optical devices. A buffer layer is epitaxially deposited onto biaxially-textured substrates and then mechanically deformed. The deformation process minimizes or eliminates grooves, or other irregularities, formed on the buffer layer while maintaining the biaxial texture of the buffer layer. Advantageously, the biaxial texture of the buffer layer is not altered during subsequent heat treatments of the deformed buffer. The present invention provides mechanical densification procedures which can be incorporated into the processing of superconducting films through the powder deposit or precursor approaches without incurring unfavorable high-angle grain boundaries.

  18. Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer and the Surface: Oklahoma Mesonet and EBBR Heat Fluxes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactions Between the Daytime Mixed Layer and the Surface: Oklahoma Mesonet and EBBR Heat Fluxes R. L. Coulter Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction Surface layer estimates of surface sensible heat flux have been made at 10 - 14 locations within the Central Facility (CF) of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program site by using energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) stations located mostly in uncultivated areas. The advent of the Oklahoma

  19. Multi-omics of Permafrost, Active Layer and Thermokarst Bog Soil

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microbiomes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Multi-omics of Permafrost, Active Layer and Thermokarst Bog Soil Microbiomes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-omics of Permafrost, Active Layer and Thermokarst Bog Soil Microbiomes Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, if thawed may represent the largest future transfer of C from the biosphere to the atmosphere 1. This process is largely dependent on

  20. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. ); Cabral, M.R. ); Scolar, J. ); Manzi, A.O.; de Abreau Sa, L.D. )

    1990-09-20

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high-frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum and the relationship between the horizontal wind speed and its standard deviation are well described by dry convective boundary layer similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain. Diurnal changes in the sign of the vertical velocity skewness observed above and inside the canopy are shown to be plausibly explained by considering the skewness budget. Simple empirical formulas that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind speed and variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented in three case studies. Even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during midday.

  1. GRAIN BOUNDARY STRENGTHENING PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2012-10-10

    Density functional theory was employed to investigate grain boundary (GB) properties of W alloys. A range of substitutional solutes across the Periodic Table was investigated to understand the behavior of different electronic orbitals in changing the GB cleavage energy in the Σ27a[110]{525} GB. A number of transition metals were predicted to enhance the GB cohesion. This includes Ru, Re, Os, Ir, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ti, Hf, Ta and Nb. While lanthanides, s and p elements were tended to cause GB embrittlement.

  2. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF BROWN DWARFS: JETS, VORTICES, AND TIME VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xi; Showman, Adam P.

    2014-06-10

    A variety of observational evidence demonstrates that brown dwarfs exhibit active atmospheric circulations. In this study we use a shallow-water model to investigate the global atmospheric dynamics in the stratified layer overlying the convective zone on these rapidly rotating objects. We show that the existence and properties of the atmospheric circulation crucially depend on key parameters including the energy injection rate and radiative timescale. Under conditions of strong internal heat flux and weak radiative dissipation, a banded flow pattern comprised of east-west jet streams spontaneously emerges from the interaction of atmospheric turbulence with the planetary rotation. In contrast, when the internal heat flux is weak and/or radiative dissipation is strong, turbulence injected into the atmosphere damps before it can self-organize into jets, leading to a flow dominated by transient eddies and isotropic turbulence instead. The simulation results are not very sensitive to the form of the forcing. Based on the location of the transition between jet-dominated and eddy-dominated regimes, we suggest that many brown dwarfs may exhibit atmospheric circulations dominated by eddies and turbulence (rather than jets) due to the strong radiative damping on these worlds, but a jet structure is also possible under some realistic conditions. Our simulated light curves capture important features from observed infrared light curves of brown dwarfs, including amplitude variations of a few percent and shapes that fluctuate between single-peak and multi-peak structures. More broadly, our work shows that the shallow-water system provides a useful tool to illuminate fundamental aspects of the dynamics on these worlds.

  3. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multi-density layer structure as a moisture permeation barrier deposited by radio frequency remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hyunsoo [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heeyoung [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hagyoung; Ham, Giyul; Shin, Seokyoon [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-21

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition have been used for thin film encapsulation of organic light emitting diode. In this study, a multi-density layer structure consisting of two Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with different densities are deposited with different deposition conditions of O{sub 2} plasma reactant time. This structure improves moisture permeation barrier characteristics, as confirmed by a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) test. The lowest WVTR of the multi-density layer structure was 4.7 10{sup ?5} gm{sup ?2} day{sup ?1}, which is one order of magnitude less than WVTR for the reference single-density Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. This improvement is attributed to the location mismatch of paths for atmospheric gases, such as O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, in the film due to different densities in the layers. This mechanism is analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection, and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results confirmed that the multi-density layer structure exhibits very good characteristics as an encapsulation layer via location mismatch of paths for H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} between the two layers.

  4. Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polymer is coated on the first polymer. A substrate or a multi-layer polymer structure is placed on the filled mold and the resulting structure is exposed to UV light (i.e., is UV...

  5. D0 layer 0 innermost layer of silicon microstrip tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanagaki, K.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    A new inner layer silicon strip detector has been built and will be installed in the existing silicon microstrip tracker in D0. They report on the motivation, design, and performance of this new detector.

  6. Atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Lang; Shu Tao; Wenxin Liu; Yanxu Zhang; Staci Simonich

    2008-07-15

    A potential receptor influence function (PRIF) model, based on air mass forward trajectory calculations, was applied to simulate the atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from China. With a 10 day atmospheric transport time, most neighboring countries and regions, as well as remote regions, were influenced by PAH emissions from China. Of the total annual PAH emission of 114 Gg, 92.7% remained within the boundary of mainland China. The geographic distribution of PRIFs within China was similar to the geographic distribution of the source regions, with high values in the North China Plain, Sichuan Basin, Shanxi, and Guizhou province. The Tarim basin and Sichuan basin had unfavorable meteorological conditions for PAH outflow. Of the PAH outflow from China (8092 tons or 7.1% of the total annual PAH emission), approximately 69.9% (5655 tons) reached no further than the offshore environment of mainland China and the South China Sea. Approximate 227, 71, 746, and 131 tons PAHs reached North Korea, South Korea, Russia-Mongolia region, and Japan, respectively, 2-4 days after the emission. Only 1.4 tons PAHs reached North America after more than 9 days. Interannual variation in the eastward PAH outflow was positively correlated to cold episodes of El Nino/Southern Oscillation. However, trans-Pacific atmospheric transport of PAHs from China was correlated to Pacific North America index (PNA) which is associated with the strength and position of westerly winds. 38 refs., 4 figs.

  7. THE KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY AT CORONAL MASS EJECTION BOUNDARIES IN THE SOLAR CORONA: OBSERVATIONS AND 2.5D MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moestl, U. V.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2013-03-20

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory observed a coronal mass ejection with an embedded filament on 2011 February 24, revealing quasi-periodic vortex-like structures at the northern side of the filament boundary with a wavelength of approximately 14.4 Mm and a propagation speed of about 310 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}. These structures could result from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability occurring on the boundary. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and compare the simulated characteristic properties of the instability with the observations, where we obtain qualitative as well as quantitative accordance. We study the absence of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex-like structures on the southern side of the filament boundary and find that a magnetic field component parallel to the boundary with a strength of about 20% of the total magnetic field has stabilizing effects resulting in an asymmetric development of the instability.

  8. Direct imaging of enhanced current collection on grain boundaries of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, JunHo; Kim, SeongYeon; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Ramanathan, Kannan; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2014-02-10

    We report on direct imaging of current collection by performing conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) measurement on a complete Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell. The localized current was imaged by milling away the top conductive layer of the device by repeated C-AFM scans. The result exhibits enhanced photocurrent collection on grain boundaries (GBs) of CIGS films, consistent with the argument for electric-field-assisted carrier collection on the GBs.

  9. A Characteristic-Galerkin method for the Navier-Stokes equations in thin domains with free boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornetti, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    The 3D Navier-Stokes equations are solved via the Characteristic-Galerkin method extended to free boundary problems. A temporal discretization procedure is proposed for the case where a preferential direction to move mesh point exists, as in thin domains. Using a single layer of finite elements, the numerical results cover the so-called shallow water 2D approximation, showing the same wave propagation speed.

  10. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced spatial ALD of silver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruele, Fieke J. van den Smets, Mireille; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul; Buskens, Pascal; Roozeboom, Fred

    2015-01-15

    The authors have investigated the growth of thin silver films using a unique combination of atmospheric process elements: spatial atomic layer deposition and an atmospheric pressure surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma source. Silver films were grown on top of Si substrates with good purity as revealed by resistivity values as low as 18 μΩ cm and C- and F-levels below detection limits of energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The growth of the silver films starts through the nucleation of islands that subsequently coalesce. The authors show that the surface island morphology is dependent on surface diffusion, which can be controlled by temperature within the deposition temperature range of 100–120 °C.

  12. Proposed Route to Thin Film Crystal Si Using Biaxially Textured Foreign Template Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teplin, C. W.; Ginley, D. S.; van Hest, M.F.A.M.; Perkins, J. D.; Young, D. L.; Stradins, P.; Wang, Q.; Al-Jassim, M.; Iwaniczko, E.; Leenheer, A.; Jones, K. M.; Branz, H. M.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a new approach to growing photovoltaic-quality crystal silicon (c-Si) films on glass. Other approaches to film c-Si focus on increasing grain size in order to reduce the deleterious effects of grain boundaries. Instead, we have developed an approach to align the silicon grains biaxially (both in and out of plane) so that 1) grain boundaries are "low-angle" and have less effect on the electronic properties of the material and 2) subsequent epitaxial thickening is simplified. They key to our approach is the use of a foreign template layer that can be grown with biaxial texture directly on glass.

