Sample records for atlas relativistic heavy

  1. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most...

  2. Relativistic heavy ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  3. Measurements of Heavy Flavour Production at ATLAS and CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gladilin, Leonid; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New and updated (after the previous Moriond QCD) ATLAS and CMS results on heavy flavour production are reviewed.

  4. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

  5. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Relativistic heavy ion research. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  7. Electron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benchmarking experiments Also: Cost and schedule. Work in progress. #12;Electron cooling group. Reporting to Thomas Roser systems Yuri Eidelman, electron cooling simulations. Harald Hahn, Superconducting RF and HOMs. AdyElectron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: Overview Ilan Ben-Zvi Collider

  8. Electron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron Cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: Overview Ilan Ben-Zvi Collider-Accelerator Department's Machine Advisory Committee January 2006 #12;Motivation · The motivation for electron coolingRHIC are on the DOE's 20 years facilities plan. RHIC luminosity decay (3.5 hours) #12;What is special about cooling

  9. A short course on Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Some ideas/concepts in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. To a large extent, the discussions are non-comprehensive and non-rigorous. It is intended for fresh graduate students of Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kolkata Centre, who are intending to pursue career in theoretical /experimental high energy nuclear physics. Comments and criticisms will be appreciated.

  10. A short course on Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some ideas/concepts in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. To a large extent, the discussions are non-comprehensive and non-rigorous. It is intended for fresh graduate students of Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kolkata Centre, who are intending to pursue career in theoretical /experimental high energy nuclear physics. Comments and criticisms will be appreciated.

  11. Relativistic effects in heavy-quarkonium spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClary, R.; Byers, N.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the discrepancy between the measured rate for psi'..-->..chi/sub 0/..gamma.. and that predicted by nonrelativistic models can be accounted for by (v/c)/sup 2/ relativistic corrections. A Breit-Fermi Hamiltonian is used to predict the energy level structure and E1 transition rates in the charmonium and UPSILON systems. It is obtained from an instantaneous approximation to a Bethe-Salpeter equation whose kernel is composed of Coulomb-gauge gluon exchange and a scalar confining piece. The model accounts for the observed fine and hyperfine structure of the charmonium levels and for the E1 transition rates. It is used to predict the level structure and E1 rates in the UPSILON system. It is shown that an extension of Siegert's theorem is valid in the relativistic regime. This result is useful in analyzing E1 transition-matrix elements.

  12. Multipole decomposition of potentials in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Isar

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions an exact multipole decomposition of the Lorentz transformed time dependent Coulomb potentials in a coordinate system with equal constant, but opposite velocities of the ions, is obtained for both zero and different from zero impact parameter. The case of large values of $\\gamma$ and the gauge transformation of the interaction removing both the $\\gamma$ dependence and the $\\ln b$ dependence are also considered.

  13. Multiphase transport model for relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Pal, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that for producing a plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons, which is believed to have existed during the first microsecond after the Big Bang. Experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with center-of-mass energy up to ?sNN = 200 GeV in Au... will have an even higher temperature and a nearly vanishing net baryon chemical potential. Many observables have beenmeasured at RHIC, such as the rapidity distributions of various particles and their transverse momentum spectra up to very high...

  14. Thermophoretic Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoma, M H

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If a quark-gluon plasma is formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, there might be a mixed phase of quarks and gluons and hadronic clusters when the critical temperature is reached in the expansion of the fireball. If there is a temperature gradient in the fireball, the hadronic clusters, embedded in the heat bath of quarks and gluons, are subjected to a thermophoretic force. It is shown that even for small temperature gradients and short lifetimes of the mixed phase thermophoresis leads to a strong flow.

  15. Energy loss, hadronization and hadronic interactions of heavy flavors in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shanshan; Bass, Steffen A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a theoretical framework to describe the evolution of heavy flavors produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin equation that incorporates both quasi-elastic scatterings and the medium-induced gluon radiation. The space-time profiles of the fireball is described by a (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics simulation. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is utilized for heavy quark hadronization, after which the produced heavy mesons together with the soft hadrons produced from the bulk QGP are fed into the hadron cascade UrQMD model to simulate the subsequent hadronic interactions. We find that the medium-induced gluon radiation contributes significantly to heavy quark energy loss at high $p_\\mathrm{T}$; heavy-light quark coalescence enhances heavy meson production at intermediate $p_\\mathrm{T}$; and scatterings inside the hadron gas further suppress the $D$ meson $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ at large $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and e...

  16. Elliptic flow and energy loss of heavy quarks in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Uphoff; Oliver Fochler; Zhe Xu; Carsten Greiner

    2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-time propagation of heavy quarks in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions is studied within the partonic transport model Boltzmann Approach of MultiParton Scatterings (BAMPS). In this model heavy quarks interact with the partonic medium via binary scatterings. The cross sections for these interactions are calculated with leading order perturbative QCD, but feature a more precise Debye screening derived within the hard thermal loop approximation and obey the running of the coupling. Within this framework the elliptic flow and the nuclear modification factor of heavy quarks are computed for RHIC and LHC energies and compared to available experimental data. It is found that binary scatterings alone cannot reproduce the data and, therefore, radiative corrections have to be taken into account.

  17. Consequences of energy conservation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete characterization of particle production and emission in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is in general not feasible experimentally. This work demonstrates, however, that the availability of essentially complete pseudorapidity distributions for charged particles allows for a reliable estimate of the average transverse momenta and energy of emitted particles by requiring energy conservation in the process. The results of such an analysis for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}= 130 and 200 GeV are compared with measurements of mean-p_T and mean-E_T in regions where such measurements are available. The mean-p_T dependence on pseudorapidity for Au+Au collisions at 130 and 200 GeV is given for different collision centralities.

  18. Strangelet Search at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, Ha

    2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4percent) Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order>_0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few 10-6 to 10-7 per central Au+Au collision are set for strangelets with mass>~;;30 GeV/c2.

  19. Medium induced jet absorption at relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Drees; Haidong Feng; Jiangyong Jia

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The dense medium created in Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) significantly suppresses particle production from hard scattering processes and their characteristic back-to-back angular correlation. We present a simple model of jet absorption in dense matter which incorporates a realistic nuclear geometry. Our calculations are performed at the jet level and assume independent jet fragmentation in the vacuum. This model describes quantitatively the centrality dependence of the observed suppression of the high $p_T$ hadron yield and of the back-to-back angular correlations. The azimuthal anisotropy of high $p_T$ particle production can not be accounted for using a realistic nuclear geometry.

