Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Scaled modeling and simulation of ocean wave linear generator buoy systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Accurate scaled modeling and simulation are critical to advancing ocean wave linear generator buoys. A 100th scaled model of ocean wave generator buoy systems is… (more)

Gore, Ganesh P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys Douglas A. Gemme1 are presented for numerical simulations and field experiments using point absorption ocean wave energy and experimental data. Index Terms ­ energy conversion, wave energy harvesting, linear generator, ocean energy

Grilli, Stéphan T.

3

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

Kristoffersen, Yngve

4

Experimental analysis of an energy self sufficient ocean buoy utilizing a bi-directional turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental analysis of a Venturi shrouded hydro turbine for wave energy conversion. The turbine is designed to meet the specific power requirements of a, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute offshore monitoring buoy ...

Gruber, Timothy J. (Timothy James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation is the ultimate source of energy for motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Most absorption of solar radiation takes place on the Earth surface, the majority of which is occupied by oceans. Thus oceanic modulate surface radiative flux. Thus, the ocean and atmosphere are a coupled system and their interaction

Xie, Shang-Ping

6

VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

Wood, Robert (VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington); Bretherton, Christopher (GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington); Huebert, Barry (SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii); Mechoso, Roberto C. (VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA); Weller, Robert (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

7

Exploring the Deep... Ocean-Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate oscillations 97 #12;Storing energy To understand how solar radiation affects large-scale processes), and biosphere (living organisms) that are driven by solar energy. The ocean and the atmosphere have the greatest on the others. To fully understand the dynamics of our climate, we must examine the global energy balance

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

8

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professor; Recipient, Teaching Innovation Prize; Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year Allison Mission to Comet 67P / Churyumov- Gerasimenko · Solar and Heliospheric Physics Group · STEREO Mission,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann

Eustice, Ryan

9

ECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interface #12;1*- Sensible heat flux 6*- Evaporation + int. energy [+ Qlat] ECMWF workshop on Ocean layer) 5- Surface ocean current 7- Surface height 7 1- Continental runoff + internal Energy 8 1*- SurfECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere physical

10

Modeling decade to century scale variability in the atmosphere/ocean [Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Study of the intrinsic variability of a coupled atmosphere/ocean model called The Fast Ocean/Atmosphere Model (FOAM).

Kutzbach, John E.

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

11

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

12

EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment Spring 2012 Instructors: Steven Hall E Overview Description: EPS22 introduces students to the fluid earth, emphasizing Earth's weather is EPS22? A graphical representation of major topics. Current topics in atmospheric and ocean sciences

Huybers, Peter

13

12.003 Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans, Fall 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The laws of classical mechanics and thermodynamics are used to explore how the properties of fluids on a rotating Earth manifest themselves in, and help shape, the global patterns of atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and ...

Marshall, John C.

14

Tropical atmosphere - Ocean interactions in a conceptual framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical analysis of observations (including atmospheric reanalysis and forced ocean model simulations) is used to address two questions: First, does an analogous mechanism to that of El Nińo–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) ...

Jansen, Malte Friedrich

15

AUTOMATED UNDERWAY OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS FROM Shawn R. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTOMATED UNDERWAY OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS FROM SHIPS Shawn R. Smith (1) , Mark A 32306-2840, USA, Emails: smith@coaps.fsu.edu, mbourassa@coaps.fsu.edu (2) CSIRO Land and Water, PO Box

Sprintall, Janet

16

Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26) UW Hon220c Energy & Environment in the atmosphere: 50-70% of the greenhouse effect; ½ the flow of thermal energy from laEtude (like SeaXle and its sister city, Bergen Norway. Meehl et al. Geophysical

17

Atmosphere and Ocean: Earth's Heat Engine: GFD Lab notes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmosphere and Ocean: Earth's Heat Engine: GFD Lab notes 18 May 2012 UW Hon220c Energy' of water vapor, CO2 and cloud, makes us much warmer than a Marsian (almost no atmosphere. -550C average 2002 clouds, snow, ice, deserts are bright absorbing areas are dark

18

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Research areas Atmospheric Science Atmospheric Dynamics Climate, Climate Modeling & Climate Change Clouds & Precipitation Paleoclimate, Ice

Eustice, Ryan

19

Evolving research directions in Surface OceanLower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolving research directions in Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science Cliff S. Law. Understanding the exchange of energy, gases and particles at the ocean­atmosphere interface is critical­Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) coordinates multi-disciplinary ocean­ atmosphere research projects that quantify

20

Water and Climate 2. Circulation of ocean and atmosphere; climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to high latitude and part of that thermal energy is FW: latent heat Gill Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics integrated vertically (annual mean) ERA40 Atlas ECMWF HIGH: ICTZ, monsoon regions, Amazon.... convergent March 2005 from satellite radiometer AMSR-E. Ranges up to 6.5 cm FW in tropics #12;#12;Relative humidity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

JOINT INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF THE ATMOSPHERE & OCEAN (JISAO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional datasets. SCIENCE HIgHLIgHTS MARINE ECOSYSTEMS / FISHERIES RECRUITMENT Collaborations JOINT INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF THE ATMOSPHERE & OCEAN (JISAO) ANNUAL REPORT JULy 1, 2005 ­ JUNE Management and Administration 20 ProjEct SummariES 23 Marine Ecosystems 24 Climate 44 Environmental Chemistry

Rigor, Ignatius G.

22

Bragg scattering and wave-power extraction by an array of small buoys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for power extraction from ocean waves will likely involve a periodic array of absorbing units. We report an asymptotic theory of scattering and radiation by a linear array of heaving buoys in a channel and attached the asymptotic theory. Keywords: Periodic buoy array, Multiple scattering and radiation, Bragg resonance, Wave

Boyer, Edmond

23

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical DepthgovCampaignsSpring(PROBE) govCampaignsTheOcean-Atmosphere

24

Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) CawithMicrofluidicJournalWhatActivities inNOAA Science

25

Effect of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Changes on Tropical Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) changes on tropical coupled ocean-atmosphere system via oceanic and atmospheric processes. A suite of numerical simulations have been...

Wan, Xiuquan

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Explorations of Atmosphere–Ocean–Ice Climates on an Aquaplanet and Their Meridional Energy Transports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The degree to which total meridional heat transport is sensitive to the details of its atmospheric and oceanic components is explored. A coupled atmosphere, ocean, and sea ice model of an aquaplanet is employed to simulate ...

Marshall, John C.

27

Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean: Spatial distribution,winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and

Taylor, Stephen V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to an increase in atmospheric CO2 are partly offset by the carbon uptake by the oceans and the restAnalytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes 2008; accepted 18 June 2008; published 12 September 2008. [1] Carbon perturbations leading

Follows, Mick

29

Overturning and wind driven circulation in a low-order ocean-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

july 2002 Abstract A low-order ocean-atmosphere model is presented which combines coupling through heat exchange at the interface and wind stress forcing. The coupling terms are derived from the boundary conditions and the forcing terms of the constituents. Both the ocean and the atmosphere model are based

van Veen, Lennaert

30

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

On the meridional heat transport and its partition between the atmosphere and oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I study the meridional heat transport of the climate system and its partition between the atmosphere and oceans using models and data. I focus on three primary questions: (1) What is the total heat transport ...

Enderton, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission Mission The NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE (NESDIS to promote, protect and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environment and quality of life. To fulfill

33

AUTOMATED UNDERWAY OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS FROM Shawn R. Smith (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTOMATED UNDERWAY OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS FROM SHIPS Shawn R. Smith (1) , Mark A 32306-2840, USA, Emails: smith@coaps.fsu.edu, mbourassa@coaps.fsu.edu (2) CSIRO Land and Water, PO Box

34

The Total Meridional Heat Flux and Its Oceanic and Atmospheric Partition CARL WUNSCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model residual is done to permit calculation of a preliminary uncertainty estimate for the atmospheric the oceanic flux drops rapidly, but does not actually vanish until the oceanic surface area goes to zero The partitioning and fluctuations in the net poleward transport of heat (energy, actually enthalpy; see War- ren

Wunsch, Carl

35

Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone) in a realistic configuration aiming at simulating the genesis and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica and Oceanic Coupled Models (AOCMs) which account for important air-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations

Recanati, Catherine

36

Impacts of interruption of the Agulhas leakage on the tropical Atlantic in coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Climate Dynamics October 2009 #12;2 ABSTRACT In this paper we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere model Indian ocean water temperature (cold) and salinity (fresh) anomalies of southern ocean origin propagate the closure of the "warm water path" in favor of the "cold water path". As part of the atmospheric response

Drijfhout, Sybren

37

Atmospheric Moisture Transports from Ocean to Land and Global Energy Flows in Reanalyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Moisture Transports from Ocean to Land and Global Energy Flows in Reanalyses KEVIN E energy and hydrological cycles from eight current atmospheric reanalyses and their depiction of changes over time. A brief evaluation of the water and energy cycles in the latest version of the NCAR climate

Fasullo, John

38

Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

39

Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean M. Jochum Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary model of the tropical Pacific ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability caused by internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the Pacific cold tongue internal variability

Jochum, Markus

40

Air Resources Laboratory The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is a research laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the atmospheric transport, transformation and fate of air pollutants. To support air quality decision makers, ARL the interaction of air pollutants in the atmosphere and between the atmosphere and the underlying land and water the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ARL is headquartered at the NOAA Center for Weather

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The dynamics of a low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A system of five ordinary differential equations is studied which combines the Lorenz-84 model for the atmosphere and a box model for the ocean. The behaviour of this system is studied as a function of the coupling parameters. For most parameter values, the dynamics of the atmosphere model is dominant. For a range of parameter values, competing attractors exist. The Kaplan-Yorke dimension and the correlation dimension of the chaotic attractor are numerically calculated and compared to the values found in the uncoupled Lorenz model. In the transition from periodic behaviour to chaos intermittency is observed. The intermittent behaviour occurs near a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation at which a periodic solution loses its stability. The length of the periodic intervals is governed by the time scale of the ocean component. Thus, in this regime the ocean model has a considerable influence on the dynamics of the coupled system.

L. van Veen; F. Verhulst; T. Opsteegh

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Explorations of AtmosphereOceanIce Climates on an Aquaplanet and Their Meridional Energy Transports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explorations of Atmosphere­Ocean­Ice Climates on an Aquaplanet and Their Meridional Energy climates--some with polar ice caps, some without--even though they are driven by the same incoming solar is a useful guide. In cold climates with significant polar ice caps, however, meridional gradients in albedo

Miami, University of

43

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance E. Hanna 1 ice loss over Greenland. Recent warm events are about the same magnitude, if not smaller, than those warming, remain incompletely understood. Satellite Observations The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) contains 7

Box, Jason E.

44

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology , L.-S. Bai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland J. E. Box 1 , L.-S. Bai 1 , R across the southern half of Greenland led to substantially higher west coast sea ice thickness and concentration. Even so, record-setting summer temperatures around Greenland, combined with an intense melt

Box, Jason E.

45

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Ensuring the Safety of Your Seafood Crude oil has the potential to taint seafood with flavors and odors imparted by exposure to hydrocarbon chemicals. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates the presence

46

Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere & Ocean OPERATIONS MANUAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere & Ocean OPERATIONS MANUAL 2009-2010 Joint Institute Operations Manual Revised October 2009---mcs 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. INTRODUCTION 4 A. Organization Chart Employees 14 I. Equipment Inventory and Property Activity 14 #12;JISAO Operations Manual Revised October

Rigor, Ignatius G.