  13. Intermetallic Layers in Soldered Joints

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-12-10

    ILAG solves the one-dimensional partial differential equations describing the multiphase, multicomponent, solid-state diffusion-controlled growth of intermetallic layers in soldered joints. This software provides an analysis capability for materials researchers to examine intermetallic growth mechanisms in a wide variety of defense and commercial applications involving both traditional and advanced materials. ILAG calculates the interface positions of the layers, as well as the spatial distribution of constituent mass fractions, and outputs the results at user-prescribed simulation times.

  14. Process for forming epitaxial perovskite thin film layers using halide precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clem, Paul G.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Voigt, James A.; Ashley, Carol S.

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming an epitaxial perovskite-phase thin film on a substrate. This thin film can act as a buffer layer between a Ni substrate and a YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor layer. The process utilizes alkali or alkaline metal acetates dissolved in halogenated organic acid along with titanium isopropoxide to dip or spin-coat the substrate which is then heated to about 700.degree. C. in an inert gas atmosphere to form the epitaxial film on the substrate. The YBCO superconductor can then be deposited on the layer formed by this invention.

  15. Hydrogen Diffusion through Multiple Packaging Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAllister, J.; Mohiuddin, A.

    2010-05-05

    For this scenario, hydrogen is generated in a container that is eventually stored within a drum or some type of long range storage container. When preparing for long-term storage, the hydrogen container (HC) is placed in a plastic bag (PB1). The PB1 is then placed inside an inner drum (ID). The ID is placed inside a plastic bag (PB2) which is then placed within an outer drum (OD). One or more ODs are then storage is a large container (LC). Filtered vents or vent holes are located on all the container barriers to prevent pressurization and allow gases to flow in and out of the HC. The LC is vented to the atmosphere with four vent paths for this example. The source of hydrogen generation for this study is not important. Any source that generates hydrogen in elemental form (i.e., H{sub 2}) is a candidate for the purposes of this generic evaluation. The released hydrogen accumulates inside the waste packaging. Depending on the permeability of the packaging layers, some of the accumulated hydrogen may diffuse out of the packaging layers and into the space surrounding the drums. Since the drums are confined in the LC, the hydrogen accumulates in the LC as it did inside the drums if venting of the LC does not occur. If accumulation in the LC is allowed without venting, the confinement is eventually breached or the hydrogen is consumed by reaction with other chemical species. One possible reaction is combustion with oxygen. Such a reaction can be explosive, and from this possibility arises the safety concern.

  16. Sol-gel deposition of buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  17. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  18. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  19. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  20. Iridium profile for 10 million years across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary at Gubbio (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, W.; Montanari, A. ); Asaro, F. )

    1990-12-21

    The iridium anomaly at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) boundary was discovered in the pelagic limestone sequence at Gubbio on the basis of 12 samples analyzed by neutron activation analysis (NAA) and was interpreted as indicating impact of a large extraterrestrial object at exactly the time of the KT mass extinction. Continuing controversy over the shape of the Ir profile at the Gubbio KT boundary and its interpretation called for a more detailed follow-up study. Analysis of a 57-meter-thick, 10-million-year-old part of the Gubbio sequence using improved NAA techniques revealed that there is only one Ir anomaly at the KT boundary, but this anomaly shows an intricate fine structure, the origin of which cannot yet be entirely explained. The KT Ir anomaly peaks in a 1-centimeter-thick clay layer, where the average Ir concentration is 3,000 parts per trillion (ppt); this peak is flanked by tails with Ir concentrations of 20 to 80 ppt that rise above a background of 12 to 13 ppt. The fine structure of the tails is probably due in part to lateral reworking, diffusion, burrowing, and perhaps Milankovitch cyclicity.

  1. Method of depositing a high-emissivity layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickersham, Charles E.; Foster, Ellis L.

    1983-01-01

    A method of depositing a high-emissivity layer on a substrate comprising RF sputter deposition of a carbide-containing target in an atmosphere of a hydrocarbon gas and a noble gas. As the carbide is deposited on the substrate the hydrocarbon gas decomposes to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon deposits on the target and substrate causing a carbide/carbon composition gradient to form on the substrate. At a sufficiently high partial pressure of hydrocarbon gas, a film of high-emissivity pure carbon will eventually form over the substrate.

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore » and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  3. Atomistic simulations of dislocation pileup: Grain boundaries interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jian

    2015-05-27

    Here, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the dislocation pileup–grain boundary (GB) interactions. Two Σ11 asymmetrical tilt grain boundaries in Al are studied to explore the influence of orientation relationship and interface structure on dislocation activities at grain boundaries. To mimic the reality of a dislocation pileup in a coarse-grained polycrystalline, we optimized the dislocation population in MD simulations and developed a predict-correct method to create a dislocation pileup in MD simulations. MD simulations explored several kinetic processes of dislocations–GB reactions: grain boundary sliding, grain boundary migration, slip transmission, dislocation reflection, reconstruction of grain boundary, and the correlation ofmore » these kinetic processes with the available slip systems across the GB and atomic structures of the GB.« less

  4. Atomistic simulations of dislocation pileup: Grain boundaries interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian

    2015-05-27

    Here, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the dislocation pileup–grain boundary (GB) interactions. Two Σ11 asymmetrical tilt grain boundaries in Al are studied to explore the influence of orientation relationship and interface structure on dislocation activities at grain boundaries. To mimic the reality of a dislocation pileup in a coarse-grained polycrystalline, we optimized the dislocation population in MD simulations and developed a predict-correct method to create a dislocation pileup in MD simulations. MD simulations explored several kinetic processes of dislocations–GB reactions: grain boundary sliding, grain boundary migration, slip transmission, dislocation reflection, reconstruction of grain boundary, and the correlation of these kinetic processes with the available slip systems across the GB and atomic structures of the GB.

  5. Light extinction in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laulainen, N.

    1992-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  7. Absorbing boundary conditions for relativistic quantum mechanics equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoine, X.; Sater, J.; Fillion-Gourdeau, F.; Bandrauk, A.D.

    2014-11-15

    This paper is devoted to the derivation of absorbing boundary conditions for the Klein–Gordon and Dirac equations modeling quantum and relativistic particles subject to classical electromagnetic fields. Microlocal analysis is the main ingredient in the derivation of these boundary conditions, which are obtained in the form of pseudo-differential equations. Basic numerical schemes are derived and analyzed to illustrate the accuracy of the derived boundary conditions.

  8. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in

  9. Grain boundary energy in 5 degrees of freedom space

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-21

    GB5DOF is a program written in MatLab for computing excess energy of an arbitrary grain boundary defined by its 5 geometrical degrees of freedom. The program is written in the form of a single self-contained function callable from within commercially available MatLab software package. The function takes a geometric description of the boundary and material identity as input parameters and returns the predicted boundary energy.

  10. Dynamics of multiple double layers in high pressure glow discharge in a simple torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Paul, Manash, E-mail: manashkr@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Tripura799 046 (India); Sharma, P. K.; Thakur, A.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Bora, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat382 428 (India)

    2014-06-15

    Parametric characterization of multiple double layers is done during high pressure glow discharge in a toroidal vessel of small aspect ratio. Although glow discharge (without magnetic field) is known to be independent of device geometry, but the toroidal boundary conditions are conducive to plasma growth and eventually the plasma occupy the toroidal volume partially. At higher anode potential, the visibly glowing spots on the body of spatially extended anode transform into multiple intensely luminous spherical plasma blob structures attached to the tip of the positive electrode. Dynamics of multiple double layers are observed in argon glow discharge plasma in presence of toroidal magnetic field. The radial profiles of plasma parameters measured at various toroidal locations show signatures of double layer formation in our system. Parametric dependence of double layer dynamics in presence of toroidal magnetic field is presented here.

  11. Boundary condition and fuel composition effects on injection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Boundary condition and fuel composition effects on injection processes of high-pressure sprays at the microscopic level This content will become ...

  12. Evaluation of Wall Boundary Condition Parameters for Gas-Solids

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... constitutive relations for antigranulocytes-materials, with application to plane shearing. ... Study of wall boundary condition in numerical simulations of 2D bubbling fluidized beds. ...

  13. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to...

  14. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parallel to the boundary, which is just what seismologists observe. These results open new possibilities for modeling anisotropy evolution at extreme conditions, linking...

  15. Two-dimensional heavy fermions on the strongly correlated boundaries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-dimensional heavy fermions on the strongly correlated boundaries of Kondo topological insulators Prev Next Title: Two-dimensional heavy fermions on the strongly ...

  16. [Perovskite and Fluorite Grain Boundary Properties]. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, N. D.

    2004-02-24

    One of the main areas of research in the last two years in this program has been the properties of grain boundaries in perovskite and fluorite structure materials.

  17. On the interaction of solutes with grain boundaries (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is considered by modeling solute atoms as misfitting inclusions within a disclination structural unit model describing the grain boundary structure and its intrinsic stress field. ...