  20. Jet-Underlying Event Separation Method for Heavy Ion Collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Hanks; A. M. Sickles; B. A. Cole; A. Franz; M. P. McCumber; D. P. Morrison; J. L. Nagle; C. H. Pinkenburg; B. Sahlmueller; P. Steinberg; M. von Steinkirch; M. Stone

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstructed jets in heavy ion collisions are a crucial tool for understanding the quark-gluon plasma. The separation of jets from the underlying event is necessary particularly in central heavy ion reactions in order to quantify medium modifications of the parton shower and the response of the surrounding medium itself. There have been many methods proposed and implemented for studying the underlying event substructure in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we detail a method for understanding underlying event contributions in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV utilizing the HIJING event generator. This method, extended from previous work by the ATLAS collaboration, provides a well-defined association of "truth jets" from the fragmentation of hard partons with "reconstructed jets" using the anti-$k_T$ algorithm. Results presented here are based on an analysis of 750M minimum bias HIJING events. We find that there is a substantial range of jet energies and radius parameters where jets are well separated from the background fluctuations (often termed "fake jets") that make jet measurements at RHIC a compelling physics program.

  1. J/psi production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Taesoo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Xu, Jun.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upsilon(2) of J/psi in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. For the expansion dynamics of produced hot, dense matter, we introduce a schematic fireball model with its transverse acceleration determined from the pressure gradient inside the fireball...

  2. Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

  3. Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Zhang; Jay P. Mayfield

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

  4. Low Energy Nuclear Structure from Ultra-relativistic Heavy-Light Ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Ruiz Arriola; Wojciech Broniowski

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for specific signals in ultra-relativistic heavy-light ion collisions addressing intrinsic geometric features of nuclei may open a new window to low energy nuclear structure. We discuss specifically the phenomenon of {\\alpha}-clustering in $^{12}$C when colliding with $^{208}$Pb at almost the speed of light.

  5. Antiflow of kaons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Lin, ZW; Zhang, B.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare relativistic transport model calculations to recent data on the sideward flow of neutral strange K-s(0) mesons for Au+Au collisions at 6A GeV. A soft nuclear equation of state is found to describe very well the positive proton flow data...

  6. Cavitation and thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitesh R. Bhatt; Hiranmaya Mishra; V. Sreekanth

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \\textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\\epsilon-3 P \

  7. Resonance Absorption and Regeneration in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sascha Vogel; Marcus Bleicher

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The regeneration of hadronic resonances is discussed for heavy ion collisions at SPS and SIS-300 energies. The time evolutions of Delta, rho and phi resonances are investigated. Special emphasize is put on resonance regeneration after chemical freeze-out. The emission time spectra of experimentally detectable resonances are explored.

  8. Core-Corona Separation in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Werner

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple geometrical considerations show that the collision zone in high energy nuclear collisions may be divided into a central part (``core''), with high energy densities, and a peripheral part (``corona''), with smaller energy densities, more like in pp or pA collisions. We present calculations which allow to separate these two contributions, and which show that the corona contribution is quite small (but not negligible) for central collisions, but gets increasingly important with decreasing centrality. We will discuss consequences concerning results obtained in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS).

  9. The iEBE-VISHNU code package for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun Shen; Zhi Qiu; Huichao Song; Jonah Bernhard; Steffen Bass; Ulrich Heinz

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The iEBE-VISHNU code package performs event-by-event simulations for relativistic heavy-ion collisions using viscous hydrodynamics (+ hadronic cascade model). We present the detailed model implementations accompanied with some numerical code tests for this package. The iEBE-VISHNU builds up a general theoretical framework for model-data comparisons through large scale Monte-Carlo simulations. The numerical interface between hydrodynamical evolving medium and thermal photon radiation is also discussed. This interface is designed for generic calculations of all kinds of rare probes, which are coupled to the temperature and flow velocity evolution of the bulk medium, such as jet energy loss and heavy quark diffusion.

  10. Effect of equilibrium phase transition on multiphase transport in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Meiling; Du Jiaxin; Liu Lianshou

    2006-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The hadronization scheme for parton transport in relativistic heavy ion collisions is considered in detail. It is pointed out that the traditional scheme for particles being freezed out one by one leads to serious problem on unreasonable long lifetime for partons. A super-cooling of the parton system followed by a collective phase transition is implemented in a simple way. It turns out that the modified model with a global phase transition is able to reproduce the experimental longitudinal distributions of final state particles better than the original one does. The encouraging results indicate that a relevant parton transport model for relativistic heavy ion collision should take equilibrium phase transition into proper account.

  11. Noncommutativity and Lorentz Violation in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castorina, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Iorio, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague V Holesovickach 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Zappala, D. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    One shows that relativistic heavy ion collisions could be used as an experimental probe to detect fundamental properties of spacetime long speculated about. The results rely on the recent proposal that magnetic fields of intensity much larger than that of magnetars should be produced at the beginning of the collisions and this could have an important impact on the experimental manifestation of a noncommutative spacetime. Indeed, in the noncommutative generalization of electrodynamics the interplay between a nonzero noncommutative parameter and an external magnetic field leads us to predict the production of lepton pairs of low invariant mass by free photons(an event forbidden by Lorentz invariant electrodynamics) in relativistic heavy ion collisions at present and future available energies. This unique channel can be clearly considered as a signature of noncommutativity.

  12. Novel Geometrical Models of Relativistic Stars. II. Incompressible Stars and Heavy Black Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. P. Fiziev

    2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a series of articles we describe a novel class of geometrical models of relativistic stars. Our approach to the static spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein equations is based on a careful physical analysis of radial gauge conditions. It turns out that there exist heavy black dwarfs: relativistic stars with arbitrary large mass, which are to have arbitrary small radius and arbitrary small luminosity. In the present article we mathematically prove this new phenomena, using a detailed consideration of incompressible GR stars. We study the whole two parameter family of solutions of extended TOV equations for incompressible stars. This example is used to illustrate most of the basic features of the new geometrical models of relativistic stars. Comparison with newest observational data is discussed

  13. Studies of multiplicity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I'll review the present status of charged particle multiplicity measurements from heavy-ion collisions. The characteristic features of multiplicity distributions obtained in Au+Au collisions will be discussed in terms of collision centrality and energy and compared to those of p+p collisions. Multiplicity measurements of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy will also be discussed. The results will be compared to various theoretical models and simple scaling properties of the data will be identified.