47

Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica. Sensitiv- ity tests to the coupling method are carried out-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations of the Corresponding author. Phone: +33 (0)4 76 51 48 60 Fax: +33 (0)4 76

48

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of transport and ocean ice extent on biogenic aerosol sulfur in the Arctic atmosphere S, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). This study examines relationships between changes in total sea ice extent north of 70. These results suggest that a decrease in seasonal ice cover influencing other mechanisms of DMS production could

49

A Hybrid Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Approach on the Simulation of Tropical Asian-Pacific Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Hybrid Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Approach on the Simulation of Tropical Asian-Pacific Climate at Manoa, 1680 East West Road, POST Bldg. 4th Floor, Honolulu, HI 96822 #12;ABSTRACT A unique Hybrid spring (in late fall). The encouraging results from this hybrid coupled model indicate

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

50

Technical Sessions B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8, 2013Battelle:Technical Services.T. J. KulpAB.

51

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun JumpMuscoy,Jump9 CaseNatElInformation Atmospheric

52

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

54

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Surface Products over the Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Boundary Forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the uncertainties related to atmospheric fields from reanalysis products used in forcing ocean models. Four reanalysis products, namely from 1) the interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) version ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

55

A Three-Dimensional Ocean-Seaice-Carbon Cycle Model and its Coupling to a Two-Dimensional Atmospheric Model: Uses in Climate Change Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the coupling of a three-dimensional ocean circulation model, with explicit thermodynamic seaice and ocean carbon cycle representations, to a two-dimensional atmospheric/land model. This coupled system has been ...

Dutkiewicz, Stephanie.

56

Low-frequency variability and heat transport in a low-order nonlinear coupled ocean-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We formulate and study a low-order nonlinear coupled ocean-atmosphere model with an emphasis on the impact of radiative and heat fluxes and of the frictional coupling between the two components. This model version extends a previous 24-variable version by adding a dynamical equation for the passive advection of temperature in the ocean, together with an energy balance model. The bifurcation analysis and the numerical integration of the model reveal the presence of low-frequency variability (LFV) concentrated on and near a long-periodic, attracting orbit. This orbit combines atmospheric and oceanic modes, and it arises for large values of the meridional gradient of radiative input and of frictional coupling. Chaotic behavior develops around this orbit as it loses its stability; this behavior is still dominated by the LFV on decadal and multi-decadal time scales that is typical of oceanic processes. Atmospheric diagnostics also reveals the presence of predominant low- and high-pressure zones, as well as of a subtropical jet; these features recall realistic climatological properties of the oceanic atmosphere. Finally, a predictability analysis is performed. Once the decadal-scale periodic orbits develop, the coupled system's short-term instabilities --- as measured by its Lyapunov exponents --- are drastically reduced, indicating the ocean's stabilizing role on the atmospheric dynamics. On decadal time scales, the recurrence of the solution in a certain region of the invariant subspace associated with slow modes displays some extended predictability, as reflected by the oscillatory behavior of the error for the atmospheric variables at long lead times.

Stéphane Vannitsem; Jonathan Demaeyer; Lesley De Cruz; Michael Ghil

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A study of atmosphere-ocean interaction using a one-dimensional numerical air-sea boundary layer model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surface with no allowance for exchange induced by wave action. The model does produce reasonable solutions, in comparison with oceanic data, for the response of the lower atmosphere and the upper ocean to specific. sets of meteorological and oceanic.../2 this function is of the form f(Ri) = (1 + b Ri) , then one obtains ? 3 1/2 2 -1 K (z) = K 62 (gX ) exp(z/W) (z/I + rdI) (1 + b Ri) hw 1 (61) Although KITAIGORODSKII (1961) does not give a specific value of b, it would appear that b = 10/3 would be in line...

Hebenstreit, Gerald Thomas

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere ocean heat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 The Oceans and Climate Change LuAnne Thompson Summary: it takes vastly more energy to heat up the ocean, ocean temperature is much more resistant to change than... dioxide is...

59

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

60

Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences in the bottom bound- ary layer. In the nonlinear internal waves that were observed, the kinetic energy. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear

Kurapov, Alexander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

Gleckler, P J

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

63

Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

Silverthorne, Katherine E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

65

Multiscale dynamics of atmospheric and oceanic variability in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filtering) for Numerical Weather Prediction models wereNumerical Weather Prediction (NWP) in meteorology, caused ocean models

Subramanian, Aneesh C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Biological Fluxes in the Ocean and Atmospheric pCO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the ocean; the rest of the ocean is dark, or at least too dark to make a living harvesting energy from light.10.1 INTRODUCTION 275 6.10.2 CHEMICAL REARRANGEMENT OF THE WATERS OF THE OCEAN 276 6.10.2.1 The Organic Carbon redissolution depth 279 6.10.2.4.2 CaCO3 water column redissolution 279 6.10.2.4.3 SiO2 sinking

Archer, David

67

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryNovember-December 2009 Volume 13, Number 6 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research located on Virginia KeyAtlantic With an estimated 40% of the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) from fossil fuels having entered the oceans since the start studies in the Atlantic and equatorial Pacific performed by NOAA researchers and their affiliates. Carbon

68

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

The atmospheric ocean: eddies and jets in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in sea surface height across the basin. Similar regions of surface pumping and suction occur in the ACC motions that `pump down' or `suck up' on the water column, respectively. In ocean basins, this surface) is the longest and the strongest oceanic current on the Earth and is the primary means of inter-basin exchange

Thompson, Andrew

70

The feasibility of sodar wind profile measurements from an oceanographic buoy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the feasibility of making wind speed profile measurements from an oceanographic buoy using a Doppler sodar. In the fall of 2005, we deployed a Scintec SFAS sodar on an ASIS buoy. Roughly one week of ...

Berg, Allison M. (Allison May)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sphere-sea-ice-ocean... .01.015 12;are included within the latest generation of Earth System Models in order to allow more direct... for Space Studies and Center for Climate...

72

The tropical cyclone-induced flux of carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical cyclones are known to cause phytoplankton blooms in regions of the ocean that would otherwise support very little life; it is also known that these storms entrain carbon-rich deep water, which can cause ...

Zimmerman, Neil L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness Jacqueline A the Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB) in response to the need for monitoring changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover. The IMB is an autonomous, ice-based system. IMB buoys provide a time series of ice

Geiger, Cathleen

74

Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems for a Dynamically Positioned Buoy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems for a Dynamically Positioned Buoy by Robert Sean Pagliari ________________________ #12; ii We the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Hybrid Renewable Energy, College of Engineering #12; iii Abstract Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems for a Dynamically Positioned

Wood, Stephen L.

75

Comparing TRMM rainfall retrieval with NOAA buoy rain gauge data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to December of 2001. TRMM's 3G68 product provides instantaneous rain rate data averaged over 0.5? x 0.5? latitude-longitude grid boxes for the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), Precipitation Radar (PR), and a combined algorithm (COMB). The buoy's rain rate data...

Phillips, Amy Blackmore

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Small Buoys for Energy Harvesting : Experimental and Numerical Modeling Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a permanent magnet, suspended to a spring, oscillating within a (two-phase) coil), whose armature motion. A rod, attached to the LEG magnetic armature, exits through the bottom of the canister and connects to its bottom, oscillates as a result of buoy heave through coupled resonance. Hence, LEG oscillations

Grilli, Stéphan T.

77

Bromocarbons in the tropical coastal and open ocean atmosphere during the 2009 Prime Expedition Scientific Cruise (PESC-09)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK 5Centre for Atmospheric Science, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW, UK 6Department of Environmental Management, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400... deck, with the inlet ? 10 m above the ocean sur- face and adjusted at each sampling time to face the prevail- ing wind. Air was pumped into a pre-evacuated 3 L canis- ter (Restek SilcoCan™) using a compact, battery-operated diaphragm pump (Rasmussen...

Mohd Nadzir, M. S.; Phang, S. M.; Abas, M. R.; Abdul Rahman, N.; Abu Samah, A.; Sturges, W. T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G. P.; Leedham, E. C.; Pyle, J. A.; Harris, N. R. P.; Robinson, A. D.; Ashfold, M. J.; Mead, M. I.; Latif, M. T.; Khan, M. F.; Amiruddin, A. M.; Banan, N.; Hanafiah, M. M.

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration noaa Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Peter Tatro Director, Center for Ocean Exploration... Exploration Program ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

79

Exploring the Texture of Ocean-Atmosphere Redox Evolution on the Early Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

northeastern Baltic Shield. Earth Sci Rev 36:205- 241. B81.Earth.DC, Claire MW (2005) How Earth’s atmosphere evolved to an

Reinhard, Christopher Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Century Climate Change Scenario for the Mediterranean using a coupled Atmosphere-Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21st Century Climate Change Scenario for the Mediterranean using a coupled Atmosphere The SAMM (Sea Atmosphere Mediterranean Model) has been developed to study the climate evolution significantly amplifies the climate change signal over large parts of Europe with respect to the corresponding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil (or a heavier refined product) floats on the ocean surface, its physical characteristics change crude oils mix with water to form an emulsion that often looks like chocolate pudding. This emulsion, including the hydrocarbons found in crude oil and petroleum products. They may have an allergic reaction

82

Millennial-scale oscillations in the Southern Ocean in response to atmospheric CO2 increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time scale under several global warming long-term scenarios, stabilized at different levels ranging: millennial oscillations climate variability abrupt change global warming ice sheets ocean behaviour Southern from 2 to 7 times the pre-industrial CO2 level. The climate response is mainly analyzed in terms

Álvarez-Solas, Jorge

83

The Role of the Ocean in the Atmospheric Budgets of Methyl Bromide, Methyl Chloride and Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which was 700 (490 to 920) Gg yr^-1 and -370 (-440 to -280) Gg yr^-1, respectively. The ocean accounts for 10 - 19 % in the global CH3Cl emission and 6 - 9 % in its global sinks. Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, which has a warming potential...

Hu, Lei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

84

Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 52 (2011) 322340 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill A.J. Marianoa, , V.H. Kourafaloua , A. Srinivasana,d , H. Kanga , G Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Both systems use ocean current fields from high online 19 August 2011 Keywords: Numerical model Lagrangian trajectory prediction Oil spill a b s t r a c

85

A Regional OceanAtmosphere Model for Eastern Pacific Climate: Toward Reducing Tropical Biases*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5°) of the ROAM enables it to capture mesoscale features, such as tropical instability waves, Central American gap these asymmetric features despite a solar radia- tion forcing at the top of the atmosphere that is zonally uniform

Wang, Yuqing

86

On a revised ocean-atmosphere physical coupling interface and about technical coupling software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere constraints of Earth System Models (ESMs) as a whole and each component individually, including laws

87

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

Decadal Variability in the Formation of the North Pacific Subtropical Mode Water: Oceanic versus Atmospheric Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling. In contrast, the decadal signal is found to be closely related to variability in the dynamic cooling. Sheltered from surface processes in subsequent seasons or years, depending on the atmospheric- trainment and/or lateral induction, modulating local or remote wintertime sea surface temperatures (SSTs

Qiu, Bo

89

Radiative interactions: I. Light scattering and emission from irregular particles. II. Time dependent radiative coupling of an atmosphere-ocean system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fluorescence. In the second part of the dissertation, we study radiative interactions in an atmosphere-ocean system. By using the so called Matrix operator method, not only the radiance of the radiation field, but also the polarization of the radiation field...