  18. DEFRA Global Atmosphere Dept | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: SW1E 6DE Product: Atmosphere research department of the UK Department of Food and Rural Affairs. References: DEFRA - Global Atmosphere Dept.1 This article is a...

  19. Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springston, Stephen R.; Lloyd, Judith; Zheng, Jun

    2007-10-23

    A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

  20. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  1. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused

  2. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused

  3. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atmosphere to Electrons Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow 2 Atmosphere to Electrons Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) research initiative is focused on improving the performance and reliability of wind plants by establishing an unprecedented under- standing of how the Earth's atmosphere interacts with the wind plants and developing innovative technologies to maximize energy extraction from the wind. The A2e initiative

  4. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused

  5. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused

  6. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused

  7. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the

  8. Conditions for establishing quasistable double layers in the Earth's auroral upward current region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Main, D. S.; Newman, D. L.; Ergun, R. E.

    2010-12-15

    The strength and stability of simulated double layers at the ionosphere-auroral cavity boundary have been studied as a function of cold ionospheric electron temperature and density. The simulations are performed with an open boundary one-dimensional particle-in- cell (PIC) simulation and are initialized by imposing a density cavity within the simulation domain. The PIC simulation includes H{sup +} and O{sup +} ion beams, a hot H{sup +} background population, cold ionospheric electrons, and a hot electron population. It is shown that a double layer remains quasistable for a variety of initial conditions and plasma parameters. The average potential drop of the double layer is found to increase as the cold electron temperature decreases. However, in terms of cold electron density, the average potential drop of the double layer is found to increase up to some critical cold electron density and decreases above this value. Comparisons with FAST observations are made and agreement is found between simulation results and observations in the shape and width of the double layer. This study helps put a constraint on the plasma conditions in which a DL can be expected to form and remain quasistable.

  9. Compressional boundaries in the Earth's foreshock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Castillo, D.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Omidi, N.

    2013-06-13

    The terrestrial foreshock is a highly dynamic region populated by particles, waves and non-linear structures such as shocklets, SLAMS, hot flow anomalies, cavities and cavitons. Recently a new structure named foreshock compressional boundary (FCB) was reported in global hybrid simulations by Omidi et al. (2009). This structure represents a transition region that separates the highly disturbed foreshock plasma from pristine solar wind or from the region of field-aligned ion beams. The FCB is associated with a strong compression of magnetic field and density. Besides the enhancements in the field and density, the FCB also shows a region where these two quantities decrease below the ambient solar wind (SW) values. Here, we study a FCB observed by Cluster-1. This FCB shows that although sometimes FCBs are transition regions between the pristine solar wind plasma and the foreshock plasma, in this case the FCB separates a region with large amplitude waves from regions with high frequency (f{approx}1.7 Hz) small amplitude waves. We analyze the FCB properties, ion distributions inside them, and the waves near the structure.

  10. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warneford, Emma S. Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  11. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  12. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  13. Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer-by-layer deposition Title: Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer-by-layer deposition ...

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION ATMOSPHERIC ENSEMBLE MODELING AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R.; Werth, D.; Chiswell, S.; Etherton, B.

    2011-05-10

    The High-Resolution Mid-Atlantic Forecasting Ensemble (HME) is a federated effort to improve operational forecasts related to precipitation, convection and boundary layer evolution, and fire weather utilizing data and computing resources from a diverse group of cooperating institutions in order to create a mesoscale ensemble from independent members. Collaborating organizations involved in the project include universities, National Weather Service offices, and national laboratories, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The ensemble system is produced from an overlapping numerical weather prediction model domain and parameter subsets provided by each contributing member. The coordination, synthesis, and dissemination of the ensemble information are performed by the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. This paper discusses background related to the HME effort, SRNL participation, and example results available from the RENCI website.

  15. Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) Data Archive () | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) Data Archive Title: Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) Data Archive The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) originally ...

  16. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-05-24

    A photosensitive device includes a series of organic photoactive layers disposed between two electrodes. Each layer in the series is in direct contact with a next layer in the series. The series is arranged to form at least one donor-acceptor heterojunction, and includes a first organic photoactive layer comprising a first host material serving as a donor, a thin second organic photoactive layer comprising a second host material disposed between the first and a third organic photoactive layer, and the third organic photoactive layer comprising a third host material serving as an acceptor. The first, second, and third host materials are different. The thin second layer serves as an acceptor relative to the first layer or as a donor relative to the third layer.

  17. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2006-10-31

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  18. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  19. Chemical solution seed layer for rabits tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A method for making a superconducting article includes the steps of providing a biaxially textured substrate. A seed layer is then deposited. The seed layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different rare earth or transition metal cations. A superconductor layer is grown epitaxially such that the superconductor layer is supported by the seed layer.

  20. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are

  1. Atmospheric corrosion of lithium electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.J.

    1981-10-01

    Atmospheric corrosion of lithium during lithium-cell assembly and the dry storage of cells prior to electrolyte fill has been found to initiate lithium corrosion pits and to form corrosion products. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate lithium pitting and the white floccullent corrosion products. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and Auger spectroscopy in combination with X-ray diffraction were used to characterize lithium surfaces. Lithium surfaces with corrosion products were found to be high in carbonate content indicating the presence of lithium carbonate. Lithium electrodes dry stored in unfilled batteries were found to contain high concentration of lithium flouride a possible corrosion product from gaseous materials from the carbon monofluoride cathode. Future investigations of the corrosion phenomena will emphasize the effect of the corrosion products on the electrolyte and ultimate battery performance. The need to protect lithium electrodes from atmospheric exposure is commonly recognized to minimize corrosion induced by reaction with water, oxygen, carbon dioxide or nitrogen (1). Manufacturing facilities customarily limit the relative humidity to less than two percent. Electrodes that have been manufactured for use in lithium cells are typically stored in dry-argon containers. In spite of these precautions, lithium has been found to corrode over a long time period due to residual gases or slow diffusion of the same into storage containers. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the nature of the lithium corrosion.

  2. Oxygen Diffusion Enables Anti-Wear Boundary Film Formation on Titanium Surfaces in Zinc-Dialkyl-Dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-Containing Lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a wear reduction by up to six orders of magnitude for Ti-6Al-4V alloy when treated by an oxygen diffusion (OD) process and subsequently tested in a zinc-dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-containing lubricant. In addition to case hardening, it is discovered that OD enables the formation of an anti-wear boundary film on the titanium surface. Transmission electron microscopy and surface chemical analyses revealed that this boundary film has a two-layer structure comprising an amorphous oxide interlayer and a ZDDP-based top film with complex compounds.

  3. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  4. A boundary-value problem in weighted Hlder spaces for elliptic equations which degenerate at the boundary of the domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazalii, B V; Degtyarev, S P

    2013-07-31

    An elliptic boundary-value problem for second-order equations with nonnegative characteristic form is investigated in the situation when there is a weak degeneracy on the boundary of the domain. A priori estimates are obtained for solutions and the problem is proved to be solvable in some weighted Hlder spaces. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  5. Potential Impact of Atmospheric Releases at Russian Far East Nuclear Submarine Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, F.; Mahura, A.; Compton, K.; Brown, K.; Takano, M.; Novikov, V.; Soerensen, J. H.; Baklanov, A.

    2003-02-25

    An ''Assessment of the Impact of Russian Nuclear Fleet Operations on Far Eastern Coastal Regions'' is being performed as part of the Radiation Safety of the Biosphere Project (RAD) of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) of Laxenburg, Austria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive unclassified analysis of the potential impact of accidents at the Russian Far East nuclear submarine sites near Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk. We have defined the situation there based upon available information and studies commissioned by RAD in collaboration with Russian research institutes including Russian Research Center-''Kurchatov Institute'', Institute of Northern Environmental Problems and Lazurit Central Design Bureau. Further, in our original work, some in collaboration with the staff of the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, we have calculated the nuclide trajectories from these sites in the atmospheric boundary layer, less than 1.5 kilometers high, and determined their probability of crossing any of the nearby countries as well as Asiatic Russia. We have further determined the concentrations in each of these crossings as well as the total, dry and wet depositions of nuclides on these areas. Finally, we have calculated the doses to the Japanese Island population from typical winter airflow patterns (those most likely to cross the Islands in the minimum times), strong north winds, weak north winds and cyclonic winds for conditions similar to the Chazhma Bay criticality accident (fresh fuel) and for a criticality accident for the same type of reactor with fuel being withdrawn (spent fuel). The maximum individual committed dosages were less than 2 x 10-7 and 2 x 10-3 mSv, respectively. The long-term external doses by radionuclides deposited on the ground and the internal doses by consumption of foods were not evaluated as it is believed that such doses can be avoided

  6. Mobility of charge carriers in porous silicon layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsh, P. A. Martyshov, M. N.; Latysheva, A. P.; Vorontsov, A. S.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2008-12-15

    The (conduction) mobility of majority charge carriers in porous silicon layers of the n and p types is estimated by joint measurements of electrical conductivity and free charge carrier concentration, which is determined from IR absorption spectra. Adsorption of donor and acceptor molecules leading to a change in local electric fields in the structure is used to identify the processes controlling the mobility in porous silicon. It is found that adsorption of acceptor and donor molecules at porous silicon of the p and n types, respectively, leads to a strong increase in electrical conductivity, which is associated with an increase in the concentration of free carrier as well as in their mobility. The increase in the mobility of charge carriers as a result of adsorption indicates the key role of potential barriers at the boundaries of silicon nanocrystals and may be due to a decrease in the barrier height as a result of adsorption.