  14. Hydro-inspired parameterizations of freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Wojciech Broniowski

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Popular parameterizations of the freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are discussed. Similarities and differences between the blast-wave model and the single-freeze-out model, both used recently to interpret the RHIC data, are outlined. A non-boost-invariant extension of the single-freeze-out model is proposed and applied to describe the recent BRAHMS data.

  15. Formation and Collapse of False Vacuum Bubbles in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajarshi Ray; Soma Sanyal; Ajit M. Srivastava

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is possible that under certain situations, in a relativistic heavy-ion collision, partons may expand out forming a shell like structure. We analyze the process of hadronization in such a picture for the case when the quark-hadron transition is of first order, and argue that the inside region of such a shell must correspond to a supercooled (to $T = 0$) deconfined vacuum. Hadrons from that region escape out, leaving a bubble of pure deconfined vacuum with large vacuum energy. This bubble undergoes relativistic collapse, with highly Lorentz contracted bubble walls, and may concentrate the entire energy into extremely small regions. Eventually different portions of bubble wall collide, with the energy being released in the form of particle production. Thermalization of this system can lead to very high temperatures. With a reasonably conservative set of parameters, at LHC, the temperature of the hot spot can reach as high as 3 GeV, and well above it with more optimistic parameters. Such a hot spot can leave signals like large $P_T$ partons, dileptons, and enhanced production of heavy quarks. We also briefly discuss a speculative possibility where the electroweak symmetry may get restored in the highly dense region resulting from the decay of the bubble wall via the phenomenon of non-thermal symmetry restoration (which is usually employed in models of pre-heating after inflation). If that could happen then the possibility may arise of observing sphaleron induced baryon number violation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Multi Module Modeling of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magas, V. K.; Csernai, L. P. (László P.); Keranen, A.; Manninen, J.; Strottman, D. D. (Daniel D.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi Module Model is required for the realistic and detailed description of an ultrarelativistic heavy ion reaction. We are working in the framework of such a model: initial stages are described by Effective String Rope Model with expanding final streaks; hydrodynamical approach is used for the intermediate stages. This paper is mainly devoted to Third Module - the one dealing with Freeze Out (FO). Two possibilities are discussed in details: (A) freeze out at the constant time hypersurface, where the statistical production model is used to describe post FO particle species; and (B) simultaneous hadronization and freeze out from supercooled QGP. For the last case the ALCOR-like algorithm for calculation of the post FO particle species is presented, due to the fact that these do not have time to reach chemical equilibrium.

  17. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  18. Rho0 Photoproduction in Ultra-Peripheral Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions with STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoproduction reactions occur when the electromagnetic field of a relativistic heavy ion interacts with another heavy ion. The STAR collaboration presents a measurement of {rho}{sup 0} and direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photoproduction in ultra-peripheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe both exclusive photoproduction and photoproduction accompanied by mutual Coulomb excitation. We find a coherent cross-section of {sigma}(AuAu {yields} Au*Au* {rho}{sup 0}) = 530 {+-} 19 (stat.) {+-} 57 (syst.) mb, in accord with theoretical calculations based on a Glauber approach, but considerably below the predictions of a color dipole model. The {rho}{sup 0} transverse momentum spectrum (p{sub T}{sup 2}) is fit by a double exponential curve including both coherent and incoherent coupling to the target nucleus; we find {sigma}{sub inc}/{sigma}{sub coh} = 0.29 {+-} 0.03 (stat.) {+-} 0.08 (syst.). The ratio of direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} production is comparable to that observed in {gamma}p collisions at HERA, and appears to be independent of photon energy. Finally, the measured {rho}{sup 0} spin helicity matrix elements agree within errors with the expected s-channel helicity conservation.

  19. Kaon dispersion relation and flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The average transverse momentum of kaons in the re- action plane for Au1Au reactions at Pbeam /A5 4 GeV/c ~upper window! and 12 GeV/c ~lower window! at impact parameters less than 4 fm. The open ~filled! circles are the results obtained with ~without... and azimuthal angle distributions. We find that th studying the kaon dispersion relation in dense medium PACS number~s!: 25.75.Ld, 13.75.Jz, 21.65.1f The properties of a kaon in the extremely hot and dense enviroment created in relativistic heavy...

  20. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B. (eds.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  1. Heavy-quark probes of the quark-gluon plasma and interpretation of recent data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Greco, V.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strongly interacting QGP (sQGP), as well as parton coalescence, can play an essential role in the interpretation of recent data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), and thus illuminate the nature of the sQGP and its hadronization. Our main...

  2. Hanbury-Brown-Twiss Interferometry with Identical Bosons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions: Comparisons with Hadronic Scattering Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Humanic

    2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Identical boson Hanbury-Brown-Twiss interferometry as applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the use of hadronic scattering models to interpret the physical significance of experimental results. Interferometric studies with center-of-mass energies from < 1 GeV/nucleon up to 5500 GeV/nucleon are considered.

  3. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  4. Scaling of Anisotropic Flows in Intermediate Energy and Ultra-relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Ma

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Anisotropic flows ($v_2$ and $v_4$) of hadrons and light nuclear clusters are studied by a partonic transport model and nucleonic transport model, respectively, in ultra-relativistic and intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. Both number-of-constituent-quark scaling of hadrons, especially for $\\phi$ meson which is composed of strange quarks, and number-of-nucleon scaling of light nuclear clusters are discussed and explored for the elliptic flow ($v_2$). The ratios of $v_4/v_2^2$ of hadrons and nuclear clusters are, respectively, calculated and they show different constant values which are independent of transverse momentum. The above phenomena can be understood, respectively, by the coalescence mechanism in quark-level or nucleon-level.