Li, Changhui

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

The hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere. Stefan Hagemann and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substance across the globe, but they also carry along thermal energy in the process ­ albeit hidden into liquid water or freezes to form ice. Conversely, energy input is necessary for ice to melt or sublimeThe hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere

91

K. SHAFER SMITH AND ROSS TULLOCH Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reply K. SHAFER SMITH AND ROSS TULLOCH Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute). Tulloch and Smith (2006, 2009) argued that sur- face quasigeostrophic effects are consistent with many, Tulloch and Smith (2006) considered a ``toy'' model consisting of SQG flow overlying a finite-depth region

Smith, K. Shafer

92

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 21, NO. 1, 2004, 112 1 A Possible Role of Solar Radiation and Ocean in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 21, NO. 1, 2004, 1­12 1 A Possible Role of Solar Radiation to simulate the climate of the mid-Holocene period. The role of the solar radiation and ocean in the mid solar radiation induced by the changed orbital parameters and the changed SST simulated by the OGCM

93

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Provides Forecasting Support for CLASIC and CHAPS 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of Energy Login

94

Developing El Niño The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phase Allinea2 Developing

95

AUTONOMOUS MOBILE BUOY (A-M-B) COASTAL & LAGOON: autonomous monitoring and sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTONOMOUS MOBILE BUOY (A-M-B) COASTAL & LAGOON: autonomous monitoring and sampling PI: Stephen, goals and objectives The project objective of this proposal is to develop an Autonomous Mobile Buoy student built instrumentation and autonomous/remotely operated vehicles that will be deployed, monitored

Wood, Stephen L.

96

Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean) due to sea ice loss Brent G.T. Else,1 R.J. Galley,1 B. Lansard,2 D.G. Barber,1 K. Brown,3 L as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290­320 matm), considering that surface water

Boyer, Edmond

97

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 P. E. Thornton et al. : Carbon-nitrogen interactionsregulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks Monfray, P. ,T. H. : A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECMWF and NCEP numerical weather prediction models, Mon.atmospheric numerical weather prediction model. The

Taylor, Stephen V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2008) Arctic Fall Temperature Anomalies Greater Than +5° C 2. CAUSES for Reduced Sea Ice #12;[Woodgate et al to the Beaufort Sea Marbled eelpout Walleye pollock Salmon snailfishBigeye sculpin Pacific cod Bering flounder Baseline Observatory Barrow Arctic Haze Air Pollution (Decrease Since the Fall of the USSR) >50% Decrease

Kuligowski, Bob

100

Atmospheric Model Ocean Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Seasonal Prediction of Remote Drivers of Australian Climate Variability using POAMA Andrew G Marshall, Debbie Hudson index at 140°°°°E for OBS and POAMA hindcasts > http://poama.bom.gov.au andrew.marshall@bom.gov.au #12;

Marshall, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Accessing the Energy Department’s Lidar Buoy Data off Virginia Beach  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In December 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) deployed the Energy Department’s floating lidar buoy off of Virginia Beach, Virginia, in less than 30 meters (m) of water,...

102

Tropical Moored Buoy Implementation Panel (TIP) Report Michael J. McPhaden, TIP Chairman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIVAR and IOC/WMO panels) to advance the implementation of a moored buoy network in the context of other), which advises the Administrator of NOAA on management and policy issues, has requested submission

103

M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR Expected Spring, 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDUCATION M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean. Dilles Relevant Courses Interpretation of Geologic Maps Igneous Petrology Tectonic Geomorphology B.S. Geology, University of Idaho College of Science, Moscow, ID; GPA: 3

Kurapov, Alexander

104

Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

Wei, Jun

105

Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud-aerosol Properties at the AMF Point Reyes Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud microphysical properties measured at the ARM Mobile Facility site located on the northern coast of California near Point Reyes, during the 2005 Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol and Drizzle experiment, were analyzed to determine their relationship to the coastal sea surface temperature (SST) which was characterized using measurements acquired from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration offshore buoy. An increase in SST resulting from a relaxation of upwelling, occurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in summer is observed to strongly correlate with nearby ground measured cloud microphysical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. Correlations between these atmospheric and oceanic features provide insight into the interplay between the ocean and cloud radiative properties. We present evidence of this robust correlation and examine the factors controlling these features. The marine boundary layer is in direct contact with the sea surface and is strongly influenced by SST. Moisture and vertical motion are crucial ingredients for cloud development and so we examine the role of SST in providing these key components to the atmosphere. Although upwelling of cold subsurface waters is conventionally thought to increase aerosols in the region, thus increasing clouds, here we observed a relaxation of upwelling associated with changes in the structure of marine stratus clouds. As upwelling relaxes, the SST get warmer, thick clouds with high liquid water paths are observed and persist for a few days. This cycle is repeated throughout the summer upwelling season. A concomitant cyclic increase and decrease of CCN concentration is also observed. Forcing mechanisms and large-scale atmospheric features are discussed. Marine stratocumulus clouds are a critical component of the earth's radiation budget and this site provides an excellent opportunity to study the influence of SST on these clouds.

Dunn, M.; Jensen, M.; Miller, M.; Kollias, P.; Bartholomew, M. J.; Turner, D.; Andrews, E.; Jefferson, A.; Daum, P.

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

Texas Automated Buoy System Sustainable Ocean Observations to Help Protect the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico. Some were too young to remember the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989

107

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IEOWC < MHK Technologies Jump to:RigOWEC <

108

Development, Operation, and Results From the Texas Automated Buoy System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) regional association and the primary source of near-surface current measurements in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. This article describes the origin of Angolan crude, exploded and caught fire while lightering its cargo about 60 nautical miles south

109

Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CCl4 ...

Xiao, X.

110

Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

Wang, Chunzai

111

www.solas-int.org //00//00 surface ocean -lower atmosphere study Mid-Term Strategy theme: Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary Upwelling and Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.solas-int.org //00//00 surface ocean - lower atmosphere study Mid-Term Strategy theme: Air at the SOLAS workshop on "Air-sea fluxes at the Eastern Boundary Upwelling and OMZ systems" 8-10 November 2010

112

In situ Monitoring of Cyanobacterial HABs in Western Lake Erie using Buoy-mounted Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ Monitoring of Cyanobacterial HABs in Western Lake Erie using Buoy-mounted Sensors Primary for the rest of the western basin of Lake Erie. We propose to deploy environmental sensors at these sites. The first sensor is a fluorescence-based detector of phycocyanin, a pigment found predominantly

113

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forests indi- cates that the model representation of competition between plants and microbes for new mineral nitrogen resources is reasonable. Our results suggest a weaker dependence of net land carbon flux on soil moisture changes in tropical regions... National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335, USA 2Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543-1543, USA 3Climate and Global Dynamics Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research...

Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Sandia National Laboratories: backward-bent duct buoy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wavearc-fault circuitatomicaxial-flow turbine

117

Coastal ocean variability off the coast of Taiwan in response to typhoon Morakot : river forcing, atmospheric forcing, and cold dome dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ocean is a complex, constantly changing, highly dynamical system. Prediction capabilities are constantly being improved in order to better understand and forecast ocean properties for applications in science, industry, ...

Landry, Jennifer Jacobs

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

1992 Invited speaker, Coral records of ocean-atmosphere variability, La Parguera, Puerto Rico (NOAA) 1996 Invited speaker, Annual Records of Tropical Systems Workshop, Hawaii (PAGES-CLIVAR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Best Practices in the Development of Scientific Drilling Projects, Minneapolis on the future of Ocean Scientific Drilling, Vancouver, Canada. 1997 Invited speaker Chair, Conference on Alternate Platforms as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling

Yang, Zong-Liang

119

Exploring the Deep... Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 1The Ocean Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEO/OC 103 Exploring the Deep... Lab 2 #12;Exploring the Ocean Environment Unit 1­The Ocean Basins Ocean origins 19 How did the oceans form? Scientists believe that the oceans developed early ). This early atmosphere reflected much of the solar radiation striking Earth, allowing the surface to cool

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

120

Chapter 9.1: Department of Atmospheric Science1 The Department of Atmospheric Science was founded in 1962 within the College of Engineering as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in first place among departments of atmosphere and ocean sciences in the nation. Strategic Planning Areas, or full professor levels) in atmospheric dynamics, climate dynamics, atmospheric radiation, atmospheric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Contribution of ocean, fossil fuel, land biosphere, and biomass burning carbon fluxes to seasonal and interannual variability in atmospheric CO 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cementannual variations in fossil fuel emissions, J. Geophys.2008 Contribution of ocean, fossil fuel, land biosphere, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJuly-August 2009 Volume13,Number4 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hurricanes with winds above 110 mph (categories 3, 4, and 5 on the Saffir- Simpon hurricane scale). In May been shown to curb hurricane activity in the Atlantic basin by increasing vertical wind shear, which of the Lesser Antilles. Ocean Surface Wind Product Derived from Satellite Data A new ocean surface wind product

123

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

124

Mesoscale Eddy Energy Locality in an Idealized Ocean Model IAN GROOMS, LOUIS-PHILIPPE NADEAU, AND K. SHAFER SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. SHAFER SMITH Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York

Smith, K. Shafer

125

Experimental and Numerical Study of Spar Buoy-magnet/spring Oscillators Used as Wave Energy Annette R. Grilli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental and Numerical Study of Spar Buoy-magnet/spring Oscillators Used as Wave Energy at least one short-stroke linear generator (SSLG), made of a magnet, suspended to a spring, and oscillating within a coil. This system is aimed at producing low and renewable wave power (up to ¢ £ ¤ ¥ k

Grilli, Stéphan T.

126

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice Mass Balance Buoys: A tool for measuring and attributing changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover Jacqueline A. Richter-Menge1 , Donald K. Perovich1 , Bruce C. Elder1 , Keran Claffey1 Abstract Recent observational and modeling studies indicate that the Arctic sea ice cover is undergoing

Rigor, Ignatius G.

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic ocean woce Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S Upper ocean (250 m... OceanAtmosphere Interaction (1) The Hydrological Cycle ATMESSOCN 587 1142010 S. Riser 12... with temperature. An enhanced water cycle will...

128

Contribution of Ocean, Fossil Fuel, Land Biosphere and Biomass Burning Carbon1 Fluxes to Seasonal and Interannual Variability in Atmospheric CO22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Contribution of Ocean, Fossil Fuel, Land Biosphere and Biomass Burning Carbon1 Fluxes to Seasonal et al., 1989].18 Anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacture drive most of the recent by deforestation, discussed below) over the last 50 years. The fossil fuel plus4 cement input, in contrast

Mahowald, Natalie

129

Special issue of Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, 11(1), 157-186, March 2000. Assimilation of GPS Radio Occultation Data for Numerical Weather Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assimilation of GPS Radio Occultation Data for Numerical Weather Prediction Y-H. Kuo1 , S. Sokolovskiy2, 3 , R, water vapor), and to effectively assimilate them into weather prediction models is a challenging task assimilation, GPS/MET, numerical weather prediction, COSMIC) 1. INTRODUCTION The lack of data over the oceans

130

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2007 Volume11,Number2 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

miles, to ensure total coverage of the global ocean and to calibrate the satellites. AOML contributes, FloridaMiami, Florida Global Drifter 1250 Retrieved After Crossing North Atlantic Global drifter 1250 and the Global Telecommunications System. In fact, its sensors were still operational when retrieved

131

Role of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Circulation in the Tropical Pacific SST Changes Nansen-Zhu International Research Centre, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Beijing, China, and Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen, Norway HUIJUN WANG Nansen Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, and Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center ocean and, furthermore, lead to anomalous positive convergences of heat transport, which is the main

132

Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

133

Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

Ward, Bess

134

The Antarctic Circumpolar Productivity Belt Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Antarctic Circumpolar Productivity Belt T. Ito Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere] We illustrate the mechanisms controlling the spatial patterns of biological productivity of enhanced export production, figuratively termed as the Antarctic Circumpolar Productivity Belt. As observed

Follows, Mick

135

MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;The Earth receives a total amount of radiation variations of TOP solar radiation How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Albedos of various

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

136

AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

Haak, Hein

137

BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marineFaculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia

Frandsen, Jannette B.