  7. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western ... for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western ...

  8. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    engineering data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): engineering data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral ...

  9. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  10. A Cartesian embedded boundary method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjogreen, B; Petersson, N A

    2006-12-04

    The authors develop an embedded boundary finite difference technique for solving the compressible two- or three-dimensional Euler equations in complex geometries on a Cartesian grid. The method is second order accurate with an explicit time step determined by the grid size away from the boundary. Slope limiters are used on the embedded boundary to avoid non-physical oscillations near shock waves. They show computed examples of supersonic flow past a cylinder and compare with results computed on a body fitted grid. Furthermore, they discuss the implementation of the method for thin geometries, and show computed examples of transonic flow past an airfoil.

  11. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  12. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushner, Mark Jay

    2014-07-10

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2012 (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Program Document: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2012 Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility

  14. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations Professor Takaaki Kajita

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmosphere to Electrons Atmosphere to Electrons Addthis Description Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) is a multi-year U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing electricity generation by wind plants. The goal of A2e is to ensure future wind plants are sited, built, and operated in a way that produces the most cost-effective, usable electric power. Text Version

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan. Current...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan. Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Radiation ...

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly ... are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest ...

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations ... are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest ...

  18. Correcting radar range measurements for atmospheric propagation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Correcting radar range measurements for atmospheric propagation effects. Abstract not provided. Authors: Doerry, Armin Walter Publication Date: 2013-12-01 OSTI Identifier: ...

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan. Current...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Program Science Plan. Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science ...

  20. Atmospheric Ionization Mass Spectrometry Capabilities at Sandia...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mass Spectrometry Capabilities at Sandia National Labs. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Ionization Mass Spectrometry Capabilities at Sandia National Labs. ...

  1. PRECISION DETERMINATION OF ATMOSPHERIC EXTINCTION AT OPTICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State-of-the-art models of atmospheric radiation transport and modern codes are used to ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 79 ASTROPHYSICS, ...

  2. Assessment of radionuclides (uranium and thorium) atmospheric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Assessment of radionuclides (uranium and thorium) atmospheric pollution around Manjung district, Perak using moss as bio-indicator Bio-monitoring method using mosses have ...

  3. Search for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring ...

  4. Evaluation of Routine Atmospheric Sounding Measurements using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using Unmanned Systems (ERASMUS) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of Routine Atmospheric Sounding Measurements using Unmanned Systems ...

  5. Atmosphere to Electrons | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atmosphere to Electrons Atmosphere to Electrons Atmosphere to Electrons Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) is a multi-year U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing electricity generation by wind plants. The goal of A2e is to ensure future wind plants are sited, built, and operated in a way that produces the most cost-effective, usable electric power. To achieve

  6. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while...

  7. Search for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurement" 50 results for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" Full Text and Citations Filters Filter Search Results Everything (Citations and Full Text) (50 results) ...

  8. Sea ice - atmosphere interaction: Application of multispectral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates. ... Title: Sea ice - atmosphere interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in ...

  9. Study of energy conversion and partitioning in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Daughton, William; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell M.; Myers, Clayton E.

    2015-05-15

    The most important feature of magnetic reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy to particle energy, the exact mechanisms by which this happens are yet to be determined despite a long history of reconnection research. Recently, we have reported our results on the energy conversion and partitioning in a laboratory reconnection layer in a short communication [Yamada et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 4474 (2014)]. The present paper is a detailed elaboration of this report together with an additional dataset with different boundary sizes. Our experimental study of the reconnection layer is carried out in the two-fluidmore » physics regime where ions and electrons move quite differently. We have observed that the conversion of magnetic energy occurs across a region significantly larger than the narrow electron diffusion region. A saddle shaped electrostatic potential profile exists in the reconnection plane, and ions are accelerated by the resulting electric field at the separatrices. These accelerated ions are then thermalized by re-magnetization in the downstream region. A quantitative inventory of the converted energy is presented in a reconnection layer with a well-defined, variable boundary. We also carried out a systematic study of the effects of boundary conditions on the energy inventory. This study concludes that about 50% of the inflowing magnetic energy is converted to particle energy, 2/3 of which is ultimately transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. When assisted by another set of magnetic reconnection experiment data and numerical simulations with different sizes of monitoring box, it is also observed that the observed features of energy conversion and partitioning do not depend on the size of monitoring boundary across the range of sizes tested from 1.5 to 4 ion skin depths.« less

  10. Study of energy conversion and partitioning in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Daughton, William; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell M.; Myers, Clayton E.

    2015-05-15

    The most important feature of magnetic reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy to particle energy, the exact mechanisms by which this happens are yet to be determined despite a long history of reconnection research. Recently, we have reported our results on the energy conversion and partitioning in a laboratory reconnection layer in a short communication [Yamada et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 4474 (2014)]. The present paper is a detailed elaboration of this report together with an additional dataset with different boundary sizes. Our experimental study of the reconnection layer is carried out in the two-fluid physics regime where ions and electrons move quite differently. We have observed that the conversion of magnetic energy occurs across a region significantly larger than the narrow electron diffusion region. A saddle shaped electrostatic potential profile exists in the reconnection plane, and ions are accelerated by the resulting electric field at the separatrices. These accelerated ions are then thermalized by re-magnetization in the downstream region. A quantitative inventory of the converted energy is presented in a reconnection layer with a well-defined, variable boundary. We also carried out a systematic study of the effects of boundary conditions on the energy inventory. This study concludes that about 50% of the inflowing magnetic energy is converted to particle energy, 2/3 of which is ultimately transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. When assisted by another set of magnetic reconnection experiment data and numerical simulations with different sizes of monitoring box, it is also observed that the observed features of energy conversion and partitioning do not depend on the size of monitoring boundary across the range of sizes tested from 1.5 to 4 ion skin depths.

  11. Inkjet Deposition of Layer-by-Layer Assembled Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andres, C. M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2010-09-23

    Layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) can create advanced composites with exceptional properties unavailable by other means, but the laborious deposition process and multiple dipping cycles hamper their utilization in microtechnologies and electronics. Multiple rinse steps provide both structural control and thermodynamic stability to LBL multilayers, but they significantly limit their practical applications and contribute significantly to the processing time and waste. Here we demonstrate that by employing inkjet technology one can deliver the necessary quantities of LBL components required for film buildup without excess, eliminating the need for repetitive rinsing steps. This feature differentiates this approach from all other recognized LBL modalities. Using a model system of negatively charged gold nanoparticles and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride, the material stability, nanoscale control over thickness, and particle coverage offered by the inkjet LBL technique are shown to be equal or better than the case of multilayers made with traditional dipping cycles. The opportunity for fast deposition of complex metallic patterns using a simple inkjet printer is also shown. The additive nature of LBL deposition based on the formation of insoluble nanoparticle-polyelectrolyte complexes of various compositions provides an excellent opportunity for versatile, multicomponent, and noncontact patterning for the simple production of stratified patterns that are much needed in advanced devices.

  12. The Puzzling Boundaries of Topological Quantum Matter | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Puzzling Boundaries of Topological Quantum Matter January 8, 2016 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Michael Levin, University of Chicago Location Building 203 Type Colloquium Series...

  13. Microsoft Word - Gr-hBN boundary state (050214)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... B atoms are specified in blue, N atoms are green, carbons are black, and Cu atoms are ... The boundary states are located around 0.1 eV above the Fermi energy. The calculations ...

  14. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have...

  15. Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Brewer, Luke N.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid M.; Clark, Blythe B.; Olmsted, David L.; Medlin, Douglas L.

    2009-09-01

    Interfaces are a critical determinant of the full range of materials properties, especially at the nanoscale. Computational and experimental methods developed a comprehensive understanding of nanograin evolution based on a fundamental understanding of internal interfaces in nanocrystalline nickel. It has recently been shown that nanocrystals with a bi-modal grain-size distribution possess a unique combination of high-strength, ductility and wear-resistance. We performed a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the structure and motion of internal interfaces in nanograined metal and the resulting grain evolution. The properties of grain boundaries are computed for an unprecedented range of boundaries. The presence of roughening transitions in grain boundaries is explored and related to dramatic changes in boundary mobility. Experimental observations show that abnormal grain growth in nanograined materials is unlike conventional scale material in both the level of defects and the formation of unfavored phases. Molecular dynamics simulations address the origins of some of these phenomena.

  16. Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, M. Leuthold, J.; Peterlechner, M.; Divinski, S. V.; Song, X.; Wilde, G.

    2014-09-07

    Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline Cu samples with grain sizes, ?d?, of ?35 and ?44?nm produced by spark plasma sintering were investigated by the radiotracer method using the {sup 63}Ni isotope. The measured diffusivities, D{sub eff}, are comparable with those determined previously for Ni grain boundary diffusion in well-annealed, high purity, coarse grained, polycrystalline copper, substantiating the absence of a grain size effect on the kinetic properties of grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material at grain sizes d???35?nm. Simultaneously, the analysis predicts that if triple junction diffusion of Ni in Cu is enhanced with respect to the corresponding grain boundary diffusion rate, it is still less than 500?D{sub gb} within the temperature interval from 420?K to 470?K.

