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1

Meteorological Tracer Techniques for Parameterizing Atmospheric Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tracer materials have been used in atmospheric dispersion studies for decades, basic information about meteorological tracer techniques is scattered among a number of different sources. This paper attempts to pull together this ...

Warren B. Johnson

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Experimental Techniques for Measuring Temperature and Velocity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Temperature and Velocity Fields to Improve the Use and Validation of Building Heat Transfer Models Title Experimental Techniques for Measuring Temperature and Velocity...

3

Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes: Techniques and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hunt for cosmic TeV particle accelerators is prospering through Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes. We face challenges such as low light levels and MHz trigger rates, and the need to distinguish between particle air showers stemming from primary gamma rays and those due to the hadronic cosmic ray background. Our test beam is provided by the Crab Nebula, a steady accelerator of particles to energies beyond 20 TeV. Highly variable gamma-ray emission, coincident with flares at longer wavelengths, is revealing the particle acceleration mechanisms at work in the relativistic jets of Active Galaxies. These 200 GeV to 20 TeV photons propagating over cosmological distances allow us to place a limit on the infra-red background linked to galaxy formation and, some speculate, to the decay of massive relic neutrinos. Gamma rays produced in neutralino annihilation or the evaporation of primordial black holes may also be detectable. These phenomena and a zoo of astrophysical objects will be the targets of the next generation multi-national telescope facilities.

S. M. Bradbury

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption technique to retrieve columnar water vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential absorption techniques are suitable to retrieve the total column water vapor contents from imaging spectroscopy data. A technique called Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption (APDA) is derived directly from simplified radiative transfer equations. It combines a partial atmospheric correction with a differential absorption technique. The atmospheric path radiance term is iteratively corrected during the retrieval of water vapor. This improves the results especially over low background albedos. The error of the method for various ground reflectance spectra is below 7% for most of the spectra. The channel combinations for two test cases are then defined, using a quantitative procedure, which is based on MODTRAN simulations and the image itself. An error analysis indicates that the influence of aerosols and channel calibration is minimal. The APDA technique is then applied to two AVIRIS images acquired in 1991 and 1995. The accuracy of the measured water vapor columns is within a range of {+-}5% compared to ground truth radiosonde data.

Schlaepfer, D.; Itten, K.I. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography] [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography; Borel, C.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Keller, J. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Title Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Salamanca, Francisco, Shaheen R. Tonse, Surabi Menon, Vishal Garg, Krishna P. Singh, Manish Naja, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 4 Abstract We evaluate differences in clear-sky upwelling shortwave radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere in response to increasing the albedo of roof surfaces in an area of India with moderately high aerosol loading. Treated (painted white) and untreated (unpainted) roofs on two buildings in northeast India were analyzed on five cloudless days using radiometric imagery from the IKONOS satellite. Comparison of a radiative transfer model (RRTMG) and radiometric satellite observations shows good agreement (R2 = 0.927). Results show a mean increase of ~50 W m-2 outgoing at the top of the atmosphere for each 0.1 increase of the albedo at the time of the observations and a strong dependence on atmospheric transmissivity.

6

Applications of 3D Experimental Techniques Across Length Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 11, 2012... Experimental Techniques Across Length Scales: Non-Destructive Techniques .... The efficient image-processing pipeline provides a full 3D ...

7

The role of fluctuations in atmospheric Cerenkov technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the absence of a standard source of gamma rays or hadrons of known energy one has to study the details of production of \\v Cerenkov light at the observation level only through detailed simulation studies. Recently such studies have become all the more important in view of the various techniques resulting from such studies, to distinguish between gamma ray initiated events from those generated by much more abundant hadronic component of cosmic rays. We have carried out a detailed simulation studies using the CORSIKA package in order to study the Cerenkov photon density fluctuations at various core distances both for photon and proton primaries incident vertically at the top of the atmosphere. It is found that the density fluctuations are significantly non-statistical. Such fluctuations are much more pronounced in the case of proton primaries as compared to photon primaries at all energies. Several statistical parameters have been computed some which might lead to a technique in distinguishing photon primaries.

P. N. Bhat

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

Wavelet denoising techniques with applications to experimental geophysical data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare Fourier-based and wavelet-based denoising techniques applied to both synthetic and real experimental geophysical data. The Fourier-based technique used for comparison is the classical Wiener estimator, and the wavelet-based ... Keywords: Denoising, Empirical Bayes, Wavelet, Wavelet thresholding, Wiener filter

Albert C. To; Jeffrey R. Moore; Steven D. Glaser

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Pseudospectral Technique for Calculation of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pseudospectral method and its numerical solution algorithm for application to boundary layer problems in the atmosphere are presented. The method introduces the evaluation of a polynomial function when the solution is expressed as the sum of a ...

H. N. Lee; J. K. Shi

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Numerical and Experimental Investigation of the Neutral Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study combines the experimental measurements with large-eddy simulation (LES) data of a neutral planetary boundary layer (PBL) documented by a 60-m tower instrumented with eight sonic anemometers, and a high-resolution Doppler lidar during ...

Philippe Drobinski; Pierre Carlotti; Jean-Luc Redelsperger; Valery Masson; Robert M. Banta; Rob K. Newsom

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 1 Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Techniques in Modern Lipid Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 1 Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Techniques in Modern Lipid Analysis Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press 2F9B8A831F53D269EADF2AB8911EFA88 AOCS Pr

12

Experimental Techniques for the Study of Liquid Monopropellant Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propellants based on hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) have shown promise as a hydrazine replacement because of their comparably low toxicity, low vapor pressure, high specific impulse and high density. Herein, the recent history of advanced monopropellant research is explored, and new experimental techniques are presented to investigate the combustion behavior of a potential hydrazine replacement propellant. Nitromethane, a widely available monopropellant with a recent resurgence in research, is utilized in the current study as a proof of concept for the newly designed equipment and as a step towards investigating more-advanced, HAN-based monopropellants. A strand bomb facility capable of supporting testing at up to 340 atm was employed, and experiments were performed between 28 atm and 130 atm. Burning rate data for nitromethane are calculated from experiments and a power correlation is established as r(mm/s) = 0.33[P(MPa)]^1.02. A comparison with available literature reveals this correlation to be very much in agreement to other studies of nitromethane. Other physical characteristics of nitromethane combustion are presented. Updates to the facility and new methods to examine the combustion of liquid propellant are described in detail. Special focus is given to procedures and safety information.

Warren, William

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Experimental thin film deposition and surface analysis techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An attempt has been made to present some of the thin-film deposition and surface analysis techniques which may be useful in growing superionic conducting materials. Emphasis is made on the importance of being careful in selecting process parameters and materials in order to produce films with properties outlined in this article. Also, special care should be given to proper consideration of grain boundary effects.

Collins, W.E.; Rambabu, B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Comparisons of empirical localization techniques for serial ensemble Kalman filters in a simple atmospheric general circulation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two techniques for estimating good localization functions for serial ensemble Kalman filters are compared in observing system simulation experiments (OSSE) conducted with the dynamical core of an atmospheric general circulation model. The first ...

Lili Lei; Jeffrey L. Anderson

15

Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations  

SciTech Connect

Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Techniques to Mitigate the Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Free Space Optical Communication Links.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Free space optical communication links are an attractive technology for broadband communications when fiber optic links are unavailable or simply not feasible. Atmospheric turbulence, aerosols,… (more)

Wasiczko, Linda Marie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Using the Radiative Kernel Technique to Calculate Climate Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models differ in their responses to imposed forcings, such as increased greenhouse gas concentrations, due to different climate feedback strengths. Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) are separated into two components: ...

Karen M. Shell; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Christine A. Shields

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The ONSAM Experiment: Remote Sensing Techniques for Vertical Sounding of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ONSala Atmospheric Measurement program was carried out in May 1983 in order to test the performance of new remote sensing equipment, compared with radiosondes launched for this particular program. A temperature profiling radiometer and a ...

J. Askne; G. Elgered; H. Nordius; G. Skoog; E. Winberg; A. Ha?ga?rd; E. Andersson; N. Gustafsson; J. Svensson; I. Carlsson

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Experimental Tropical Cyclone Prediction Using the GFDL 25-km-Resolution Global Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a forecasting configuration of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) High-resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM). HiRAM represents an early attempt in unifying, within a global modeling framework, the capabilities of ...

Jeffrey S. Gall; Isaac Ginis; Shian-Jiann Lin; Timothy P. Marchok; Jan-Huey Chen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Experimental and theoretical investigation of nucleation and growth of atmospheric aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerosol particles have profound impacts on human health, atmospheric radiation, and cloud microphysics and these impacts are strongly dependent on particle sizes. However, formation and growth of atmospheric particles are currently not well understood. In this work, laboratory and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. The first two parts of the dissertation are a laboratory investigation of new particle formation and growth, and a theoretical study of atmospheric molecular complexes and clusters. The nucleation rate was considerably enhanced in the presence of cis-pinonic acid and ammonia. The composition of the critical cluster was estimated from the dependence of the nucleation rate on the precursor concentration and the time evolution of the clusters was then simulated using molecular dynamic simulations. Results from quantum chemical calculations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) reveal that formation of strong hydrogen bonding between an organic acid and sulfuric acid is likely responsible for a reduction of the nucleation barrier by modifying the hydrophobic properties of the organic acid and allowing further addition of hydrophilic species (e.g., H2SO4, H2O, and possibly NH3) to the hydrophilic side of the clusters. This promotes growth of the nascent cluster to overcome the nucleation barrier and thus enhances the nucleation in the atmosphere. The last part of this dissertation is the laboratory investigation of heterogeneous interactions of atmospheric carbonyls with sulfuric acid. Direct measurement has been performed to investigate the heterogeneous uptake of atmospheric carbonyls on sulfuric acid. Important parameters have been obtained from the time-dependent or timeindependent uptake profiles. The results indicated that the acid-catalyzed reactions of larger aldehydes (e.g. octanal and 2, 4-hexadienal) in sulfuric acid solution were attributed to aldol condensation in high acidity. However such reactions do not contribute much to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation due to the low acidity under tropospheric conditions. On the other hand, heterogeneous reactions of light dicarbonyl such as methylglyoxal likely contribute to SOA formation in slightly acidic media. The reactions of methylglyoxal in the atmospheric aerosol-phase involve hydration and subsequent polymerization, which are dependent on the hygroscopicity, rather than the acidity of the aerosols.

Zhao, Jun

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Intercomparison of Nocturnal Lower-Atmospheric Structure Observed with Lidar and Sodar Techniques at Pune, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coordinated experiments to study the nocturnal lower atmosphere were conducted on selected nights during April?August 1991 using an argon ion lidar and a Doppler sodar at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (18°32?N, 73°51?E, 559 m ...

P. C. S. Devara; P. Ernest Raj; B. S. Murthy; G. Pandithurai; S. Sharma; K. G. Vernekar

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 run resolution. This data includes information on constituents of the earth`s surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various rationing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. This work testS the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of tropospheric water vapor.

Schlaepfer, D. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland). Dept. of Geography; Borel, C.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Keller, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosols at the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several techniques developed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment for measuring aerosol vertical optical depth, aerosol horizontal attenuation length, and aerosol phase function. The techniques are based on measurements of side-scattered light generated by a steerable ultraviolet laser and collected by an optical detector designed to measure fluorescence light from cosmic-ray air showers. We also present a technique to cross-check the aerosol optical depth measurement using air showers observed in stereo. These methods can be used by future air fluorescence experiments.

The HiRes Collaboration

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 7 Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Triacylglycerolsby Atmospheric Pressure Ionization (APCI and ESI) Mass Spectrometry Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 7 Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Triacylglycerolsby Atmospheric Pressure Ionization (APCI and ESI) Mass Spectrometry Techniques Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AO

26

Experimental validation of a diagnostic technique for tuning the fourth shock timing on National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] will be driven with a carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The Hohlraum conditions present during the first three shocks allow for a very accurate and direct diagnosis of the strength and timing of each individual shock by velocity interferometry. Experimental validation of this diagnostic technique on the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] has been reported in [Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056302 (2009)]. The Hohlraum environment present during the launch and propagation of the final shock, by contrast, is much more severe and will not permit diagnosis by the same technique. A new, closely related technique has been proposed for measuring and tuning the strength and timing of the fourth shock. Experiments to test this technique under NIF-relevant conditions have also been performed on OMEGA. The result of these experiments and a comparison to numerical simulations is presented, validating this concept.

Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Experimental and computational study of complex shockwave dynamics in laser ablation plumes in argon atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

We investigated spatio-temporal evolution of ns laser ablation plumes at atmospheric pressure, a favored condition for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. The 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser were focused on to an Al target and the generated plasma was allowed to expand in 1 atm Ar. The hydrodynamic expansion features were studied using focused shadowgraphy and gated 2 ns self-emission visible imaging. Shadowgram images showed material ejection and generation of shock fronts. A secondary shock is observed behind the primary shock during the time window of 100-500 ns with instabilities near the laser cone angle. By comparing the self-emission images obtained using fast photography, it is concluded that the secondary shocks observed in the shadowgraphy were generated by fast moving target material. The plume front estimates using fast photography exhibited reasonable agreement with data obtained from shadowgraphy at early times {<=}400 ns. However, at later times, fast photography images showed plume confinement while the shadowgraphic images showed propagation of the plume front even at greater times. The structure and dynamics of the plume obtained from optical diagnostic tools were compared to numerical simulations. We have shown that the main features of plume expansion in ambient Ar observed in the experiments can be reproduced using a continuum hydrodynamics model which provided valuable insight into the expansion dynamics and shock structure of the plasma plume.

Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Diwakar, P. K.; LaHaye, N. L.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, and School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Crystallization and Solidification Properties of LipidsChapter 10 Comparison of Experimental Techniques Used in Lipid Crystallization Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystallization and Solidification Properties of Lipids Chapter 10 Comparison of Experimental Techniques Used in Lipid Crystallization Studies Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 491A63F5EC71B64D1ED

29

Technique for the experimental estimation of nonlinear energy transfer in fully developed turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new procedure for calculating the nonlinear energy transfer and linear growth/damping rate of fully developed turbulence is derived. It avoids the unphysically large damping rates typically obtained using the predecessor method of Ritz [Ch. P. Ritz, E. J. Powers, and R. D. Bengtson, Phys. Fluids B {bold 1}, 153 (1989)]. It enforces stationarity of the turbulence to reduce the effects of noise and fluctuations not described by the basic governing equation, and includes the fourth-order moment to avoid the closure approximation. The new procedure has been implemented and tested on simulated, fully developed two-dimensional (2-D) turbulence data from a 2-D trapped-particle fluid code, and has been shown to give excellent reconstructions of the input growth rate and nonlinear coupling coefficients with good noise rejection. However, in the experimentally important case where only a one-dimensional (1-D) averaged representation of the underlying 2-D turbulence is available, this technique does not, in general, give acceptable results. A new 1-D algorithm has thus been developed for analysis of 1-D measurements of intrinsically 2-D turbulence. This new 1-D algorithm includes the nonresonant wave numbers in calculating the bispectra, and generally gives useful results when the width of the radial wave number spectrum is comparable to or less than that of the poloidal spectrum. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Kim, J.S.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Fernandez, E.; Ware, A.; Terry, P.W. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Modeling the Global Solar Radiation on the Earth’s Surface Using Atmospheric Deterministic and Intelligent Data-Driven Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three methods for analyzing and modeling the global shortwave radiation reaching the earth’s surface are presented in this study. Solar radiation is a very important input for many aspects of climatology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and ...

M. Santamouris; G. Mihalakakou; B. Psiloglou; G. Eftaxias; D. N. Asimakopoulos

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Step-Mountain Technique Applied to an Atmospheric C-Grid Model, or How to Improve Precipitation near Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting with Arakawa and Lamb’s second-order C-grid scheme, this paper describes the modifications made to the dynamics to create a C-grid atmospheric model with a variable number of cells for each vertical column. Where mountains exist, grid ...

Gary L. Russell

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Experimental techniques for subnanosecond resolution of laser-launched plates and impact studies  

SciTech Connect

Miniature laser-launched plates have applications in shock wave physics, studying dynamic properties of materials and can be used to generate experimental data in a manner similar to a laboratory gas gun for one-dimensional impact experiments. Laser-launched plates have the advantage of small size, low kinetic energy, and can be launched with ubiquitous laboratory lasers. Because of the small size and high accelerations (10{sup 7}--10{sup 10} g`s), improved temporal resolution and optical non-contact methods to collect data are required. Traditional mechanical in-situ gauges would significantly impair the data quality and do not have the required time response.

Paisley, D.L.; Warnes, R.H.; Stahl, D.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Dynamic Experimentation Div.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.  

SciTech Connect

This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Experimental Study on Focusing Multiple Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using a quartz tube and electrodes by applying low frequencies and high voltages. To increase the number of charged particles per unit area, a bundle of multiple plasma jets was concentrated at one point. To study the characteristics of the jet, the plasma was injected into a magnetic field produced by external electromagnetic coils. It was found that the plasma jet was affected by the magnetic field.

Kiyoyuki Yambe; Hajime Sakakita; Haruhisa Koguchi; Satoru Kiyama; Nagayasu Ikeda; Yoichi Hirano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

Kent, Stephen [University of Chicago

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Direct Experimental Evaluation of the Grain Boundaries Gas Content in PWR fuels: New Insight and Perspective of the ADAGIO Technique  

SciTech Connect

Over the last decades, many analytical experiments (in-pile and out-of-pile) have underlined the active role of the inter-granular gases on the global fuel transient behavior under accidental conditions such as RIA and/or LOCA. In parallel, the improvement of fission gas release modeling in nuclear fuel performance codes needs direct experimental determination/validation regarding the local gas distribution inside the fuel sample. In this context, an experimental program, called 'ADAGIO' (French acronym for Discriminating Analysis of Accumulation of Inter-granular and Occluded Gas), has been initiated through a joint action of CEA, EDF and AREVA NP in order to develop a new device/technique for quantitative and direct measurement of local fission gas distribution within an irradiated fuel pellet. ADAGIO technique is based on the fact that fission gas inventory (intra and inter-granular parts) can be distinguished by controlled fuel oxidation, since grain boundaries oxidize faster than the bulk. The purpose of the current paper is to present both the methodology and the associated results of the ADAGIO program performed at CEA. It has been divided into two main parts: (i) feasibility (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels), (ii) application on high burn up UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

Pontillon, Y.; Noirot, J.; Caillot, L. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DEN/DEC/SA3C, Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Les Durance (France); Muller, E. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DEN/DEC/SESC, Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Les Durance (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A General, Cryogenically-Based Analytical Technique for the Determination of Trace Quantities of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical technique for the determination of trace (sub-ppbv) quantities of volatile organic compounds in air was developed. A liquid nitrogen-cooled trap operated at reduced pressures in series with a Dupont Nafion-based drying tube and a ...

Randolph A. Coleman; Wesley R. Cofer III; Robert A. Edahl Jr.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Automatic Mirror Alignment for VIRGO: First experimental demonstration of the Anderson technique on a large-scale interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The French-Italian interferometric gravitational wave detector VIRGO is currently being commissioned. Its principal instrument is a Michelson laser interferometer with 3 km long optical cavities in the arms and a power-recycling mirror. The interferometer resides in an ultra-high vacuum system and the mirrors are suspended from multistage pendulums for seismic isolation. This type of laser interferometer reaches its maximum sensitivity only when the optical setup is held actively very accurately at a defined operating point: control systems using the precise interferometer signals stabilise the longitudinal and angular positions of the optical component. This paper gives an overview of the control system for the angular degrees of freedom; we present the current status of the system and report the first experimental demonstration of the Anderson technique on a large-scale interferometer.

A. Freise; for the VIRGO Collaboration

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modeling of Non-Homogeneous Containment Atmosphere in the ThAI Experimental Facility Using a CFD Code  

SciTech Connect

The CFD code CFX4.4 was used to simulate an experiment in the ThAI facility, which was designed for investigation of thermal-hydraulic processes during a severe accident inside a Light Water Reactor containment. In the considered experiment, air was initially present in the vessel, and helium and steam were injected during different phases of the experiment at various mass flow rates and at different locations. The main purpose of the simulation was to reproduce the non-homogeneous temperature and species concentration distributions in the ThAI experimental facility. A three-dimensional model of the ThAI vessel for the CFX4.4 code was developed. The flow in the simulation domain was modeled as single-phase. Steam condensation on vessel walls was modeled as a sink of mass and energy using a correlation that was originally developed for an integral approach. A simple model of bulk phase change was also introduced. The calculated time-dependent variables together with temperature and concentration distributions at the end of experiment phases are compared to experimental results. (authors)

Babic, Miroslav; Kljenak, Ivo; Mavko, Borut [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Observed local and remote influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America using a model-validated statistical technique that first excludes oceanic forcings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed local and non-local influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America are quantified after first removing the ocean’s impact. The interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere is dominated by forcing from the ...

Fuyao Wang; Michael Notaro; Zhengyu Liu; Guangshan Chen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

42

A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale Radar Observations of Cloud Occurrence and Large-Scale Atmospheric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A classification scheme is created to map the synoptic-scale (large scale) atmospheric state to distributions of local-scale cloud properties. This mapping is accomplished by a neural network that classifies 17 months of synoptic-scale initial ...

Roger Marchand; Nathaniel Beagley; Sandra E. Thompson; Thomas P. Ackerman; David M. Schultz

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Experimental Measurements of Concentration Fluctuations and Scales in a Dispersing Plume in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Obtained Using a Very Fast Response Concentration Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-frequency fluctuations of concentration in a plume dispersing in the atmospheric surface layer have been measured with high-resolution concentration detectors (approximately 270 Hz at the ?6-dB point) to extract various concentration ...

Eugene Yee; R. Chan; P. R. Kosteniuk; G. M. Chandler; C. A. Biltoft; J. F. Bowers

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

45

Testing and Evaluating Atmospheric Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model validation is a crucial process that underpins model development and gives confidence to the results from running models. This article discusses a range of techniques for validating atmosphere models given that the atmosphere is chaotic and incompletely ...