138

E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inertia and to its opacity, the ocean stores vast amounts of energy, away from a direct contactE. Guilyardi á G. Madec á L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance of a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM Received: 24 January 2000 / Accepted: 11 September 2000 Abstract

Guilyardi, Eric

139

11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and in situ observations, for NWP, ocean forecasting, ecosystem applications, and climate research. BY C forecasting, military and defence operations, validating or forcing ocean and atmospheric models, ecosystem11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment

Merchant, Chris

140

An investigation of Bjerknes Compensation in the Southern Ocean in the CCSM4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project aims to understand the relationship between poleward oceanic and atmospheric heat transport in the Southern Ocean by analyzing output from the community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4). In particular, time series of meridional heat transport in both the atmosphere and the ocean are used to study whether variability in ocean heat transport is balanced by opposing changes in atmospheric heat transport, called Bjerknes Compensation. It is shown that the heat storage term in the Southern Ocean has a significant impact on the oceanic heat budget; as a result, no robust coherences between oceanic and atmospheric heat transports could be found at these southern latitudes.

Weijer, Wilbert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kinstle, Caroline M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Atmospheric dynamics triggered by an oceanic SST front in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Atmospheric dynamics triggered and motivation Over the last few years, the emphasis of air­sea interaction studies has shifted from the effect. 1981; Businger and Shaw 1984) noted that the asymmetry in the SST profile creates an unequal heating

Ghil, Michael

142

Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

Dail, Holly Janine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

California at Irvine, University of

144

Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's...

145

Ocean Currents, Marine Debris, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paper bag cardboard box milk carton tin can styrofoam buoys Aluminum can 6-pack ring plastic bottles #12: styrofoam buoys 200 ­ 400 yrs: Aluminum can 400 yrs: 6-pack ring 450 yrs: plastic bottles #12;Biological ·!Up to 80% of marine debris is plastic United Nations Environment Programme #12;How does debris get

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

146

THE GLOBAL TROPICAL MOORED BUOY ARRAY M. J. McPhaden(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan, Email: andouk@jamstec.go.jp, masumoto, USA, Email: michael.j.mcphaden@noaa.gov 2 Research Institute for Global Change, Japan Agency. Intense insolation also leads to the highest open ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in tropics

147

Antarctic ice sheet fertilises the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southern Ocean (SO) marine primary productivity (PP) is strongly influenced by the availability of iron in surface waters, which is thought to exert a significant control upon atmospheric CO2 concentrations on glacial/interglacial ...

Death, R.

148

Comprehensive Ocean Drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric mercury concentrations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

et al. 2007... 1 Global 3-D land-ocean-atmosphere model for mercury: present-day vs. pre-industrial1 cycles... 12 13 14 15 Short title: Global 3-D land-ocean-atmosphere model ......

150

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role in naturally removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the ocean is considered an essential dioxide in addition to the vast quantities already stored naturally. A few recent research to contradict each other regarding the use of the ocean as a "sink" or disposal area for carbon dioxide. On one

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere program handbook Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an programs dealing with atmospheric science, subsurface science, environmental radon, ocean margins... Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the...

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric diffusion experiments Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric fine elemental Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere model description Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling software Summary: linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere model version Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling software Summary: linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric models final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling software Summary: linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

157

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere model validation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling software Summary: linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric experiment recherche Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric interference Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric diffusion models Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling software Summary: linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating some of the concerns of discharging CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. Laboratory experiments showed that the CaCO{sub 3} emulsion is slightly alkaline, not acidic. We tested the release of the CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by pulverized limestone in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF). Digital photographs showed the sinking globules in the HPWTF, confirming the concept of releasing the emulsion in the deep ocean. We modeled the release of an emulsion from the CO{sub 2} output of a 1000 MW coal-fired power plant at 500 m depth. The emulsion would typically sink several hundred meters before density equilibration with ambient seawater. The CO{sub 2} globules would rain out from the equilibrated plume toward the ocean bottom where they would disintegrate due to wave action and bottom friction. Conceptual release systems are described both for an open ocean release and a sloping seabed release of the emulsion.

Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Stephen Pennell; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Devinder Arora; John Hannon; Michael Woods; Huishan Duan; Tom Lawlor

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various decomposition of ocean heat transport into thermal wind, gyre, and Ekman components for a rough estimateTransport across 48°N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic

163

Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. OurRole of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars Yongyun Hu1 and Jun Yang Laboratory for Climate and Atmosphere­Ocean Studies, Department of Atmospheric

Hu, Yongyun

164

atmospheric administration key: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

warming, ocean chemistry, carbon cycle Abstract CO2 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere Matsumoto,...

165

Quaternary Science Reviews 20 (2001) 15611576 Millennial scale climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northwest North America based on radiolaria and pollen N.G. Pisiasa, *, A in the Northeast Pacific and the northwestern United States. 2. Study region 2.1. Ocean climate and biota.C. Mixa , L. Heusserb a College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 Ocean

Kurapov, Alexander

166

Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmosphere) #12;Clouds, Radiation, and SST Low Clouds - Cool the ocean surface High Clouds - WarmingChanges in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface Observations, 1954-2008 Ryan Eastman Stephen G. Warren Carole J. Hahn #12;Clouds Over the Ocean The ocean is cloudy, more-so than land

Hochberg, Michael

167

Ch.6 Atmospheric and Oceanic Circulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

motion of air across Earth's surface. Turbulence adds one vertical component to wind (e.g. downdraft and updraft). Two principal properties of wind are speed and direction. Winds are named for the direction originates #12;Wind measurement Anemometer for measuring wind speed Wind vane for measuring wind direction

Pan, Feifei

168

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaii |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2 to:DieselEnergyHydrogen Storage1, 2011 - Page

169

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaii |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugust 2012NEVADAEnergyEnergy ImpactDepartment of

170

Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss_um@umich.edu http Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Mark Schlissel, ex officio Sequential Graduate / under/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved

Eustice, Ryan

172

Changing controls on oceanic radiocarbon: New insights on shallow-to-deep ocean exchange and anthropogenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radiocarbon (14 C) into the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has provided; Ito et al., 2004]. [3] Nuclear weapons testing added a large pulse of 14 C to the atmosphere dilution, is now weaker than before weapons testing in most regions. Oceanic 14 C, and particularly its

Keeling, Ralph

173

Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard a,d,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard of the overturning circulation. Volumetrically the Pacific Ocean dominates the world ocean (it is three times larger of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, USA c Department of Geosciences, Princeton

Gilli, Adrian

174

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

175

Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

Johnson, Robert E.

176

How ocean color can steer Pacific tropical cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because ocean color alters the absorption of sunlight, it can produce changes in sea surface temperatures with further impacts on atmospheric circulation. These changes can project onto fields previously recognized to alter ...

Gnanadesikan, Anand

177

Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, Vol. 40, No. 3, 2004, pp. 313322. Translated from Izvestiya AN. Fizika Atmosfery i Okeana, Vol. 40, No. 3, 2004, pp. 355365. Original Russian Text Copyright 2004 by Makarova, Poberovskii, Timofeev.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information about them is used in global atmospheric models for the prediction of climate change. The annual major factors that cause the observed changes in gas contents over northwestern Russia. Temporal /Interperiodica" (Russia). 1. INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic impacts on the atmospheric compo- sition have enhanced

178

10-Ch09-N51893 [13:43 2008/9/13] Temam & Tribbia: Computational Methods for the Atmosphere and the Oceans Page: 377 377434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Oceans Page: 377 377­434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical Fluids Jacques Blum Laboratoire Jean. A prerequisite before a prediction is to retrieve at best the state of the environment. Data assimilation-order analysis should be considered. One of the first methods used for assim- ilating data in oceanography

Navon, Michael

179

The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

Not Available

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI Atmospheric, Oceanic January 2012, in final form 3 May 2012) ABSTRACT The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using

Johnson, Helen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE´veloppement, LEGOS, Toulouse, France WILLIAM S. KESSLER National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Argo float data in the tropical Pacific Ocean during January 2003­August 2011 are analyzed to obtain

Boyer, Edmond

182

Importance of the polarization in the retrieval of oceanic constituents from the remote sensing reflectance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2007. [1] The influence of marine particles on the polarized radiation exiting the ocean are investigated. Simulations were carried out using a vector radiative transfer model. Open ocean and coastal and analysis of the spectral and angular polarization signature of the oceanic and atmospheric radiation

Chami, Malik

183

Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU National Center of high-resolution wind in coastal ocean modeling. This paper tests the Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) at the 9-, 27-, and 81-km grid resolutions in simulating wind off the central

184

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy-diagnostics intercomparison of coupled ice-ocean Arctic models Petteri Uotila a,*, David. Understanding the Arctic Ocean energy balance is important because it can strengthen our understanding for Atmosphere-Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NYU, 200 Water

Zhang, Jinlun

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration national Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

national Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Madelyn Appelbaum Senior Communications Policy Advisor Summary: Communications Director Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research National...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-surface exchange processes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atmospheric surface layer during CBLAST, in 16th Symposium on Boundary Layers... on heat, gas, and momentum transport, infrared remote sensing, upper-ocean processes,...

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric polycyclic aromatic Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

burning of coal, oil, gas... called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... by atmospheric currents and ocean currents...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric mercury deposition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 32 Global 3-D land-ocean-atmosphere model for mercury: present-day vs. pre-industrial1 cycles and...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheres annual status Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sea and ice cover... , and planetary interiors human interactions with atmosphere, ocean, and land environments ... Source: Collection: Biology and Medicine 40 The Transport...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric oxygenation recorded Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Summary: is that photosynthesising microbes in the surface ocean caused atmospheric oxygen levels to rise significantly around 2... not viable. Researchers have long speculated...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric carbon monoxide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reservoirs (storages, especially the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere, oceans... emissions trading and the control of greenhouse gas emissions. Carbon monoxide a chemical...

192

Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2001, pp. 314319. Translated from Izvestiya AN. Fizika Atmosfery i Okeana, Vol. 37, No. 3, 2001, pp. 339345. Original Russian Text Copyright 2001 by Kashin, Kamenogradskii, Grechko, Dzhola, Pobe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and, thus, in changes of the earth's climate. That is why, at present, there are different (first © 2001 by åAIK "Nauka /Interperiodica" (Russia). INTRODUCTION An increase in the content of greenhouse gases (CO2, H2O, CH4, N2O, and others) results in changes of the radiative properties of the atmosphere

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric radiocarbon monitoring Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mixing. In the presence of varying atmospheric 14 C... equation that relates the deep-water 14 C12 C59 concentrations to the atmospheric radiocarbon history... 61 ocean were...

194

Ocean Engineering Development Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

Wood, Stephen L.

195

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

Antarctic Circumpolar Current System and its Response to Atmospheric Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the meridional location of ACC fronts is observed in the Pacific sector in association to minor sea surface cooling trends. Therefore, unlike in the Indian sector, the regional Pacific Ocean response is significantly sensitive to dominant atmospheric forcing...