  17. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  18. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  19. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  20. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  1. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  2. Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boron-based oil additives | Argonne National Laboratory Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives Title Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2016 Authors Kim, Y-J, Baik, S-I, Bertolucci-Coelho, L, Mazzaferro, L, Ramirez, G, Erdemir, A, Seidman, DN Journal Scripta Materialia Volume 111 Start Page 65 Issue 15 Pagination 4 Date

  3. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  4. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  5. Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of

  6. Flavor twisted boundary conditions in the Breit frame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, F.-J.; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-08-01

    We use a generalization of chiral perturbation theory to account for the effects of flavor twisted boundary conditions in the Breit frame. The relevant framework for two light flavors is an SU(6|4) partially quenched theory, where the extra valence quarks differ only by their boundary conditions. Focusing on the pion electromagnetic form factor, finite volume corrections are calculated at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion and are estimated to be small on current lattices.

  7. The Puzzling Boundaries of Topological Quantum Matter Michael Levin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Puzzling Boundaries of Topological Quantum Matter Michael Levin University of Chicago October 14, 2015 4:00 p.m. Insulators, by definition, cannot conduct electric current in their interior. However, some insulators - most famously, the recently discovered "topological insulators" - possess the unusual property that they conduct at their surfaces or edges. This conduction occurs through modes that travel along the boundary of the insulator, like waves moving on the surface of the

  8. Twist-averaged boundary conditions for nuclear pasta Hartree-Fock calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-10-21

    Nuclear pasta phases, present in the inner crust of neutron stars, are associated with nucleonic matter at subsaturation densities arranged in regular shapes. Those complex phases, residing in a layer which is approximately 100-m thick, impact many features of neutron stars. Theoretical quantum-mechanical simulations of nuclear pasta are usually carried out in finite three-dimensional boxes assuming periodic boundary conditions. The resulting solutions are affected by spurious finite-size effects. To remove spurious finite-size effects, it is convenient to employ twist-averaged boundary conditions (TABC) used in condensed matter, nuclear matter, and lattice quantum chromodynamics applications. In this work, we study the effectiveness of TABC in the context of pasta phase simulations within nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrated that by applying TABC reliable results can be obtained from calculations performed in relatively small volumes. By studying various contributions to the total energy, we gain insights into pasta phases in mid-density range. Future applications will include the TABC extension of the adaptive multiresolution 3D Hartree-Fock solver and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov TABC applications to superfluid pasta phases and complex nucleonic topologies as in fission.

  9. Twist-averaged boundary conditions for nuclear pasta Hartree-Fock calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-10-21

    Nuclear pasta phases, present in the inner crust of neutron stars, are associated with nucleonic matter at subsaturation densities arranged in regular shapes. Those complex phases, residing in a layer which is approximately 100-m thick, impact many features of neutron stars. Theoretical quantum-mechanical simulations of nuclear pasta are usually carried out in finite three-dimensional boxes assuming periodic boundary conditions. The resulting solutions are affected by spurious finite-size effects. To remove spurious finite-size effects, it is convenient to employ twist-averaged boundary conditions (TABC) used in condensed matter, nuclear matter, and lattice quantum chromodynamics applications. In this work, we study the effectivenessmore » of TABC in the context of pasta phase simulations within nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrated that by applying TABC reliable results can be obtained from calculations performed in relatively small volumes. By studying various contributions to the total energy, we gain insights into pasta phases in mid-density range. Future applications will include the TABC extension of the adaptive multiresolution 3D Hartree-Fock solver and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov TABC applications to superfluid pasta phases and complex nucleonic topologies as in fission.« less

  10. Contributions of anharmonic phonon interactions to thermal boundary conductance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.; Duda, John C.

    2010-05-01

    Continued reduction of characteristic dimensions in nanosystems has given rise to increasing importance of material interfaces on the overall system performance. With regard to thermal transport, this increases the need for a better fundamental understanding of the processes affecting interfacial thermal transport, as characterized by the thermal boundary conductance. When thermal boundary conductance is driven by phononic scattering events, accurate predictions of interfacial transport must account for anharmonic phononic coupling as this affects the thermal transmission. In this paper, a new model for phononic thermal boundary conductance is developed that takes into account anharonic coupling, or inelastic scattering events, at the interface between two materials. Previous models for thermal boundary conductance are first reviewed, including the Diffuse Mismatch Model, which only consdiers elastic phonon scattering events, and earlier attempts to account for inelastic phonon scattering, namely, the Maximum Transmission Model and the Higher Harmonic Inelastic model. A new model is derived, the Anharmonic Inelastic Model, which provides a more physical consideration of the effects of inelastic scattering on thermal boundary conductance. This is accomplished by considering specific ranges of phonon frequency interactions and phonon number density conservation. Thus, this model considers the contributions of anharmonic, inelastically scattered phonons to thermal boundary conductance. This new Anharmonic Inelastic Model shows excellent agreement between model predictions and experimental data at the Pb/diamond interface due to its ability to account for the temperature dependent changing phonon population in diamond, which can couple anharmonically with multiple phonons in Pb.

  11. Phenomena of oscillations in atmospheric pressure direct current glow discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fu-cheng; Yan, Wen; Wang, De-zhen

    2013-12-15

    Self-sustained oscillations in a dc glow discharge with a semiconductor layer at atmospheric pressure were investigated by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the dc glow discharge initially becomes unstable in the subnormal glow region and gives rise to oscillations of plasma parameters. A variety of oscillations with one or more frequencies have been observed under different conditions. The discharge oscillates between the glow discharge mode and the Townsend discharge mode in the oscillations with large amplitude while operates in the subnormal glow discharge mode all the while in the oscillations with small amplitude. Fourier Transform spectra of oscillations reveal the transition mechanism between different oscillations. The effects of semiconductor conductivity on the oscillation frequency of the dominant mode, gas voltage, as well as the discharge current have also been analyzed.

  12. Biaxially textured metal substrate with palladium layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robbins, William B.

    2002-12-31

    Described is an article comprising a biaxially textured metal substrate and a layer of palladium deposited on at least one major surface of the metal substrate; wherein the palladium layer has desired in-plane and out-of-plane crystallographic orientations, which allow subsequent layers that are applied on the article to also have the desired orientations.

  13. Enhanced molecular dynamics for simulating porous interphase layers in batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Lee, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Understanding charge transport processes at a molecular level using computational techniques is currently hindered by a lack of appropriate models for incorporating anistropic electric fields in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. An important technological example is ion transport through solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers that form in many common types of batteries. These layers regulate the rate at which electro-chemical reactions occur, affecting power, safety, and reliability. In this work, we develop a model for incorporating electric fields in MD using an atomistic-to-continuum framework. This framework provides the mathematical and algorithmic infrastructure to couple finite element (FE) representations of continuous data with atomic data. In this application, the electric potential is represented on a FE mesh and is calculated from a Poisson equation with source terms determined by the distribution of the atomic charges. Boundary conditions can be imposed naturally using the FE description of the potential, which then propagates to each atom through modified forces. The method is verified using simulations where analytical or theoretical solutions are known. Calculations of salt water solutions in complex domains are performed to understand how ions are attracted to charged surfaces in the presence of electric fields and interfering media.

  14. NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processing Platform Capabilities Research Process Development and Integration Laboratory Printable Version Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of

  15. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  16. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Glish, Gary L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above.

  17. Dense, layered membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roark, Shane E.; MacKay, Richard; Mundschau, Michael V.

    2006-02-21

    This invention provides hydrogen-permeable membranes for separation of hydrogen from hydrogen-containing gases. The membranes are multi-layer having a central hydrogen-permeable layer with one or more catalyst layers, barrier layers, and/or protective layers. The invention also relates to membrane reactors employing the hydrogen-permeable membranes of the invention and to methods for separation of hydrogen from a hydrogen-containing gas using the membranes and reactors. The reactors of this invention can be combined with additional reactor systems for direct use of the separated hydrogen.

  18. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0layer is disposed on the back surface of the portion of the substrate. A semiconductor layer is disposed on the silicon oxynitride dielectric layer.

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... boundary layer, optical properties, black carbon, biomass burning, non methane hydrocarbons, radiative forcing, climate, ice nuclei, atmosphere, long range transport (1) Filter ...

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strongly influenced by atmospheric dynamics as well as ecosystem and anthropogenic fluxes. ... mid-day is determined by both net ecosystem uptake and the growing boundary layer. ...

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the free troposphere (up to 10 km high), and (b) weather-related variability in both free tropospheric and atmospheric boundary layer CO2 concentrations. Temperature and...

  2. Upper atmospheric effects of the hf active auroral research program ionospheric research instrument (HAARP IRI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccles, V.; Armstrong, R.

    1993-05-01

    The earth's ozone layer occurs in the stratosphere, primarily between 10 and 30 miles altitude. The amount of ozone, O3, present is the result of a balance between production and destruction processes. Experiments have shown that natural processes such as auroras create molecules that destroy O. One family of such molecules is called odd nitrogen of which nitric oxide (NO) is an example. Because the HAARP (HF Active Auroral Research Program) facility is designed to mimic and investigate certain natural processes, a study of possible effects of HAARP on the ozone layer was conducted. The study used a detailed model of the thermal and chemical effects of the high power HF beam, which interacts with free electrons in the upper atmosphere above 50 miles altitude. It was found only a small fraction of the beam energy goes into the production of odd nitrogen molecules, whereas odd nitrogen is efficiently produced by auroras. Since the total energy emitted by HAARP in the year is some 200,000 times less than the energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by auroras, the study demonstrates that HAARP HF beam experiments will cause no measurable depletion of the earth's ozone layer.... Ozone, Ozone depletion, Ozone layer, Odd nitrogen, Nitric oxide, HAARP Emitter characteristics.