Vicky Pope; Terry Davies

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

Andrews, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A study of the performance of an ion shutter for drift tubes in atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry: Computer models and experimental findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion mobility spectra are initiated when ions, derived from a sample, are pulsed or injected through ion shutters into a drift region. The effect on signal intensity from electric fields arising from the shutter grids (E{sub s}) and a superimposed electric field of the drift tube (E{sub d}) was determined experimentally and simulated computationally for ion motion at ambient pressure. The combination of these two fields influenced shutter performance in three ways: (1) intensity of an ion peak was suppressed by increased current in the baseline due to continuous leakage of ions into the drift region from insufficient E{sub s} to block ion motion when needed, at a given value of E{sub d}; (2) the ion shutter provided maximum peak intensity with some optimal ratio of E{sub s}/E{sub d} when ions were fully blocked except using the injection time; (c) the signal intensity was reduced when the blocking voltage of the ion shutter exceeded this optimal E{sub s}/E{sub d} ratio from ion depletion at the shutter grids. The optimal ratio from the computer models was equal to 1.50, whereas a value of 2.50 was obtained from the experimental findings. This difference was attributed to nonideal geometry with the grids of the shutter and the conducting elements in the drift tube establishing both E{sub s} and E{sub d}. As both the experimental and modeling results demonstrated, a mobility dependence of ion yield from the ionization source was found to cause a mobility dependent ion signal at the collector electrode.

Tadjimukhamedov, Fatkhulla K.; Eiceman, Gary A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States); Puton, Jaroslaw [Department of Environmental Sciences, Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Mikkeli FIN-50100 (Finland); Stone, John A. [Department of Chemistry, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Investigating Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Byron Meadows - NASALangley Research Center May 14, 1991 Demonstrations of weather forecasting tools and techniques for experiments in the atmosphere and of lasers used to...

50

The Seasonal Cycle of Gravity Wave Drag in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a variational technique, middle atmosphere gravity wave drag (GWD) is estimated from Met Office middle atmosphere analyses for the year 2002. The technique employs an adjoint model of a middle atmosphere dynamical model to minimize a cost ...

Manuel Pulido; John Thuburn

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Experimental design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing data information requires careful selection, termed design, of the points at which data are observed. Experimental design is reviewed here for broad classes of data collection and analysis problems, including: fractioning techniques ... Keywords: Key Design Issues in Data Mining, Science and Technology, Statistical Fundamentals

J. P. Morgan; Xinwei Deng

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analysis methods for Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three different analysis techniques for Atmospheric Imaging System are presented. The classical Hillas parameters based technique is shown to be robust and efficient, but more elaborate techniques can improve the sensitivity of the analysis. A comparison of the different analysis techniques shows that they use different information for gamma-hadron separation, and that it is possible to combine their qualities.

Mathieu de Naurois

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Experimental implementation of active force control and iterative learning technique to a two-link arm driven by penumatic artificial muscles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the practical viability and feasibility of an active force control (AFC) technique incorporating an iterative learning (IL) algorithm known as AFCAIL applied to a two-link planar arm actuated by a pair of pneumatic artificial muscles ... Keywords: active force control, hardware-in-the-loop simulation, iterative learning, pneumatic artificial muscle

M. Mailah; H. H. Mun; S. Kazi; H. Jahanabadi

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Intraseasonal Variability in a Dry Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long integration of a primitive equation dry atmospheric model with time-independent forcing under boreal winter conditions is analyzed. A variety of techniques such as time filtering, space–time spectral analysis, and lag regressions are used ...

Hai Lin; Gilbert Brunet; Jacques Derome

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Ballistic Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence on munition target scatter are determined from numerical simulations of ballistic trajectories through many realizations of realistic simulated turbulent wind fields. A technique is evaluated for correcting ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Charles Clough; Michael Padovani; Kelly Fling; Ward Boughers; W. Scott Walton

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Quasi-experimental and experimental approaches to environmental economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper argues that an increased application of quasi-experimental and experimental techniques will improve understanding about core environmental economics questions. This argument is supported by a review of the ...

Greenstone, Michael

57

Quasi-experimental and experimental approaches to environmental economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper argues that an increased application of quasi-experimental and experimental techniques will improve understanding about core environmental economics questions. This argument is supported by a review of the ...

Greenstone, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) Pilot Experiment at NYC" - Michael Reynolds, BNL 17:30 "EML Pilot Studies for the Urban Atmospheric Observatory" - Hsi-Na (Sam) Lee, EML 17:40 "A...

60

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhäsalmi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

M. Sajjad Athar; M. Honda; T. Kajita; K. Kasahara; S. Midorikawa

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

Regional Earth-Atmosphere Energy Balance Estimates Based on Assimilations with a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The column budget technique described by Oort and Vonder Haar (1976) is used to assess the physical consistency and accuracy of estimates of the earth-atmosphere energy balance. Regional estimates of the atmospheric budget terms, the net ...

Michael A. Alexander; Siegfried D. Schubert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pierre Auger Atmosphere-Monitoring Lidar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluorescence-detection techniques of cosmic-ray air-shower experiments require precise knowledge of atmospheric properties to reconstruct air-shower energies. Up to now, the atmosphere in desert-like areas was assumed to be stable enough so that occasional calibration of atmospheric attenuation would suffice to reconstruct shower profiles. However, serious difficulties have been reported in recent fluorescence-detector experiments causing systematic errors in cosmic ray spectra at extreme energies. Therefore, a scanning backscatter lidar system has been constructed for the Pierre Auger Observatory in Malargue, Argentina, where on-line atmospheric monitoring will be performed. One lidar system is already deployed at the Los Leones fluorescence detector site and the second one is currently (April 2003) under construction at the Coihueco site. Next to the established ones, a novel analysis method with assumption on horizontal invariance, using multi-angle measurements is shown to unambiguously measure optical depth, as well as absorption and backscatter coefficient.

A. Filipcic; M. Horvat; D. Veberic; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik; M. Chiosso; R. Mussa; G. Sequeiros; M. A. Mostafa; M. D. Roberts

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

65

A Moist Benchmark Calculation for Atmospheric General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A benchmark calculation is designed to compare the climate and climate sensitivity of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). The experimental setup basically follows that of the aquaplanet experiment (APE) proposed by Neale and Hoskins, ...

Myong-In Lee; Max J. Suarez; In-Sik Kang; Isaac M. Held; Daehyun Kim

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Measurement of OH and HO2 in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the OH and HO2 radicals form stringent tests of our knowledge of atmospheric photochemistry. Owing to the extremely low concentrations of these species, their determination has posed a considerable experimental challenge; but now, ...

David R. Crosley

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Direct Evidence of “Sheets” in the Atmospheric Temperature Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental evidence showing the ubiquitous presence in the lower atmosphere (at least up to 25 km) of very strong (positive) temperature gradients within very thin layers. The presence of such “sheets” in the temperature ...

Francis Dalaudier; Claude Sidi; Michel Crochet; Jean Vernin

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Reflectivity of the Atmosphere-Inhomogeneous Surfaces System: Laboratory Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two- and three-dimensional solutions of the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. Such solutions have not been verified experimentally. A laboratory experiment simulates such a system to test ...

Yuri Mekler; Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Atmospheric Concentrations of Submicron Contact-freezing Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric concentrations of contact-freezing nuclei were measured using a technique primarily sensitive to submicron aerosol particles. Diffusion and phoretic forces were relied on for the capture of nuclei by supercooled drops of distilled ...

Terry Deshler; Gabor Vali

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A New Method for Exploring Coupled Land–Atmosphere Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new method for investigating coupled land–atmosphere interactions. The method is to apply an empirical correction technique to distinct components of a model and then examine differences between forecasts of the empirically ...

Timothy DelSole; Mei Zhao; Paul Dirmeyer

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Conditional Sampling of Turbulence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conditional sampling and averaging techniques are used to obtain statistics of convectively-driven quasi-ordered structures at a height of 4 m within the atmospheric surface layer. The fraction of time 'y occupiedby these structures, and their ...

R. A. Antonia; S. Rajagopalan; A. J. Chambers

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Numerical Method for Synthesizing Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical technique is described for synthesizing realistic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles. The method uses an ensemble of radiosonde measurements collected at a site of interest. Erroneous profiles are removed by comparing their ...

Maia S. Tatarskaia; Richard J. Lataitis; B. Boba Stankov; Viatcheslav V. Tatarskii

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Estimation of Atmospheric Motion Vectors from Kalpana-1 Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of atmospheric motion vectors from infrared and water vapor channels on the geostationary operational Indian National Satellite System Kalpana-1 has been attempted here. An empirical height assignment technique based on a genetic ...

C. M. Kishtawal; S. K. Deb; P. K. Pal; P. C. Joshi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Estimation of Atmospheric Duct Structure Using Radar Sea Clutter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retrieving atmospheric refractivity profiles from the sea surface backscattered radar clutter is known as the refractivity-from-clutter (RFC) technique. Because the relationship between refractivity and radar sea clutter is clearly nonlinear and ...

Zhao Xiaofeng; Huang Sixun

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Scale Invariance, Symmetries, Fractals, and Stochastic Simulations of Atmospheric Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in remote sensing and in situ measurement techniques have revealed the full continuum of atmospheric motions and have underlined the importance of mesoscale processes. This paper examines the implications of three observed ...

S. Lovejoy; D. Schertzer

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Applied Science/Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Print Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

77

Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

Howcroft, Caius L.F.; /Cambridge U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Simulation of Atmospheric Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral atmospheric circulation model is time-integrated for approximately 18 years. The model has a global computational domain and realistic geography and topography. The model undergoes an annual cycle as daily values of seasonally varying ...

Syukuro Manabe; Douglas G. Hahn

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Atmospheric Laser Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly ...

Kenneth W. Fischer*Michael R. Witiw; Jeffrey A. Baars+; T. R. Oke

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Atmospheric Available Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total potential energy of the atmosphere is the sum of its internal and gravitational energies. The portion of this total energy available to be converted into kinetic energy is determined relative to an isothermal, hydrostatic, equilibrium ...

Peter R. Bannon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

83

Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect

In December 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established a Center of Excellence (Hyperspectral-Multispectral Algorithm Research Center, HyMARC) for promoting the research and development of algorithms to exploit spectral imagery. This center is located at the DOE Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, and is operated for the DOE by Bechtel Nevada. This paper presents the results to date of a research project begun at the center during 1998 to investigate the correction of hyperspectral data for atmospheric aerosols. Results of a project conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology to define, implement, and test procedures for absolute calibration and correction of hyperspectral data to absolute units of high spectral resolution imagery will be presented. Hybrid techniques for atmospheric correction using image or spectral scene data coupled through radiative propagation models will be specifically addressed. Results of this effort to analyze HYDICE sensor data will be included. Preliminary results based on studying the performance of standard routines, such as Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption and Nonlinear Least Squares Spectral Fit, in retrieving reflectance spectra show overall reflectance retrieval errors of approximately one to two reflectance units in the 0.4- to 2.5-micron-wavelength region (outside of the absorption features). These results are based on HYDICE sensor data collected from the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site during overflights conducted in July of 1997. Results of an upgrade made in the model-based atmospheric correction techniques, which take advantage of updates made to the moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance model (MODTRAN 4.0) software, will also be presented. Data will be shown to demonstrate how the reflectance retrieval in the shorter wavelengths of the blue-green region will be improved because of enhanced modeling of multiple scattering effects.

R. J. Pollina

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

Johnson, Robert E., E-mail: rej@virginia.ed [Engineering Physics, Thornton Hall B102, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Experimental Mathematics and Computational Statistics  

SciTech Connect

The field of statistics has long been noted for techniques to detect patterns and regularities in numerical data. In this article we explore connections between statistics and the emerging field of 'experimental mathematics'. These includes both applications of experimental mathematics in statistics, as well as statistical methods applied to computational mathematics.

Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

87

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

88

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

89

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

90

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

91

A Wavelet–Based Approach for Atmospheric Pollution Modeling: Algorithm Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wavelet-based technique for numerical integration of species-conservation equations describing atmospheric pollutant transport and fate is described. This technique applies hexuplet families of spline-based biorthogonal wavelets using a quasi-...

Philip A. Ekstrom; Jeremy M. Hales

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Precomputed atmospheric scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new and accurate method to render the atmosphere in real time from any viewpoint from ground level to outer space, while taking Rayleigh and Mie multiple scattering into account. Our method reproduces many effects of the scattering of light, ...

Eric Bruneton; Fabrice Neyret

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

94

An Examination of Failure Modes and Investigation Techniques in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accident Investigation and Materials Failure Analysis at the Transportation Safety ... Experimental Technique to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on Refractories ...

95

Hydrostatic Adjustment in Nonisothermal Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author examines hydrostatic adjustment due to heating in two nonisothermal atmospheres. In the first case both the temperature and lapse rate decrease with height; in the second case the atmosphere consists of a troposphere with constant ...

Dean G. Duffy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Efficient rendering of atmospheric phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rendering of atmospheric bodies involves modeling the complex interaction of light throughout the highly scattering medium of water and air particles. Scattering by these particles creates many well-known atmospheric optical phenomena including rainbows, ...

Kirk Riley; David S. Ebert; Martin Kraus; Jerry Tessendorf; Charles Hansen

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

98

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Atmospheric Mercury Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary and analysis of research findings on utility and environmental mercury from 1997 to 2003. The update categorizes and describes recent work on mercury in utility-burned coal and its route through power plants, the measures for its control, and its fate in the environment following emissions from utility stacks. This fate includes atmospheric chemistry and transport, deposition to land and water surfaces, aquatic cycling, the dynamics of mercury in freshwater fish food webs, and th...

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework that describes the atmospheric evolution of OA and is constrained and motivated by new, high time resolution, experimental characterizations of their composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA-precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of large amounts of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) mass that has comparable concentrations to sulfate aerosol over the Northern Hemisphere. Our new model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in the atmosphere and the laboratory and can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Zhang, Qi; Kroll, Jesse H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, Allison; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Robinson, A. L.; Duplissy, J.; Smith, J. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Lanz, V. A.; Hueglin, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Tian, J.; Laaksonen, A.; Raatikainen, T.; Rautiainen, J.; Vaattovaara, P.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Dunlea, E. J.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, Paul I.; Bower, K.; Kondo, Yutaka; Schneider, J.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Salcedo, D.; Cottrell, L.; Griffin, Robert; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Shimono, A.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Dzepina, K.; Kimmel, Joel; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, Scott C.; Trimborn, Achim; Williams, L. R.; Wood, Ezra C.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

103

Atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attenuation of solar radiation by the atmosphere between the heliostat and receiver of a Central Receiver solar energy system has been computed for a number of atmospheric conditions and tower-heliostat distances. The most important atmospheric variable is found to be the atmospheric aerosol content. No dependence of atmospheric water vapor is found and only a weak dependence on solar zenith angle. For a 500 m heliostat-tower distance two to four percent reductions are expected under typical desert conditions (50 to 120 km visibility). The reduction is approximately linear with heliostat-tower distance. A representative value of the attenuation coefficient is 0.051 km/sup -1/.

Randall, C.M.

1977-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

Performance of the STACEE Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is located at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The field of solar tracking mirrors (heliostats) around a central receiver tower is used to direct Cherenkov light from atmospheric showers onto secondary mirrors on the tower, which in turn image the light onto cameras of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE Collaboration has previously reported a detection of the Crab Nebula with approximately 7 standard deviation significance, using 32 heliostats (STACEE-32). This result demonstrates both the viability of the technique and the suitability of the site. We are in the process of completing an upgrade to 48 heliostats (STACEE-48) en route to an eventual configuration using 64 heliostats (STACEE-64) in early 2001. In this paper, we summarize the results obtained on the sensitivity of STACEE-32 and our expectations for STACEE-48 and STACEE-64.

STACEE Collaboration; D. A. Williams; D. Bhattacharya; L. M. Boone; M. C. Chantell; Z. Conner; C. E. Covault; M. Dragovan; P. Fortin; D. Gingrich; D. T. Gregorich; D. S. Hanna; G. Mohanty; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; S. Oser; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; T. O. Tumer; F. Vincent; J. A. Zweerink

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

106

PNNL: FCSD: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change: Programs &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs & Facilities Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and ARM Climate Research Facility ARM Aerial Facility Environmental...

107

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Experimental Mathematics and Mathematical Physics  

SciTech Connect

One of the most effective techniques of experimental mathematics is to compute mathematical entities such as integrals, series or limits to high precision, then attempt to recognize the resulting numerical values. Recently these techniques have been applied with great success to problems in mathematical physics. Notable among these applications are the identification of some key multi-dimensional integrals that arise in Ising theory, quantum field theory and in magnetic spin theory.

Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Broadhurst, David; Zudilin, Wadim

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Atmospheric neutrinos: phenomenological summary and outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The predictions of the atmospheric nu event rates are affected by significant uncertainties, however the evidence for the `disappearance' of nu_mu's and nubar_mu's obtained by SK (and other underground detectors) is robust and cannot be accounted in the framework of the minimum standard model without assuming very large ad hoc experimental systematic effects. The existence of `new physics' beyond the standard model is therefore close to be established; neutrino oscillations provide a very good fit to all data. The theoretical uncertainties do have an important role in the detailed interpretation of the data, and in the estimate of oscillation parameters.

Paolo Lipari

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

Intercomparison of Local Hydroxyl Measurements by Radiocarbon and FAGE Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct intercomparison of near-surface tropospheric HO concentration measurements by two different techniques was made in October–November 1992 at a rural site near Pullman, Washington. The atmosphere at the site is believed to contain low ...

Malcolm J. Campbell; Brad D. Hall; John C. Sheppard; Philip L. Utley; Robert J. O'brien; Thomas M. Hard; Linda A. George

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVAL FOR SUPER-EARTHS: UNIQUELY CONSTRAINING THE ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION WITH TRANSMISSION SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect

We present a retrieval method based on Bayesian analysis to infer the atmospheric compositions and surface or cloud-top pressures from transmission spectra of exoplanets with general compositions. In this study, we identify what can unambiguously be determined about the atmospheres of exoplanets from their transmission spectra by applying the retrieval method to synthetic observations of the super-Earth GJ 1214b. Our approach to inferring constraints on atmospheric parameters is to compute their joint and marginal posterior probability distributions using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique in a parallel tempering scheme. A new atmospheric parameterization is introduced that is applicable to general atmospheres in which the main constituent is not known a priori and clouds may be present. Our main finding is that a unique constraint of the mixing ratios of the absorbers and two spectrally inactive gases (such as N{sub 2} and primordial H{sub 2}+ He) is possible if the observations are sufficient to quantify both (1) the broadband transit depths in at least one absorption feature for each absorber and (2) the slope and strength of the molecular Rayleigh scattering signature. A second finding is that the surface pressure or cloud-top pressure can be quantified if a surface or cloud deck is present at low optical depth. A third finding is that the mean molecular mass can be constrained by measuring either the Rayleigh scattering slope or the shapes of the absorption features, thus enabling one to distinguish between cloudy hydrogen-rich atmospheres and high mean molecular mass atmospheres. We conclude, however, that without the signature of molecular Rayleigh scattering-even with robustly detected infrared absorption features (>10{sigma})-there is no reliable way to tell from the transmission spectrum whether the absorber is a main constituent of the atmosphere or just a minor species with a mixing ratio of X{sub abs} < 0.1%. The retrieval method leads us to a conceptual picture of which details in transmission spectra are essential for unique characterizations of well-mixed exoplanet atmospheres.

Benneke, Bjoern; Seager, Sara, E-mail: bbenneke@mit.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

Implementation of a level 1 trigger system using high speed serial (VXS) techniques for the 12GeV high luminosity experimental programs at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

We will demonstrate a hardware and firmware solution for a complete fully pipelined multi-crate trigger system that takes advantage of the elegant high speed VXS serial extensions for VME. This trigger system includes three sections starting with the front end crate trigger processor (CTP), a global Sub-System Processor (SSP) and a Trigger Supervisor that manages the timing, synchronization and front end event readout. Within a front end crate, trigger information is gathered from each 16 Channel, 12 bit Flash ADC module at 4 nS intervals via the VXS backplane, to a Crate Trigger Processor (CTP). Each Crate Trigger Processor receives these 500 MB/S VXS links from the 16 FADC-250 modules, aligns skewed data inherent of Aurora protocol, and performs real time crate level trigger algorithms. The algorithm results are encoded using a Reed-Solomon technique and transmission of this Level 1 trigger data is sent to the SSP using a multi-fiber link. The multi-fiber link achieves an aggregate trigger data transfer rate to the global trigger at 8 Gb/s. The SSP receives and decodes Reed-Solomon error correcting transmission from each crate, aligns the data, and performs the global level trigger algorithms. The entire trigger system is synchronous and operates at 250 MHz with the Trigger Supervisor managing not only the front end event readout, but also the distribution of the critical timing clocks, synchronization signals, and the global trigger signals to each front end readout crate. These signals are distributed to the front end crates on a separate fiber link and each crate is synchronized using a unique encoding scheme to guarantee that each front end crate is synchronous with a fixed latency, independent of the distance between each crate. The overall trigger signal latency is <3 uS, and the proposed 12GeV experiments at Jefferson Lab require up to 200KHz Level 1 trigger rate.

C. Cuevas, B. Raydo, H. Dong, A. Gupta, F.J. Barbosa, J. Wilson, W.M. Taylor, E. Jastrzembski, D. Abbott

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A REVIEW OF GLOVE BOX CONSTRUCTION AND EXPERIMENTATION  

SciTech Connect

A series of fires and explosions in U. S. Atomic Energy Commission facilities handling alpha -active materiais during the last five years resulted in reconsideration of safety problems associated with glove boxes and other equipment used to contain these materials. The literature on construction and operation of glove boxes for work with toxic inorganic materials not requiring biological shielding is reviewed as a contribution to this re-examination, with special emphasis on methods and equipment for working safely with plutonium and other alpha -active materials. An effort was made to point out the direction of current trends in this field. Detailed discussions of glove box designs and methods of experimentation in these enclosures are not included in this report but sufficient information is furnished for finding needed details in the referenced material. Methods for the detection and measurement of alpha -active materials and of impurities in controlled atmospheres are discussed. In addition, the literature on controlled atmosphere enclosures, glove boxes for non- toxic inorganic materials, and the technique of experimenting with such enclosures is reviewed. Some previously unpublished developments are reported. (auth)

Barton, C.J.