Kim, Yong Sun 1976-

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Simplified Model of the Walker Circulation with an Interactive Ocean Mixed Layer and Cloud-Radiative Feedbacks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simplified Model of the Walker Circulation with an Interactive Ocean Mixed Layer and Cloud-Radiative, to leading order, these are set by the horizontally varying ocean heat transport and clear-sky radiative on the radiation budget, are strongly coupled to the large-scale circulation of both the atmosphere and ocean

Bretherton, Chris

198

Moisture budget of the Arctic atmosphere from TOVS satellite data David G. Groves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiative heating of the atmosphere. These, in turn, affect surface temperature, ice growth and melt and hemispheric atmospheric processes affect the Arctic Ocean. The lack of humidity data over the Arctic Ocean. Our method yields an average annual net precipitation of 15.1 cm yrŔ1 over the polar cap (poleward

Francis, Jennifer

199

Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

On detecting biospheres from thermodynamic disequilibrium in planetary atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in the atmospheres of Solar System planets, in which we quantify the difference in Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere compared to that of all the atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere, as measured by this available Gibbs free energy, is not unusual by Solar System standards and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's atmosphere is in contact with a surface ocean, which means that gases can react with water, and so a multiphase calculation that includes aqueous species is required. We find that the disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole o...

Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Catling, David C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS ATS 708 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academic Integrity Policy as found in the General Catalog (http://www.catalog.colostate.edu/FrontPDF/1, 1987, Andrews, Holton, Leovy, Academic Press. · Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics, 2006, Vallis Articles (alphabetically): · Baldwin et al., 2001: The quasi-biennial oscillation. Rev. Geophys., 39, 1979

203

MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS AT707 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Holton, J. R., Leovy, C. B., Academic Press, 489 pp. · Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics, 2006 Review Articles: · Haynes, P. H., 2005: Stratospheric Dynamics. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 37, 263­ 293­Dobson Circulation, Residual (Diabatic) Circulations 7.1 Discovery 7.2 Eliassen's Balanced Response to a Mechanical

204

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

205

Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity R. Giles Harrison a is the major source of air's electrical conductivity over the oceans and well above the continents atmospheric electrical circuit, including the local vertical current density and the related surface potential

Usoskin, Ilya G.

206

Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton K. M. Shell and R. Frouin Scripps the absorption of solar radiation, affecting upper ocean temperature and circulation. These changes, in turn: phytoplankton, atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), absorption of solar radiation, seasonal cycle, sea

Shell, Karen M.

207

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Using Computer Simulations to Help Understand Flow Statistics and Structures at the Air-Ocean Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interaction among atmosphere, oceans, and surface waves is an important process with many oceanographic and environmental applications. It directly affects the motion and fate of pollutants such as oil spills. The ...

Shen, Lian

209

Oceanic control of the sea ice edge and multiple equilibria in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I study fundamental mechanisms of atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interaction. Hierarchies of idealized models are invoked to argue that multiple equilibria and abrupt change are robust features of the climate system. The main ...

Rose, Brian E. J. (Brian Edward James)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

Rose, Brian E. J.

211

Fluid dynamics of sinking carbon dioxide hydrate particle releases for direct ocean carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One strategy to remove anthropogenic CO? from the atmosphere to mitigate climate change is by direct ocean injection. Liquid CO? can react with seawater to form solid partially reacted CO? hydrate composite particles (pure ...

Chow, Aaron C. (Aaron Chunghin), 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Applications of the Generalized DDA Formalism and the Nature of Polarized Light in Deep Oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is applied to confi rmation of irregular invisibility cloaks made from metamaterials. In the second part, radiative transfer in a coupled atmosphere-ocean system is solved to study the asymptotic nature of the polarized light in deep oceans. The rate at which...

You, Yu

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

Vertical Heat Transport by Ocean Circulation and the Role of Mechanical and Haline Forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suggest that heat can be pumped downward by the upper limb of the meridional overturning circulation the earth's climate, with the upper 2.5 m of the ocean able to store as much heat as the entire atmosphereVertical Heat Transport by Ocean Circulation and the Role of Mechanical and Haline Forcing JAN D

England, Matthew

214

On the non-linear response of the ocean thermohaline circulation to global deforestation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the non-linear response of the ocean thermohaline circulation to global deforestation H. Renssen-dimensional coupled atmosphere-sea-ice- ocean-vegetation model to study the transient effect of global deforestation deforestation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(2), 1061, doi:10.1029/ 2002GL016155, 2003. 1. Introduction [2] It has

Renssen, Hans

215

Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions quantities of CH4 are stored in marine sediment in the form of methane hydrate, bubbles, and dissolved CH4 in pore water. Here I discuss the various pathways for methane to enter the ocean and atmosphere

Zhang, Youxue

216

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

217

Estimating Sea Surface Temperature From Infrared Satellite and In Situ Temperature Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the exchanges of heat, momentum and gases between the ocean and the atmosphere. As the most widely observed variable in oceanography, SST is used in many different studies of the ocean and its coupling to adjust the satellite SSTs to match a selection of buoy SSTs. This forces the satellite skin SSTs

218

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean ’engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

CX-011700: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

energy density of the Power Buoy, a moored buoy system that generates power from ocean waves. CX-011700.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000312: Categorical Exclusion...

220

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Interannual variability of Caribbean rainfall, ENSO and the Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interannual variability of Caribbean rainfall, ENSO and the Atlantic Ocean Alessandra Giannini the interannual variability of Caribbean­Central American rainfall are examined. The atmospheric circulation over) and sea surface temper­ ature (SST) variability associated with Caribbean rainfall, as selected

Columbia University

222

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

223

Soil moisture regulates the biological response of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations in a coupled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, United States b Departments of Geography and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, United States Received 16 March 2005; received surface model, dynamically coupled to an atmospheric boundary layer and surface energy balance scheme

Niyogi, Dev

224

Atmosphere Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4 Medicare5Dust

225

Autonomous observing strategies for the ocean carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the exchanges of carbon between the atmosphere and ocean and the fate of carbon delivered to the deep sea is fundamental to the evaluation of ocean carbon sequestration options. An additional key requirement is that sequestration must be verifiable and that environmental effects be monitored and minimized. These needs can be addressed by carbon system observations made from low-cost autonomous ocean-profiling floats and gliders. We have developed a prototype ocean carbon system profiler based on the Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO; Davis et al., 1999). The SOLO/ carbon profiler will measure the two biomass components of the carbon system and their relationship to physical variables, such as upper ocean stratification and mixing. The autonomous observations within the upper 1500 m will be made on daily time scales for periods of months to seasons and will be carried out in biologically dynamic locations in the world's oceans that are difficult to access with ships (due to weather) or observe using remote sensing satellites (due to cloud cover). Such an observational capability not only will serve an important role in carbon sequestration research but will provide key observations of the global ocean's natural carbon cycle.

Bishop, James K.; Davis, Russ E.

2000-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

227

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

229

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnderOccupational HealthOcean Aerosols: The

230

Clean Cities: Ocean State Clean Cities coalition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities of Western New YorkGreaterNorth DakotaOcean State

231

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities of WesternVail GlobalPROGRAM MISSIONScienceOcean and

232

Mining an Ocean of Data: Application of modern statistical methods for addressing biological oceanography questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in our understanding of global ocean circulation, heat and energy transport associated with mesoscale methods of optimizing data analysis and interpretation for maximizing data use. As part of this proposal of their potential to store heat, sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide and influence major atmospheric weather events

Columbia University

233

255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that determine the surface energy budget and the sea­ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean­ice­atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

Shupe, Matthew

234

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operating across the continental US on a 70 kilometer grid; MOCHA onshore-offshore MT experiment imaging area where the broad Alaska continental margin transitions to stable North American craton. Two years. Other field campaigns are planned. The NGF is involved with offshore EM field measurements supporting

Kurapov, Alexander

235

Roy Haggerty College of Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and geologic/geophysical problems. Educational Activities: Classes - Heat and Mass Transport in the Environment, 2000. Geology Program Head, 2003-6. Associate Director, Water Resources Science program, 2004-6, 2009 (2013), A fluid-mechanics based classification scheme for surface transient storage in riverine

Kurapov, Alexander

236

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expertise in geospatial analysis, physical aspects of climate systems, and a specialization in social, graduate, and post-graduate levels. This Assistant Professor unites expertise in geospatial analysis Announcement Posting 0013318 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Geospatial Analytics, Climate Change Adaptation, and Coastal

Jenny, Bernhard

237

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for leadership and strong expertise in geospatial analysis including expertise in working with large spatial in geospatial intelligence linking large spatial datasets, decision making and policy analysis. Special Announcement Posting 0013321 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Geospatial Intelligence and Planning Leader Position

Jenny, Bernhard

238

at Exchange Between Ocean and Atmosphere in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. Seckel, June 1970. iii + 66 pp.. 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake

239

U^DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, fluid action, gas pressure, shearing, and scraping. A completely operative mechan- ical system of Mechanical Processing on the Quality and Yield of Bay Scallop Meats By N. B. WEBB and F. B. THOMAS Special of Mechanical Processing on the Quality and Yield of Bay Scallop Meats By N. B. WEBB and F. B. THOMAS Department

240

I .-i r ' National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a hazard to shipping i n its path. U5 11dle8per hour and the central pressure dropped to 28.02 inches (949

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US Department of Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Quimica Nova 21(1):73-77. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0100-40421998000100012 Hamilton EI. 1998. Marine

242

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Earth history, Stratigraphy and Sedimentology, geology field methods, and graduate courses in their area through significant contributions to the fields of Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, #12;and/or Earth Systems

243

2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 6 Atmospheric and Oceanic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's surface. · Turbulence adds one vertical component to wind (e.g., downdraft and updraft). · Two principal properties of wind are speed and direction. · Winds are named for the direction from which they originate (e Originates #12;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Wind Measurement Anemometer for measuring wind speed Wind vane

Pan, Feifei

244

Thomas H Zurbuchen, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! - Dipole centered on planet and aligned ! #12;15! Bow shock! Magnetopause! Cusp! #12;"Open Field"! 16! #12 and thermal speeds! ! · Two stage recovery ­ find best fit model E/q spectrum! ­ Stage 1: thermal speed

245

TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE-OCEAN (TAO) PROGRAM FINAL CRUISE REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John Dobbins (618) 453-3734 Quigley 413 jdobbins@siu.edu Art Ms Diane McClain-Inman (618) 453 Security Mgmt Mr Gary Kistner (618) 453-7277 Quigley 402 siufire@siu.edu Food and Nutrition Mr Terry

246

LARGE-SCALE ATMOSPHERE-OCEAN Geometric Methods and Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the following normal form: H(p, q) = k k 2 q2 k + p2 k = k kJk. (1.1) Here (q, p) denotes a set of canonical

Morrison, Philip J.,

247

Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

248

156 | Triennial Scientific Report ADAGUC Atmospheric Data Access for the Geospatial User Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer BBC British Broadcasting Company BJEPB Beijing Environmental Radiometer AOGCM Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model AOT Aerosol Optical Thickness API Application Potential Energy CERC Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants CESAR Cabauw Experimental Site

Stoffelen, Ad

249

Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

250

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

251

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

252

December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

253

Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation for the near-ocean-surface high-resolution downwelling irradiance statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a numerical study of the near-surface underwater solar light statistics using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) simulations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Advanced variance-reduction ...

Xu, Zao

254

Testing Components of New Community Isopycnal Ocean Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ocean and atmosphere are both governed by the same physical laws and models of the two media have many similarities. However, there are critical differences that call for special methods to provide the best simulation. One of the most important difference is that the ocean is nearly opaque to radiation in the visible and infra-red part of the spectrum. For this reason water mass properties in the ocean are conserved along trajectories for long distances and for long periods of time. For this reason isopycnal coordinate models would seem to have a distinct advantage in simulating ocean circulation. In such a model the coordinate surfaces are aligned with the natural paths of near adiabatic, density conserving flow in the main thermocline. The difficulty with this approach is at the upper and lower boundaries of the ocean, which in general do not coincide with density surfaces. For this reason hybrid coordinate models were proposed by Bleck and Boudra (1981) in which Cartesian coordinates were used near the ocean surface and isopycnal coordinates were used in the main thermocline. This feature is now part of the HICOM model (Bleck, 2002).