  3. Multi Layer Contaminant Migration Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-07-28

    This computer software augments and enhances certain calculation included in the previously copyrighted Vadose Zone Contaminant Migration Model. The computational method used in this model recognizes the heterogenous nature of the soils and attempts to account for the variability by using four separate layers to simulate the flow of water through the vadose zone. Therefore, the pore-water velocity calculated by the code will be different than the previous model because it accounts for a widermore » variety of soil properties encountered in the vadose zone. This model also performs an additional screening step than in the previous model. In this model the higher value of two different types of Soil Screening Levels are compared to soil concentrations of contaminants. If the contaminant concentration exceeds the highest of two SSLs, then that contaminant is listed. This is consistent with USEPA's Soil Screening Guidance.« less

  4. Ewan O'Connor FMI (Finnish Meteorological Ins7tute), Helsinki, Finland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5/16 Diagnosing boundary layer properties from remote-sensing observations Ewan O'Connor FMI (Finnish Meteorological Ins7tute), Helsinki, Finland University of Reading, Reading, UK Boundary Layer * Friction-only * Classical fluid dynamics * Atmospheric stability * Atmospheric * Include convection, cloud * Include coast, cities 3/15/16 What is a boundary layer? * Classical fluid dynamics: the layer in a nearly inviscid fluid next to a surface in which frictional drag associated with that surface

  5. SWiFT site atmospheric characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Christopher Lee; Ennis, Brandon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Historical meteorological tall tower data are analyzed from the Texas Tech University 200 m tower to characterize the atmospheric trends of the Scaled Wind Farm Technologies (SWiFT) site. In this report the data are analyzed to reveal bulk atmospheric trends, temporal trends and correlations of atmospheric variables. Through this analysis for the SWiFT turbines the site International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) classification is determined to be class III-C. Averages and distributions of atmospheric variables are shown, revealing large fluctuations and the importance of understanding the actual site trends as opposed to simply using averages. The site is significantly directional with the average wind speed from the south, and particularly so in summer and fall. Site temporal trends are analyzed from both seasonal (time of the year) to daily (hour of the day) perspectives. Atmospheric stability is seen to vary most with time of day and less with time of year. Turbulence intensity is highly correlated with stability, and typical daytime unstable conditions see double the level of turbulence intensity versus that experienced during the average stable night. Shear, veer and atmospheric stability correlations are shown, where shear and veer are both highest for stable atmospheric conditions. An analysis of the Texas Tech University tower anemometer measurements is performed which reveals the extent of the tower shadow effects and sonic tilt misalignment.

  6. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  7. Fission Product Transport in TRISO Particle Layers under Operating and Off-Normal Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van der Ven, Anton; Was, Gary; Wang, Lumin; Taheri, Mitra

    2014-07-07

    The objective of this project is to determine the diffusivity and chemical behavior of key fission products (ag, Cs, I. Te, Eu and Sr) through SiC and PyC both thermally, under irradiation, and under stress using FP introduction techniques that avoid the pitfalls of past experiments. The experimental approach is to create thin PyC-SiC couples containing the fission product to be studied embedded in the PyC layer. These samples will then be subjected to high temperature exposures in a vacuum and also to irradiation at high temperature, and last, to irradiation under stress at high temperature. The PyC serves as a host layer, providing a means of placing the fission product close to the SiC without damaging the SiC layer by its introduction or losing the FP during heating. Experimental measurements of grain boundary structure and distribution (EBSD, HRTEM, APT) will be used in the modeling effort to determine the qualitative dependence of FP diffusion coefficients on grain boundary orientation, temperature and stress.

  8. HC quench layer formation in combustion processes. Technical progress report, September-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavoie, G A

    1980-02-01

    The project is aimed at understanding wall quenching and other processes responsible for surface generated hydrocarbons in combustion under engine-like conditions. The study concerns the effects of turbulence on the evolution of hydrocarbons. At the conclusion of the program, significant new experimental information will have been generated and an analytical model of the fluid mechanics and some aspects of the chemistry of quenching will be formulated. The work is divided into three tasks: (1) combustion bomb experiments to measure the effect of turbulence on the chemical species near the cold surface; combustion bomb experiments, using a similar turbulence generating device, to fully characterize the flow and turbulence in the vicinity of the quenching surface, and an analytical study to characterize fluid mechanical scales of interest in the boundary layer and to find an analytical solution to describe the evolution of the layer. The major accomplishments to date are (i) demonstration of the feasibility of single shot sampling valve operation and gas analysis in the Ford bomb under laminar combustion conditions, (ii) formulation of design rationale for turbulence generation scheme and bomb geometry, and (iii) formulation of an approach to modeling turbulent boundary layer conditions.

  9. Delineating Bukit Bunuh impact crater boundary by geophysical and geotechnical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azwin, I. N. Rosli, S.; Nordiana, M. M.; Ragu, R. R.; Mark, J.; Mokhtar, S.

    2015-03-30

    Evidences of crater morphology and shock metamorphism in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Malaysia were found during the archaeological research conducted by the Centre for Global Archaeological Research Malaysia, Universiti Sains Malaysia. In order to register Bukit Bunuh as one of the world meteorite impact site, detailed studies are needed to verify the boundary of the crater accordingly. Geophysical study was conducted utilising the seismic refraction and 2-D electrical resistivity method. Seismic refraction survey was done using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph with 14Hz geophones and 40kg weight drop while 2-D electrical resistivity survey was performed using ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter and ES10-64C electrode selector with pole-dipole array. Bedrock depths were digitized from the sections obtained. The produced bedrock topography map shows that there is low bedrock level circulated by high elevated bedrock and interpreted as crater and rim respectively with diameter approximately 8km. There are also few spots of high elevated bedrock appear at the centre of the crater which interpreted as rebounds zone. Generally, the research area is divided into two layers where the first layer with velocity 400-1100 m/s and resistivity value of 10-800 Om predominantly consists of alluvium mix with gravel and boulders. Second layer represents granitic bedrock with depth of 5-50m having velocity >2100 m/s and resistivity value of >1500 Om. This research is strengthen by good correlation between geophysical data and geotechnical borehole records executed inside and outside of the crater, on the rim, as well as at the rebound area.

  10. DYNA3D Non-reflecting Boundary Conditions - Test Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zywicz, E

    2006-09-28

    Two verification problems were developed to test non-reflecting boundary segments in DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann, 1993). The problems simulate 1-D wave propagation in a semi-infinite rod using a finite length rod and non-reflecting boundary conditions. One problem examines pure pressure wave propagation, and the other problem explores pure shear wave propagation. In both problems the non-reflecting boundary segments yield results that differ only slightly (less than 6%) during a short duration from their corresponding theoretical solutions. The errors appear to be due to the inability to generate a true step-function compressive wave in the pressure wave propagation problem and due to segment integration inaccuracies in the shear wave propagation problem. These problems serve as verification problems and as regression test problems for DYNA3D.

  11. Explicit Expressions for 3D Boundary Integrals in Potential Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    On employing isoparametric, piecewise linear shape functions over a flat triangular domain, exact expressions are derived for all surface potentials involved in the numerical solution of three-dimensional singular and hyper-singular boundary integral equations of potential theory. These formulae, which are valid for an arbitrary source point in space, are represented as analytic expressions over the edges of the integration triangle. They can be used to solve integral equations defined on polygonal boundaries via the collocation method or may be utilized as analytic expressions for the inner integrals in the Galerkin technique. Also, the constant element approximation can be directly obtained with no extra effort. Sample problems solved by the collocation boundary element method for the Laplace equation are included to validate the proposed formulae.

  12. Constraining the atmospheric composition of the day-night terminators of HD 189733b: Atmospheric retrieval with aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jae-Min; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Barstow, Joanna K.; Heng, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    A number of observations have shown that Rayleigh scattering by aerosols dominates the transmission spectrum of HD 189733b at wavelengths shortward of 1 ?m. In this study, we retrieve a range of aerosol distributions consistent with transmission spectroscopy between 0.3-24 ?m that were recently re-analyzed by Pont et al. To constrain the particle size and the optical depth of the aerosol layer, we investigate the degeneracies between aerosol composition, temperature, planetary radius, and molecular abundances that prevent unique solutions for transit spectroscopy. Assuming that the aerosol is composed of MgSiO{sub 3}, we suggest that a vertically uniform aerosol layer over all pressures with a monodisperse particle size smaller than about 0.1 ?m and an optical depth in the range 0.002-0.02 at 1 ?m provides statistically meaningful solutions for the day/night terminator regions of HD 189733b. Generally, we find that a uniform aerosol layer provide adequate fits to the data if the optical depth is less than 0.1 and the particle size is smaller than 0.1 ?m, irrespective of the atmospheric temperature, planetary radius, aerosol composition, and gaseous molecules. Strong constraints on the aerosol properties are provided by spectra at wavelengths shortward of 1 ?m as well as longward of 8 ?m, if the aerosol material has absorption features in this region. We show that these are the optimal wavelengths for quantifying the effects of aerosols, which may guide the design of future space observations. The present investigation indicates that the current data offer sufficient information to constrain some of the aerosol properties of HD189733b, but the chemistry in the terminator regions remains uncertain.