1961-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

115

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14 C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14 C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Atmospheric Corrosion Test Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 27   Some marine-atmospheric corrosion test sites around the world...Zealand Phia Marine 0.2 0.12 15.8 2.4 � � � � Greece Rafina Marine 0.2 0.12 13.6 1.0 � � � � Rhodes Marine 0.2 0.12 14.3 1.5 � � � � Netherlands Schagen Marine 2.4 1.5 17.0 2.0 � � � � Spain Almeria � 0.035 0.022 22.4 1.6 � � � � Cartagena � 0.050 0.031 5.2 1.9 � � � � La Coruña � 0.160 0.1 26.2 1.4...

117

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH On the parameterization of ice and water substance mixing ratio fields were only strongly altered by turning off the ice phase of these schemes includes ice processes. But in mid- latitudes and also in tropics the ice phase is an important

Moelders, Nicole

118

PASS: A Portable Atmospheric Sampling System for Chemical Studies in the Marine Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement of many trace substances in the remote marine atmosphere requires that they be collected under controlled conditions and that meteorological and other data concerning these measurements be available to the experimenter. A Portable ...

George Schwartze; Robert Boldi; Timothy Wasco; Robert Duce

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Turbulence Spectra and Dissipation Rates in a Wind Tunnel Model of the Atmospheric Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) is realized in the thermally stratified wind tunnel of the Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Karlsruhe. Further experimental results from this model are presented. ...

Rolf Kaiser; Evgeni Fedorovich

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Conditional Sampling of Coherent Structures in Atmospheric Turbulence Using the Wavelet Transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and evaluation of a technique to detect and retrieve coherent structures embedded in a record of atmospheric surface-layer temperature fluctuations is described. This new detection scheme, based on a local wavelet transform, is ...

B. J. Turner; M. Y. Leclerc

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Signal Postprocessing and Reflectivity Calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915-MHz Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has recently initiated a new research avenue toward a better characterization of the transition from cloud to precipitation. Dual-wavelength techniques applied to millimeter-...

Frédéric Tridon; Alessandro Battaglia; Pavlos Kollias; Edward Luke; Christopher R. Williams

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Statistical Relations between Ocean/Atmosphere Fluctuations in the Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced statistical techniques have been used to conduct a study of the relationships between ocean and atmosphere variables in the tropical Pacific Ocean. The results of the study show that the ocean variables can hindcast features of the trade ...

T. P. Barnett

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Combining Microwave Radiometer and Wind Profiler Radar Measurements for High-Resolution Atmospheric Humidity Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-consistent remote sensing physical method to retrieve atmospheric humidity high-resolution profiles by synergetic use of a microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) and wind profiler radar (WPR) is illustrated. The proposed technique is based ...

Laura Bianco; Domenico Cimini; Frank S. Marzano; Randolph Ware

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Continuous Humidity Monitoring in a Tropical Region with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radar remote sensing technique that estimates humidity profiles using a wind profiler is applied to the equatorial atmosphere radar (EAR) to monitor detailed humidity variations in tropical regions. Turbulence echo power intensity is related to ...

Jun-ichi Furumoto; Toshitaka Tsuda; Satoshi Iwai; Toshiaki Kozu

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Conditional Sampling of Updrafts and Downdrafts in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of updrafts and downdrafts in the lower third of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the central Pacific Ocean are investigated using a conditional sampling technique. When the drafts are classified according to their ...

Siri Jodha Singh Khalsa; Gary K. Greenhut

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Adaptive Grid Refinement for Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although atmospheric phenomena tend to be localized in both time and space, numerical models generally employ only uniform discretizations or fixed nested grids. An adaptive grid technique implemented in 2D and 3D nonhydrostatic elastic ...

William C. Skamarock; Joseph B. Klemp

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Global Atmospheric Analysis Dataset Downscaled from the NCEP–DOE Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global atmospheric analysis dataset is constructed via a spectral nudging technique. The 6-hourly National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)–Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis from January 1979 to February 2011 is utilized to force ...

Jung-Eun Kim; Song-You Hong

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Multi-angle technique for measurement of ground source emission  

SciTech Connect

TAISIR, the Temperature and Imaging System Infrared, is a nominally satellite based platform for remote sensing of the earth. One of its design features is to acquire atmospheric data simultaneous with ground data, resulting in minimal dependence on external atmospheric models for data correction. One technique we employ to acquire atmospheric data is a true multi-angle data acquisition technique. Previous techniques have used only two angles. Here we demonstrate the advantage of using a large number of viewing angles to overconstrain the inversion problem for critical atmospheric and source parameters. For reasonable data acquisition scenarios, simulations show source temperature errors of less than 1K should be possible. Tradeoffs between flight geometry, number of look angles,, and system signal-to-noise are given for typical parameter ranges.

Henderson, J.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A General Systems Theory for Atmospheric Flows and Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover pattern and inverse power law form for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as windspeed, temperature, rainfall etc. Inverse power law form for power spectra indicate long-range spacetime correlations or non-local connections and is a signature of selforganised criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart beat patterns etc. The author has developed a general systems theory which predicts the observed selforganised criticality as a signature of quantumlike chaos in dynamical systems. The model predictions are (i) The fractal fluctuations can be resolved into an overall logarithmic spiral trajectory with the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the internal structure. (ii) The probability distribution represents the power (variance) spectrum for fractal fluctuations and follows universal inverse power law form incorporating the golden mean. Such a result that the additive amplitudes of eddies when squared represent probability distribution is observed in the subatomic dynamics of quantum systems such as the electron or photon. Therefore the irregular or unpredictable fractal fluctuations exhibit quantumlike chaos. (iii) Atmospheric aerosols are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric aerosol size spectrum is derived in terms of the universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy energy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following two experimentally determined atmospheric aerosol data sets, (i) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000 (CARG) (ii) World Data Centre Aerosols data sets for the three stations Ny {\\AA}lesund, Pallas and Hohenpeissenberg.

A. M. Selvam

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

131

Baiu rainband termination in atmospheric and atmosphere-ocean models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baiu rainband is a summer rainband stretching from eastern China through Japan towards the Northwest Pacific. The climatological termination of the Baiu rainband is investigated using Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis (JRA25), a stand-alone atmospheric ...

Akira Kuwano-Yoshida; Bunmei Taguchi; Shang-Ping Xie

132

Krypton-85 in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement results are presented on 85Kr content in the atmosphere over the European part of Russia in 1971-1995 based on the analysis of the commercial krypton, which is separated from air by industrial plants. Our results are by 15 per cent lower then 85Kr activites observed over West Europe. According our prediction by 2030 85Kr content in the atmosphere over Europe will amount to 1,5-3 Bq in m3 air. Average 85Kr release to the atmosphere from regeneration of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is estimated, some 180 TBq per a ton SNF. It is advisable to recommence monitoring of 85Kr content within Russia.

A. T. Korsakov; E. G. Tertyshnik

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

133

Krypton-85 in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement results are presented on 85Kr content in the atmosphere over the European part of Russia in 1971-1995 based on the analysis of the commercial krypton, which is separated from air by industrial plants. Our results are by 15 per cent lower then 85Kr activites observed over West Europe. According our prediction by 2030 85Kr content in the atmosphere over Europe will amount to 1,5-3 Bq in m3 air. Average 85Kr release to the atmosphere from regeneration of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is estimated, some 180 TBq per a ton SNF. It is advisable to recommence monitoring of 85Kr content within Russia.

Korsakov, A T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mountain Forces and the Atmospheric Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although mountains are generally thought to exert forces on the atmosphere, the related transfers of energy between earth and atmosphere are not represented in standard energy equations of the atmosphere. It is shown that the axial rotation of the ...

Joseph Egger

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Transforming big data into knowledge : experimental techniques in dynamic visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information visualizations, especially those utilizing web-based platforms, are becoming an increasingly common medium for exchanging ideas. This emergent class of tools enabling web-based, interactive platforms for ...

Kennedy, Stephen James, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Experimental Technique to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure Analysis Case Studies from Refinery and Petrochemical Pilot Plants ... Failure of Electrical Submersible Pump of Oil Reservoir · Fan Blade Fracture in a  ...

137

Experimental Test of Complementarity by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have tested complementarity for the ensemble-averaged spin states of nuclei $^{13}$C in the molecule of $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ by the use of the spin states of another nuclei $^{1}$H as the path marker. It turns out that the wave-particle duality holds when one merely measures the probability density of quantum states, and that the wave- and particle-like behavior is simultaneously observed with the help of measuring populations and coherence in a single nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) experiment. Effects of path-marking schemes and causes of the appearance and disappearance of the wave behavior are analysed.

Xiwen Zhu; Ximing Fang; Xinhua Peng; Mang Feng; Kelin Gao; Fei Du

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

Glossary Term - Composition of the Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Earth's Atmosphere Source: Definition of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere (1976) CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th Edition Gas Formula Abundance percent by volume...

139

A Computational Thermodynamic Analysis of Atmospheric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2001 ... The vacuum atmosphere is typically 0.1 atm. However, the vacuum atmosphere creates two major problems: air leakage and batch operation to ...

140

The Workshop in Atmospheric Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A workshop on the subject of atmospheric predictability was held during 23-25 April 2001 at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. Of primary concern was the nature of forecast uncertainty due to initial conditionuncertainty of ...

Ronald M. Errico; Rolf Langland; David P. Baumhefner

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

Precursors to atmospheric blocking events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric blocking events disturb synoptic-scale features from their normal eastward progression, causing anomalous weather conditions for the duration of the blocking event. The essence of blocking can be captured by ...

Marino, Garrett P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Automated Measurements of Atmospheric Visibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using a solid-state, linear-array imaging device coupled with computerized scene analysis and display to measure daytime atmospheric visibility is described. Computer software is implemented for routine conversion of observed ...

W. Viezee; W. E. Evans

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Navy's Operational Atmospheric Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January of 1988, significant upgrades were made to the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS). Among these improvements was the implementation of a multivariate optimum interpolation analysis scheme. Since that time, ...

James S. Goerss; Patricia A. Phoebus

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Stochastic Simulation of Atmospheric Trajectories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods are presented for generating an ensemble of synthetic atmospheric trajectories. These include methods for a set of independent trajectories, and methods for a correlated set of sequential trajectories. The models incorporate first-order ...

Mitchell J. Small; Perry J. Samson

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Atmospheric Water Vapor over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinese radiosonde data from 1970 to 1990 are relatively homogeneous in time and are used to examine the climatology, trends, and variability of China’s atmospheric water vapor content. The climatological distribution of precipitable water (PW) ...

Panmao Zhai; Robert E. Eskridge

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

Ackerman, T

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques, January IAP 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students ...

Tabacco, Sarah

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Matrali, S. H. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Gazeli, K. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Clement, F. [IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Antimisiaris, S. G. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICES)-FORTH, Rion 26504 (Greece)

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Experimental Summary and Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief experimental overview of the workshop is given, with emphasis on polarized targets from the experimental equipment perspective, and kinematic coverage, precision, and newly investigated channels from the experimental results perspective.

Peter Bosted

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

152

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

153

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

154

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

155

Estimation of stellar atmospheric parameters from SDSS/SEGUE spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present techniques for the estimation of stellar atmospheric parameters (Teff,logg,[Fe/H]) for stars from the SDSS/SEGUE survey. The atmospheric parameters are derived from the observed medium-resolution (R=2000) stellar spectra using non-linear regression models trained either on (1) pre-classified observed data or (2) synthetic stellar spectra. In the first case we use our models to automate and generalize parametrization produced by a preliminary version of the SDSS/SEGUE Spectroscopic Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). In the second case we directly model the mapping between synthetic spectra (derived from Kurucz model atmospheres) and the atmospheric parameters, independently of any intermediate estimates. After training, we apply our models to various samples of SDSS spectra to derive atmospheric parameters, and compare our results with those obtained previously by the SSPP for the same samples. We obtain consistency between the two approaches, with RMS deviations of 150K in Teff, 0.35dex in logg, and 0.22dex in [Fe/H]. The models are applied to pre-processed spectra, either via Principal Components Analysis or a Wavelength Range Selection method, which employs a subset of the full 3850-9000A spectral range. This is both for computational reasons, and because it delivers higher accuracy. From an analysis of cluster candidates with available SDSS spectroscopy (M15, M13, M2, and NGC2420), we find evidence for small systematic offsets in Teff and/or logg for the atmospheric parameter estimates from the model trained on real data with the SSPP. Thus, this model turns out to derive more precise, but less accurate, atmospheric parameters than the model trained on synthetic data.

P. Re Fiorentin; C. A. L. Bailer-Jones; Y. S. Lee; T. C. Beers; T. Sivarani; R. Wilhelm; C. Allende Prieto; J. E. Norris

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

156

Measurement of the Atmospheric $?_e$ flux in IceCube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496 $\\pm$ 66(stat.) $\\pm$ 88(syst.) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range.

IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose1; S. Boser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Diaz-Velez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegard; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glusenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; A. Gross; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Klas; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Kohne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Kopke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lunemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Meszaros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Perez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Radel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schoneberg; L. Schonherr; A. Schonwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stoss; E. A. Strahler; R. Strom; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge1; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

157

Local Dynamics of Synoptic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sources and sinks of energy for transient waves in the Martian atmosphere are investigated, applying diagnostic techniques developed for the analysis of terrestrial baroclinic waves to output from a Mars General Circulation Model. These diagnostic techniques include the vertically averaged eddy kinetic energy and regression analysis. The results suggest that the primary source of the kinetic energy of the waves is baroclinic energy conversion in localized regions. It is also shown that there exist preferred regions of baroclinic energy conversion. In addition, it is shown that downstream baroclinic development plays an important role in the evolution of the waves and in the baroclinic energy conversion process. This is the first time that evidence for downstream baroclinic development has been found for an atmosphere other than the terrestrial one.

Kavulich, Michael J., Jr.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Single event phenomena in atmospheric neutron environments  

SciTech Connect

As integrated circuit technology achieves higher density through smaller feature sizes and as the airplane manufacturing industry integrates more sophisticated electronic components into the design of new aircraft, it has become increasingly important to evaluate the contribution of single event effects, primarily Single Event Upset (SEU), to the safety and reliability of commercial aircraft. In contrast to the effects of radiation on electronic systems in space applications for which protons and heavy ions are of major concern, in commercial aircraft applications the interactions of high energy neutrons are the dominant cause of single event effects. These high energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of solar and galactic cosmic rays, principally protons and heavy ions, in the upper atmosphere. This paper will describe direct experimental measurements of neutron-induced Single Event Effect (SEE) rates in commercial high density static random access memories in a neutron environment characteristic of that at commercial airplane altitudes. The first experimental measurements testing current models for neutron-silicon burst generation rates will be presented, as well as measurements of charge collection in silicon test structures as a function of neutron energy. These are the first laboratory SEE and charge collection measurements using a particle beam having a continuum energy spectrum and with a shape nearly identical to that observed during flight.

Gossett, C.A.; Hughlock, B.W.; Katoozi, M.; LaRue, G.S. (Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)); Wender, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Quality Assurance in Atmospheric Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a number of best practices associated with the use of numerical models of the atmosphere and is motivated by the rapid growth in the number of model users, who have a range of scientific and technical preparations. An underlying ...

Thomas T. Warner

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geomagnetic Effects on Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic effects distort the zenith angle distribution of sub--GeV and few--GeV atmospheric neutrinos, breaking the up--down symmetry that would be present in the absence of neutrino oscillations and without a geomagnetic field. The geomagnetic effects also produce a characteristic azimuthal dependence of the $\

Paolo Lipari; T. K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Fast Line-by-Line Method for Atmospheric Absorption Computations: The Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally fast line-by-line method for the determination of atmospheric absorption is described. This method is based on the creation of an Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas (4A) covering all possible plausible atmospheric ...

N. A. Scott; A. Chedin

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry occurring at or near the surfaces of aqueous droplets and thin films in the atmosphere influences air quality and climate. Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly useful for gaining atomic-scale insight into the structure and reactivity of aqueous interfaces in the atmosphere. Here we review simulation studies of atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces, with an emphasis on ions that play important roles in the chemistry of atmospheric aerosols. In addition to surveying results from simulation studies, we discuss challenges to the refinement and experimental validation of the methodology for simulating ion adsorption to the air-water interface, and recent advances in elucidating the driving forces for adsorption. We also review the recent development of a dielectric continuum theory that is capable of reproducing simulation and experimental data on ion behavior at aqueous interfaces.

Douglas J. Tobias; Abraham C. Stern; Marcel D. Baer; Yan Levin; Christopher J. Mundy

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

High-energy atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known hadronic models, SIBYLL 2.1 and QGSJET-II. The atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy range $10-10^7$ GeV was computed within the 1D approach to solve nuclear cascade equations in the atmosphere, which takes into account non-scaling behavior of the inclusive cross-sections for the particle production, the rise of total inelastic hadron-nucleus cross-sections and nonpower-law character of the primary cosmic ray spectrum. This approach was recently tested in the atmospheric muon flux calculations [1]. The results of the neutrino flux calculations are compared with the Frejus, AMANDA-II and IceCube measurement data.

S. I. Sinegovsky; A. A. Kochanov; T. S. Sinegovskaya

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

MHD mode conversion in a stratified atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mode conversion in the region where the sound and Alfven speeds are equal is a complex process, which has been studied both analytically and numerically, and has been seen in observations. In order to further the understanding of this process we set up a simple, one-dimensional model, and examine wave propagation through this system using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. Simulations are carried out in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere with a uniform, vertical magnetic field for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases. For the non-isothermal case a temperature profile is chosen to mimic the steep temperature gradient encountered at the transition region. In all simulations, a slow wave is driven on the upper boundary, thus propagating down from low-beta to high-beta plasma across the mode-conversion region. In addition, a detailed analytical study is carried out where we predict the amplitude and phase of the transmitted and converted components of the incident wave as it passes through the mode-conversion region. A comparison of these analytical predictions with the numerical results shows good agreement, giving us confidence in both techniques. This knowledge may be used to help determine wave types observed and give insight into which modes may be involved in coronal heating.

A. M. Dee McDougall; Alan W. Hood

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

BNL | Climate Change Experimental Facility Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Experimental Facility Design Climate Change Experimental Facility Design Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) is a method and infrastructure used to experimentally enrich the atmosphere enveloping portions of a terrestrial ecosystem with controlled amounts of carbon dioxide (and in some cases, other gases), without using chambers or walls. Before FACE, much of what we knew about plant and ecosystem responses to rising carbon dioxide concentration came from studies conducted in enclosures where the response of plants is modified by their growth conditions. Results from FACE experiments have provided important field validation of findings from earlier work, but have also yielded results that are both qualitatively and quantitatively different from those obtained using field enclosures. We pioneered the use of FACE technology to study the impact of carbon

166

Aerosol optical depth of the atmosphere over the ocean in the wavelength range 0.37-4 µm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At least two problems, the climatic impact of aerosols and improvement in techniques for space-borne sensing, require investigation of the spatiotemporal variability of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the ocean. The marine atmosphere covers an area ...

S. M. Sakerin; D. M. Kabanov; A. V. Smirnov; B. N. Holben

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Application of a dynamic-stochastic approach to short-term forecasting of the atmospheric boundary layer.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, dynamic-stochastic model presented in this study is used for short-term forecasting of vertical profiles of air temperature and wind velocity orthogonal components in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The technique of using ...

V. S. Komarov; A. V. Lavrinenko; N. Ya. Lomakina; S. N. Il’in

168

Remotely Sensing the Earth’s Atmosphere Using the Global Positioning System (GPS)—The GPS/MET Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Positioning System/Meteorology (GPS/MET) project is an active satellite-to-satellite remote sensing experiment using the radio occultation technique. Due to the atmospheric index of refraction and gradient of the index of refraction, ...

Derek D. Feng; Benjamin M. Herman

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Inference of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Moisture and Temperature Structure Using Airborne Lidar and Infrared Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for retrieving near-surface moisture and profiles of mixing ratio and potential temperature through the depth of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) using airborne lidar and multichannel infrared radiometer data is ...

Stephen P. Palm; Denise Hagan; Geary Schwemmer; S. H. Melfi

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Proposal for Analyzing and Forecasting Lower-Atmospheric Undular Bores in the Western Gulf of Mexico Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for analyzing and forecasting the occurrence of lower-atmospheric undular bores over the western and central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and adjacent land areas using standard operational forecasting and analysis techniques. The ...

Philip A. Lutzak

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Generation of Turbulence by Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard current criterion for the generation of turbulence by atmospheric gravity waves and for the associated limitation on wave growth is based upon the standard criterion for static instability of the unperturbed atmosphere, namely, that ...

Colin O. Hines

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

AMIP: The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) is an international effort to determine the systematic climate errors of atmospheric models under realistic conditions, and calls for the simulation of the climate of the decade 1979–1988 using ...

W. Lawrence Gates

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Retrieval of atmospheric properties of extrasolar planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method to retrieve molecular abundances and temperature profiles from exoplanet atmosphere photometry and spectroscopy. Our method allows us to run millions of 1-D atmosphere models in order to cover the ...

Nikku, Madhusudhan, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Interannual Variation of Global Atmospheric Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative atmospheric angular momentum (RAM) integrated over the globe is an explicit variable representing the state of the atmospheric general circulation. After removing the annual, semiannual, and higher-frequency components, the filtered ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Joseph J. Tribbia; Ming-Cheng Yen

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Statistics Education in the Atmospheric Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of atmospheric sciences data and models are heavily dependent upon statistical and probabilistic reasoning. Statistical methods have played an important role in establishing physical relationships of atmosphere-ocean-land interactions ...

Timothy J. Brown; L. Mark Berliner; Daniel S. Wilks; Michael B. Richman; Christopher K. Wilke

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atmospheric Control on the Thermohaline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to elucidate the role of atmospheric and oceanic processes in setting a vigorous ocean overturning circulation in the North Atlantic but not in the North Pacific, a comparison of the observed atmospheric circulation and net surface ...

Arnaud Czaja

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Promise of GPS in Atmospheric Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for active measurement of the Earth's atmosphere. Microwave radio signals transmitted by GPS satellites are delayed (refracted) by the atmosphere as they ...