Bryan, Kirk

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Mark Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures, seasonal sea ice, and the remoteness of the regions all conspire to make observations difficult latitudes - the vertical exchanges of heat, momentum and material between the ocean, atmosphere and ice1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Research

Gille, Sarah T.

256

Oceans. Europe2005 An Acoustically-Linked Deep-Ocean Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), diesel generator for power, and fiber optic connections to a seafloorjunction box. These =e ideal to communications power efficiency and cost of the acoustic and satellite telemetry systems. The efficiency ship servicing. Solarcells on the buoy provide enough power for many hours of Iridium terminal

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

257

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with the

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean: National Science Foundation _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling

259

Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences EARLY ONLINE RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cite this EOR in a separate work, please use the following full citation: Bu, Y., R. Fovell, and K. Corbosiero, 2013: Influence of cloud-radiative forcing on tropical cyclone structure. J. Atmos. Sci. doi:10 on tropical cyclone structure1 Yizhe Peggy Bu and Robert G. Fovell Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic

Corbosiero, Kristen L.

260

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

262

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

263

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

264

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, Februarythe Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. OceanSixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

266

Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

267

of atmospheres ELSEVIER Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 24 (1996) 51-62  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ingredients, as heavy, nutrient-rich bottom water is lifted to the surface to support plant and animal life vertical mixing. For example, vertical mixing supplies the biological ecosys- tem with necessary fluid provides a mechanism to weaken the interior density gradient, and continuously supply fresh

Slinn, Donald

268

Baiu rainband termination in atmospheric and1 atmosphere-ocean models2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale nature, Baiu rainband provides much50 needed rainfall to supply precious water to a broad region of East Asia, causing local51 disasters such as floods and mudslides by heavy rain.52 Recently Sampe and Xie

Xie, Shang-Ping

269

ARM - Oceanic Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethane Background InformationNewsMediaAlaskaNewsOceanic

270

Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acousticsOcean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

Pringle, James "Jamie"

271

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

Rothstein, Lewis M.

273

Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

Dales, K Phillips

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 190 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

164 Japan __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling under the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean

275

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy................................................................. 21 #12;ii List of Tables Table 1 California Small Hydropower And Ocean Wave Energy Resources Table 2

279

Tracking El Nio using optical indices of phytoplankton dynamics in the equatorial Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific's normally deep thermocline to shoal. Subsequently, the tongue of cold water normally extending Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) project array of around 70 buoys tracing meridians from 156E to 95W between 8N and 8S, backscattering meter and C-star beam attenuation meter (proxies for chlorophyll, particulate organic carbon

Kurapov, Alexander

280

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

282

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

Boynton, Walter R.

283

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

284

ISSN 0001-4338, Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2006, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp. 215227. Pleiades Publishing, Inc., 2006. Original Russian Text M.V. Makarova, A.V. Poberovskii, S.V. Yagovkina, I.L. Karol', V.E. Lagun, N.N. Paramonova, A.I. Reshetni  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the prediction of pos- sible climate changes is a correct consideration of the spatiotemporal variability in the atmosphere over northwestern Russia. The study was based on analysis of measurement results [2­4], air to examine changes in TM and atmospheric methane concentra- tions at a qualitatively new level [1, 6

285

Comparison of the Carbon System Parameters at the Global CO2 Survey Crossover Locations in the North and South Pacific Ocean, 1990-1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a collaborative program to measure global ocean carbon inventories and provide estimates of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C02) uptake by the oceans. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy have sponsored the collection of ocean carbon measurements as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study cruises. The cruises discussed here occurred in the North and South Pacific from 1990 through 1996. The carbon parameters from these 30 crossover locations have been compared to ensure that a consistent global data set emerges from the survey cruises. !'he results indicate that for dissolved inorganic carbon. fugacity of C02• and pH. the a~:,rreements at most crossover locations are well within the design specifications for the global CO) survey: whereas. in the case of total alkaliniry. the agreement between crossover locations is not as close.

Feely, Richard A [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Lamb, Marilyn F. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Greeley, Dana J. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Wanninkhof, Rik [NOAA, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Research by BNL investigators was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are an programs dealing with atmospheric science, subsurface science, environmental radon, ocean margins Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP--Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. The ARM Program is the Department's major research activity focusing

287

Generated using V3.2 of the official AMS LATEX templatejournal page layout FOR AUTHOR USE ONLY, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on global-mean outgoing radiation is that an at- 1 #12;mosphere/ocean climate model with a poor simulation, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part 1: Tuning. Simon. Rowlands Atmospheric, Oceanic & Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road

288

Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http://aerosol.ucsd.edu/courses.html Text: Curry & Webster Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 Energy Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http

Russell, Lynn

289

5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

290

A REVIEW OF GLOBAL OCEAN TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values, Energy Sustainable Economic, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided

291

composition of putative oceans on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Results: Oceanic water composition · Oceanic water is a NaCl-CaCl2 solution · Large Cl mass · Cl in a "soda ocean" Temperature, o C 100 200 300 400 500 Concentration,mole/kgH2O 0.01 0.1 1 Cl- CaCl2 CaCl+ Na calcite · Quartz · Na-K feldspars · Anhydrite · Pyrite · Hematite/magnetite · Evaporites: NaCl+CaCl2 350o

Treiman, Allan H.

292

Atmospheric rivers as Lagrangian coherent structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that filamentous Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) over the Northern Atlantic Ocean are closely linked to attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the large scale wind field. LCSs represent lines of attraction in the evolving flow with a significant impact on all passive tracers. Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE), we extract LCSs from a two-dimensional flow derived from water vapor flux of atmospheric reanalysis data and compare them to the three-dimensional LCS obtained from the wind flow. We correlate the typical filamentous water vapor patterns of ARs with LCSs and find that LCSs bound the filaments on the back side. Passive advective transport of water vapor from tropical latitudes is potentially possible.

Garaboa, Daniel; Huhn, Florian; Perez-Muńuzuri, Vicente

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

296

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

297

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

298

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

299

INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

300

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology Overview The Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology (COEST) is dedicated to the ocean, the most fascinating and the most challenging environment for human endeavour. COEST brings together the disciplines of ocean

Liley, David

302

4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSD 4, 709­732, 2007 Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

Boyer, Edmond

303

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process of converting the ocean thermal energy into electricity. OTEC transfer function The relationship between

304

Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

Lee, Zhongping

305

Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

Lamborg, Carl

306

Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 62, pp. 887 to 902, 2006 Ocean carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, anthropogenic carbon, sequestration, numerical model, biogeochemistry. * E-mail address: katsumi@umn.edu Copyright©The Oceanographic Society of Japan/TERRAPUB/Springer Model Simulations of Carbon Sequestration from the atmosphere into the oceans. The chain of events amounts to carbon sequestration, because

Matsumoto, Katsumi

308

Processes of interannual mixed layer temperature variability in the thermocline ridge of the Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dominates from July to November. Atmospheric fluxes generally damp SSTA generation in the TRIO region, there is no obvious peak in SSTA amplitude in boreal winter, as previously noted for heat content anomalies. Positive of the Indian Ocean (TRIO--Jayaku- mar et al. 2011). The TRIO is primarily maintained by wind stress curl

309

Major Cellular and Physiological Impacts of Ocean Acidification on a Reef Building Coral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be facing a significant increase in local and global stressors [1,3]. Global warming and ocean acidification, Townsville, Queensland, Australia, 5 Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia Abstract As atmospheric levels of CO2 increase, reef-building corals are under greater

310

Multiple Hypothesis Object Tracking For Unsupervised Self-Learning: An Ocean Eddy Tracking Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and others 2003; Hoegh-Guldberg and Bruno 2010). In order to project a future response accurately eddies transport heat, salt, energy, and nutrients across oceans. As a result, accurately identi- fying and atmospheric CO2 levels remains a topic of intense scientific and societal inter- est (Caldeira, Wickett

Minnesota, University of

311

www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 www.cesos.ntnu.no Author ­ Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation Structures Outline · Introduction · Wind Turbine Operational Conditions · Wind Turbine Operation under Atmospheric Icing · Wind Turbine Operation under Fault Condition · Conclusions www.cesos.ntnu.no M. Etemaddar

Nørvåg, Kjetil

312

The Annual Cycle of the Energy Budget. Part I: Global Mean and LandOcean Exchanges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Annual Cycle of the Energy Budget. Part I: Global Mean and Land­Ocean Exchanges JOHN T. FASULLO and thus with OE, and between RT and atmospheric total energy divergence over land, are documented both March, in final form 1 October 2007) ABSTRACT The mean and annual cycle of energy flowing

Fasullo, John

313

Ice-ocean boundary conditions for coupled models Gavin A. Schmidt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that must be simulated in any comprehensive earth system model incorporating ocean, atmosphere, sea ice different groups (a central fo- cus in the ongoing PRogramme for Integrated earth System Modelling (PRISM) and Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) projects). This paper addresses developments in coupling at sea

Bitz, Cecilia

314

The relative importance of tropical variability forced from the North Pacific through ocean pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forced through the atmosphere? To address this question, in this study we use an anomaly-coupled model), and with coupling con- fined to the Tropics and wind stress and heat fluxes in the North Pacific specified by output impact the tropics through ocean pathways. These two signals are forced by wind stress and surface heat

Solomon, Amy

315

Upper Ocean Response to Tropical Cyclone Wind Asymmetries S. Daniel Jacob and Lynn K. Shay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images of SST. As a storm intensifies, the increasing wind speed may. However, the significant SST reduction induced by the increasing wind speed leads to reduced air to the atmosphere ( 20%) and vertical mixing at the base of the oceanic mixed layer ( 80%) induced by wind stress

Shay, Lynn K. "Nick"

316

Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62 (2000) 15151525 www.elsevier.nl/locate/jastp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62 (2000) 1515­1525 wwwDepartment of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA bDepartment ofAerospace Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA cDepartment of Electrical Engineering

Stout, Quentin F.

318

Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 2, September 1994--August 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options (others are depleted oil and gas wells or deep, confined aquifers) and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Technically, the term `disposal` is really a misnomer because the atmosphere and ocean eventually equilibrate on a time scale of 1000 years regardless of where the CO{sub 2} is originally discharged. However, peak atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations expected to occur in the next few centuries could be significantly reduced by ocean disposal. The magnitude of this reduction will depend upon the quantity of CO{sub 2} injected in the ocean, as well as the depth and location of injection. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release.

Herzog, H.J.; Adams, E.E. [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

322

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, June 19-Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruaryFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. June 19-

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

331

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

"What Controls the Structure and Stability of the Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation: Implications for Abrupt Climate Change?"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The central goal of this research project is to understand the properties of the ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) – a topic critical for understanding climate variability and stability on a variety of timescales (from decadal to centennial and longer). Specifically, we have explored various factors that control the MOC stability and decadal variability in the Atlantic and the ocean thermal structure in general, including the possibility abrupt climate change. We have also continued efforts on improving the performance of coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs.

Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University] [Yale University

2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Atmospheric Thermodynamics Composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 EnergyBalance Ch4 Water Ch Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http #12;2 Review from Ch. 1 · Thermodynamic quantities · Composition · Pressure · Density · Temperature

Russell, Lynn

343

Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

Monteiro, Fanny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 207 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3E3 Canada -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute

345

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department SeptemberSignificant

346

North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes within the WRF model needs more evaluation and analysis.

Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intense climate interest. A large fraction of the carbon fixed in the oceanic surface waters is recycledOceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean are estimated from selected hydrographic sections from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment spanning the world

Wunsch, Carl

348

Ocean Sci., 5, 313327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The role of the penetration length scale of short- wave radiation into the surface ocean and its impact of the shortwave radiation hitting the ocean sur- face is absorbed and scattered at depths considerably shal- lowerOcean Sci., 5, 313­327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work

Gnanadesikan, Anand

349

AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

350

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

351

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

Wang, Yuqing

352

Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

Frandsen, Jannette B.

353

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Oceans and ClimateOceans and Climate PeterPeter RhinesRhines 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

say, the ocean is a great thermometer/thermometer/halometerhalometer Levitus, Antonov, Boyer+ Stephens

355

Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research: The Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) is seeking a dynamic individual to lead its Renewable Ocean Energy Program for a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary renewable ocean energy research program. The position

356

Ocean Sci., 3, 337344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/3 of the total tidal energy dissipation, in the ocean basins through "internal" waves breaking, eOcean Sci., 3, 337­344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Unpredictability of internal M2 H. van Haren Netherlands

Boyer, Edmond

357

Ocean Sci., 3, 461482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Sci., 3, 461­482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco *now at: Institute of Biogeochemistry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

challenges in ocean management Theme 5 ­ Energy Area ENERGY.10.1 Call "The ocean of tomorrow" ­ Joining1 Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" · Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010 · Date of publication: 30, and Biotechnology (KBBE) - EUR 6 million from Theme 5 ­ Energy - EUR 10.5 million from Theme 6 ­ Environment

Milano-Bicocca, UniversitĂ 

359

The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 Ă? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

Battisti, David

360

Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

362

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

363

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

364

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

365

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

366

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

367

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

368

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

369

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

370

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

371

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

372

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

373

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

374

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

375

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST AFRICA Dr. William Ruddiman Co Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Philip W Rabin Direct Ocean Drilling Program

376

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 Andrew C. Adamson Staff Scientist, Leg 118 Ocean Drilling Program the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

377

Ocean Optics Environmental Optics, Nanoscience Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suspended solids swept up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico The right picture shows a phytoplankton bloom and changes observed. This can be used to monitor pollution in our oceans and methods taken when levels become such as ocean pollution, currents and warming, and to see how the oceans are affecting the health of our planet

Strathclyde, University of

378

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy Collaboration: A Charge for Engineers BULLETIN Summer 2012 Beginning the State of Florida provided $5 million to establish the Center for Ocean Energy Technology at FAU. In 2010 to ocean energy research; the others are in Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest. Bill Baxley is the SNMREC

Fernandez, Eduardo

379

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department SeptemberSignificant76 1980

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Atmospheric Signatures of Super-Earths: How to Distinguish Between Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Poor Atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extrasolar super-Earths (1-10 M$_{\\earth}$) are likely to exist with a wide range of atmospheres. Some super-Earths may be able to retain massive hydrogen-rich atmospheres. Others might never accumulate hydrogen or experience significant escape of lightweight elements, resulting in atmospheres more like those of the terrestrial planets in our Solar System. We examine how an observer could differentiate between hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-poor atmospheres by modeling super-Earth emission and transmission spectra, and we find that discrimination is possible by observing the transmission spectrum alone. An Earth-like atmosphere, composed of mostly heavy elements and molecules, will have a very weak transmission signal due to its small atmospheric scale height (since the scale height is inversely proportional to molecular weight). On the other hand, a large hydrogen-rich atmosphere reveals a relatively large transmission signal. The super Earth emission spectrum can additionally contrain the atmospheric composition and temperature structure. Super-Earths with massive hydrogen atmospheres will reveal strong spectral features due to water, whereas those that have lost most of their hydrogen (and have no liquid ocean) will be marked by CO$_2$ features and a lack of H$_2$O. We apply our study specifically to the low-mass planet orbiting an M star, Gl 581c ($M sin i$ = 5 M$_{\\earth}$), although our conclusions are relevant for super-Earths in general. The ability to distinguish hydrogen-rich atmospheres might be essential for interpreting mass and radius observations of planets in the transition between rocky super-Earths and Neptune-like planets.

E. Miller-Ricci; D. Sasselov; S. Seager

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

Stephen M. Masutani

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer Kirsty E. Hanley Stephen E. Belcher;Abstract The interaction between ocean surface waves and the overlying wind leads to a transfer of momentum can also be transferred upwards when long wavelength waves, characteristic of re- motely generated

Reading, University of

384

Global impact of fossil fuel combustion on atmospheric NOx Larry W. Horowitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential than emissions in the United States to perturb the global oxidizing power of the atmosphere. #12% of NOx concentrations in the lower and middle troposphere throughout the extratropical northern of the ocean. Sources in the United States are found to contribute about half of the fossil fuel NOx over

Jacob, Daniel J.

385

01/14 Ver. 4.1 Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Mark Schlissel, ex officio Master of engineering Space Dynamics Climate, Climate Modeling & Climate Change Clouds & Precipitation Paleoclimate, Ice Dynamics in these research areas: http://aoss.engin.umich.edu/pages/research Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University

Eustice, Ryan

386

The Atmospheric General Circulation in Thermodynamical Coordinates JOAKIM KJELLSSON AND KRISTOFER DO O S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the cycle has a peak transport of 428 Sv (Sv [ 109 kg s21 ). The thermodynamic cycle encapsulates a globally. Introduction The atmospheric general circulation forms as a re- sponse to differential solar heating (solar heating and ocean heat fluxes) vary. El Ni~no­Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is one of the dominant

Döös, Kristofer

387

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 13 JULY 2014 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO2200 Eddy-induced variability in Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the world ocean upwell to the surface and subsequently sink to intermediate and abyssal depths, forming two overturning cells that exchange substantial quantities of heat and carbon with the atmosphere4, derived from moored current meter and altimetric measurements. As the intensity of the regional eddy field

Naveira Garabato, Alberto

388

Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at high wind speeds in the Southern Ocean: Implications for global parameterizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 2006. [1] The SOLAS Air-Sea Gas Exchange (SAGE) Experiment was conducted in the western Pacific of air-sea gas exchange. Globally, the dominant control of air-sea gas exchange is turbulent energy as the primary source of energy for the atmospheric and oceanic molecular boundary layers have been derived from

Ho, David

389

Climate variability and ocean production in the Leeuwin Current system off the west coast of Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Western Australia M Feng1 , A M Waite2 , P A Thompson3 1 CSIRO Marine & Atmospheric Research, Floreat, WA 6014 Ming.Feng@csiro.au 2 School of Environmental Systems Engineering, University of Western Australia coast of Western Australia (WA), as well as the upper ocean stratification (mixing) and the nutrient

Feng, Ming

390

The Arctic Ocean--a Canadian perspective from IPY H. Melling & R. Francois & P. G. Myers & W. Perrie &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resulting from ice melt. Careful experiments have revealed that Arctic phytoplankton growth is constrained with the atmosphere is dramatically reduced by its ice cap. Sea ice inhibits transfers of vapour and heat reflectivity and latent heat reduce the ocean's absorption of sunshine, and slow ice melting until insolation

Long, Bernard

391

The circulation of the ocean is usually divided into two parts, a wind-driven circulation that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Princeton, NJ 08540 #12;2 the solar energy reaching the lowest layers of the atmosphere during the winter, in the formation of new deep water in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Large volumes of cold polar water occurs and how upwelled deep water returns to the areas of deep-water formation. The main new development

392

Analysis of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions and photochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and known emission factors for black carbon (BC) from South Asia yields 0.7 Tg yrĂ?1 (upper limit of about 1 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); KEYWORDS: Soot, black carbon, CO, emissions, India Citation of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions

Dickerson, Russell R.

393

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

Reid, Joseph L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Horizontal stirring in the global ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Global Climate network evolves with North Atlantic Oscillation phases: Coupling to Southern Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a network from climate records of atmospheric temperature at surface level, at different geographical sites in the globe, using reanalysis data from years 1948-2010. We find that the network correlates with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both locally in the north Atlantic, and through coupling to the southern Pacific Ocean. The existence of tele-connection links between those areas and their stability over time allows us to suggest a possible physical explanation for this phenomenon.

Guez, Oded; Berezin, Yehiel; Wang, Yang; Havlin, Shlomo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Dynamics of Atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer ­ Solar heating of surface, and atmosphere via dust absorption ­ Infrared CO2 band cooling (especially around 667 cm-1) ­ nonLTE near-infrared heating of CO2 and nonLTE cooling effects above ~60-80 km. Baroclinic waves, scales, heat and momentum transport, seasonal occurrence. Qualitative treatment

Read, Peter L.

398

Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure (bars) N2 82%; Ar 12%; CH4 6%CO2 96.5%; N2 3.5%Atmospheric composition 26177Orbital inclination (1992) orbiter ­ Winds from cloud-tracking and probe drifts ­ IR temperatures, solar-fixed tides, polar-Huygens mission (from 2005) ­ Doppler wind descent profile ­ IR temperature and composition maps ­ Visible, IR

Read, Peter L.

399

Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TECHNICAL NOTE 11 1989 #12;TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY #12;INTRODUCTION TO THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 11 Anne Gilbert Graham Ocean Drilling Program Texas A

400

2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

Ribes, Aurélien

402

Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Rohwer, Forest

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

404

OceanObs 1999 G GRIFFITHS et al. OceanObs 99  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, telecoms, defence, science, monitoring Hugin, Odyssey, OE X, R-One Robot, Martin, LDUUV, Autosub #12;Ocean

Griffiths, Gwyn

405

Surface Wave Effects in the NEMO Ocean Model: Forced and Coupled Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wave field), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extra-tropics, but the sea-state dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total oce...

Breivik, Řyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A E M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

Meyers, Steven D.

407

2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

408

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

Boss, Emmanuel S.

409

Ocean Sci., 3, 299310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and industrial fisheries, are experiencing a constant increase, significantly affecting the marine ecosystemOcean Sci., 3, 299­310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Observing the Mediterranean Sea from space: 21 years

Boyer, Edmond

410

Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change -New Regulations: Implications for Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change - New Regulations: Implications for Ocean Engineers Dr. Philomène Verlaan Visiting Colleague, Department of Oceanography & Senior Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization", a definition of marine geo-engineering

Frandsen, Jannette B.

411

Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

412

ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid Rain OutreachMoving Water andOcean

413

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpenTheOceanThermal

414

Response of a boundless two-layer ocean to atmospheric disturbancesResponse of a boundless two-layer ocean to atmospheric disturbances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- )? (8) and a y 2 Q . = 2 r - 2 - ? cur l T >? w j y ^ ^ y a t a x - - The set of equations (7)> (8) and (9) are formally the same as the equations for homogeneous water# ?10- In terms of the normal mode functions R_, . and Q. ? j ? jx... /' (*o) and for V > C , i r / / c ~ v S 3 -n 9 \\ I, U , Q , t ) = i ----- J | /------------- - - KA), (41) for t ?*> 00 1 c2 - V2 sin24 c2 - V2 1 * . V2 sin24 2 r 2 j n T c Z ?\\*J ^2 _ c2 for l^ >| | > sin C...

Kajiura, Kinjiro; Kajiura, Kinjiro

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

Weber, Thomas Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the most efficient radiation in the ocean. Sounds of seismicmost efficient radiation in the ocean. Of any remote sensingRadiation of Sound The underwater world is never silent. Even a hydrophone placed in the ocean

Freeman, Simon Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs of work for Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) activities and deliverables for the current fiscal

420

Oceanic alkyl nitrates as a natural source of tropospheric ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during Saga 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics Ain the tropical Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 32,

Neu, Jessica L; Lawler, Michael J; Prather, Michael J; Saltzman, Eric S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab of the University of New Hampshire. Parking is available at the Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Building. Directions

422

Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii REQUIREMENTS ............................................... 16 Ocean and Resources Engineering Page 3 #12;Page 4 Ocean and Resources Engineering BACKGROUND Hawaii's unique location, climate and marine

Frandsen, Jannette B.