  13. Vision for cross-layer optimization to address the dual challenges of energy and reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M; Dehon, Andre; Carter, Nicholas P

    2009-01-01

    We are rapidly approaching an inflection point where the conventional target of producing perfect, identical transistors that operate without upset can no longer be maintained while continuing to reduce the energy per operation. With power requirements already limiting chip performance, continuing to demand perfect, upset-free transistors would mean the end of scaling benefits. The big challenges in device variability and reliability are driven by uncommon tails in distributions, infrequent upsets, one-size-fits-all technology requirements, and a lack of information about the context of each operation. Solutions co-designed across traditional layer boundaries in our system stack can change the game, allowing architecture and software (a) to compensate for uncommon variation, environments, and events, (b) to pass down invariants and requirements for the computation, and (c) to monitor the health of collections of deVices. Cross-layer codesign provides a path to continue extracting benefits from further scaled technologies despite the fact that they may be less predictable and more variable. While some limited multi-layer mitigation strategies do exist, to move forward redefining traditional layer abstractions and developing a framework that facilitates cross-layer collaboration is necessary.

  14. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-11-18

    Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr?1, with wetlandmoremethane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr?1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004June 2005 were in the range of 14.630.4 Tg yr?1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr?1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr?1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.less

  15. Operating Experience Level 3, Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 OE-3 2015-02: Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter (xQ) for Calculation of Co-located Worker Dose This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document informs the complex of the...

  16. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A large portion of the microscopic particles floating in the air originate from incomplete combustion of coal and oil and from dust storms. Once in the atmosphere, they can have ...

  17. Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov

    2009-05-15

    Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

  18. Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos...

  19. Solar collector with blackened layer facing insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugger, R.

    1981-05-12

    A solar collector has a surface turned toward the sun and forms a heat exchange cell which has at least one wall composed of sheet aluminum. A tramsmitting layer of such a wall or the absorption layer thereof is a black layer of aluminum oxide containing Ag or Sn and formed unitarily on the aluminum sheet, e.g. By a chemical or electrochemical process.

  20. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

  1. Manganese containing layer for magnetic recording media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambeth, David N.; Lee, Li-Lien; Laughlin, David E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides for a magnetic recording media incorporating Mn-containing layers between a substrate and a magnetic layer to provide media having increased coercivity and lower noise. The Mn-containing layer can be incorporated in a rotating, translating or stationary recording media to operate in conjunction with magnetic transducing heads for recording and reading of magnetic data, as well as other applications. The magnetic recording medium of the invention preferably includes a Co or Co alloy film magnetic layer, and Mn-containing layer, preferably comprised of VMn, TiMn, MnZn, CrMnMo, CrMnW, CrMnV, and CrMnTi, and most preferably a CrMn alloy, disposed between the substrate and the magnetic layer to promote an epitaxial crystalline structure in the magnetic layer. The medium can further include seed layers, preferably polycrystalline MgO for longitudinal media, underlayers, and intermediate layers. Underlayers and intermediate layers are comprised of materials having either an A2 structure or a B2-ordered crystalline structure disposed between the seed layer and the magnetic layer. Materials having an A2 structure are preferably Cr or Cr alloys, such as CrV, CrMo, CrW and CrTi. Materials having a B2-ordered structure having a lattice constant that is substantially comparable to that of Cr, such as those preferably selected from the group consisting of NiAl, AILCo, FeAl, FeTi, CoFe, CoTi, CoHf, CoZr, NiTi, CuBe, CuZn, A-LMn, AlRe, AgMg, and Al.sub.2 FeMn.sub.2, and is most preferably FeAl or NiAl.

  2. Multi-layer seal for electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung [Richland, WA; Meinhardt, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-09-14

    Multi-layer seals are provided that find advantageous use for reducing leakage of gases between adjacent components of electrochemical devices. Multi-layer seals of the invention include a gasket body defining first and second opposing surfaces and a compliant interlayer positioned adjacent each of the first and second surfaces. Also provided are methods for making and using the multi-layer seals, and electrochemical devices including said seals.

  3. Multi-layer seal for electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung [Richland, WA; Meinhardt, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-11-16

    Multi-layer seals are provided that find advantageous use for reducing leakage of gases between adjacent components of electrochemical devices. Multi-layer seals of the invention include a gasket body defining first and second opposing surfaces and a compliant interlayer positioned adjacent each of the first and second surfaces. Also provided are methods for making and using the multi-layer seals, and electrochemical devices including said seals.

  4. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  5. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2004-11-02

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  6. Associations of Pd, U and Ag in the SiC layer of neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, Thomas; Rooyen, Isabella Van

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of the associations and composition of fission products in the neutron irradiated SiC layer of high-temperature gas reactor TRISO fuel is important to the understanding of various aspects of fuel performance that presently are not well understood. Recently, advanced characterization techniques have been used to examine fuel particles from the Idaho National Laboratorys AGR-1 experiment. Nano-sized Ag and Pd precipitates were previously identified in grain boundaries and triple points in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO nuclear fuel. Continuation of this initial research is reported in this paper and consists of the characterization of a relatively large number of nano-sized precipitates in three areas of the SiC layer of a single irradiated TRISO nuclear fuel particle using standardless EDS analysis on focused ion beam-prepared transmission electron microscopy samples. Composition and distribution analyses of these precipitates, which were located on grain boundaries, triple junctions and intragranular precipitates, revealed low levels, generally <10 atomic %, of palladium, silver and/or uranium with palladium being the most common element found. Palladium by itself, or associated with either silver or uranium, was found throughout the SiC layer. A small number of precipitates on grain boundaries and triple junctions were found to contain only silver or silver in association with palladium while uranium was always associated with palladium but never found by itself or in association with silver. Intergranular precipitates containing uranium were found to have migrated ~23 ?m along a radial direction through the 35 ?m thick SiC coating during the AGR-1 experiment while silver-containing intergranular precipitates were found at depths up to ~24 ?m in the SiC layer. Also, Pd-rich, nano-precipitates (~10 nm in diameter), without evidence for the presence of either Ag or U, were revealed in intragranular regions throughout the SiC layer. Because not all

  7. Technology evaluation for space station atmospheric leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemon, D.K.; Friesel, M.A.; Griffin, J.W.; Skorpik, J.R.; Shepard, C.L.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1990-02-01

    A concern in operation of a space station is leakage of atmosphere through seal points and through the walls as a result of damage from particle (space debris and micrometeoroid) impacts. This report describes a concept for a monitoring system to detect atmosphere leakage and locate the leak point. The concept is based on analysis and testing of two basic methods selected from an initial technology survey of potential approaches. 18 refs., 58 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  9. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists

  11. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  12. Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic,

  13. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study () | Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Title: VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international ...

  14. Sodium-layer laser guide stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, H.W.

    1993-08-03

    The requirements and design of a laser system to generate a sodium- layer beacon is presented. Early results of photometry and wavefront sensing are given.

  15. Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-09-12

    This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

  16. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan; Rand, Barry P.

    2011-09-06

    A photosensitive device includes a plurality of organic photoconductive materials disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode, including a first continuous layer of donor host material, a second continuous layer of acceptor host material, and at least one other organic photoconductive material disposed as a plurality of discontinuous islands between the first continuous layer and the second continuous layer. Each of these other photoconductive materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor host material and the acceptor host material. Preferably, each of the discontinuous islands consists essentially of a crystallite of the respective organic photoconductive material, and more preferably, the crystallites are nanocrystals.

  17. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howcroft, Caius L.F.

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) | U.S.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum

  19. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  20. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  1. Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work ...

  2. Validation of the ARchived CERES Surface and Atmosphere Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archived CERES Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget at SGP T. P. Charlock National ... System (CERES) Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget (SARB) product (Charlock et al. ...

  3. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere. (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models. Authors: Doerry, Armin Walter ...

  4. Model-Observation "Data Cubes" for the DOE Atmospheric Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model-Observation "Data Cubes" for the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Facility's ... Program through its Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Facility. 2. Data Cube ...

  5. DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report ... DOESC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations ...

  6. About Effective? Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important...

  7. Search for: "atmospheric radiation measurement" | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    velocity (162) radar doppler (150) general circulation models (149) atmospheric chemistry (146) remote sensing (143) water vapor (134) earth atmosphere (133) radiometers (130) ...

  8. Aerosol specification in single-column Community Atmosphere Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aerosol specification in single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 Prev Next Title: Aerosol specification in single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 ...

  9. Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant...

  10. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH uptake ...

  11. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): channel 1 data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  12. ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    summary data Title: ARM: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST): summary data Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology ...

  13. Simulated response of the atmosphere-ocean system to deforestation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the atmosphere-ocean system to deforestation in the Indonesian Archipelago Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulated response of the atmosphere-ocean system to ...

  14. Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically...

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the ARM Aerial Facility Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global ...

  16. A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained by ... Title: A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained ...

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the ...

  18. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model system for studies of interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin and precipitation over the Southwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chung-Chieng A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ultimate objective of this research project is to make understanding and predicting regional climate easier. The long-term goals of this project are (1) to construct a coupled ocean-atmosphere model (COAM) system, (2) use it to explore the interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin, and (3) determine climate effects on the precipitation over the Southwestern United States. During this project life, three major tasks were completed: (1) Mesoscale ocean and atmospheric model; (2) global-coupled ocean and atmospheric modeling: completed the coupling of LANL POP global ocean model with NCAR CCM2+ global atmospheric model; and (3) global nested-grid ocean modeling: designed the boundary interface for the nested-grid ocean models.