  5. Initialization of hydrodynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions with an energy-momentum transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Naboka; S. V. Akkelin; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A key ingredient of hydrodynamical modeling of relativistic heavy ion collisions is thermal initial conditions, an input that is the consequence of a pre-thermal dynamics which is not completely understood yet. In the paper we employ a recently developed energy-momentum transport model of the pre-thermal stage to study influence of the alternative initial states in nucleus-nucleus collisions on flow and energy density distributions of the matter at the starting time of hydrodynamics. In particular, the dependence of the results on isotropic and anisotropic initial states is analyzed. It is found that at the thermalization time the transverse flow is larger and the maximal energy density is higher for the longitudinally squeezed initial momentum distributions. The results are also sensitive to the relaxation time parameter, equation of state at the thermalization time, and transverse profile of initial energy density distribution: Gaussian approximation, Glauber Monte Carlo profiles, etc. Also, test results ensure that the numerical code based on the energy-momentum transport model is capable of providing both averaged and fluctuating initial conditions for the hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic nuclear collisions.

  6. Quarkonia Disintegration due to time dependence of the $q \\bar{q}$ potential in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partha Bagchi; Ajit M. Srivastava

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid thermalization in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions leads to fast changing potential between a heavy quark and antiquark from zero temperature potential to the finite temperature one. Time dependent perturbation theory can then be used to calculate the survival probability of the initial quarkonium state. In view of very short time scales of thermalization at RHIC and LHC energies, we calculate the survival probability of $J/\\psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ using sudden approximation. Our results show that quarkonium decay may be significant even when temperature of QGP remains low enough so that the conventional quarkonium melting due to Debye screening is ineffective.

  7. Two-Photon Interactions with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; R Klein, Spencer; Nystrand, Joakim

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross-sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, since the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs, and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross-sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross-sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  8. Alternative Scenarios of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions: I. Baryon Stopping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. B. Ivanov

    2013-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of relativistic heavy-ion collisions within the three-fluid model employing a purely hadronic equation of state (EoS) and two versions of the EoS involving deconfinement transition are presented. The latter are an EoS with the first-order phase transition and that with a smooth crossover transition. The model setup is described in detail. The analysis is performed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 GeV $< \\sqrt{s_{NN}} <$ 39 GeV in terms of the center-of-mass energy. Results on proton and net-proton rapidity distributions are reported. Comparison with available data indicate certain preference of the crossover EoS. It is found that predictions within deconfinement-transition scenarios exhibit a "peak-dip-peak-dip" irregularity in the incident energy dependence of the form of the net-proton rapidity distributions in central collisions. This irregularity is a signal of deconfinement onset occurring in the hot and dense stage of the nuclear collision.

  9. Alternative Scenarios of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions: II. Particle Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. B. Ivanov

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle production in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei is analyzed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 GeV $\\le \\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\le$ 62.4 GeV. The analysis is performed within the three-fluid model employing three different equations of state (EoS): a purely hadronic EoS, an EoS with the first-order phase transition and that with a smooth crossover transition. It is found that the hadronic scenario fails to reproduce experimental yields of antibaryons (strange and nonstrange), starting already from lower SPS energies, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 5 GeV. Moreover, at energies above the top SPS one, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 17.4 GeV, the mid-rapidity densities predicted by the hadronic scenario considerably exceed the available RHIC data on all species. At the same time the deconfinement-transition scenarios reasonably agree (to a various extent) with all the data. The present analysis demonstrates certain advantage of the deconfinement-transition EoS's. However, all scenarios fail to reproduce the strangeness enhancement in the incident energy range near 30A GeV (i.e. a horn anomaly in the $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio) and yields of $\\phi$-mesons at 20A--40A GeV.

  10. Heavy sterile neutrinos, entropy and relativistic energy production, and the relic neutrino background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, George M; Kusenko, Alexander

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the implications of the existence of heavy neutral fermions (i.e., sterile neutrinos) for the thermal history of the early universe. In particular, we consider sterile neutrinos with rest masses in the 100 MeV to 500 MeV range, with couplings to ordinary active neutrinos large enough to guarantee thermal and chemical equilibrium at epochs in the early universe with temperatures T > 1 GeV, but in a range to give decay lifetimes from seconds to minutes. Such neutrinos would decouple early, with relic densities comparable to those of photons, but decay out of equilibrium, with consequent prodigious entropy generation prior to, or during, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Most of the ranges of sterile neutrino rest mass and lifetime considered are at odds with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) limits on the relativistic particle contribution to energy density (e.g., as parameterized by N_eff). However, some sterile neutrino parameters can lead to an acceptable N_eff. These parameter ranges are accompanie...

  11. Temperature dependent sound velocity in hydrodynamic equations for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikolaj Chojnacki

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the effects of different forms of the sound-velocity function cs(T) on the hydrodynamic evolution of matter formed in the central region of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. At high temperatures (above the critical temperature Tc) the sound velocity is calculated from the recent lattice simulations of QCD, while in the low temperature region it is obtained from the hadron gas model. In the intermediate region we use different interpolations characterized by the values of the sound velocity at the local maximum (at T = 0.4 Tc) and local minimum (at T = Tc). In all considered cases the temperature dependent sound velocity functions yield the entropy density, which is consistent with the lattice QCD simulations at high temperature. Our calculations show that the presence of a distinct minimum of the sound velocity leads to a very long (about 20 fm/c) evolution time of the system, which is not compatible with the recent estimates based on the HBT interferometry. Hence, we conclude that the hydrodynamic description is favored in the case where the cross-over phase transition renders the smooth sound velocity function with a possible shallow minimum at Tc.

  12. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant ?-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  13. Search for a Heavy Particle Decaying into an Electron and a Muon with the ATLAS Detector in ?s=7??TeV pp collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents the first search for a heavy particle decaying into an e[superscript ±]?[superscript ?] final state in ?s=7??TeV pp collisions at the LHC. The data were recorded by the ATLAS detector during 2010 and ...

  14. Heavy sterile neutrinos, entropy and relativistic energy production, and the relic neutrino background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George M. Fuller; Chad T. Kishimoto; Alexander Kusenko

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the implications of the existence of heavy neutral fermions (i.e., sterile neutrinos) for the thermal history of the early universe. In particular, we consider sterile neutrinos with rest masses in the 100 MeV to 500 MeV range, with couplings to ordinary active neutrinos large enough to guarantee thermal and chemical equilibrium at epochs in the early universe with temperatures T > 1 GeV, but in a range to give decay lifetimes from seconds to minutes. Such neutrinos would decouple early, with relic densities comparable to those of photons, but decay out of equilibrium, with consequent prodigious entropy generation prior to, or during, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Most of the ranges of sterile neutrino rest mass and lifetime considered are at odds with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) limits on the relativistic particle contribution to energy density (e.g., as parameterized by N_eff). However, some sterile neutrino parameters can lead to an acceptable N_eff. These parameter ranges are accompanied by considerable dilution of the ordinary background relic neutrinos, possibly an adverse effect on BBN, but sometimes fall in a range which can explain measured neutrino masses in some particle physics models. A robust signature of these sterile neutrinos would be a measured N_eff not equal to 3 coupled with no cosmological signal for neutrino rest mass when the detection thresholds for these probes are below laboratory-established neutrino mass values, either as established by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation scale or direct measurements with, e.g., KATRIN or neutrino-less double beta decay experiments.