Steven Businger; Steven R. Chiswell; Michael Bevis; Jingping Duan; Richard A. Anthes; Christian Rocken; Randolph H. Ware; Michael Exner; T. VanHove; Fredrick S. Solheim

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

179

Dynamical Processes of Equatorial Atmospheric Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical processes that drive intraseasonal equatorial atmospheric angular momentum (EAAM) fluctuations are examined with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) reanalysis data. ...

Steven B. Feldstein

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

VALDRIFT—A Valley Atmospheric Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VALDRIFT (valley drift) is a valley atmospheric transport, diffusion, and deposition model. The model is phenomenological—that is, the dominant meteorological processes governing the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in ...

K. Jerry Allwine; Xindi Bian; C. David Whiteman; Harold W. Thistle

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Spontaneously Generated Tropical Atmospheric General Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of idealized atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments are presented. These experiments examine whether and how atmospheric deep moist convection, in the absence of meridional gradients in external forcing, interacts with ...

Ben P. Kirtman; Edwin K. Schneider

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Atmospheric Turbidity in the Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis is presented of 800 measurements of atmospheric monochromatic aerosol optical depth made poleward of 65° latitude. The atmosphere of the southern polar region appears to be uncontaminated but is charged with a background aerosol having ...

Glenn E. Shaw

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advanced Atmospheric Modeling for Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport and diffusion models are an important part of emergency response systems for industrial facilities that have the potential to release significant quantities of toxic or radioactive material into the atmosphere. An advanced ...

Jerome D. Fast; B. Lance O'steen; Robert P. Addis

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical  

SciTech Connect

A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

INHIBITION OF METHANE ATMOSPHERIC FLAMES BY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... atmospheric pressure was studied. The burner temperature was maintained at 65 “C by using a thermostat. The volumetric velocity ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

186

North Carolina Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Carolina Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

187

Experimental parabolic trough collector performance characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental data from the Collector Module Test Facility (CMTF) at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, are used to develop a collector performance model and characterize three parabolic trough solar collectors. The independent variables used in the model are selected and fitted to the experimental data using a multiple linear regression technique. The collector model developed accounts for optical performance, including incident angle effects and thermal losses, both linear and non-linear.

Lukens, L.L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Photon 2009 - Experimental Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a summary of the experimental talks given at the Photon 2009 conference held at DESY, Hamburg, Germany.

P. J. Bussey

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Detecting atmospheric rivers in large climate datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme precipitation events on the western coast of North America are often traced to an unusual weather phenomenon known as atmospheric rivers. Although these storms may provide a significant fraction of the total water to the highly managed western ... Keywords: atmospheric rivers, automatic detection of atmospheric rivers, connected component labeling, extreme climate events

Surendra Byna; Prabhat; Michael F. Wehner; Kesheng John Wu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Electron Based Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Characterization of Materials through High Resolution Coherent Imaging: Electron Based Techniques Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials ...

191

Milling Techniques - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

February 4-8 · 1996 TMS ANNUAL MEETING · Anaheim, California. SYNTHESIS AND PROCESSING OF NANOCRYSTALLINE POWDER III: Milling Techniques ...

192

Evaluation of DBS Wind Measurement Technique in Different Beam Configurations for a VHF Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric winds in the troposphere have been observed routinely for many years with wind profiling (VHF and UHF) radars using the Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique. Accuracy of wind estimates using wind profiling radars with different beam ...

I. Srinivasa Rao; V. K. Anandan; P. Narasimha Reddy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

194

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

195

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

196

Acoustic Waves in the Turbulent Atmosphere: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of atmospheric acoustics and its role in atmospheric research and in development of modern methods of ground-based remote sensing of the atmosphere are outlined. A historical overview of investigations of the effect of atmospheric ...

M. A. Kallistratova

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Refinery analytical techniques optimize unit performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refinery process engineers need to consider benefits of laboratory analytical techniques when evaluating unit performance. Refinery heavy-oil laboratory analytical techniques use both old and new technologies. Knowing how to use available laboratory analytical techniques within their limitations are critical to obtain correct refinery optimization decisions. Better refinery stream distillation and contaminant data ultimately improves the accuracy of various refinery decision-making tools. These laboratory analytical techniques are covered: high-temperature simulated distillation (HTSD); true boiling point (TBP) distillation--ASTM D2892; vacuum distillation--ASTM D5236; continuous-flash vaporizers; wiped-film evaporators; inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES); Conradson--ASTM D189/Microcarbon residue--ASTM D4530; and asphaltene IP-143, ASTM D3279, ASTM D4124. Analysis of atmospheric crude, vacuum crude and delayed coker units highlight these laboratory techniques to identify potential yield and product quality benefits. Physical distillation or wiped-film evaporation in conjunction with HTSD, ICP-AES, microcarbon residue and asphaltened data will better characterize a feedstock as well as determine the source of contaminants. Economics are refinery specific, therefore, these examples focus on applying laboratory techniques as opposed to discussing specifics of unit improvement. These are discussed qualitatively.

Golden, S.W. [Process Consulting Services Inc., Grapevine, TX (United States); Craft, S. [Chempro, Inc., LaPorte, TX (United States); Villalanti, D.C. [Triton Analytics Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Controlled fusion physics: experimental  

SciTech Connect

A historical review is given of the experimental thermonuclear research program. The role of pinch devices, mirror machines, tokamak devices, and laser fusion is discussed. (MOW)

Post, R.F.

1975-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Experimental results - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

given the names J (Brookhaven), ~ (SLAC) for the first one and ~' (SLAC) for the second one. The experimental determi- nation of their widths is limited by the ...

200

Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

High-energy atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Title Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5236-5250 Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, atria, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, indoor pollutant dispersion, mixed convection, turbulence model

203

THE FACILITY 350 HELIUM-ATMOSPHERE SYSTEM. Final Report, Metallurgy Division Program 1.5.5  

SciTech Connect

The He atmosphere system in Argonne's Facility 350 is described in detail. The system is straightforward, employing drying and carbon towers for the removal of moisture, oxygen, and other impurities. The bulk of the 15,000 ft/ sup 3/ of He atmosphere is continuously recirculated at nearly atmospheric pressure. Purification is accomplished at 140 psig on a portion of the gas that is passed through the drying tower at room temperature and the carbon towers at -- 46 deg C (--50 deg F). The operation is continuous, requiring a minimum of maintenance and operational manpower. The He atmosphere is supplied to the glove- boxes with impurity levels below 3,000 ppm nitrogen, 1,000 ppm oxygen, and 50 ppm moisture. Such purity levels prevent oxidation and combustion of the Pu materials being processed. Experimental data concerning the adsorption of oxygen from He by activated carbon over a range of temperature and pressure conditions are reported. (auth)

Mayfield, R.M.; Tope, W.G.; Shuck, A.B.

1962-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Multicolor Underwater Imaging Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies were conducted on multispectral polarimetric subtraction imaging techniques for underwater imaging that use a broadband light source. The main objective of this study was… (more)

Waggoner, Douglas Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

207

Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a non-technical review of the problems associated with atmospheric carbon dioxide and the resulting greenhouse effect. (TEM)

Firestine, M.W. (ed.)

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities Atmospheric Processing Platform Capabilities The Atmospheric Processing platform in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated tools for depositing, processing, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. In particular, this platform focuses on different methods to deposit ("write") materials onto a variety of substrates and then further process into optoelectronic materials using rapid thermal processing. You can read more on the rationale for developing this platform and its capabilities. Contact Maikel van Hest for more details on these capabilities. The Atmospheric Processing platform will allow deposition in any sequence and is applicable to activities in all Technology Roadmaps, which include

209

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-scale features in ocean winds. Science, 303, Chelton,of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO. Borealstress dependence on ocean surface velocity: implications

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

FOAM:The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models Performance User Resources Publications History Developer's Page FOAM The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model cup2.jpeg (48474 bytes) Image made by Johan Kellum with Vis5D...

212

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

213

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility...

214

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

215

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

216

Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Former ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd)a New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 14. Refinery Sales During 2005

217

Data Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Data Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Data Techniques: The collection, processing, and interpretation of data from various methods so accurate interpretations can be made about the subject matter. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Data techniques are any technique where data is collected and organized in a manner so that the information is useful for geothermal purposes. The

218

Contamination Control Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

EBY, J.L.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development of manufacturing technique for composite structures for robotic applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed with the aim of developing a technique for manufacturing composite parts for use in dynamic robotic applications in lieu of heavy and expensive metal parts used in conventional robotic ...

Dixon, Theresa, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Internal Versus SST-Forced Atmospheric Variability as Simulated by an Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of atmospheric flow is analyzed by separating it into an internal part due to atmospheric dynamics only and an external (or forced) part due to the variability of sea surface temperature forcing. The two modes of variability are ...

Ali Harzallah; Robert Sadourny

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Transient Response of a Global Ocean-Atmosphere Model to a Doubling of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient response of climate to an instantaneous increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has been investigated by a general circulation model of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system with global geography and annual ...

Syukuro Manabe; Kirk Bryan; Michael J. Spelman

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane and 13C12C, Flask Air Samples Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999) data Data Investigators Paul Quay and...

223

Response of the Middle Atmosphere to CO2 Doubling: Results from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) has been used to examine the middle atmosphere response to CO2 doubling. The radiative-photochemical response induced by doubling CO2 alone and the response produced by changes in prescribed SSTs are ...

V. I. Fomichev; A. I. Jonsson; J. de Grandpré; S. R. Beagley; C. McLandress; K. Semeniuk; T. G. Shepherd

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Definition: Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Seismic methods provide information regarding the elastic properties of the subsurface through the measurement of the propagation velocity of elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismology /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/ is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes (such as explosions). A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram. A seismologist

225

7.02 Introduction to Experimental Biology, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7.02 and 7.021 require simultaneous registration. Application of experimental techniques in biochemistry, microbiology, and cell biology. Emphasizes integrating factual knowledge with understanding the design of experiments ...

Amon, Angelika

226

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

227

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

228

TRIDENT flyer plate Impact technique: comparison to gas gun plate impact technique  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the details of a series of plate impact experiments that were conducted on a gas gun in an effort to validate a new technique for plate impact using the TRIDENT laser to launch thin flyers. The diagnostics fielded were VISAR and identical samples and impactors were used on both platforms. All experimenters agree that the VISAR results should have agreed between the two experimental platforms. The VISAR results did not agree across the platforms and experimenters offer explanations and implications for this outcome.

Darcie D. Koller; George T. Gray III; Sheng-Nian Luo

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nuclear test experimental science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S. (eds.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Blind Source Separation Techniques for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blind Source Separation techniques, based both on Independent Component Analysis and on second order statistics, are presented and compared for extracting partially hidden texts and textures in document images. Barely perceivable features may occur, for instance, in ancient documents previously erased and then re-written (palimpsests), or for transparency or seeping of ink from the reverse side, or from watermarks in the paper. Detecting these features can be of great importance to scholars and historians. In our approach, the document is modeled as the superposition of a number of source patterns, and a simplified linear mixture model is introduced for describing the relationship between these sources and multispectral views of the document itself. The problem of detecting the patterns that are barely perceivable in the visible color image is thus formulated as the one of separating the various patterns in the mixtures. Some examples from an extensive experimentation with real ancient documents are shown and commented.

Detecting Hidden Texts; Anna Tonazzini; Emanuele Salerno; Matteo Mochi; Luigi Bedini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Color and experimental physics  

SciTech Connect

After a brief review of the color hypothesis and the motivations for its introduction, the experimental tests arare discussed. It is assumed that colored states have not been produced at present energies and only experimental tests which apply below the color threshold, when color is a ''hidden symmetry,'' are discussed. Some of these tests offer the possibility of distinguishing between quark models with fractional and integral quark charges. (auth)

Chanowitz, M.S.

1975-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Comparison of Energy Source Estimates Derived from Atmospheric Circulation Data with Satellite Measurements of Net Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distributions of the net sources of atmospheric dry and latent energy are evaluated by the residual technique using the reanalyzed ECMWF FGGE level IIIb data for February and July 1979. Their sum (i.e., the residual estimate of the source of ...

Carl Fortelius; Eero Holopainen

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Perfromance analysis of the Parallel Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient execution of parallel applications requires insight into how the parallel system features impact the performance of the application. Significant experimental analysis and the development of performance models enhance the understanding of such an impact. Deep understanding of an application’s major kernels and their design leads to a better understanding of the application’s performance, and hence, leads to development of better performance models. The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the latest in a series of global atmospheric models developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) as a community tool for NCAR and the university research community. This work focuses on analyzing CAM and understanding the impact of different architectures on this application. In the analysis of CAM, kernel coupling, which quantifies the interaction between adjacent and chains of kernels in an application, is used. All experiments are conducted on four parallel platforms: NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center) Seaborg, SDSC (San Diego Supercomputer Center) DataStar P655, DataStar P690 and PSC (Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center) Lemieux. Experimental results indicate that kernel coupling gave an insight into many of the application characteristics. One important characteristic of CAM is that its performance is heavily dependent on a parallel platform memory hierarchy; different cache sizes and different cache policies had the major effect on CAM’s performance. Also, coupling values showed that although CAM’s kernels share many data structures, most of the coupling values are still destructive (i.e., interfering with each other so as to adversely affect performance). The kernel coupling results helps developers in pointing out the bottlenecks in memory usage in CAM. The results obtained from processor partitioning are significant in helping CAM users in choosing the right platform to run CAM.

Shawky Sharkawi, Sameh Sherif

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Using Structured Interviewing Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GAO assists congressional decisionmakers in their deliberative process by furnishing analytical information on issues and options under consideration. Many diverse methodologies are needed to develop sound and timely answers to the questions that are posed by the Congress. To provide GAO evaluators with basic information about the more commonly used methodologies, GAO’s policy guidance includes documents such as methodology transfer papers and technical guidelines, This methodology transfer paper on using structured interviewing techniques discusses how GAO evaluators should incorporate structured interview techniques when appropriate to performing our work. It explains when these techniques should be

Gao/pemd-. Preface; Werner Grosshans

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Human effects on the global atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

This review considers whether human activities can significantly change important functions of the global atmosphere by altering the amount or distribution of certain trace species. It deals with three specific topics: stratopheric ozone, the role of species other than carbon dioxide on the greenhouse effect, and certain recently recognized atmospheric consequences of a large scale nuclear war. 64 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

Johnston, H.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Overwater Atmospheric Diffusion: Measurements and Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of ten atmospheric tracer experiments provided 62 hours of overwater atmospheric dispersion data. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released as the tracer gas at a height of 13 m from a ship positioned about 7 km off the central California ...

Walter F. Dabberdt

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Measurements of Atmospheric Nanoparticles (1875–1980)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmosphere contains a large variety of particles, ranging in size from near molecular (~1 nm) to larger than 10,000 nm. The total number concentration N of particles is dominated by nanoparticles ? 100 nm in diameter. Discovery of atmospheric ...

Volker Mohnen; George M. Hidy

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Experimental Study of the Vertical Structure of the Lower Troposphere over a SmallGreek Island in the Aegean Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental campaign was carried out on a small Greek island that is characterized by complex terrain; its aim was to study the local characteristics of the vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The instrumentation was ...

C. G. Helmis; C. Jacovides; D. N. Asimakopoulos; H. A. Flocas

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Earth's early atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Ideas about atmospheric composition and climate on the early Earth have evolved considerably over the last 30 years, but many uncertainties still remain. It is generally agreed that the atmosphere contained little or no free oxygen initially and that oxygen concentrations increased markely near 2.0 billion years ago, but the precise timing of and reasons for its rise remain unexplained. Likewise, it is usually conceded that the atmospheric greenhouse effect must have been higher in the past to offset reduced solar luminosity, but the levels of atmospheric carbon cioxide and other greenhouse gases required remain speculative. A better understanding of past atmospheric evolution is important to understanding the evolution of life and to predicting whether Earth-like planets might exist elsewhere in the galaxy.

Kasting, J.F. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Development of an Experimental Facility for Flame Speed Measurements in Powdered Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research with heterogeneous mixtures involving solid particulate in closed, constant-volume bombs is typically limited by the powder dispersion technique. This work details the development of an experimental apparatus that promotes ideal conditions, namely a quiescent atmosphere and uniform particle distribution, for measuring laminar, heterogeneous flame propagation. In this thesis, two methods of dispersing particles are investigated. In the first, heterogeneous mixtures are made in a secondary vessel that is connected to the main experiment. Particles are dispersed into the secondary vessel by adapting a piston-driven particle injector, which has been shown to produce uniform particle distributions. The heterogeneous mixture is then transferred to the main bomb facility and ignited after laminar conditions are achieved. In the second method of dispersion, particles are directly injected into the main experimental facility using a strong blast of compressed air. As with the first approach, enough time is given (~4 minutes) for the mixture to become quiescent before ignition occurs. An extinction diagnostic is also applied to the secondary mixing vessel as well as the primary experimental facility (for both dispersion methods) to provide a qualitative understanding of the dispersion technique. To perform this diagnostic a 632.8-nm, 5-mW Helium-Neon (HeNe) laser was employed. Aluminum nano-particles with an average diameter of 100 nm were used in this study. It was found that for typical dust loadings produced with both dispersion techniques, a pure dust-air system would not ignite due to the current spark ignition system. Thus, a hybrid mixture of Al/CH4/O2/N2 was employed to achieve the project goal of demonstrating a system for controlled laminar flame speed measurements in aerosol mixtures. With the hybrid mixture, the combustion characteristics were studied both with and without the presence of nano-Al particles. Based on the experimental results, the simplicity of the "direct-injection" methodology compared to that of the "side-vessel" is desirable and will be further investigated as a viable alternative, or improvement, to the side-vessel technology.

Vissotski, Andrew John

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques:

242

Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Determination of lithology, grain size Stratigraphic/Structural: Thickness and geometry of rock strata, fracture identification Hydrological: Porosity, permeability, water saturation Thermal: Formation temperature with depth Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques: Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids

243

Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Techniques Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: may be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: may be inferred Hydrological: may be inferred Thermal: may be inferred Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques: Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Geophysical techniques measure physical phenomena of the earth such as gravity, magnetism, elastic waves, electrical and electromagnetic waves.

244

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg{sub evap} to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg[sub evap] to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

CHALLENGES IN DATA INTENSIVE ANALYSIS AT SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTAL USER FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

This chapter will discuss the critical data intensive analysis and visualiza-tion challenges faced by the experimental science community at large scale and laboratory based facilities. The chapter will further highlight initial solutions under development through community efforts and lay out perspectives for the future, such as the potential of more closely linked experimental and computational science approaches, methods to achieve real time analysis capabilities and the challenges and opportunities of data integration across experimental scales, levels of theory and varying techniques.

Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Li, Dongsheng; Miller, Stephen D.; Cobb, John W.; Green, Mark L.; Ruby, Catherine L.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

X-ray divergent-beam (Kossel) technique: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the X-ray divergent-beam (Kossel) technique over the last 50 years is traced. The fundamentals of this technique and ways to implement it experimentally are considered, and its potential for studying the real structure of crystals is analyzed in detail.

Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Acoustic Tomography as a Remote Sensing Method to Investigate the Near-Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer in Comparison with In Situ Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acoustic tomography method is applied in the atmospheric surface layer to observe near-surface temperature fields. Important advantages of this technique are the remote sensing capacity and the possibility of directly deriving area-average ...

Astrid Ziemann; Klaus Arnold; Armin Raabe

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

New Approach to Calculation of Atmospheric Model Physics: Accurate and Fast Neural Network Emulation of Longwave Radiation in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach based on a synergetic combination of statistical/machine learning and deterministic modeling within atmospheric models is presented. The approach uses neural networks as a statistical or machine learning technique for an accurate ...

Vladimir M. Krasnopolsky; Michael S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Dmitry V. Chalikov

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Experimental Path End  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fin de la ruta experimental Fin de la ruta experimental Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Usted ha conocido las técnicas usadas para registrar las evidencias experimentales que sustentan el Modelo Standard. En resumen, podemos decir que los físicos usan los aceleradores para "espiar" dentro de la estructura de las partículas. Los detectores recogen datos, que son analnizados primero por computadoras y luego por personas. Usted ha llegado al final de la ruta de la evidencia experimental. A pesar que las evidencias experimentales han dado un amplio sustento al Modelo Standard, es necesario reconocer que aún queda mucho por aprender. En particular, los físicos están plagados de problemas relacionados con los neutrinos, la materia oscura, y la imposibilidad de incluir la gravedad en

251

The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

Precision Determination of Atmospheric Extinction at Optical and Near IR Wavelengths  

SciTech Connect

The science goals for future ground-based all-sky surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, PanSTARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a per cent or better, and absolute calibration of color measurements that are similarly accurate. This performance will need to be achieved with measurements made from multiple images taken over the course of many years, and these surveys will observe in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a technique to implement a new strategy to directly measure variations of atmospheric transmittance at optical wavelengths and application of these measurements to calibration of ground-based observations. This strategy makes use of measurements of the spectra of a small catalog of bright 'probe' stars as they progress across the sky and back-light the atmosphere. The signatures of optical absorption by different atmospheric constituents are recognized in these spectra by their characteristic dependences on wavelength and airmass. State-of-the-art models of atmospheric radiation transport and modern codes are used to accurately compute atmospheric extinction over a wide range of observing conditions. We present results of an observing campaign that demonstrate that correction for extinction due to molecular constituents and aerosols can be done with precisions of a few millimagnitudes with this technique.

Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Axelrod, T.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Blondin, Stephane; /European Southern Observ. /Marseille, CPPM; Claver, Chuck; /NOAO, Tucson; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Saha, Abhijit; /NOAO, Tucson; Smith, Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Smith, R.Chris; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Techniques Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Modeling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Modeling Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock types, rock chemistry, stratigraphic layer organization Stratigraphic/Structural: Stress fields and magnitudes, location and shape of permeable and non-permeable structures, faults, fracture patterns Hydrological: Visualization and prediction of the flow patterns and characteristics of geothermal fluids, hydrothermal fluid flow characteristics, up-flow patterns

254

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

255

Synoptic Reorganization of Atmospheric Flow during the Last Glacial Maximum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled global atmosphere–ocean model of intermediate complexity is used to study the influence of glacial boundary conditions on the atmospheric circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum in a systematical manner. A web of atmospheric ...