  19. Subjective surfaces: a geometric model for boundary completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarti, Alessandro; Malladi, Ravi; Sethian, J.A.

    2000-06-01

    We present a geometric model and a computational method for segmentation of images with missing boundaries. In many situations, the human visual system fills in missing gaps in edges and boundaries, building and completing information that is not present. Boundary completion presents a considerable challenge in computer vision, since most algorithms attempt to exploit existing data. A large body of work concerns completion models, which postulate how to construct missing data; these models are often trained and specific to particular images. In this paper, we take the following, alternative perspective: we consider a reference point within an image as given, and then develop an algorithm which tries to build missing information on the basis of the given point of view and the available information as boundary data to the algorithm. Starting from this point of view, a surface is constructed. It is then evolved with the mean curvature flow in the metric induced by the image until a piecewise constant solution is reached. We test the computational model on modal completion, amodal completion, texture, photo and medical images. We extend the geometric model and the algorithm to 3D in order to extract shapes from low signal/noise ratio medical volumes. Results in 3D echocardiography and 3D fetal echography are presented.

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Layer Deposition New nanophase thin film materials with properties tailored to specifically meet the needs of industry New software simulates ALD over multiple length scale, saving industry time and money on developing specialized tools PDF icon Atomic_Layer_Deposition

  1. Multi-scale Atmospheric Modeling of Green House Gas Dispersion in Complex Terrain. Atmospheric Methane at Four Corners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costigan, Keeley Rochelle; Dubey, Manvendra Krishna

    2015-07-10

    Atmospheric models are compared in collaboration with LANL and the University of Michigan to understand emissions and the condition of the atmosphere from a model perspective.

  2. Epitaxial growth of silicon for layer transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M

    2015-03-24

    Methods of preparing a thin crystalline silicon film for transfer and devices utilizing a transferred crystalline silicon film are disclosed. The methods include preparing a silicon growth substrate which has an interface defining substance associated with an exterior surface. The methods further include depositing an epitaxial layer of silicon on the silicon growth substrate at the surface and separating the epitaxial layer from the substrate substantially along the plane or other surface defined by the interface defining substance. The epitaxial layer may be utilized as a thin film of crystalline silicon in any type of semiconductor device which requires a crystalline silicon layer. In use, the epitaxial transfer layer may be associated with a secondary substrate.

  3. Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Department of Physics, Texas Lutheran University, Seguin, Texas 78155 ; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W.; Magee, R. M.; TriAlpha Energy, Inc., Foothill Ranch, California 92610 ; Reynolds, E.

    2013-11-15

    We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability.

  4. Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Yonghao; Ding, Xianfei; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-09-15

    Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of a weld joint were investigated in a 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar weldment. The results showed that there were two alternately distributed typical fusion boundaries, a narrow random boundary (possessed 15% in length) with a clear sharp interface and an epitaxial fusion one with (100){sub BM}//(100){sub WM} at the joint interface. The composition transition, microstructure and hardness across the fusion boundary strongly depended on the type of the fusion boundary. For the random boundary, there was a clear sharp interface and the composition transition with a width of 100 μm took place symmetrically across the grain boundary. For the epitaxial fusion one, however, there were Type-I and Type-II grain boundaries perpendicular and parallel to the epitaxial fusion boundary, respectively. The composition transition took place in the Inconel 182 weld side. Σ3 boundaries in the HAZ of 316SS side and Σ5 grain boundaries in weld metal were usually observed, despite the type of fusion boundary, however the former was much more in epitaxial fusion boundary. Microhardness was continuously decreased across the random fusion boundary from the side of Inconel 182 to 316SS, but a hardening phenomenon appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary zone because of its fine cellular microstructure. - Highlights: • Two typical fusion boundaries alternately distributed in the fusion interface • The microstructure, composition and hardness across fusion boundary depended on its type. • Different regions in welded joint have different special CSL value boundaries. • Hardening phenomenon only appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary.

  5. Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

  6. Thermoelectric material including conformal oxide layers and method of making the same using atomic layer deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cho, Jung Young; Ahn, Dongjoon; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2016-06-07

    A thermoelectric material includes a substrate particle and a plurality of conformal oxide layers formed on the substrate particle. The plurality of conformal oxide layers has a total oxide layer thickness ranging from about 2 nm to about 20 nm. The thermoelectric material excludes oxide nanoparticles. A method of making the thermoelectric material is also disclosed herein.

  7. Magnetospheric structure and atmospheric Joule heating of habitable planets orbiting M-dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Glocer, A.; Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-07-20

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvnic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvnic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvnic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvnic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the intense stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1%-3% of the total incoming stellar irradiation, and it is enhanced by 50% for the time-dependent case. The significant Joule Heating obtained here should be considered in models for the atmospheres of habitable planets in terms of the thickness of the atmosphere, the top-side temperature and density, the boundary conditions for the atmospheric pressure, and particle radiation and transport. Here we assume constant ionospheric Pedersen conductance similar to that of the Earth. The conductance could be greater due to the intense EUV radiation leading to smaller heating rates. We plan to quantify the ionospheric conductance in future study.

  8. Functionalization of polymers using an atmospheric plasma jet in a fluidized bed reactor and the impact on SLM-processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachs, M. Schmitt, A. Schmidt, J. Peukert, W. Wirth, K-E

    2014-05-15

    In order to improve thermoplastics (e.g. Polyamide, Polypropylene and Polyethylene) for Selective Laser Beam Melting (SLM) processes a new approach to functionalize temperature sensitive polymer powders in a large scale is investigated. This is achieved by combining an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a fluidized bed reactor. Using pressurized air as the plasma gas, radicals like OH* are created. The functionalization leads to an increase of the hydrophilicity of the treated polymer powder without changing the bulk properties. Using the polymers in a SLM process to build single layers of melted material leads to an improvement of the melted layers.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  10. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250C, the temperature may reach 1600C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  11. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - Atmospheric Technologies Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Technologies Center Working with SRNL Our Facilities - Atmospheric Technologies Center The SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Center has extensive capabilities for world-wide meteorological forecasts and real-time atmospheric transport modeling and assessment. Meteorological monitoring through this facility includes the collection, archival, and application of SRS meteorological data, and the technology to predict the transport and consequence of accidental hazardous material release to

  12. Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, S.P.; Woods, R.W.

    1998-08-11

    A process is disclosed for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750 C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5--3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite. 2 figs.

  13. Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P.; Woods, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    A process for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750.degree. C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5-3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of grain boundaries in thin nanocrystalline silicon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, G.P.; Doolen, G.D.; Mainieri, R.; Campbell, D.K.; Luchnikov, V.A. |

    1997-10-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the grain boundaries in thin polycrystalline silicon films (considered as promising material for future nanoelectronic devices) are investigated. It is shown that in polysilicon film with randomly oriented grains the majority of grain boundaries are disordered. However, some grains with small mutual orientation differences can form extended crystalline patterns. The structure of the grain boundaries satisfies the thermodynamical criterion. The majority of atoms in the grain boundaries are tetrahedrally coordinated with the nearest neighbors, even though the grain boundaries are disordered. The grain boundary matter is characterized as an amorphous phase with a characteristic tetragonality value.

  15. Superconducting composite with multilayer patterns and multiple buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D.; Muenchausen, Ross E.

    1993-01-01

    An article of manufacture including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of a material selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, yttrium oxide, curium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, europium oxide, iron oxide, gadolinium oxide, holmium oxide, indium oxide, lanthanum oxide, manganese oxide, lutetium oxide, neodymium oxide, praseodymium oxide, plutonium oxide, samarium oxide, terbium oxide, thallium oxide, thulium oxide, yttrium oxide and ytterbium oxide over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superco n FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of superconducting articles having two distinct regions of superconductive material with differing in-plane orientations whereby the conductivity across the boundary between the two regions can be tailored. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  16. ON THE LOW-FREQUENCY BOUNDARY OF SUN-GENERATED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN THE SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shergelashvili, Bidzina M.; Fichtner, Horst

    2012-06-20

    New aspects of the slow solar wind turbulent heating and acceleration are investigated. A physical meaning of the lower boundary of the Alfven wave turbulent spectra in the solar atmosphere and the solar wind is studied and the significance of this natural parameter is demonstrated. Via an analytical and quantitative treatment of the problem we show that a truncation of the wave spectra from the lower frequency side, which is a consequence of the solar magnetic field structure and its cyclic changes, results in a significant reduction of the heat production and acceleration rates. An appropriate analysis is presented regarding the link of the considered problem with existing observational data and slow solar wind initiation scenarios.

  17. Method for forming a barrier layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  18. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-11-16

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

  19. Strained layer Fabry-Perot device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Fritz, Ian J.; Hammons, Burrell E.

    1994-01-01

    An asymmetric Fabry-Perot reflectance modulator (AFPM) consists of an active region between top and bottom mirrors, the bottom mirror being affixed to a substrate by a buffer layer. The active region comprises a strained-layer region having a bandgap and thickness chosen for resonance at the Fabry-Perot frequency. The mirrors are lattice matched to the active region, and the buffer layer is lattice matched to the mirror at the interface. The device operates at wavelengths of commercially available semiconductor lasers.

  20. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.