  15. Effects of nuclear absorption on the antiLambda/antiproton ratio in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuqiang Wang; Marlene Nahrgang; Marcus Bleicher

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An enhanced antiLambda/antiproton ratio in heavy-ion relative to p+p collisions has been proposed as one of the signatures for the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) formation. A significantly large (antiLambda+antiSigma0+1.1*antiSigma-)/antiproton ratio of 3.5 has been observed in the mid-rapidity and low transverse momentum region in central Au+Au collisions at the nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 4.9 GeV at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This is an order of magnitude larger than the values in peripheral Au+Au collisions and p+p collisions at the corresponding energy. By using the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport model, we demonstrate that the observed large ratio can be explained by strong absorption of antiprotons (~99.9%) and antiLambdas (~99%) in dense nuclear matter created in central collisions. We find within the model that the initial antiLambda/antiproton ratio, mainly from string fragmentation, does not depend on the collision centrality, and is consistent with that observed in p+p collisions. This suggests that the observed large (antiLambda+antiSigma0+1.1*antiSigma-)/antiproton ratio at the AGS does not necessarily imply the formation of the QGP. We further study the excitation function of the ratio in UrQMD, which may help in the search and study of the QGP.

  16. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, R; Fischer, W; Jowett, J M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon 197Au79+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both meth...

  17. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the measurement of {phi} meson production via its charged kaon decay channel {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, and in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) {phi} meson transverse momentum (p{sub T}) spectra in central Au + Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the p{sub T} spectra from p + p, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high p{sub T} and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant {phi}/K{sup -} yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {phi} production at RHIC. The {Omega}/{phi} yield ratio as a function of p{sub T} is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to p{sub T} {approx} 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R{sub dAu}, for the {phi} meson increases above unity at intermediate p{sub T}, similar to that for pions and protons, while R{sub AA} is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au + Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both R{sub cp} and v{sub 2} for the {phi} meson with respect to other hadrons in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at intermediate p{sub T} is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate p{sub T} region at RHIC.

  18. Feasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chamber to be able to change ion species on a pulse by pulse basis. The optimal plasma drift length variesFeasibility study of a laser ion source for primary ion injection into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider electron beam ion sourcea... Takeshi Kanesue Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear

  19. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bruce; M. Blaskiewicz; W. Fischer; J. M. Jowett

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon Au beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  20. Search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson in the channel H->ZZ->llqq using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via H->ZZ->llqq, where l=e,mu, is presented. The search is performed using a data set of pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb^-1 collected in 2011 by the ATLAS detector at the CERN LHC collider. No significant excess of events above the estimated background is found. Upper limits at 95% confidence level on the production cross section (relative to that expected from the Standard Model) of a Higgs boson with a mass in the range between 200 and 600 GeV are derived. Within this mass range, there is at present insufficient sensitivity to exclude a Standard Model Higgs boson. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 360 GeV, where the sensitivity is maximal, the observed and expected cross section upper limits are factors of 1.7 and 2.7, respectively, larger than the Standard Model prediction.

  1. Energy and Atomic Mass Dependence of Nuclear Stopping Power in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Interacting Gluon Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. J. Liu; W. Q. Chao; G. Wilk

    1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Monte-Carlo simulation of energy deposition process in relativistic heavy-ion collisions based on a new realization of the Interacting-Gluon-Model (IGM) for high energy $N-N$ collisions. In particular we show results for proton spectra from collisions of $E_{lab}=200 \\ GeV/N$ $^{32}$S beam incident on $^{32}$S target and analyze the energy and mass dependence of nuclear stopping power predicted by our model. Theoretical predictions for proton rapidity distributions of both $^{208}$Pb + $^{208}$Pb collisions at $E_{lab}=160 \\ GeV/N$ CERN SPS and $^{197}$Au + $^{197}$Au at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 \\ GeV$ BNL RHIC are given.

  2. Absence of Thermophoretic Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions as an Indicator for the Absence of a Mixed Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus H. Thoma

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If a quark-gluon plasma is formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, there may or may not be a mixed phase of quarks, gluons and hadronic clusters when the critical temperature is reached in the expansion of the fireball. If there is a temperature gradient in the fireball, the hadronic clusters, embedded in the heat bath of quarks and gluons, are subjected to a thermophoretic force. It is shown that even for small temperature gradients and short lifetimes of the mixed phase, thermophoresis would lead to a flow essentially stronger than the observed one. The absence of this strong flow provides support for a rapid or sudden hadronization mechanism without a mixed phase.

  3. Effects of momentum conservation and flow on angular correlations observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Scott; Schlichting, Soeren; Gavin, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations of azimuthal angles observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have gained great attention due to the prospect of identifying fluctuations of parity-odd regions in the field sector of QCD. Whereas the observable of interest related to parity fluctuations involves subtracting opposite-sign from same-sign correlations, the STAR collaboration reported the same-sign and opposite-sign correlations separately. It is shown here how momentum conservation combined with collective elliptic flow contributes significantly to this class of correlations, although not to the difference between the opposite- and same-sign observables. The effects are modeled with a crude simulation of a pion gas. Although the simulation reproduces the scale of the correlation, the centrality dependence is found to be sufficiently different in character to suggest additional considerations beyond those present in the pion gas simulation presented here.