Flávio Justino; Axel Timmermann; Ute Merkel; Enio P. Souza

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The NCAR Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) facility developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will support observational research on the structure of the atmospheric surface layer. ASTER will provide state-...

J. A. Businger; W. F. Dabberdt; A. C. Delany; T. W. Horst; C. L. Martin; S. P. Oncley; S. R. Semmer

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Estimating the Meridional Energy Transports in the Atmosphere and Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The poleward energy transports in the atmosphere–ocean system are estimated for the annual mean and the four seasons based on satellite measurements of the net radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, atmospheric transports of energy at ...

B. C. Carissimo; A. H. Oort; T. H. Vonder Haar

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Biogenic Hydrocarbons in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this ...

J. D. Fuentes; L. Gu; M. Lerdau; R. Atkinson; D. Baldocchi; J. W. Bottenheim; P. Ciccioli; B. Lamb; C. Geron; A. Guenther; T. D. Sharkey; W. Stockwell

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Vacillations in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a 35-year integration of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Both ocean and atmosphere are two-level, nonlinear primitive equations models. The global atmospheric model is forced by a steady, zonally symmetric Newtonian ...

Paul S. Schopf; Max J. Suarez

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Rainfall and Radiative Heating Rates from TOGA COARE Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heat and moisture budgets are used to determine rainfall and radiative heating rates over the western Pacific warm pool during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Results are ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formulation to include prognostic atmospheric layers in offline surface schemes is derived from atmospheric equations. Whereas multilayer schemes developed previously need a complex coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme ...

Valéry Masson; Yann Seity

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Homoclinic Dynamics: A Scenario for Atmospheric Ultralow-Frequency Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a link will be established between atmospheric ultralow-frequency variability (ULFV) and the occurrence of homoclinic dynamics in models of large-scale atmospheric flow. It is known that uncoupled atmosphere models possess ...

Daan T. Crommelin

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: CRITICAL REVIEW OF MOST RECENT ADVANCES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript presents an overview of the most recent instrument developments, field and laboratory applications of mass spectrometry (MS) in chemistry and physics of atmospheric aerosols. A broad range of MS instruments employing different sample introduction methods, ionization and mass detection techniques are utilized for both 'on-line' and 'off-line' characterization of aerosols. On-line MS techniques enable detection of individual particles with simultaneous measurements of particle size distributions and aerodynamic characteristics, and are ideally suited for field studies which require high temporal resolution. Off-line MS techniques provide means for detailed molecular-level analysis of aerosol samples which is essential to fundamental knowledge on aerosol chemistry, mechanisms of particle formation and atmospheric aging. Combined together, complementary MS techniques provide comprehensive information on the chemical composition, size, morphology and phase of aerosols - data of key importance for evaluating hygroscopic and optical properties of particles, their health effects, understanding their origins, and atmospheric evolution. Developments and applications of MS techniques in the aerosol research have expanded remarkably over a couple of last years as evidenced by sky-rocketing publication statistics. The goal of this review is to period of late 2010 - early 2012, which were not conveyed in previous reviews.

Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

264

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MAINTENANCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of housing experimental animals such as mice in individual tube- like plastic enclosures is described. Contrary to experience, when this was tried with metal the mice did not become panicky. Group housing, with its attendant difficulties, may thus be dispensed with. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1962-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Auto-ignition during instationary jet evolution of dimethyl ether (DME) in a high-pressure atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The auto-ignition process during transient injection of gaseous dimethyl ether (DME) in a constant high-pressure atmosphere is studied experimentally by laser-optical methods and compared with numerical calculations. With different non-intrusive measurement techniques jet properties and auto-ignition are investigated at high temporal and spatial resolution. The open jet penetrates a constant pressure oxidative atmosphere of up to 4 MPa. During the transient evolution, the fuel jet entrains air at up to 720 K. The subsequent auto-ignition of the ignitable part of the jet occurs simultaneously over a wide spatial extension. The ignition delay times are not affected by variation of the nozzle exit velocity. Thus, the low-temperature oxidation is slow compared with the shorter time scales of mixing, so that chemical kinetics is dominating the process. The typical two-stage ignition is resolved optically with high-speed shadowgraphy at a sampling rate of 10 kHz. The 2D fields of jet velocity and transient mixture fraction are measured phase-coupled with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Tracer Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) during the time-frame of ignition. The instationary Probability Density Functions (PDF) of mixture fraction are described very well by Beta functions within the complete area of the open jet. Additional 1D flamelet simulations of the auto-ignition process are computed with a detailed reaction mechanism for DME [S. Fischer, F. Dryer, H. Curran, Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 32 (12) (2000) 713-740; H. Curran, S. Fischer, F. Dryer, Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 32 (12) (2000) 741-759]. Calculated ignition delay times are in very good agreement with the measured mean ignition delay times of 3 ms. Supplemental flamelet simulations address the influence of DME and air temperature, pressure and strain. Underneath a critical strain rate the air temperature is identified to be the most sensitive factor on ignition delay time. (author)

Fast, G.; Kuhn, D.; Class, A.G. [Institut fuer Kern- und Energietechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Weberstrasse 5, D-76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Maas, U. [Institut fuer Technische Thermodynamik, Universitat Karlsruhe (TH), Kaiserstrasse 12, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

267

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program DOESC-ARM...

268

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this room ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH -RECEIVED •I.AWSSKCEDIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTMass and Composition of Aerosol as a Function of Time,

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part II: Atmospheric Transient Adjustment and Its Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical mechanisms underlying the transient circulation adjustment in the extratropical atmosphere after the instantaneous doubling of carbon dioxide are investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere ...

Yutian Wu; Richard Seager; Tiffany A. Shaw; Mingfang Ting; Naomi Naik

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

272

Atmospheric considerations for central receiver power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of the effects of atmospheric attenuation, turbulent scattering, and the use of cooling towers on the performance of solar thermal central receiver power plants.

Henderson, R.G.; Pitter, R.L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Spectral Preconditioners for Nonhydrostatic Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The elliptic problems in semi-implicit nonhydrostatic atmospheric models are difficult. Typically, they are poorly conditioned, nonseparable, contain cross-derivative terms, and are often nonsymmetric. Here, the resulting linear system is solved ...

Stephen J. Thomas; Joshua P. Hacker; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz; Roland B. Stull

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Toward a Fully Lagrangian Atmospheric Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved treatment of advection is essential for atmospheric transport and chemistry models. Eulerian treatments are generally plagued with instabilities, unrealistic negative constituent values, diffusion, and dispersion errors. A higher-...

Jahrul M. Alam; John C. Lin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Filtering of Gravity Modes in Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of gravity modes in atmospheric model predictions is assessed quantitatively by comparing integrations with a normal mode initialized primitive equation model and its corresponding pseudogeostrophic form to document some generally ...

F. Baer; J. J. Tribbia

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stochastic Dynamics of the Midlatitude Atmospheric Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The innate tendency of the background straining field of the midlatitude atmospheric jet to preferentially amplify a subset of disturbances produces a characteristic response to stochastic perturbation whether the perturbations are internally ...

Brian F. Farrell; Peteros J. Ioannou

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Removal of Atmospheric Effects prom AVHRR Albedos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on numerical simulations, coefficients are determined to be used in a linear relationship between clear-sky planetary albedo and surface albedo. Thew coefficients are given as functions of solar zenith angle and atmospheric parameters for ...

Peter Koepke

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Exploring Atmospheric Aerosols by Twilight Photometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instrument twilight photometer was designed, developed, and installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India (18°43?N, 73°51?E), to monitor the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols. The instrument, based ...

B. Padma Kumari; S. H. Kulkarni; D. B. Jadhav; A. L. Londhe; H. K. Trimbake

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Carbon Dioxide Variability and Atmospheric Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly values of the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) formed the basis for an investigation of concentration fluctuations on daily to monthly time scales. In agreement with earlier studies we found no ...

James C. Sadler; Colin S. Ramage; Arnold M. Hori

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Potential Vorticity in a Moist Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential vorticity principle for a nonhydrostatic, moist, precipitating atmosphere is derived. An appropriate generalization of the well-known (dry) Ertel potential vorticity is found to be P = ??1(2? + × u)?·???, where ? is the total ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Scott A. Hausman; Matthew Garcia; Katsuyuki V. Ooyama; Hung-Chi Kuo

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nonlinear Atmospheric Adjustment to Thermal Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear, numerical model of a compressible atmosphere is used to simulate the hydrostatic and geostrophic adjustment to a localized prescribed heating applied over five minutes with a size characteristic of an isolated, deep, cumulus cloud. ...

Paul F. Fanelli; Peter R. Bannon

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Effect of Nonlinearity on Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear limit of two-dimensional gravity waves in an incompressible, inviscid and stably stratified atmosphere is studied. The three-wave resonant interaction theory indicates an energy cascade from a vertically propagating wave (...

Mostafa M. Ibrahim

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Shear Excitation of Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unstable Velocity shears are a Common source of vertically propagating gravity waves in the atmosphere. However, the growth rates of unstable modes predicted by linear theory cannot always amount for their observed importance.

David C. Fritts

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dynamic Stabilization of Atmospheric Single Column Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single column models (SCMs) provide an economical framework for assessing the sensitivity of atmospheric temperature and humidity to natural and imposed perturbations, and also for developing improved representations of diabatic processes in ...

John W. Bergman; Prashant D. Sardeshmukh

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Atmospheric Mesoscale Dispersion Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mesoscale dispersion modeling system (MDMS) described herein is under development as a simulation tool to investigate atmospheric flow and pollution dispersion over complex terrain for domains up to several hundred kilometers. The system ...

Marek Uliasz

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Atmospheric Entropy. Part I: Climate Dissipation Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric entropy and its association with climate dissipation are investigated. The balance equation for entropy is derived through the mean and transient thermal and moisture equations. The entropy production contains the internal and external ...

Jiangnan Li; Petr Chylek

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Atmospheric Turbidity over Central North Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some 8500 observations of atmospheric turbidity, taken at Raleigh, North Carolina from July 1969 to July 1975 are analyzed for within-day and day-to-day variations and their dependence on meteorological parameters. The annual average turbidity of ...

James T. Peterson; Edwin C. Flowers; Guillermo J. Berri; Cheryl L. Reynolds; John H. Rudisill

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Linear Baroclinic Instability in the Martian Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear baroclinic instability of zonal-mean flows like those in the wintertime Martian atmosphere under both relatively nondusty and highly dusty conditions is examined using a spherical quasi-geostrophic model. The basic states are idealized,...

Jeffrey R. Barnes

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

State-Space Modeling for Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different aspect concerning the state-space modeling for atmospheric pollution are dealt with separately in this paper: (i) the treatment of the advection-diffusion equation and (ii) the use of time series analysis.

E. Hernández; F. Martín; F. Valero

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Resonant Planetary Waves in a Spherical Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global model of planetary wave propagation in a spherical atmosphere is used to examine the spectrum of free or resonant planetary waves of the solstitial stratosphere. These free modes are located by forcing the model with a weak periodic ...

Mark R. Schoeberl; John H. E. Clark

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Flywheel Effect in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the requirement of geostrophic balance, mechanical inertia can affect the thermal response of the atmosphere to transient heating. We examine some very simple linear models of this “flywheel effect,” and discuss their possible ...

Roelof K. Snieder; Stephen B. Fels

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Atmosphere–Ocean Modeling Exploiting Fluid Isomorphisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical isomorphisms between the hydrostatic equations that govern the evolution of a compressible atmosphere and an incompressible ocean are described and exploited to guide the design of a hydrodynamical kernel for simulation of either ...

John Marshall; Alistair Adcroft; Jean-Michel Campin; Chris Hill; Andy White

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Basic Meteorological Observations for Schools: Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article addresses measurement of atmospheric surface pressure using economical instruments. It is intended to provide members of the Society with a ready reference to respond to inquiries from earth and physical science teachers at the ...

John T. Snow; Michelle E. Akridge; Shawn B. Harley

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development is described of a Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS)—the result of a cooperative project to collect global weather observations taken near the ocean's surface since 1854, primarily from merchant ships, into a compact and ...

Scott D. Woodruff; Ralph J. Slutz; Roy L. Jenne; Peter M. Steurer

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Mars Atmosphere Pressure Periodicities from Viking Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first martian year of pressure data taken by the Viking landers on Mars is subjected to power spectrum analysis. The analysis suggests that strong periodicities are present in the martian atmosphere, especially at the high-latitude (48°N) ...

R. D. Sharman; J. A. Ryan

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Profiling atmospheric aerosols | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a number of instruments that use low power lasers (the instrument is called Micropulse Lidar, MPL) to measure the turbidity of the atmosphere above the ground. For the first time,...

298

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quantum light in the turbulent atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonclassical properties of light propagating through the turbulent atmosphere are studied. We demonstrate by numerical simulation that the probability distribution of the transmission coefficient, which characterizes the effects of the atmosphere on the quantum state of light, can be reconstructed by homodyne detection. Nonclassical photon-statistics and, more generally, nonclassical Glauber-Sudarshan functions appear to be more robust against turbulence for weak light fields rather than for bright ones.

A. A. Semenov; W. Vogel

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

300

Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV - 1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Nature Bulletin No. 554-A February 15, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF OUR ATMOSPHERE In Bulletin No. 542-A we described the atmosphere that surrounds the earth, held there by the pull of gravity, including the canopy of air immediately above us. That canopy is responsible for our weather and climates, shields us from the killing rays of the sun, and furnishes substances necessary for all life: oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Astronomers believe that none of the other planets -- excepting Mars, perhaps -- has an atmosphere anything like ours. The principal elements, free nitrogen (78 percent) and free oxygen (21 percent), apparently are rare in the universe. On the other hand, the earth's atmosphere contains only traces of free hydrogen and helium -- the two lightest gases -- whereas they are by far the most common elements elsewhere in the universe.

302

Review of General Circulation Models and Downscaling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate forecasting and climate change projections are currently made with general circulation models (GCMs) that integrate the complex interactions of atmosphere-land-ocean-ice systems to simulate the Earth's climate and make projections of its future change on timescales from decades to centuries. This report reviews the current state of GCMs, including their approaches, limitations, uncertainties, and performance. The report also describes various downscaling techniques used to scale GCM output from c...

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

New mass spectrometry techniques for studying physical chemistry of atmospheric heterogeneous processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ion mode DESI and nano-DESI result in the formation of protonated molecules [M + H]+ and molecules cationised on metals, such as sodium [M + Na]+ adducts, while deprotonated [M Ã? H]Ã? molecules are observed+ ) reacts selectively with molecules (M) containing carbonyl groups, such as aldehydes and ketones [79

Nizkorodov, Sergey

304

Experimental Quantum Process Discrimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrimination between unknown processes chosen from a finite set is experimentally shown to be possible even in the case of non-orthogonal processes. We demonstrate unambiguous deterministic quantum process discrimination (QPD) of non-orthogonal processes using properties of entanglement, additional known unitaries, or higher dimensional systems. Single qubit measurement and unitary processes and multipartite unitaries (where the unitary acts non-separably across two distant locations) acting on photons are discriminated with a confidence of $\\geq97%$ in all cases.

Anthony Laing; Terry Rudolph; Jeremy L. O'Brien

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Experimental Adaptive Bayesian Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental realization of an adaptive quantum state tomography protocol. Our method takes advantage of a Bayesian approach to statistical inference and is naturally tailored for adaptive strategies. For pure states we observe close to 1/N scaling of infidelity with overall number of registered events, while best non-adaptive protocols allow for $1/\\sqrt{N}$ scaling only. Experiments are performed for polarization qubits, but the approach is readily adapted to any dimension.

Konstantin Kravtsov; Stanislav Straupe; Igor Radchenko; Neil Houlsby; Sergey Kulik

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Resin infiltration transfer technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

307

Technique Subgroupings Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and NSLS-II beamlines according to DOE Technique Scheme and NSLS-II beamlines according to DOE Technique Scheme Technique Subgroupings Spectroscopy 01 - Low Energy Spectroscopy Infrared Photoemission U12IR, U4IR / MET* U5UA, U13 / ESM 02 - Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Tender XAS U4B, U7A, X24A / SST, SSS* X15B, X19A / TES* 03 - Hard X-ray Spectroscopy EXAFS X3A, X3B, X11A, X11B, X18A, X18B, X23A2 / ISS, BMM, QAS*, XAS* 04 - Optics/Calibration/Metrology U3C,X8A/ OFT,MID Scattering 05 X-ray Diffraction X-Ray Powder Diffraction Extreme Conditions Energy Dispersive Micro-Beam Diffraction X7B,X10B,X14A,X16C,X17A / XPD,IXD* X17B2,X17B3,X17C / XPD, TEC*, 4DE* X17B1, X17B2 / NA X13B / MXD* 06 MX, footprinting Protein Crystallography X-ray footprinting X4A, X4C, X6A, X12B, X12C, X25, X29 / FMX, AMX, NYX;

308

Atmospheric Pressure Low Current Plasma for Syngas Production from Alcohol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract – Atmospheric pressure low current arc discharge between graphite electrodes with conical geometry in liquid ethanol/water mixture was investigated. Syngas production was demonstrated over large experimental conditions. In this paper we focus on discharge aspects. It is shown from pictures that the behavior of low current arc discharge with consumable electrodes represents non-stationary plasma. The energetic properties of plasmas can be used to carry out many applications, particularly in discharge based systems. Recently, research interest focuses on the Non Thermal Plasma (NTP) treatment of hydrocarbons, alcohol, or biomass aimed to improve the yield of synthetic gas (syngas: H2+CO) production at low cost [1, 4]. Experiments were performed on a plasma reactor consisting of two graphite electrodes with conical shape

Ahmed Khacef; Khadija Arabi; Olivier Aubry; Jean Marie Cormier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

310

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress-relaxation techniques using electric

311

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress relaxation techniques using electric

312

Recent Improvements to an Advanced Atmospheric Transport Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Technologies Group (ATG) has developed an advanced atmospheric modeling capability using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and a stochastic Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) for operational use at the Savannah River Site (SRS). For local simulations concerning releases from the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA), RAMS is run in a nested grid configuration with horizontal grid spacing of 8 and 2 km for each grid, with 6-hr forecasts updated every 3 hours. An interface to allow for easy user access to LPDM had been generated, complete with post-processing results depicting surface concentration, deposition, and a variety of dose quantities. A prior weakness in this approach was that observations from the SRS tower network were only incorporated into the three-dimensional modeling effort during the initialization process. Thus, if the forecasted wind fields were in error, the resulting plume predictions would also be erroneous. To overcome this shortcoming, the procedure for generating RAMS wind fields and reading them into LPDM has been modified such that SRS wind measurements are blended with the predicted three-dimensional wind fields from RAMS using the Barnes technique. In particular, the horizontal components in RAMS are replaced with the observed values at a series of 8 towers that exist within the SRS boundary (covering {approx}300 km{sup 2}). Even though LPDM is currently configured to account only for radioactive releases, it was used in a recent chlorine gas release to generate plume concentrations based on unit releases from the site of a train accident in Graniteville, South Carolina. This information was useful to local responders as an indication of potential protective actions downwind of the release.

Buckley, R. L.; Hunter, C. H.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effect of annealing atmosphere on phase formation and electrical characteristics of bismuth ferrite thin films  

SciTech Connect

Bismuth ferrite thin films were deposited on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by a soft chemical method and spin-coating technique. The effect of annealing atmosphere (air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}) on the structure and electrical properties of the films are reported. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the film annealed in air atmosphere is a single-phase perovskite structure. The films annealed in air showed better crystallinity and the presence of a single BFO phase leading to lower leakage current density and superior ferroelectric hysteresis loops at room temperature. In this way, we reveal that BFO film crystallized in air atmosphere by the soft chemical method can be useful for practical applications, including nonvolatile digital memories, spintronics and data-storage media.

Simoes, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, UNIFEI - CAMPUS ITABIRA, Rua Sao Paulo, 377, Bairro Amazonas, CEP: 35900-373 Itabira, MG (Brazil); Riccardi, C.S.; Dos Santos, M.L. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica Universidade Estadual Paulista, Bairro: Quitandinha, CEP: 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Garcia, F. Gonzalez [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, UNIFEI - CAMPUS ITABIRA, Rua Sao Paulo, 377, Bairro Amazonas, CEP: 35900-373 Itabira, MG (Brazil); Longo, E.; Varela, J.A. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica Universidade Estadual Paulista, Bairro: Quitandinha, CEP: 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

314

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

Category:Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques page? For detailed information on Gravity Techniques, click here. Category:Gravity Techniques Add.png Add a new Gravity Techniques Technique Pages in category "Gravity...

316

3D atmospheric modeling based on MODTRAN4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All the factors of atmospheric environment that influence the transmission of infrared radiation were analyzed in detail in the paper. Taking horizontally varying atmospheric property into consideration, a 3D model of atmospheric transmission of infrared ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, infrared radiation, model, path radiation, ratio of atmospheric transmission, simulation, single scatter solar radiation

Ge Li; Zhifeng Lu; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

318

Guam Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

319

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

320

Uncertainties in (E)UV model atmosphere fluxes (Research Note)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. During the comparison of synthetic spectra calculated with two NLTE model atmosphere codes, namely TMAP and TLUSTY, we encounter systematic differences in the EUV fluxes due to the treatment of level dissolution by pressure ionization. Aims. In the case of Sirius B, we demonstrate an uncertainty in modeling the EUV flux reliably in order to challenge theoreticians to improve the theory of level dissolution. Methods. We calculated synthetic spectra for hot, compact stars using state-of-the-art NLTE model-atmosphere techniques. Results. Systematic differences may occur due to a code-specific cutoff frequency of the H I Lyman bound-free opacity. This is the case for TMAP and TLUSTY. Both codes predict the same flux level at wavelengths lower than about 1500 Å for stars with effective temperatures (Teff) below about 30 000 K only, if the same cutoff frequency is chosen. Conclusions. The theory of level dissolution in high-density plasmas, which is available for hydrogen only should be generalized to all species. Especially, the cutoff frequencies for the bound-free opacities should be defined in order to make predictions of UV fluxes more reliable.