423

ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation Core course Catalog Description This course aims to provide ocean and resources engineering students with the fundamentals necessary Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core

Frandsen, Jannette B.

424

The changing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate ChangeSYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S

Dibble, Theodore

427

Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

428

Automated Sensor Networks to Advance Ocean Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satellite telecom- munications. A regional cabled observa- tory will "wire" a single region in the north- eastern Pacific Ocean with a high-speed optical and power grid. The coastal com- ponent will expand ocean- observing network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight waters (MAB, spanning offshore regions from

429

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

430

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

431

ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

Purkis, Sam

432

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

433

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

434

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

435

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 106 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 ±nuwiLZ" ector ODP Drilling Program, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3469. In some cases, orders

436

LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

437

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

438

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical mechanics and ocean circulation Rick Salmon Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD equilibrium statistical mechanics based upon the conservation of energy and potential enstrophy to the mass. The equilibrium state resembles the buoyancy structure actually observed. Key words: statistical mechanics, ocean

Salmon, Rick

439

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

440

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/RP/147 Validation of ASCAT 12.5-km winds The Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers an operational level 2 wind product produces a level 1 product with 12.5-km WVC spacing that has a resolution of approximately 25 km. Since

Stoffelen, Ad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/194 Quality Control of Ku. The OSCAT level 2a data are available in near-real time and OWDP is used at KNMI to produce the Ocean and Sea Ice (OSI) SAF wind product which is made available to users. A beta version of OWDP is also

Stoffelen, Ad

442

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT ACTIVE CONTINENTAL EXTENSION IN THE WESTERN WOODLARK BASIN, PAPUA NEW GUINEA Dr. Philippe Huchon CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie �cole Normale Supérieure and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa 2525 Correa Road Honolulu, HI 96822-2285 U.S.A. Dr. Adam Klaus Ocean

443

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations ODP/TAI Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU May 1991 #12;This informal report Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University of Tokyo (Japan) Any

444

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Louis E. Garrison Deputy Director ODP

445

Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 2209­2223 Technical Note Pulsatile vortex generators for low-speed maneuvering of small underwater vehicles Kamran Mohseni� Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, science writer). #12;1. Introduction Oceans hold the key to the origin and continuity of life on the Earth

Mohseni, Kamran

446

Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

Fleming, Alex J.

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

447

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DSDP HOLE 504B REVISITED Keir Becker

448

Pluto's Atmosphere Does Not Collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining stellar occultation observations probing Pluto's atmosphere from 1988 to 2013 and models of energy balance between Pluto's surface and atmosphere, we conclude that Pluto's atmosphere does not collapse at any point in its 248-year orbit. The occultation results show an increasing atmospheric pressure with time in the current epoch, a trend present only in models with a high thermal inertia and a permanent N2 ice cap at Pluto's north rotational pole.

Olkin, C B; Borncamp, D; Pickles, A; Sicardy, B; Assafin, M; Bianco, F B; Buie, M W; de Oliveira, A Dias; Gillon, M; French, R G; Gomes, A Ramos; Jehin, E; Morales, N; Opitom, C; Ortiz, J L; Maury, A; Norbury, M; Ribas, F B; Smith, R; Wasserman, L H; Young, E F; Zacharias, M; Zacharias, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems

Frandsen, Jannette B.

450

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

451

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc. Washington DC 20005 19 July 2005 #12

452

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic

453

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of...

454

The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

455

Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg,...

456

Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

457

Self-adaptive processes for the mitigation of coherent multipath in ocean acoustics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) Universityin Electrical Engineering (Applied Ocean Sciences) by

Higley, William J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Design of a mobile coastal communications buoy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In response to a growing interest in networked communications at sea as well as the needs of our vital commercial fishing industry, the Northeast Consortium funded a novel research initiative to establish wireless acoustic ...

Hendry-Brogan, Meghan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Ocean Univ. China (Oceanic and Coastal Sea Research) DOI 10.1007/s11802-011-1700-1 ISSN 1672-5182

Morandini, Andre C.

460

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsTools PrintableCARIBU ProposalBeamAtmospheric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999 ARM

462

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999

463

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999July

464

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August

465

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM 2003

466

Atmospheric Particulates | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -GrownAn overheadAtmospheric

467

Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) • Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) • Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 – 081103) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) • Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 – 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 – 090397) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 – 012296) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) • Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 – 102192) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 – 111093) • The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 – Jan, 1996) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Th

468

1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Department, course number, title ORE 603 Oceanography for Ocean Engineers 2. Designation Core for ocean engineers. Introduction to ocean dynamical processes and general circulation. Ocean measurement Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core Program Outcome 6: Problem formulation & solution Program

Frandsen, Jannette B.

469

Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

470

Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Abrupt changes in atmospheric methane at the MIS 5b5a transition Alexi M. Grachev,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abrupt changes in atmospheric methane at the MIS 5b­5a transition Alexi M. Grachev,1 Edward J, as was previously described for the last deglaciation. Citation: Grachev, A. M., E. J. Brook, and J. P. Severinghaus by more than 25% [Valdes et al., 2005], and the oceanic methane hydrate source appears to be stable

Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

472

Laboratory Experiments to Stimulate CO(2) Ocean Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Progress Report summarizes activities conducted over the period 8/16/96-2/15/97 as part of this project. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation is to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. Critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will be addressed by performing experiments that: (1) characterize size spectra and velocities of a dispersed CO{sub 2} phase in the near-field of a discharge jet; and (2) estimate rates of mass transfer from dissolving droplets of liquid CO{sub 2} encased in a thin hydrate shell. Experiments will be conducted in a laboratory facility that can reproduce conditions in the ocean to depths of 600 m (1,969 ft). Between 8/16/96 and 2/15/97, activities focused on modifications to the experimental apparatus and the testing of diagnostics. Following completion of these tasks, experiments will be initiated and will continue through the end of the 36 month period of performance. Major accomplishments of this reporting period were: (1) delivery, set-up, and testing of the PDPA (Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer), which will be the principal diagnostic of the continuous CO{sub 2} jet injection tests; (2) presentation of research papers and posters at the 212th American Chemical Society National Meeting and the Third International Conference on Carbon Dioxide Removal; (3) participation in the 4th Expert Workshop on Ocean Storage of Carbon Dioxide; (4) execution of an Agreement with ABB Management, Ltd. to support and extend the activities of this grant; and (5) initiation of research collaborations with Dr. P.M. Haugen of the University of Bergen, Norway, and Dr. A. Yamasaki of the National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Japan.

Masutani, S.M.

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

473

Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

474

Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

475

Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

476

2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

477

2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

478

2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

479

Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stone Soup Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 13 Compiled by Elizabeth A. Heise Ocean Drilling Program Texas A orpersonalresearchpurposes; however,republicationof any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling

480

2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere ocean buoys" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

482

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION FISCAL YEAR 2008 ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM UNITED STATES IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION CONSORTIUM FOR OCEAN LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION CONTRACT OCE-0352500 1 OCTOBER 2007­30 SEPTEMBER 2008 #12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ii

483

Characterization of Prochlorococcus clades from iron-depleted oceanic regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trace metal values (22). Nitrate and phosphate were monthly averages derived from the World Ocean Atlas (

Rusch, D. B; Martiny, A. C; Dupont, C. L; Halpern, A. L; Venter, J. C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Ocean, Estuary and Plume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and nearshore ocean as critical habitat in the lifecycle of anadromous fish. Various entities recommended

485

Self-Study Report Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABET Self-Study Report for the Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii........................................................................................I-1 #12;1 Self-Study Report Ocean and Resources Engineering Master of Science University of Hawaii of Science (MS) in Ocean and Resources Engineering (formerly Master of Science in Ocean Engineering

Frandsen, Jannette B.

486

ORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Fall Semester 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this course is to provide the ocean engineering student an understanding of how sound propagates through: Ocean engineering specialization Program Outcome 5: Use of latest tools in ocean engineering ProgramORE 654: Applications of Ocean Acoustics Syllabus Fall Semester 2014 Tuesday/Thursday 12:00-1:15 PM

Frandsen, Jannette B.

487

The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in controlling ocean chemistry. Better quantification of global

Demouchy, Sylvie

488

DCNS, OTEC roadmap May 2013 DCNSDCNS -Ocean Energy Business Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© DCNS, OTEC roadmap ­ May 2013 © DCNSDCNS - Ocean Energy Business Unit Emmanuel BROCHARD, VP OTEC positioning for DCNS on Ocean Energy Provider of added-value · On Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Floating #12;© DCNS, OTEC roadmap ­ May 2013 4 DNCS invests in 4 ocean energy technologies Keypoints OTEC

489

Ocean heat transport in a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA): structure, mechanisms, and impacts on climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is primarily controled by the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), particularly in the Atlantic Ocean. The role of variation of temperature on variability of meridional OHT increases in the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Results iv... circulation in the mid-latitude Atlantic reinforces the MOCs, which contribute to a positive trend of OHT. Finaly, in the northern North Atlantic Ocean, a smal increase in meridional OHT and a slight weakening of MOC are detected. The weakening...

Zheng, Yangxing

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative transfer calculations, will be acquired using the aircraft and surface facilities available to ARESE. This document outlines the scientific approach and measurement requirements of the project.

Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

491

Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

Stone, Peter H.

492

Ocean Fertilization: Science, Policy, and Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past 20 years there has been growing interest in the concept of fertilizing the ocean with iron to abate global warming. This interest was catalyzed by basic scientific experiments showing that iron limits primary ...

Strong, Aaron L.

493

Ocean fertilization : ecological cure or calamity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The late John Martin demonstrated the paramount importance of iron for microscopic plant growth in large areas of the world's oceans. Iron, he hypothesized, was the nutrient that limited green life in seawater. Over twenty ...

Ogilvie, Megan Jacqueline, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Conservation Scheme for sigma Ocean Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Scheme for sigma Ocean Models (Finite Volume Consideration for Pressure Gradient Force for the Finite Volume · Flux Conservation #12;Dynamic and Thermodynamic Equations · Continuity · Momentum

Chu, Peter C.

495

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

Schmitt, Raymond W.

497

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 166 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Director ODP/TAMU _____________________ Jack Baldauf Manager Science Operations ODP Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract of the University of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council

498

Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

A New Family of Planets ? "Ocean Planets"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new family of planets is considered which is between rochy terrestrial planets and gaseous giant ones: "Ocean-Planets". We present the possible formation, composition and internal models of these putative planets, including that of their ocean, as well as their possible Exobiology interest. These planets should be detectable by planet detection missions such as Eddington and Kepler, and possibly COROT (lauch scheduled in 2006). They would be ideal targets for spectroscopic missions such as Darwin/TPF.

A. Leger; F. Selsis; C. Sotin; T. Guillot; D. Despois; H. Lammer; M. Ollivier; F. Brachet; A. Labeque; C. Valette

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

500

Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Di sposai . Geological aspects Physical aspects Chemical aspects Biological aspects CHAPTER II. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF OCEAN DISPOSAL Types of Waste Materials. Dredged materiais. Industrial wastes, DomestIc sewage wa tes Solid wastes Radloact..., can reduce the passage of light through the water column and cause damaging effects to the marine ecosystem. Each of five major oceans has pronounced gyral, or circular current motion (Fiaure 1. 1). The North Atlantic current system is comprised...

Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z