  4. Recent results in relativistic heavy ion collisions: from ``a new state of matter'' to "the perfect fluid"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum

    2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental Physics with Relativistic Heavy Ions dates from 1992 when a beam of 197Au of energy greater than 10A GeV/c first became available at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) soon followed in 1994 by a 208Pb beam of 158A GeV/c at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research). Previous pioneering measurements at the Berkeley Bevalac in the late 1970's and early 1980's were at much lower bombarding energies (~ 1 A GeV/c) where nuclear breakup rather than particle production is the dominant inelastic process in A+A collisions. More recently, starting in 2000, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has produced head-on collisions of two 100A GeV beams of fully stripped Au ions, corresponding to nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy, sqrt(sNN)=200 GeV, total c.m. energy 200A GeV. The objective of this research program is to produce nuclear matter with extreme density and temperature, possibly resulting in a state of matter where the quarks and gluons normally confined inside individual nucleons (r < 1 fm) are free to act over distances an order of magnitude larger. Progress from the period 1992 to the present will be reviewed, with reference to previous results from light ion and proton-proton collisions where appropriate. Emphasis will be placed on the measurements which formed the basis for the announcements by the two major laboratories: "A new state of matter", by CERN on Feb 10, 2000 and "The perfect fluid", by BNL on April 19, 2005.

  5. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberg andReindustrializationLivermoreRelativistic

  6. P(t) Dependence of Transverse Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bao-An; Ko, Che Ming; Li, GQ.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in t for studying the ??squeeze-out?? phenomenon at s energies @19?22#, it is still interesting to investi- r this approach can reveal new features of the flow and thus information about the equation of e superdense hadronic matter formed in relativistic... collisions among most of these particles are included by using as inputs either the available experimental data or results from one-boson-exchange and resonance models. An optional, self-consistent mean field for baryons is also included. We refer...

  7. Transport theory of relativistic heavy-ion collisions with chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W.; Wilets, L. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transport theory with chiral symmetry is developed from the quark level to describe the chiral dynamics in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The strong interaction is treated effectively by the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. A set of generalized Boltzmann equations of constitutent quarks and mesons is derived by using the closed time-path Green's function technique and a loop expansion approach. Chiral symmetry, energy spectrum and dissipation, and density distributions of constitutent quarks and mesons can then be studied self-consistently in the nonequilibrium dynamical processes. In particular, the discussion for exploring chiral symmetry breaking and its restoration and for studying dynamics of meson production (as collective {ital q{bar q}} excitations) in heavy-ion collisions is presented.

  8. Quarks Production in the Quark-Gluon Plasma Created in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Ruggieri; Salvatore Plumari; Francesco Scardina; Vincenzo Greco

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we report on our results about quark production and chemical equilibration of quark-gluon plasma. Our initial condition corresponds to a classic Yang-Mills spectrum, in which only gluon degrees of freedom are considered; the initial condition is then evolved to a quark-gluon plasma by means of relativistic transport theory with inelastic processes which permit the conversion of gluons to $q\\bar{q}$ pairs. We then compare our results to the ones obtained with a standard Glauber model initialization. We find that regardless of the initial condition the final stage of the system contains an abundant percentage of $q\\bar{q}$ pairs; moreover spanning the possible coupling from weak to strong we find that unless the coupling is unrealistically small, both production rate and final percentage of fermions is quite large.

  9. Quarks Production in the Quark-Gluon Plasma Created in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruggieri, Marco; Scardina, Francesco; Greco, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we report on our results about quark production and chemical equilibration of quark-gluon plasma. Our initial condition corresponds to a classic Yang-Mills spectrum, in which only gluon degrees of freedom are considered; the initial condition is then evolved to a quark-gluon plasma by means of relativistic transport theory with inelastic processes which permit the conversion of gluons to $q\\bar{q}$ pairs. We then compare our results to the ones obtained with a standard Glauber model initialization. We find that regardless of the initial condition the final stage of the system contains an abundant percentage of $q\\bar{q}$ pairs; moreover spanning the possible coupling from weak to strong we find that unless the coupling is unrealistically small, both production rate and final percentage of fermions is quite large.

  10. Fluctuations of charge separation perpendicular to the event plane and local parity violation in ?S[subscript NN] = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Previous experimental results based on data (?15 × 10[superscript 6] events) collected by the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggest event-by-event charge-separation fluctuations perpendicular to ...

  11. J/psi production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from a multiphase transport model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Pal, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments at RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where the colli- sion energy is much higher than at SPS, have also shown possible effects due to the formation of a partonic matter @4#. To find the signal for the quark-gluon plasma in relativis- tic... in the hadronic matter @11?18#. The observed abnormal suppres- sion of J/c in central Pb1Pb collisions at SPS may require the formation of the quark-gluon plasma in these collisions @19,3#. For heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies, unlike in pre- vious fixed...

  12. Partonic effects on the elliptic flow at relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain an elliptic flow that is comparable to the measured ones in heavy ion collisions at both SPS and RHIC energies @18#. In transport models including only the parton cascade, the elliptic flow has been shown to be sensitive to the parton... scattering cross section, and a large value can be obtained with a large cross section @20,21#. On the other hand, transport models based on hadronic and/or string de- grees of freedom in general give a smaller elliptic flow @9# than that observed at RHIC...

  13. Relativistic Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck Model for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming; LI, Q.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Q. Li, and R. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1084 (1987). zJ. D. Walecka, Ann. Phys. $3, 491 (1974). 3H. Elze et al. , Mod. Phys. Lett. 2, 451 (1987). 4Q. Li and C. M. Ko, Mod. Phys. Lett. (to be published). SR. Y. Cusson et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett.... 55, 2786 (1985). 6G. F. Bertsch, H. Kruse, and S. Das Gupta, Phys. Rev. C 29, 673 (1984). 78. ter Haar and R. Malfliet, Phys. Rep. 149, 207 (1987). G. E. Brown, in Proceedings of the Eighth High Energy Heavy ion Study, Berkeley, California, 1987...

  14. Contribution of the Reaction Ny-]Nnk to Antikaon Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy spectrum can also be understood qualitatively. ' There is another process NY ?+NNK which may also contribute to the production of antikaons in heavy-ion collisions. Since the threshold energies for this process are -455 MeV and -635 MeV for Y...=X and Y=A, respectively, and are larger than those for the process m Y?+KN, which are ?120 MeV and -215 MeV for Y=X and Y=A, respectively, one might intuitively think that the contribution from the reaction NY~NNK is negligible. To ensure...

  15. Event-shape fluctuations and flow correlations in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jia, Jiangyong [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review recent measurements of a large set of flow observables associated with event-shape fluctuations and collective expansion in heavy ion collisions. First, these flow observables are classified and experiment methods are introduced. The experimental results for each type of observables are then presented and compared to theoretical calculations. A coherent picture of initial condition and collective flow based on linear and non-linear hydrodynamic responses is derived, which qualitatively describe most experimental results. I discuss new types of fluctuation measurements that can further our understanding of the event-shape fluctuations and collective expansion dynamics.