T. Rauch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Water vapour in the atmosphere of a transiting extrasolar planet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is predicted to be among, if not the most abundant molecular species after hydrogen in the atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets (hot-Jupiters) Several attempts have been made to detect water on an exoplanet, but have failed to find compelling evidence for it or led to claims that should be taken with caution. Here we report an analysis of recent observations of the hot-Jupiter HD189733b taken during the transit, where the planet passed in front of its parent star. We find that absorption by water vapour is the most likely cause of the wavelength-dependent variations in the effective radius of the planet at the infrared wavelengths 3.6, 5.8 and 8 microns. The larger effective radius observed at visible wavelengths may be due to either star variability or the presence of clouds/hazes. We explain the most recent thermal infrared observations of the planet during secondary transit behind the star, reporting a non-detection of water on HD189733b, as being a consequence of the nearly isothermal vertical profile of the planet.s atmosphere. Our results show that water is detectable on extrasolar planets using the primary transit technique and that the infrared should be a better wavelength region than the visible, for such searches.

Giovanna Tinetti; Alfred Vidal-Madjar; Mao-Chang Liang; Jean-Philippe Beaulieu; Yuk Yung; Sean Carey; Robert J. Barber; Jonathan Tennyson; Ignasi Ribas; Nicole Allard; Gilda E. Ballester; David K. Sing; Franck Selsis

2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results  

SciTech Connect

Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Dust Accelerator Facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA Lunar Institute's Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies has recently completed the construction of a new experimental facility to study hypervelocity dust impacts. The installation includes a 3 MV Pelletron, accelerating small particles in the size range of 0.1 to few microns to velocities in the range of 1 to 100 km/s. Here we report the capabilities of our facility, and the results of our first experiments.

Horanyi, M.; Colette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Robertson, S.; Shu, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X. [NASA Lunar Science Institute Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

326

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

327

atmospheric water vapor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric water vapor atmospheric water vapor Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords atmospheric water vapor Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 247.8 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 370.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

328

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

329

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

330

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

331

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

On the Climatology and Trend of the Atmospheric Heat Source over the Tibetan Plateau: An Experiments-Supported Revisit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heating over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) enhances the Asian summer monsoon. This study presents a state-of-the-art estimate of the heating components and their total over the TP, with the aid of high-accuracy experimental data, an ...

Kun Yang; Xiaofeng Guo; Jie He; Jun Qin; Toshio Koike

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetic Techniques Magnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Magnetic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Presence of magnetic minerals such as magnetite. Stratigraphic/Structural: Mapping of basement structures, horst blocks, fault systems, fracture zones, dykes and intrusions. Hydrological: The circulation of hydrothermal fluid may impact the magnetic susceptibility of rocks. Thermal: Rocks lose their magnetic properties at the Curie temperature (580° C for magnetite) [1] and, upon cooling, remagnetize in the present magnetic field orientation. The Curie point depth in the subsurface may be determined in a magnetic survey to provide information about hydrothermal activity in a region.

334

Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Techniques Gravity Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gravity Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Gravity Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Distribution of density in the subsurface enables inference of rock type. Stratigraphic/Structural: Delineation of steeply dipping formations, geological discontinuities and faults, intrusions and the deposition of silicates due to hydrothermal activity. Hydrological: Density of sedimentary rocks are strongly influenced by fluid contained within pore space. Dry bulk density refers to the rock with no moisture, while the wet bulk density accounts for water saturation; fluid content may alter density by up to 30%.(Sharma, 1997)

335

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

337

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

338

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

SciTech Connect

A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

339

Optical techniques for fluid flow and heat transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is presented of optical measuring techniques employed in momentum heat and mass transfer studies. A classification is given of those techniques that are nowadays widely employed in studies to advance the understanding of transport phenomena in fluids. Techniques that employ effects caused by fluid molecules are briefly treated, and examples of measurements are given to demonstrate the kind of information that can be obtained by these techniques. Optical techniques using tracers to obtain transport information are summarized, and laser-Doppler anemometry and its application to fluid flow studies are emphasized. Applications of this technique in single-phase and two-phase flows are given that demonstrate its potential in experimental fluid mechanics and convective heat transfer studies. 63 refs.

Durst, F. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Universitaet, Erlangen (Germany, F.R.))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electrical conductivity of plasmas of DB white dwarf atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The static electrical conductivity of non-ideal, dense, partially ionized helium plasma was calculated over a wide range of plasma parameters: temperatures $1\\cdot 10^{4}\\textrm{K} \\lesssim T \\lesssim 1\\cdot 10^{5}\\textrm{K}$ and mass density $1 \\times 10^{-6} \\textrm{g}/\\textrm{cm}^{3} \\lesssim \\rho \\lesssim 2 \\textrm{g}/\\textrm{cm}^{3}$. Calculations of electrical conductivity of plasma for the considered range of plasma parameters are of interest for DB white dwarf atmospheres with effective temperatures $1\\cdot 10^{4}\\textrm{K} \\lesssim T_{eff} \\lesssim 3\\cdot 10^{4}\\textrm{K}$. Electrical conductivity of plasma was calculated by using the modified random phase approximation and semiclassical method, adapted for the case of dense, partially ionized plasma. The results were compared with the unique existing experimental data, including the results related to the region of dense plasmas. In spite of low accuracy of the experimental data, the existing agreement with them indicates that results obtained in th...

Sreckovic, V A; Mihajlov, A A; Dimitrijevic, M S; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16702.x

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

342

Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Identify and document surface geology and mineralogy. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest. Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

343

New wind input term consistent with experimental, theoretical and numerical considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We offer a new method for determining the wind source term for energy and momentum fluxes transfer from the atmosphere to the wind-driven sea. This new source-term formulation is based on extensive analysis of experimental data collected at different sites around the world. It is shown that this new wind source term to be consistent both with numerical solution of exact equation for resonant four-wave interactions and available experimental data.

V. E. Zakharov; D. Resio; A. Pushkarev

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Experimental Properties of Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Properties of Fluids Group, Physical and Chemical Properties Division of the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, NIST.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

Experimental Datasets from Chemical Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 29, 2005 ... Optimization Online. Experimental Datasets from Chemical Thermodynamics. Evgenii Rudnyi (Evgenii ***at*** Rudnyi.Ru). Abstract: I have ...

346

Atmospheric Gravity Waves and Aircraft Turbulence Encounters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe aircraft turbulence-atmospheric gravity wave events which occurred during a 2-day period over the Continental Divide. The waves are observed by two microbarograph networks an each side of the divide and last for several hours at a ...

A. J. Bedard Jr.; F. Canavero; F. Einaudi

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Heat Budget of Tropical Ocean and Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat budget estimates for the global tropics are derived from recent calculations of the oceanic heat budget and satellite measurements of net radiation at the top of the atmosphere. Annual mean heat export from the zone 30°N–30°S amounts to 101 ...

Stefan Hastenrath

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Temperature stratification of the atmosphere of Arcturus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief overview of the results of the investigations of the red giant star Arcturus is given. One-dimensional LTE modeling of the atmospheres of Arcturus and the Sun as a star is carried out on the basis of synthesis of the extended wings of the H and K Ca II lines. It is found that the local continuum in this spectral region is underestimated by an average of 12% in the atlases of Arcturus. The average deficit in UV absorption amounts to 43% for Arcturus whereas it is 9% for the Sun. For Arcturus the correction factor to the continuum opacity at the wavelengths of 390.0, 392.5, 395.0, 398.0, and 400.0 nm equals 2.20, 1.90, 1.70, 1.55, and 1.45. The model atmosphere of Arcturus obtained from the best-fit of the wings of the H and K Ca II lines corresponds to the model atmosphere with the fundamental parameters T_eff = 4286 K, log g = 1.66, and [Fe/H]=-0.52 derived by Ramirez and Allende Prieto (2011). The temperature stratification of Arcturus' atmosphere is presented in tabular form. To obtain more accurate...

Sheminova, V A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Atmospheric Heat Engines on Earth and Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The character of the Earth's atmospheric heat engine depends, inter alia, on the relatively tight linkage between surface fluxes of energy and of H20. On Mars, on the other hand, H2O-based latent heat fluxes are only a trivial fraction of total ...

J. R. Philip

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Profiling Atmospheric Water Vapor by Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended Kaiman-Bucy filter ...

J. R. Wang; J. L. King; T. T. Wilheit; G. Szejwach; L. H. Gesell; R. A. Nieman; D. S. Niver; B. M. Krupp; J. A. Gagliano

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Baroclinic Modons as Prototypes for Atmospheric Blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-layer quasi-geostrophic channel model on a ?-plane is used to investigate the properties of dipole eddies which may be relevant models for atmospheric blocking. It is shown that quasi-stationary equivalent barotropic dipole eddies, similar ...

K. Haines

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Accuracy of Atmospheric Energy Budgets from Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Issues relevant to achieving an accuracy of better than 10 W m?2 on 250-km scales for monthly means in the atmospheric energy balance are explored from the standpoint of the formulation and computational procedures using the National Centers for ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; David P. Stepaniak; Julie M. Caron

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Mathematics of Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gaussian plume model is a standard approach for studying the transport of airborne contaminants due to turbulent diffusion and advection by the wind. This paper reviews the assumptions underlying the model, its derivation from the advection-diffusion ... Keywords: Gaussian plume solution, advection-diffusion equation, atmospheric dispersion, contaminant transport, inverse problem, linear least squares

John M. Stockie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Computational and experimental study of laminar flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have begun a computational study of nonpremixed tubular methane-air flames with detailed transport and finite rate chemistry. Our multidimensional computation research has been focused primarily on determining the structure of methane-air flames with C{sub 2} chemistry. Experimentally, we have continued our investigation of axisymmetric laminar flames using laser imaging techniques. We have investigated varying the fuel/diluent ratio. In methane flames,there is a broadband fluorescence that overlaps the Raman wavelengths used to measure the concentration of major species.

Smooke, M.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Self-imaging-based laser collimation testing technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser collimation is required in many experiments based on lasers. Some laser experiments demand a high quality of collimation, e.g., the optical coherent processor, image transformer, and Fourier transform generator. A device is required to test the collimation of lasers in such experiments. We have suggested a modification in existing collimation testing techniques by which sensitivity can be improved. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate twice the improvement in sensitivity when used with previous techniques.

Mudassar, Asloob A.; Butt, Saira

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Elementary particle physics---Experimental  

SciTech Connect

We are continuing a research program in high energy experimental particle physics and particle astrophysics. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions were performed using several techniques, in addition, a high energy leptoproduction experiment was continued at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators. The data are being collected with ballon-borne emulsion chambers. The properties of nuclear interactions at these high energies will reveal whether new production mechanisms come into play due to the high nuclear densities and temperatures obtained. We carried out closely related studies of hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams. We are members of a large international collaboration which has exposed emulsion chamber detectors to beams of {sup 32}S and {sup 16}O with energy 60 and 200 GeV/n at CERN and 15 GeV/n at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The primary objectives of this program are to determine the existence and properties of the hypothesized quark-gluon phase of matter, and its possible relation to a variety of anomalous observations. Studies of leptoproduction processes at high energies involve two separate experiments, one using the Tevatron 500 GeV muon beam and the other exploring the >TeV regime. We are participants in Fermilab experiment E665 employing a comprehensive counter/streamer chamber detector system. During the past year we joined the DUMAND Collaboration, and have been assigned responsibility for development and construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility, to be deployed in 1991. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the triggering system to be used.

Lord, J.J.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

1990-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Experimental and Analytical Simulation of MFCI (Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction) during CDA (Core Disruptive Accident) in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing demand for understanding Severe Accident Scenario in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors, there is an urgent need of enhancing numerical and experimental simulation techniques.… (more)

Natarajan, Venkataraman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The hydroxyl radical initiated oxidation of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere: a theoretical and experimental approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isoprene is the dominant non-methane organic compound emitted by vegetation into the atmosphere, with a global emission rate of ~ 500 Tg yr-1. Its oxidation serves as a major source of ground level ozone in North America during the summer months. Despite the significant impact on tropospheric chemistry, questions remain concerning the detailed oxidation mechanism. The initial step in the mechanism is the addition of OH to form four distinct isomers. The relative branching between these isomers influences the distribution of the final products. I present a comprehensive investigation into the mechanistic details of early steps in the oxidation mechanism of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and employ theoretical and experimental techniques. To understand the detailed kinetics of the initial OH addition to unsaturated hydrocarbons, I first present a model developed for the ethylene-OH system. I present the details of a robust two-transition state model. I extend the developed two-transition state model to the case of OH addition to isoprene. Excellent agreement with observed temperature and pressure dependent rate constants affords a high confidence level in understanding of the kinetics and in the calculated branching ratio of the initial OH addition step. I then focus attention on the subsequent reactivity of the OH-isoprene adducts. Until recently, all four of the OH-isoprene adducts were supposed to have reacted with O2 via addition to form alkylperoxy radicals. Previous computational results suggest that two of the OH-isoprene adducts undergo an intramolecular cyclic isomerization followed by hydrogen abstraction by O2 to form stable carbonyl compounds. I have synthesized photolytic precursors, presenting a novel approach to probe the subsequent reactivity of individual hydroxyalkyl radicals. Initial verification of the cyclic isomerization pathway involved synthesis of the photolytic precursor corresponding to the 1,3-butadiene-OH adduct. A culmination of theoretical and experimental techniques allowed verification of the cyclic isomerization pathway. I synthesized the photolytic precursor, which provided a single isoprene-OH adduct. Employing laser photolysis/laser induced fluorescence, time-dependent multiplexed mass spectrometry, velocity map ion imaging, and theoretical techniques, we present the full characterization of the reactivity of the single isoprene-OH adduct in the presence of O2.

Tullos, Erin Elizabeth

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification, including those burning lean hydrogen at both at atmospheric and elevated pressures [6]. The low

Bell, John B.

360

Atmosphere Feedbacks during ENSO in a Coupled GCM with a Modified Atmospheric Convection Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The too diverse representation of ENSO in a coupled GCM limits one’s ability to describe future change of its properties. Several studies pointed to the key role of atmosphere feedbacks in contributing to this diversity. These feedbacks are ...

Eric Guilyardi; Pascale Braconnot; Fei-Fei Jin; Seon Tae Kim; Michel Kolasinski; Tim Li; Ionela Musat

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Atmospheric Energetics in the Wavelet Domain. Part II: Time-Averaged Observed Atmospheric Blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelet energetics (WE) is a useful generalization of traditional wavenumber energetics, for analyzing atmospheric dynamics. WE is doubly indexed by wavenumber band j and location k. The interpretation is that 2 to the jth power is proportional ...

Aimé Fournier

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Characteristics of Atmospheric Transport Using Three Numerical Formulations for Atmospheric Dynamics in a Single GCM Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of a number of important archetypical tracer problems to the numerical method used to solve the equations of tracer transport and atmospheric dynamics. The tracers' scenarios were constructed to exercise the ...

Philip J. Rasch; Danielle B. Coleman; Natalie Mahowald; David L. Williamson; Shian-Jiann Lin; Byron A. Boville; Peter Hess

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic ...

Burner A. W.; Liu Tianshu

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Field Intercomparison Technique to Improve the Relative Accuracy of Longwave Radiation Measurements and an Evaluation of CASES-99 Pyrgeometer Data Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for improving the relative accuracy of longwave radiation measurements by a set of pyrgeometers [the Eppley Laboratory Precision Infrared Radiometer (Model PIR)] are presented using 10 PIRs from the 1999 Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface ...

S. P. Burns; J. Sun; A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer; S. P. Oncley; T. W. Horst

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Diagnostics Techniques of Power Transformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides the information on the diagnostics techniques for condition monitoring of power transformer (PT). This paper deals with the practical importance of the transformer diagnostic in the Electrical Engineering field. A review has been ... Keywords: temperature, condition monitoring, diagnostics methods, paper analysis techniques, oil analysis techniques

Piush Verma; Y. R. Sood; Jashandeep Singh

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

367

Dose Reduction Techniques  

SciTech Connect

As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

WAGGONER, L.O.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Techniques in Broadband Interferometry  

SciTech Connect

This is a compilation of my patents issued from 1997 to 2002, generally describing interferometer techniques that modify the coherence properties of broad-bandwidth light and other waves, with applications to Doppler velocimetry, range finding, imaging and spectroscopy. Patents are tedious to read in their original form. In an effort to improve their readability I have embedded the Figures throughout the manuscript, put the Figure captions underneath the Figures, and added section headings. Otherwise I have resisted the temptation to modify the words, though I found many places which could use healthy editing. There may be minor differences with the official versions issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office, particularly in the claims sections. In my shock physics work I measured the velocities of targets impacted by flyer plates by illuminating them with laser light and analyzing the reflected light with an interferometer. Small wavelength changes caused by the target motion (Doppler effect) were converted into fringe shifts by the interferometer. Lasers having long coherence lengths were required for the illumination. While lasers are certainly bright sources, and their collimated beams are convenient to work with, they are expensive. Particularly if one needs to illuminate a wide surface area, then large amounts of power are needed. Orders of magnitude more power per dollar can be obtained from a simple flashlamp, or for that matter, a 50 cent light bulb. Yet these inexpensive sources cannot practically be used for Doppler velocimetry because their coherence length is extremely short, i.e. their bandwidth is much too wide. Hence the motivation for patents 1 & 2 is a method (White Light Velocimetry) for allowing use of these powerful but incoherent lamps for interferometry. The coherence of the illumination is modified by passing it through a preparatory interferometer.

Erskine, D J

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Land–Atmosphere Coupling Strength in the Global Forecast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational coupled land–atmosphere forecast model from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is evaluated for the strength and characteristics of its coupling in the water cycle between land and atmosphere. Following the ...

Li Zhang; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Jiangfeng Wei; Zhichang Guo; Cheng-Hsuan Lu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Atmospheric Response to the Gulf Stream: Seasonal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric response to the Gulf Stream front in sea surface temperature is investigated using high-resolution data from satellite observations and operational analysis and forecast. Two types of atmospheric response are observed with ...

Shoshiro Minobe; Masato Miyashita; Akira Kuwano-Yoshida; Hiroki Tokinaga; Shang-Ping Xie

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Adaptive Multilevel Modeling of Land-Atmosphere Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive multilevel methods allow full coupling of atmospheric and land surface hydrological models by preserving consistency between the large-scale (atmospheric) and the regional (land) components. The methodology was investigated for three ...

Ana Paula Barros

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp 1992.07.11 - 1993.02.28 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability Final data available. For data sets, see below. Summary IOP completed. Description The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) was conducted to better understand the structure of the coupled system of the warm pool of the western Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of participants from dozens of countries took part in this experiment from November 1, 1992 through February 28, 1993. Campaign Data Sets

373

A Simulated Climatology of Spectrally Decomposed Atmospheric Infrared Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation experiment is conducted to inquire into the mean climate state and likely trends in atmospheric infrared radiation spectra. Upwelling and downwelling spectra at five vertical levels from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) ...

Yi Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Virtually Dry Snowball Earth Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hadley cell of a virtually dry snowball Earth atmosphere under equinox insolation is studied in a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. In contrast to the Hadley cell of modern Earth, momentum transport by dry convection, which ...

Aiko Voigt; Isaac M. Held; Jochem Marotzke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Evolution Dynamics of Tropical Ocean-Atmosphere Annual Cycle Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of ocean-atmosphere annual cycle variability is extracted from the revised Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set SSTs, surface winds, and the latent heat (LH) and net shortwave (SW) surface fluxes using the covariance-based ...

Sumant Nigam; Yi Chao

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Thermodynamic Foundation for Modeling the Moist Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With advances in numerical modeling of the atmosphere, we have experienced that the return to the first principles of physics often enables a model to cope more easily with the complexities of the real atmosphere. The return to the primitive ...

Katsuyuki V. Ooyama

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Systematic Metastable Atmospheric Regime Identification in an AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the authors apply a recently developed clustering method for the systematic identification of metastable atmospheric regimes in high-dimensional datasets generated by atmospheric models. The novelty of this approach is that it ...

Christian Franzke; Illia Horenko; Andrew J. Majda; Rupert Klein

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Time–Space Distribution of Long-Range Atmospheric Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global three-dimensional structure of long-range (one month to one season) atmospheric predictability was investigated with a general circulation model. The main focus was to ascertain the role of atmospheric initial conditions for such ...

Thomas Reichler; John O. Roads

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Title On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012...

380

The Dry-Entropy Budget of a Moist Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The entropy budget has been a popular starting point for theories of the work, or dissipation, performed by moist atmospheres. For a dry atmosphere, the entropy budget provides a theory for the dissipation in terms of the imposed diabatic heat ...

David M. Romps

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

TOGA COARE: The Coupled Ocean—Atmosphere Response Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite significant progress in the Tropical Ocean—Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program, a number of major hurdles remain before the primary objective, prediction of the variability of the coupled ocean—atmosphere system on time scales of months to ...

Peter J. Webster; Roger Lukas

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Predictability Associated with Nonlinear Regimes in an Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric regimes are midlatitude flow patterns that persist for periods of time exceeding a few days. Here, the authors analyzed the output of an idealized atmospheric model (QG3) to examine the relationship between regimes and predictability.

John M. Peters; Sergey Kravtsov; Nicholas T. Schwartz

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Acoustic Tomographic Monitoring of the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic tomography is proposed as a method for monitoring near-surface atmospheric temperature and wind velocity fields. Basic issues relating to the feasibility and implementation of atmospheric tomography are discussed. Among these issues are ...

D. Keith Wilson; Dennis W. Thomson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Destabilization of the Thermohaline Circulation by Atmospheric Eddy Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple proem models have been developed to investigate the role of atmosphere-ocean feedbacks in the stability of the current mode of the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic. A positive feedback between the meridional atmospheric ...

Mototaka Nakamura; Peter H. Stone; Jochem Marotzke

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Estimates of Meridional Atmosphere and Ocean Heat Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New estimates of the poleward energy transport based on atmospheric reanalyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Julie M. Caron

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Structure of the Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate water vapor transport in an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium, a simplified dynamical convection model (DCM) was constructed that explicitly models moist convection and longwave radiation in a gray atmosphere. In the ...

Yoshiharu Iwasa; Yutaka Abe; Hiroshi Tanaka

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Interannual Variability of Land-Atmosphere Coupling Strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies in the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) established a framework to estimate the extent to which anomalies in the land surface state (e.g., soil moisture) can affect rainfall generation and other atmospheric ...

Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer

388

Atmospheric Solar Heating Rate in the Water Vapor Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmosphere is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Atmospheric Icing Climatologies of Two New England Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric icing climatologies of two New England mountaintops with different elevations are compared: Mount Mansfield in northern Vermont and Mount Washington in New Hampshire. Atmospheric icing, as measured with Rosemount ice detectors, is ...

Charles C. Ryerson

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Estimating Intensity of Atmospheric Ice Accretion on Stationary Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of various atmospheric parameters in determining atmospheric ice accretion intensity on structures near the ground is examined theoretically, with an emphasis on glaze formation. Methods are presented for calculating the icing rate on ...

Lasse Makkonen

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Direct Atmospheric Forcing of Geostrophic Eddies. Part II: Coherence Maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of stochastic atmospheric forcing of quasigeostrophic eddies is applied to calculate coherence maps, that is, the coherence between the oceanic response at one location and the atmospheric forcing at another location as a function of ...

Angelika Lippert; Peter Müller

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Variational Objective Analysis for Atmospheric Field Programs: A Model Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the variational objective analysis (VOA) for producing realistic diagnoses of atmospheric field program data. Simulations from the Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere ...

D. E. Waliser; J. A. Ridout; S. Xie; M. Zhang

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Coupled Atmosphere–Biophysics–Hydrology Models for Environmental Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation and implementation of LEAF-2, the Land Ecosystem–Atmosphere Feedback model, which comprises the representation of land–surface processes in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), is described. LEAF-2 is a prognostic ...

Robert L. Walko; Larry E. Band; Jill Baron; Timothy G. F. Kittel; Richard Lammers; Tsengdar J. Lee; Dennis Ojima; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Chris Taylor; Christina Tague; Craig J. Tremback; Pier Luigi Vidale

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Implications of the Hydrostatic Assumption on Atmospheric Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The validity of the hydrostatic approximation is examined for use in predicting the dynamics of topographically generated atmospheric gravity waves (lee waves) propagating in an atmosphere with realistic wind shear. To isolate nonhydrostatic ...

Teddie L. Keller

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer. Part I: Instrument Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer has been developed to measure the atmospheric downwelling infrared radiance spectrum at the earth's surface with high absolute accuracy. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) ...

R. O. Knuteson; H. E. Revercomb; F. A. Best; N. C. Ciganovich; R. G. Dedecker; T. P. Dirkx; S. C. Ellington; W. F. Feltz; R. K. Garcia; H. B. Howell; W. L. Smith; J. F. Short; D. C. Tobin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvénic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

397

Accuracy of Atmospheric Angular Momentum Estimates from Operational Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern, high resolution atmospheric and geodetic data are finding increasing use in geophysical studies of the angular momentum balance of the earth-atmosphere system. Such studies require knowledge of the level of uncertainty associated with ...

Richard D. Rosen; Dayid A. Salstein; Alvin J. Miller; Klaus Arpe

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Multiscale Low-Frequency Circulation Modes in the Global Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, fundamental multiscale circulation modes in the global atmosphere are identified with the objective of providing better understanding of atmospheric low-frequency variabilities over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. With ...

K-M. Lau; P-J. Sheu; I-S. Kang

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Global Thermohaline Circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with Interactive Atmospheric Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid coupled ocean–atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean ...

Xiaoli Wang; Peter H. Stone; Jochem Marotzke

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fourier transform method for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose Fourier transform (FT) method for processing images of extensive air showers (EAS) detected by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) used in the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. The method is based on the discrete Fourier transforms (DFT) on compact Lie groups, and the use of continuous extension of the inverse discrete transforms to approximate the discrete EAS images by continuous EAS brightness distribution functions. Here we describe the FT-method in case of SU(3) group. It allows practical realization of the DFT technique for functions sampled on hexagonal symmetry grids. The proposed method can also be implemented in case of IACT cameras with grids of rectangular symmetry by using the DFT on the SU(2)xSU(2) group. The proposed FT-method is applied to the Monte-Carlo simulated bank of TeV proton and gamma-ray EAS images for a stand-alone telescope. Comparing between the FT-method and the currently used standard method shows that the FT technique allows a better and systematic enhancement of the gamma-ray signal. The relative difference between these two methods becomes more profound especially for `photon poor' images. It suggests that the EAS detection thresholds of IACTs could be effectively reduced with the use of FT technique. This prediction is further supported by a significant noise suppression capability of the method using simple low-pass filters in the image frequency domain. The FT-method allows very deep `tail' (and `height') image cuts, differentiation of images, operations in the image frequency domain, etc., that can be used for development of new effective parameters for the EAS image processing.

A. Atoyan; J. Patera; V. Sahakian; A. Akpherjanian

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

402

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Velocity June 5-6, 2012 Jeremy Rishel Bruce Napier Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses: GENII Today's Presentation.... Will provide a high-level overview of the GENII codes. Will cover basic aspects of GENII's acute atmospheric transport model. Will review the GENII deposition model that is used to estimate the deposition velocity used in plume depletion. 2 GENII Development History 1988 - GENII V1 released ICRP-26/30/48 dosimetry 1990 - GENII V1.485 stabilized Current DOE Toolbox Version 1992 - GENII-S stochastic version 2004 - GENII V2 ICRP-72 age-dependent dosimetry Federal Guidance Report 13 risk factors

403

Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA NOAA About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder houses the Earth System Research Lab, which supports a "reforecasting" project. The initiative involves running several decades of historical

404

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

405

Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Transient phenomena in the solar atmosphere and solar wind  

SciTech Connect

Observations of transient disturbances in the solar atmosphere are reviewed with emphasis on coronal mass ejection events. (JFP)

Gosling, J.T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2011 Calendar Day

408

Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2009 Calendar Day

409

Year/PAD District Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation Vacuum Cracking Thermal Catalytic Cracking Fresh Recycled Catalytic Hydro- Cracking Catalytic Reforming Desulfurization...

410

Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Hydrogen Storage in Materials: Theory and Experiment. Presentation Title, Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory and ...

411

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

413

West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

414

Puerto Rico Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

415

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

416

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

417

U.S. Refinery Operating Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Operating Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

418

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

419

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

420

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

SciTech Connect

Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nucleation and Growth of Atmospheric Particles  

SciTech Connect

New particle formation (NPF) in the atmospheric is a two-step process: Nucleation leads to the birth of stable nuclei that subsequently grow to sizes that can be detected and affect the atmosphere’s radiative properties. Our group is studying both of these processes. Our nucleation research is largely supported by NSF and involves measurements of neutral molecular clusters formed by nucleation with a new custom-designed mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS) and measurements of nanoparticle size distributions as small as 1 nm with a new aerosol spectrometer (the DEG SMPS). These measurements are providing new insights into aspects of cluster behavior that affect nucleation rates. The U.S. DOE supports our research on nanoparticle growth rates. This research couples physical and chemical measurements of aerosol properties and behavior. The TDCIMS, which enables real-time measurements of composition for freshly nucleated particles as small as 8 nm and was developed with support from DOE, is the most important tool in this work. Our most important discoveries about processes that affect growth rates are summarized in a recent PNAS article (doi:10.1073/pnas.0912127107). In short, this work has shown that alkylammonium-carboxylate salts, formed, for example, by reactions between amines and carboxylic acids, account for 20–50% of the mass of freshly nucleated particles in locations that include Atlanta, Mexico City, Boulder, and Hyytiälä, while sulfates account for only about 10%. These newly discovered compounds help to explain the high growth rates of freshly nucleated particles that have been observed around the globe and help to explain why nucleation is an important atmospheric process, not just a scientific curiosity. Our poster will provide an overview of this work.

McMurry, P.; Kuang, C.; Barsanti, K.; Eisele, F.; Friedli, H.; Scheckman, J.; Titcombe, M.; Williams, B.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method does not need energy, the second needs a small amount. Moreover, in variant (1) the freshwater has a high pressure (>30 or more atm.) and can be used for production of energy such as electricity and in that way the freshwater cost is lower. For increasing the productivity the seawater is injected into air and solar air heater may be used. The solar air heater produces a huge amount of electricity as a very powerful electricity generation plant. The offered electricity installation in 100 - 200 times cheaper than any common electric plant of equivalent output. Key words: Extraction freshwater, method of getting freshwater, receiving energy from atmosphere, powerful renewal electric plant.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

INO as atmospheric and magic baseline detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a status report on the proposed India?based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We focus on the physics studies possible with an iron calorimeter detector (ICAL) at INO. Such a detector would make precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters with atmospheric neutrinos in the first phase with the possibility of acting as a far?end detector of a future neutrino factory or beta beam. This talk was given at the 12th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories

D. Indumathi; The INO Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Total atmospheric emissivities for a tropical climate  

SciTech Connect

The total atmospheric flux emissivities as a function of water vapor optical depth are reported for meteorological condtions in Thailand. The water vapor optical depth was first calculated as a function of height up to 12 km from the annual average upper air pressures, temperature, and dew points at Bangkok. The flux emissivity was then computed using tabulated data for the flux emissivities of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone at 20/sup 0/C. (SPH)

Exell, R.H.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Natural Aerosols in the Global Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 N?ar det kjem til stykket ?Ar ut og ?ar inn har du site bøygd yver bøkene, du har samla deg meir kunnskap enn du treng til ni liv. N?ar det kjem til stykket, er det so lite som skal til, og det vesle har hjarta alltid visst. I Egypt hadde guden for lærdom hovud som ei ape. Olav H. HaugeNatural aerosols in the global atmosphere

Alf Grini; Alf Grini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Flammability Characteristics of Hydrogen and Its Mixtures with Light Hydrocarbons at Atmospheric and Sub-atmospheric Pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of flammability limits is essential in the prevention of fire and explosion. There are two limits of flammability, upper flammability limit (UFL) and lower flammability limit (LFL), which define the flammable region of a combustible gas/vapor. This research focuses on the flammability limits of hydrogen and its binary mixtures with light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, n-butane, and ethylene) at sub-atmospheric pressures. The flammability limits of hydrogen, light hydrocarbons, and binary mixtures of hydrogen and each hydrocarbon were determined experimentally at room temperature (20ºC) and initial pressures ranging from 1.0 atm to 0.1 atm. The experiments were conducted in a closed cylindrical stainless steel vessel with upward flame propagation. It was found that the flammable region of hydrogen initially widens when the pressure decreases from 1.0 atm to 0.3 atm, then narrows with the further decrease of pressure. In contrast, the flammable regions of the hydrocarbons narrow when the pressure decreases. For hydrogen and the hydrocarbons, pressure has a much greater impact on the UFLs than on the LFLs. For binary mixtures of hydrogen and the hydrocarbons, the flammable regions of all mixtures widen when the fraction of hydrogen in the mixture increases. When the pressure decreases, the flammable regions of all mixtures narrow. The applications of Le Chatelier’s rule and the Calculated Adiabatic Flame Temperature (CAFT) model to the flammability limits of the mixtures were verified. It was found that Le Chatelier’s rule could predict the flammability limits much better than the CAFT model. The adiabatic flame temperatures (AFTs), an important parameter in the risk assessment of fire and explosion, of hydrogen and the hydrocarbons were also calculated. The influence of sub-atmospheric pressures on the AFTs was investigated. A linear relationship between the AFT and the corresponding flammability limit is derived. Furthermore, the consequence of fire relating to hydrogen and the hydrocarbons is discussed based on the AFTs of the chemicals.

Le, Thuy Minh Hai

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques M *Corresponding author: ayman.al-falou@isen.fr Underwater target detection is investigated by combining active. This experimentally study illustrates the potential of polarization imaging for underwater target detection and opens

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos High School L Al NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Presented at the PPPL Colloquium Sept. 17, 2008 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA LA-UR-08-06284 Outline of this talk *A discussion of ball lightning reports in nature *How can ball plasmas be made in the laboratory? *Detailed experiments on long lived free floating *Detailed experiments on long-lived free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas C i f l b b ll l i h "b ll *Comparison of laboratory ball plasmas with "ball lightning" *Summary U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA

430

Lightning, atmospheric electricity and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Temperature records indicate that a global warming of 0.5{minus}0.7{degrees}C has occurred over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). Whether this trend is a result of increased trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere, or simply a result of natural variability; is still not known. These temperature trends are derived from thousands of observations worldwide. However, these observations are concentrated largely over continental areas, and then mainly in the northern hemisphere`s populated regions. This northern hemisphere continental bias results in large uncertainties in estimates of global temperature trends. Due to the increasing evidence that the present buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may result in an additional global warming of 1-5{degrees}C by the year 2050 (IPCC, 1990), it is increasingly important to find afternative methods to monitor fluctuations in global surface temperatures. As shown by two recent studies (Williams, 1992; Price, 1993), the global atmospheric electric circuit may provide a promising afternative for monitoring future climate change.

Price, C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Program Operations Plan. Atmospheric Chemistry Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) was initiated in 1991 to coordinate DOE`s university and federal-laboratory atmospheric-chemistry research, and to focus these efforts on national and international information requirements in the atmospheric-chemistry field. This Program Operations Plan describes the structure and vision of the effort designed to fulfill these needs, and is divided into two major components. The first of these is a Strategic Plan, which outlines the ACP`s rationale, objectives, and vision, and describes its products that are anticipated over a future ten-year period. Although based on realistic appraisals of goals that are attainable given the financial, material, and intellectual resources of the ACP community, this Strategic Plan does not describe these resources themselves. The second component of the Program Operations Plan, the Implementation Plan, deals directly with these resource considerations. As such it focuses on practical implementation of Strategic-Plan elements at the individual research institutions, the anticipated scientific contributions of these groups, and their coordination within the ACP. In contrast to the Strategic Plan, this Implementation Plan extends only five years into the future.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Impact of biomass burning on the atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fire has played an important part in biogeochemical cycling throughout most of the history of our planet. Ice core studies have been very beneficial in paleoclimate studies and constraining the budgets of biogeochemical cycles through the past 160,000 years of the Vostok ice core. Although to date there has been no way of determining cause and effect, concentration of greenhouse gases directly correlates with temperature in ice core analyses. Recent ice core studies on Greenland have shown that significant climate change can be very rapid on the order of a decade. This chapter addresses the coupled evolution of our planet`s atmospheric composition and biomass burning. Special attention is paid to the chemical and climatic impacts of biomass burning on the atmosphere throughout the last century, specifically looking at the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Information from ice core measurements may be useful in understanding the history of fire and its historic affect on the composition of the atmosphere and climate.

Dignon, J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Clustering of Aerosols in Atmospheric Turbulent Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism of formation of small-scale inhomogeneities in spatial distributions of aerosols and droplets associated with clustering instability in the atmospheric turbulent flow is discussed. The particle clustering is a consequence of a spontaneous breakdown of their homogeneous space distribution due to the clustering instability, and is caused by a combined effect of the particle inertia and a finite correlation time of the turbulent velocity field. In this paper a theoretical approach proposed in Phys. Rev. E 66, 036302 (2002) is further developed and applied to investigate the mechanisms of formation of small-scale aerosol inhomogeneities in the atmospheric turbulent flow. The theory of the particle clustering instability is extended to the case when the particle Stokes time is larger than the Kolmogorov time scale, but is much smaller than the correlation time at the integral scale of turbulence. We determined the criterion of the clustering instability for the Stokes number larger than 1. We discussed applications of the analyzed effects to the dynamics of aerosols and droplets in the atmospheric turbulent flow.

T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; M. A. Liberman; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Seasonal Cycle of Atmospheric Heating and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the heating of the atmosphere is divided into a component due to direct solar absorption in the atmosphere and a component due to the flux of energy from the surface to the atmosphere via latent, sensible, and radiative heat ...

Aaron Donohoe; David S. Battisti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Improving the performance scalability of the community atmosphere model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), which serves as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), is the most computationally expensive CCSM component in typical configurations. On current and next-generation leadership class ... Keywords: CAM, atmospheric modeling, massively parallel computing, performance, scalability

Arthur A. Mirin; Patrick H. Worley

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Development of a 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model is established based on MODTRAN4. Moreover, the methods of calculating the ratio of atmospheric transmission, path radiation and single scattering solar radiation are presented. This 3D model is running by ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, atmospheric radiative transfer model, infrared radiation

Zhifeng Lu; Ge Li; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Foliar lead uptake by lettuce exposed to atmospheric fallouts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Foliar lead uptake by lettuce exposed to atmospheric fallouts Gaëlle Uzu, Sophie Sobanska of foliar uptake of lead by lettuce (lactuca sativa) exposed to the atmospheric fallouts of a lead Pb-rich fallouts are studied. INTRODUCTION Particles emitted in the atmosphere present a large

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Foliar Lead Uptake by Lettuce Exposed to Atmospheric Fallouts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foliar Lead Uptake by Lettuce Exposed to Atmospheric Fallouts G A ¨E L L E U Z U , S O P H I E S O) exposed to the atmospheric fallouts of a lead-recycling plant were studied. After43daysofexposure area, they can strongly impact the biosphere (7, 8). At the global scale, fallouts of atmospheric PM

Mailhes, Corinne

440

Searching for spacetime granularity: analyzing a concrete experimental setup  

SciTech Connect

In this work we show that the spin pendulum techniques developed by the Eoet-Wash group could be used to put very stringent bounds on the free parameters of a Lorentz invariant phenomenological model of quantum gravity. The model is briefly described as well as the experimental setup that we have in mind.

Bonder, Yuri; Sudarsky, Daniel [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCN activation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 5241-precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9, 3223-particles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009, 9, A. P.

Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

DETERMINATION OF CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deuteron irradiation of an atmospheric aerosol sample.CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEARCARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR

Clemenson, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH FY-1979, CHAPTER IN THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California atmospheric aerosols," Environ. Sci. Technol. ll•suspensions," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,formation," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Experimental economics and experimental computer science: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In surprisingly many computer science research projects, system outcomes may be influenced by computerized or human agents with different economic incentives. Such studies include P2P networks, routing protocols, agent systems, and attacker-defender ... Keywords: experimental economics, experimental methodology, human subjects

Jens Grossklags

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Coastal Atmospheric Circulation around an Idealized Cape during Wind-Driven Upwelling Studied from a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study analyzes atmospheric circulation around an idealized coastal cape during summertime upwelling-favorable wind conditions simulated by a mesoscale coupled ocean–atmosphere model. The domain resembles an eastern ocean boundary with a ...

Natalie Perlin; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Response of a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: Sensitivity to the Rate of Increase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled ocean–atmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant ...

Ronald J. Stouffer; Syukuro Manabe

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Multiple-Century Response of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to an Increase of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To speculate on the future change of climate over several centuries, three 500-year integrations of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model were performed. In addition to the standard integration in which the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide ...

Syukuro Manabe; Ronald J. Stouffer

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Near-Continuous Profiling of Temperature, Moisture, and Atmospheric Stability Using the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) has funded the development and installation of five ground-based atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) systems at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ...

W. F. Feltz; W. L. Smith; H. B. Howell; R. O. Knuteson; H. Woolf; H. E. Revercomb

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

High-Resolution Atmospheric Sensing of Multiple Atmospheric Variables Using the DataHawk Small Airborne Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DataHawk small airborne measurement system provides in situ atmospheric measurement capabilities for documenting scales as small as 1 m and can access reasonably large volumes in and above the atmospheric boundary layer at low cost. The design ...

Dale A. Lawrence; Ben B. Balsley

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Central U.S. Atmospheric Water and Energy Budgets Adjusted for Diurnal Sampling Biases Using Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water and energy budgets of the atmospheric column over the Mississippi River basin are estimated using 18 yr (1976–93) of twice-daily radiosonde observations, top-of-atmosphere net radiation estimates from the Earth Radiation Budget ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Guido D. Salvucci; Dara Entekhabi

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique. The new JILA "frequency comb spectroscopy" technique ...

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

452

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

453

Atmospheric Hydrology of the Anomalous 2002 Indian Summer Monsoon Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Hydrology of the Anomalous 2002 Indian Summer Monsoon J. FASULLO Program in Atmospheric, in final form 7 April 2005) ABSTRACT The 2002 Indian summer monsoon season is unique because of its in which ENSO events fail to be associated with significant monsoon anomalies. In this study, atmospheric

Fasullo, John

454

ATMO 642 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere Jan. 17, 2012 ATMO 642: Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATMO 642 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere Jan. 17, 2012 ATMO 642: Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere. 15 % Exam 1 15 % Exam 2 15 % Exam 3 30 % Homework/In class exercises 25 % Project #12;ATMO 642 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere Jan. 17, 2012 Project: We are going to have a semester long research project

Peterson, Blake R.

455

Atmospheric performance of the special-purpose Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thin-airfoil family  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), in cooperation with SeaWest Energy Group, has completed extensive atmospheric testing of the special-purpose SERI thin-airfoil family during the 1990 wind season. The purpose of this test program was to experimentally verify the predicted performance characteristics of the thin-airfoil family on a geometrically optimized blade, and to compare it to original-equipment blades under atmospheric wind conditions. The tests were run on two identical Micon 65/13 horizontal-axis wind turbines installed side-by-side in a wind farm. The thin-airfoil family 7.96 m blades were installed on one turbine, and AeroStar 7.41 m blades were installed on the other. This paper presents final performance results of the side-by-side comparative field test for both clean and dirty blade conditions. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Tangler, J; Smith, B; Jager, D; Olsen, T

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

NCS security experimentation using DETER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous efforts are underway to develop testing and experimentation tools to evaluate the performance of networked control systems (NCS) and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. These tools offer varying levels of fidelity and scale. ... Keywords: experimentation, network security, robust control

Alefiya Hussain; Saurabh Amin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Setup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the experimental setup of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR thermosyphon prototype cooling system. A nitrogen thermosyphon prototype of such a system has been built and tested at PNNL. This document presents the experimental setup of the prototype that successfully demonstrated the heat transfer performance of the system.