  16. Production of Anticentauro Events in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sood

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel method for studying the production of anticentauro events in high energy heavy ion collisions utilizing Chebyshev expansion coefficients. These coefficients have proved to be very efficient in investigating the pattern of fluctuations in neutral pion fraction. For the anticentauro like events, the magnitude of first few coefficients is strongly enhanced (~3 times) as compared to those of normal HIJING events. Various characteristics of Chebyshev coefficients are studied in detail and the probability of formation of exotic events is calculated from the simulated events.

  17. Recent results from HADES on electron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HADES Collaboration; T. Galatyuk; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Díaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; E. Morinière; J. Mousa; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic investigations of dilepton production are performed at the SIS accelerator of GSI with the HADES spectrometer. The goal of this program is a detailed understanding of di-electron emission from hadronic systems at moderate temperatures and densities. New results obtained in HADES experiments focussing on electron pair production in elementary collisions are reported here. They pave the way to a better understanding of the origin of the so-called excess pairs earlier on observed in heavy-ion collisions by the DLS collaboration and lately confirmed in two measurements of the HADES collaboration using C+C and Ar+KCl collisions. Results of these studies are discussed.

  18. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system of deconfined partonic matter, the quark gluon plasma (QGP) [1]. Matter under such extreme conditions can be studied in the laboratory by colliding nuclei at very high energies. The Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National... C. Zhong,39 J. Zhou,36 R. Zoulkarneev,13 Y. Zoulkarneeva,13 and J. X. Zuo39 (STAR Collaboration) 1Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 2University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory...

  19. LUCIAE 3.0: A new version of a computer program for Firecracker Model and rescattering in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tai An; Sa Ben-Hao

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LUCIAE is a Monte Carlo program that, connected to FRITIOF, implements both the Firecracker Model (FCM), a possible mechanism for collective multi-gluon emission from the colour fields of interacting strings, and the reinteraction of the final state hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions. This paper includes a brief presentation of the dynamics of LUCIAE with an emphasis on the new features in this version, as well as a description of the program.

  20. Jet Study in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions with the ALICE Detectors at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah-Louise Blyth

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.5 TeV at the ALICE experiment at the LHC, interactions between the high-$p_{T}$ partons and the hot, dense medium produced in the collisions, are expected to lead to jet energy loss (jet-quenching) resulting in changes in the jet fragmentation functions as compared to the unquenched case. In order to reconstruct jet fragmentation functions, accurate information on the jet energy, direction and momentum distribution of the jet particles is needed. This thesis presents first results on jet reconstruction in simulated Pb+Pb collisions using the ALICE detectors and a UA1-based cone jet finding algorithm which has been modified and optimised to reconstruct high-$p_{T}$ jets on an event-by-event basis. Optimisation of the algorithm parameters and methods used to suppress the large background energy contribution while maximising the algorithm efficiency, are discussed and the resulting jet energy and direction resolutions are presented. Accurate jet reconstruction will allow measurement of the jet fragmentation functions and consequently the degree of quenching and therefore provide insight on the properties of the hot and dense medium (for example the initial gluon density) created in the collisions.

  1. The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sickles, Anne [BNL Physics Department

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasma—the ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHIC—including protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)—enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

  2. Interplay of the emission from thermal and direct sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozek, Piotr [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Institute of Physics, Rzeszow University, PL-35959 Rzeszow (Poland)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of the source created in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions into a thermalized dense core and an outer mantle consisting of independent nucleon-nucleon collisions is discussed. Indications for such a two-component picture are found in the transverse mass spectra of kaons, protons, and antiprotons produced in Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV. Estimates of the sizes of the thermal and direct sources are compared with models separating the interaction zone into a core and a corona. New initial conditions corresponding to the dense core lead to a stronger azimuthal asymmetry of the fireball, and pressure gradients also increase. We find faster transverse hydrodynamic expansion and stronger elliptic flow for the dense core initial conditions.

  3. A Tale of Tails: Photon Rates and Flow in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLerran, Larry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility that quark and gluon distributions in the medium created in high energy heavy ion collisions may be modified by a power law tail at energies much higher than the temperature. We parametrize such a tail by Tsallis distributions with an exponent motivated by phenomenology. These distributions are characterized by an effective temperature scale that we assume to evolve in time like the temperature for thermal distributions. We find that including such a tail increases the rates for photon production and significantly delays the emission times for photons of a fixed energy. We argue that these effects are sufficiently large that they should be able to account for photon yields and flow patterns seen in LHC and RHIC experiments.

  4. Pseudo-Critical Enhancement of Thermal Photons in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrik van Hees; Min He; Ralf Rapp

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the spectra and elliptic flow of thermal photons emitted in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions (URHICs) at RHIC and LHC. The thermal emission rates are taken from complete leading-order rates for the QGP and hadronic many-body calculations including baryons and antibaryons, as well as meson-exchange reactions (including Bremsstrahlung). We first update previous thermal fireball calculations by implementing a lattice-QCD based equation of state and extend them to compare to recent LHC data. We then scrutinize the space-time evolution of Au-Au collisions at RHIC by employing an ideal hydrodynamic model constrained by bulk- and multistrange-hadron spectra and elliptic flow, including a non-vanishing initial flow. We systematically compare the evolutions of temperature, radial flow, azimuthal anisotropy and four-volume, and exhibit the temperature profile of thermal photon radiation. Based on these insights, we put forward a scenario with a "pseudo-critical enhancement" of thermal emission rates, and investigate its impact on RHIC and LHC direct photon data.

  5. Interplay of the emission from thermal and direct sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Bozek

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of the source created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions into a thermalized dense core and an outer mantle consisting of independent nucleon-nucleon collisions is discussed. Evidence for such a two component picture is found in transverse mass spectra of kaon, protons and antiprotons produced in Au-Au collisions at 200GeV. Estimates of the sizes of the thermal and direct sources are compared to models separating the interaction zone into a core and a corona, according to the density of participants or to the number of collisions. Consequences for the modeling of the dynamics of the small size, thermalized core are described. New initial conditions corresponding to the dense core lead to a stronger azimuthal asymmetry of the hydrodynamically expanding fireball, pressure gradients also increase. 2+1-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are presented starting from all the matter in the interaction region or from the dense, thermal part of the source. We find faster transverse expansion and stronger elliptic flow for dense core initial conditions. For different impact parameters we find very similar spectra of the thermal part of the source and only adding particles emitted directly from nucleon-nucleon collisions in the corona the experimentally observed softening of the spectra with increasing impact parameter is reproduced. The elliptic flow is stronger for particles emitted from a source separated into a core and a corona.