Reid, Douglas J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Munley, John T.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

HOT METHANE LINE LISTS FOR EXOPLANET AND BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

We present comprehensive experimental line lists of methane (CH{sub 4}) at high temperatures obtained by recording Fourier transform infrared emission spectra. Calibrated line lists are presented for the temperatures 300-1400 Degree-Sign C at twelve 100 Degree-Sign C intervals spanning the 960-5000 cm{sup -1} (2.0-10.4 {mu}m) region of the infrared. This range encompasses the dyad, pentad, and octad regions, i.e., all fundamental vibrational modes along with a number of combination, overtone and hot bands. Using our CH{sub 4} spectra, we have estimated empirical lower state energies (E{sub low} in cm{sup -1}) and our values have been incorporated into the line lists along with line positions ({nu}-bar in cm{sup -1}) and calibrated line intensities (S' in cm molecule{sup -1}). We expect our hot CH{sub 4} line lists to find direct application in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and brown dwarfs.

Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Beale, Christopher A.; Michaux, Laurent; Irfan, Melis, E-mail: rjh135@york.ac.uk, E-mail: cbeale@odu.edu, E-mail: lm595@york.ac.uk, E-mail: melis.irfan@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

459

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.

Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Free radicals induced in aqueous solution by non-contact atmospheric-pressure cold plasma  

SciTech Connect

To understand plasma-induced chemical processing in liquids, we investigated the formation of free radicals in aqueous solution exposed to different types of non-contact atmospheric-pressure helium plasma using the spin-trapping technique. Both hydroxyl radical (OH{center_dot}) and superoxide anion radical (O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot}) adducts were observed when neutral oxygen gas was additionally supplied to the plasma. In particular, O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} can be dominantly induced in the solution via oxygen flow into the afterglow gas of helium plasma. This type of plasma treatment can potentially be used in medical applications to control infectious diseases, because the O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} is crucial for sterilization of liquids via atmospheric-pressure plasma.

Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ono, Yusuke; Kitano, Katsuhisa [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ikawa, Satoshi [Technology Research Institute of Osaka Prefecture, Izumi, Osaka 594-1157 (Japan)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New Developments in LC-MS and Other Hyphenated Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Extensive challenges faced by analytical chemists in studying real world complex samples such as biological body fluids, tissue samples, environmental and geological samples have lead to the development of advanced analytical approaches. The vast array of contemporary technologies can be categorized into two major areas: sample separation and mass spectrometry analysis. Current state-of-the-art sample separation methods include gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, ultra high pressure liquid chromatography, solid phase extraction, capillary electrophoresis, and gas phase separation techniques such as ion mobility spectrometry. The recent trend in sample separation is to combine (or hyphenate) multiple techniques that employ different separation mechanisms to maximize separation efficiency. The most widely used combinations include two-dimensional gas chromatography, strong cation exchange or weak cation exchange chromatography followed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, two-dimensional reversed-phase liquid chromatography, liquid chromatography followed by ion mobility spectrometry and two-dimensional electrophoresis techniques. The introduction of atmospheric pressure ionization techniques such as electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and variations of the two have drastically increased the impact of mass spectrometry on bioanalytical applications. Mass spectrometry itself has tremendously improved over the years in terms of sensitivity, detection limits, dynamic range and sequencing capabilities. Currently, mass spectrometers can attain zeptomolole detection limits with five orders of magnitude dynamic range. In this chapter, we summarize recent developments in hyphenated techniques and their applications to complex sample analysis.

Belov, Mikhail E.; Kurulugama, Ruwan T.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Baker, Erin Shammel

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Geomagnetic effects on atmospheric Cerenkov images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes are used to detect electromagnetic showers from primary gamma rays of energy ~300 GeV - ~10 TeV and to discriminate these from cascades due to hadrons using the Cerenkov images. The geomagnetic field affects the development of showers and is shown to diffuse and distort the images. When the component of the field normal to the shower axis is sufficiently large (> 0.4 G) the performance of gamma ray telescopes may be affected, although corrections should be possible.

P. M. Chadwick; K. Lyons; T. J. L. McComb; K. J. Orford; J. L. Osborne; S. M. Rayner; I. D. Roberts; S. E. Shaw; K. E. Turver

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles (2.1 nm average diameter) at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2 and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes mounted on a specially designed specimen rod. Gas flow occurred through plastic tubing from the outside of the microscope to the specimen region and back. Gold nanoparticles of a full width half maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise and the achieved resolution was 0.5 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

De Jonge, Niels [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Bigelow, Wilbur C [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nuclear Test-Experimental Science: Annual report, fiscal year 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiscal year 1988 has been a significant, rewarding, and exciting period for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's nuclear testing program. It was significant in that the Laboratory's new director chose to focus strongly on the program's activities and to commit to a revitalized emphasis on testing and the experimental science that underlies it. It was rewarding in that revolutionary new measurement techniques were fielded on recent important and highly complicated underground nuclear tests with truly incredible results. And it was exciting in that the sophisticated and fundamental problems of weapons science that are now being addressed experimentally are yielding new challenges and understanding in ways that stimulate and reward the brightest and best of scientists. During FY88 the program was reorganized to emphasize our commitment to experimental science. The name of the program was changed to reflect this commitment, becoming the Nuclear Test-Experimental Science (NTES) Program.

Struble, G.L.; Donohue, M.L.; Bucciarelli, G.; Hymer, J.D.; Kirvel, R.D.; Middleton, C.; Prono, J.; Reid, S.; Strack, B. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Development of techniques for quantum-enhanced laser-interferometric gravitational-wave detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed theoretical and experimental study of techniques necessary for quantum-enhanced laser- interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detectors was carried out. The basic theory of GWs and laser-interferometric GW ...

Goda, Keisuke

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modeling Minority-Carrier Lifetime Techniques That Use Transient Excess-Carrier Decay: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lifetime spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the characterization of PV materials. This paper combines modeling and experimental results to illustrate the injection-level dependent response of three transient excess-carrier decay techniques.

Johnston, S. W.; Berman, G. M.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Atmospheric CO2 Records fFrom Sites Operated by the Fraunhofer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric Environment Research Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany Wank Peak, Germany Zugspitze, Germany Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric...

469

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: A Bootstrap Technique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale Radar Observations of Cloud Occurrence and Large-Scale Atmospheric Fields Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Beagley, Nathaniel Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Limitations in the ability of Global Climate Models (GCMs) to predict clouds create significant uncertainties in predicting and understanding climate. Comparison studies have demonstrated that clouds are among the largest source of uncertainty in global climate model simulations [Cess et al., 1990; Potter and Cess, 2003]. Comparisons of model output and observational data generally require averaging (or aggregating) the observations in an attempt to put them on the same large spatial scale as

470

Experimental Investigations of Ice in Supercooled Clouds. Part II: Scavenging of an Insoluble Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study of aerosol scavenging by ice growing in supercooled clouds was conducted with a continuous flow cloud chamber. Techniques for detecting insoluble (latex) submicron particles in individual ice crystals were developed. The ...

Naihui Song; Dennis Lamb

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Emerging Technology for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosol Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Laboratory and with funding from the DOE STTR program. DMT is developing a new technique for measuring aerosol size distributions in the sub-0.1 um size range. The...

472

Linear Anelastic Equations for Atmospheric Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear anelastic-vortex model is derived using assumptions appropriate to waves on vortices with scales similar to tropical cyclones. The equation set is derived through application of a multiple-scaling technique, such that the radial ...

Daniel Hodyss; David S. Nolan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

HPLC Determination of Atmospheric Organic Hydroperoxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical technique has been developed for the separation of hydrogen peroxide and low molecular weight organic hydroperoxides. A total of 10 C1–C3 organic hydroperoxides have been separated. The ...

Gregory L. Kok; Scott E. McLaren; Thomas A. Stafflbach

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Combustion characteristics and influential factors of isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental study on the isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion (ATAC) which is assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane. The active-thermal atmosphere is created by low- and high-temperature reactions of n-heptane which is injected at intake port, and isooctane is directly injected into combustion chamber near the top dead center. The effects of isooctane injection timing, active-thermal atmosphere intensity, overall equivalence ratio, and premixed ratio on combustion characteristics and emissions are investigated. The experimental results reveal that, the isooctane ignition and combustion can be classified to thermal atmosphere combustion, active atmosphere combustion, and active-thermal atmosphere combustion respectively according to the extent of n-heptane oxidation as well as effects of isooctane quenching and charge cooling. n-Heptane equivalence ratio, isooctane equivalence ratio and isooctane delivery advance angle are major control parameters. In one combustion cycle, the isooctane ignited and burned after those of n-heptane, and then this combustion phenomenon can also be named as dual-fuel sequential combustion (DFSC). The ignition timing of the overall combustion event is mainly determined by n-heptane equivalence ratio and can be controlled in flexibility by simultaneously adjusting isooctane equivalence ratio. The isooctane ignition regime, overall thermal efficiency, and NO{sub x} emissions show strong sensitivity to the fuel delivery advance angle between 20 CA BTDC and 25 CA BTDC. (author)

Lu, Xingcai; Ji, Libin; Ma, Junjun; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Huang, Zhen [Key Lab. for Power Machinery and Engineering of MOE, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Propagation of B mesons in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collisions of cosmic rays in the atmosphere may produce heavy hadrons of very high energy. The decay length of a $B$ meson of energy above $10^7$ GeV is larger than 1 km, implying that such a particle tends to interact in the air before it decays. We show that the fraction of energy deposited in these interactions is much smaller than in proton and pion collisions. We parameterize their elasticity and determine the average number of interactions and the atmospheric depth at the decay point for different initial energies. We find that the profile of a $3\\times 10^9$ GeV bottom shower may be very different from the profile of a proton shower of the same energy, defining either a very deep maximum, or two maxima, or other features that cannot be parameterized with a single Gaisser-Hillas function. Finally, we discuss under what conditions a bottom hadron inside the parent air shower may provide observable effects.

A. Bueno; A. Gascon; J. I. Illana; M. Masip

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Control and supervision of a complex production process using hybrid systems techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New processing activities for the decommissioning of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II are being carried out at Argonne National Laboratory. The task addressed in this paper is a process to convert metallic sodium to sodium carbonate. The main idea ... Keywords: Argonne National Laboratory, Experimental Breeder Reactor II, complex production process supervision, fission reactor core control, fission research reactors, hybrid control solution, hybrid system techniques, hybrid systems techniques, metallic sodium, nuclear engineering computing, sodium carbonate

H. E. Garcia

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Synoptic Variability of Ocean–Atmosphere Turbulent Fluxes Associated with Atmospheric Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synoptic-scale variability in the air–sea turbulent fluxes in the areas of midlatitudinal western boundary currents is analyzed. In the Gulf Stream area, ocean–atmosphere fluxes on synoptic time- and space scales are clearly coordinated with the ...

Olga Zolina; Sergey K. Gulev

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Category:Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A Active Seismic Techniques 2 pages P Passive Seismic Techniques 2 pages Pages in category "Seismic Techniques" The following 2...

479

Definition: Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the subsurface through the measurement...

480

Category:Data Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Data Techniques page? For detailed information on Data Techniques...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmosphere experimental techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Photovoltaic I-V curve measurement techniques  

SciTech Connect

Performance evaluation of photovoltaic (PV) arrays under actual field conditions provides important feedback to the module design process. One of the principal methods for assessing an array's performance is to plot its current, I, versus voltage, V, curve. Following a brief review of techniques for measuring the I-V curve, a new, capacitive-based approach is presented. It uses a rapid sweep of the I-V curve that substantially reduces the average power transfer between array and load, and in turn, substantially reduces the size and weight of the curve tracer. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the approach are presented for a 10-kW unit. Performance is verified by comparison with I-V curves obtained by using a conventional load. The agreement is found to be excellent. Approximately an order of magnitude reduction in size, weight and power consumption over conventional units was realized with the experimental I-V curve tracer.

Cox, C.H.; Warner, T.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Quadrupole Magnetic Center Definition Using the Hall Probe Measurement Technique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quadrupole Magnetic Center Definition Quadrupole Magnetic Center Definition Using the Hall Probe Measurement Technique Isaac Vasserman Experimental Facility Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory 1. Introduction The linac coherent light source [LCLS] project [1] requires 5 µm straightness of the particle beam trajectory to achieve the desired goal of x-ray multiplication. The main source of beam trajectory distortion is misalignment of quadrupoles. The LCLS project will use a beam-based alignment technique to align the quadrupoles to the needed accuracy. An initial accuracy of the quadrupole alignment not worse than 50 µm is required [2]. A different technique could be used for this purpose. It would be though quite desirable to avoid using an additional magnetic measurement technique and to use

484

Twistor inspired techniques in QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I present a short review of the new twistor inspired techniques in perturbative QCD, which are the result of Witten's conjecture of a duality between twistors and string theory. I give an introduction to the main two tree-level techniques, the BCFW recursion and the CSW formalism, and show how the idea of using on-shell QCD amplitudes evaluated for complex momenta can lead to efficient techniques to perform analytic computations. Finally, I briefly discuss how these ideas can be applied to loop calculations if they are combined to the generalized unitarity approach.

Duhr, C. [Center for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

485

Fundamentals and Techniques of Nonimaging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report describing a long term basic research program in nonimaging optics that has led to major advances in important areas, including solar energy, fiber optics, illumination techniques, light detectors, and a great many other applications. The term ''nonimaging optics'' refers to the optics of extended sources in systems for which image forming is not important, but effective and efficient collection, concentration, transport, and distribution of light energy is. Although some of the most widely known developments of the early concepts have been in the field of solar energy, a broad variety of other uses have emerged. Most important, under the auspices of this program in fundamental research in nonimaging optics established at the University of Chicago with support from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences at the Department of Energy, the field has become very dynamic, with new ideas and concepts continuing to develop, while applications of the early concepts continue to be pursued. While the subject began as part of classical geometrical optics, it has been extended subsequently to the wave optics domain. Particularly relevant to potential new research directions are recent developments in the formalism of statistical and wave optics, which may be important in understanding energy transport on the nanoscale. Nonimaging optics permits the design of optical systems that achieve the maximum possible concentration allowed by physical conservation laws. The earliest designs were constructed by optimizing the collection of the extreme rays from a source to the desired target: the so-called ''edge-ray'' principle. Later, new concentrator types were generated by placing reflectors along the flow lines of the ''vector flux'' emanating from lambertian emitters in various geometries. A few years ago, a new development occurred with the discovery that making the design edge-ray a functional of some other system parameter permits the construction of whole new classes of devices with greatly expanded capabilities compared to conventional approaches. These ''tailored edge-ray'' designs have dramatically broadened the range of geometries in which nonimaging optics can provide a significant performance improvement. Considerable progress continues to be made in furthering the incorporation of nonimaging secondaries into practical high concentration and ultra-high concentration solar collector systems. In parallel with the continuing development of nonimaging geometrical optics, our group has been working to develop an understanding of certain fundamental physical optics concepts in the same context. In particular, our study of the behavior of classical radiance in nonimaging systems, has revealed some fundamentally important new understandings that we have pursued both theoretically and experimentally. The field is still relatively new and is rapidly gaining widespread recognition because it fuels many industrial applications. Because of this, during the final years of the project, our group at Chicago has been working more closely with a team of industrial scientists from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) at first informally, and later more formally, beginning in 1998, under a formal program initiated by the Department of Energy and incrementally funded through this existing grant. This collaboration has been very fruitful and has led to new conceptual breakthroughs which have provided the foundation for further exciting growth. Many of these concepts are described in some detail in the report.

O'Gallagher, J. J.; Winston, R.

2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

486

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

487

ARM - Field Campaign - Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment govCampaignsLower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment Campaign Links LABLE Website Related Campaigns 2013 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2013.05.28, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment 2012.09.17 - 2012.11.13 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Boundary layer turbulence is an important process that is parameterized in most atmospheric numerical models. Turbulence redistributes energy and mass within the boundary layer. Many different characteristics can impact the character of turbulence in the boundary layer, including different surface types, horizontal wind speed and direction, and the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. However, there have been few studies that have

488

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

489

Energy Spectra, Altitude Profiles and Charge Ratios of Atmospheric Muons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of air shower muons made during atmospheric ascent of the High Energy Antimatter Telescope balloon experiment. The muon charge ratio mu+ / mu- is presented as a function of atmospheric depth in the momentum interval 0.3-0.9 GeV/c. The differential mu- momentum spectra are presented between 0.3 and about 50 GeV/c at atmospheric depths between 13 and 960 g/cm^2. We compare our measurements with other recent data and with Monte Carlo calculations of the same type as those used in predicting atmospheric neutrino fluxes. We find that our measured mu- fluxes are smaller than the predictions by as much as 70% at shallow atmospheric depths, by about 20% at the depth of shower maximum, and are in good agreement with the predictions at greater depths. We explore the consequences of this on the question of atmospheric neutrino production.

S. Coutu; J. J. Beatty; M. A. DuVernois; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; A. Labrador; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; C. Chaput; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; S. L. Nutter; G. A. deNolfo

2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

490

CHEMISTRY OF SILICATE ATMOSPHERES OF EVAPORATING SUPER-EARTHS  

SciTech Connect

We model the formation of silicate atmospheres on hot volatile-free super-Earths. Our calculations assume that all volatile elements such as H, C, N, S, and Cl have been lost from the planet. We find that the atmospheres are composed primarily of Na, O{sub 2}, O, and SiO gas, in order of decreasing abundance. The atmospheric composition may be altered by fractional vaporization, cloud condensation, photoionization, and reaction with any residual volatile elements remaining in the atmosphere. Cloud condensation reduces the abundance of all elements in the atmosphere except Na and K. We speculate that large Na and K clouds such as those observed around Mercury and Io may surround hot super-Earths. These clouds would occult much larger fractions of the parent star than a closely bound atmosphere, and may be observable through currently available methods.

Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce, E-mail: laura_s@levee.wustl.ed, E-mail: bfegley@levee.wustl.ed [Planetary Chemistry Laboratory, McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis, MO 63130-4899 (United States)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Ranges of Atmospheric Mass and Composition of Super Earth Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Terrestrial-like exoplanets may obtain atmospheres from three primary sources: Capture of nebular gases, degassing during accretion, and degassing from subsequent tectonic activity. Here we model degassing during accretion to estimate the range of atmospheric mass and composition on exoplanets ranging from 1 to 30 Earth masses. We use bulk compositions drawn from primitive and differentiated meteorite compositions. Degassing alone can create a wide range of masses of planetary atmospheres, ranging from less than a percent of the planet's total mass up to ~6 mass% of hydrogen, ~20 mass% of water, and/or ~5 mass% of carbon compounds. Hydrogen-rich atmospheres can be outgassed as a result of oxidizing metallic iron with water, and excess water and carbon can produce atmospheres through simple degassing. As a byproduct of our atmospheric outgassing models we find that modest initial water contents (10 mass% of the planet and above) create planets with deep surface liquid water oceans soon after accretion is complete.

L. Elkins-Tanton; S. Seager

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

492

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii The graphs on this page are generated from data taken from "Trends in Carbon Dioxide" page on the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website. The NOAA website presents monthly and weekly atmospheric CO2 concentrations measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. It offers weekly and monthly data, additional graphs, analysis, descriptions of how the data are collected, and an animation of historical changes in atmospheric CO2. Mauna Loa constitutes the longest record of direct measurements of CO2 in the atmosphere. The measurents were started by C. David Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in March of 1958. Recent Monthly Average CO2

493

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Experimental study of new laser-based alignment system at the KEK B-factory injector linear accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new laser-based alignment system for the precise alignment of accelerator components along an ideal straight line at the KEK B-factory injector linear accelerator (linac) is under development. This system is strongly required in the next generation of B-factories for the stable acceleration of high-brightness electron and positron beams with high bunch charges and also for maintaining the stability of injection beams with high quality. A new laser optics for the generation of a so-called Airy beam has been developed for the laser-based alignment system. The laser propagation characteristics both in vacuum and at atmospheric pressure have been systematically investigated in an 82-m-long straight section of the injector linac. The laser-based alignment measurements based on the new laser optics have been carried out with a measurement resolution of {+-}0.1 mm level by using an existing laser detection electronics. The horizontal and vertical displacements from a reference laser line measured using this system are in good agreement with those measured using a standard telescope-based optical alignment technique. In this report, we describe the experimental study in detail along with the basic designs and the recent developments in the new laser-based alignment system.

Suwada, T.; Satoh, M.; Kadokura, E. [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

Experimental Analysis of Numeric and Symbolic ConstraintSatisfaction Techniques for Temporal Reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many temporal applications like planning and scheduling can be viewed as special cases of the numeric and symbolic temporal constraint satisfaction problem. Thus we have developed a temporal model, TemPro, based on the interval Algebra, to express ... Keywords: arc consistency, constraint satisfaction, path consistency, temporal reasoning

Malek Mouhoub; Francois Charpillet; Jean Paul Haton

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Experimental techniques for hydrodynamic characterization of multiphase flows in slurry-phase bubble-column reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Slurry-phase bubble-column Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactors are recognized as one of the more promising technologies for converting synthesis gas from coal into liquid fuel products (indirect liquefaction). However, hydrodynamic effects must be considered when attempting to scale these reactors to sizes of industrial interest. The objective of this program is to facilitate characterization of reactor hydrodynamics by developing and applying noninvasive tomographic diagnostics capable of measuring gas holdup spatial distribution in these reactors.

Torczynski, J.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Mondy, L.A.; Jackson, N.B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

A new experimental technique for investigation of plasma generated with plasmotrons in electrophysical installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Payload Weight (CO) Models Support Energy-Saving Microwave Technologies (NY) Materials Advance Chemical with Marshall Space Flight Center, PWR used its rocket engine experience to make clean energy gasification technology. Compared to standard gasification systems, the capital cost to build a commercial plant using PWR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

498

Experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

opacities of mid-atomic-number elements over a wide range of temperatures. The 150-300 eV temperature range is particularly interesting. The opacity models are complex and...

499

Tools & Techniques for Failure Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 31, 2013 ... Failure Analysis and Prevention: Tools & Techniques for Failure ... As lithium-ion battery technology continues to advance and is adopted in diverse markets, ... fracture origin and an understanding of the fracture event energy.

500

Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

Dudukovic, M.P.

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z