  6. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Review of the modifications and upgrades since 2002 and planned improvements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter; Arenius, Dana

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system, which also resulted in an improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases, balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid-helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid-helium storage tank, compressor-bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thomson ex

  7. A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: A Riemann solver for quark–gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao, E-mail: akamatsu@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)] [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nonaka, Chiho [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan) [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Takamoto, Makoto [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan) [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamics equation with the QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which is crucial in describing of quark–gluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In sound wave propagation, the intrinsic numerical viscosity is measured and its explicit expression is shown, which is the second-order of spatial resolution both in the presence and absence of physical viscosity. The expression of the numerical viscosity can be used to determine the maximum cell size in order to accurately measure the effect of physical viscosity in the numerical simulation.

  8. Search for a Heavy Particle Decaying into an Electron and a Muon with the ATLAS Detector in s = 7 ? ? TeV p p collisions at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitat, Freiburg (Germany). Fakultat fur Mathematik und Physik; Abbott, B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Abdallah, J [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain). Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies; Abdelalim, A. A. [Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland). Section de Physique; Abdesselam, A. [Oxford Univ., Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Abdinov, B [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Dept. of Physics; Abolins, M [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel). Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy; Abreu, E. [Universita di Milano, Milano (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica; INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Acharya, B. S. [Collegato di Udine (Italy). INFN Gruppo; ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Adams, D. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.; Addy, T. N. [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Dept. of Physics; Adelman, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Aderholz, M. [Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, Muchen (Germany). Max-Planck-Institut fur Physik; Adomeit, S. [Ludwig Maximilian Univ., Munich (Germany). Fakultat fur Physik; Adragna, P. [Queen Mary Univ. of London, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Adye, T. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom). Particle Physics Dept.; Aefsky, S. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A. [Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain). Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos and CAFPE; Siegrist, James L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter presents the first search for a heavy particle decaying into an e±?? final state in ?s=7??TeV pp collisions at the LHC. The data were recorded by the ATLAS detector during 2010 and correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 35??pb?¹. No excess above the standard model background expectation is observed. Exclusions at 95% confidence level are placed on two representative models. In an R-parity violating supersymmetric model, tau sneutrinos with a mass below 0.75 TeV are excluded, assuming all R-parity violating couplings are zero except ??311=0.11 and ?312=0.07. In a lepton flavor violating model, a Z?-like vector boson with masses of 0.70–1.00 TeV and corresponding cross sections times branching ratios of 0.175–0.183 pb is excluded. These results extend to higher mass R-parity violating sneutrinos and lepton flavor violating Z’s than previous constraints from the Tevatron.

  9. Search for a Heavy Particle Decaying into an Electron and a Muon with the ATLAS Detector in s = 7 ? ? TeV p p collisions at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, E.; Acharya, B. S.; et al

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter presents the first search for a heavy particle decaying into an e±?? final state in ?s=7??TeV pp collisions at the LHC. The data were recorded by the ATLAS detector during 2010 and correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 35??pb?¹. No excess above the standard model background expectation is observed. Exclusions at 95% confidence level are placed on two representative models. In an R-parity violating supersymmetric model, tau sneutrinos with a mass below 0.75 TeV are excluded, assuming all R-parity violating couplings are zero except ??311=0.11 and ?312=0.07. In a lepton flavor violating model, a Z?-like vector bosonmore »with masses of 0.70–1.00 TeV and corresponding cross sections times branching ratios of 0.175–0.183 pb is excluded. These results extend to higher mass R-parity violating sneutrinos and lepton flavor violating Z’s than previous constraints from the Tevatron.« less

  10. atlas physics workshop: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results. Vasiliki A....

  11. atlas tracking results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results. Vasiliki A....

  12. Toward an understanding of the single electron data measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Aichelin, J. [SUBATECH, Universite de Nantes, EMN, IN2P3/CNRS, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, F-44307 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High transverse momentum (p{sub T}) single nonphotonic electrons which have been measured in the RHIC experiments come dominantly from heavy meson decay. The ratio of their p{sub T} spectra in pp and AA collisions [R{sub AA}(p{sub T})] reveals the energy loss of heavy quarks in the environment created by AA collisions. Using a fixed coupling constant and the Debye mass (m{sub D}{approx_equal}gT) as the infrared regulator, perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations are not able to reproduce the data, neither the energy loss nor the azimuthal (v{sub 2}) distribution. Employing a running coupling constant and replacing the Debye mass by a more realistic hard thermal loop (HTL) calculation, we find a substantial increase in the collisional energy loss, which brings the v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) distribution as well as R{sub AA}(p{sub T}) to values close to the experimental ones without excluding a contribution from radiative energy loss.

  13. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. Specifically, the Zhang's parton...

  14. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. Specifically, the Zhang's parton...

  15. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) CRYOGENIC SYSTEM AT BNL: REVIEW OF THE MODIFICATIONS AND UPGRADES SINCE 2002 AND PLANNED IMPROVEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THAN,Y.R.; TUOZZOLO, J.; SIDI-YAKHLEF, A.; GANNI, V.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system which also resulted in improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases by balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid helium storage tank, compressor bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thompson expander) with associated heat exchangers at the cold end of the plant. Also, liquid helium pumps used for forced circulation of the sub-cooled helium through the magnet loops were eliminated by an accelerator supply flow reconfiguration. Planned future upgrades include the resizing of expanders 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies.

  16. Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marlene Nahrgang; Tim Schuster; Michael Mitrovski; Reinhard Stock; Marcus Bleicher

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central ($b\\leq 2.75$ fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from $E_{lab}=2A$ GeV to $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$.

  17. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) REFRIGERATOR SYSTEM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: PHASE III OF THE SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND OPERATIONS UPGRADES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDI-YEKHLEF,A.; TUOZZOLO,J.; THAN, R.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and I1 of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase 111, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for, the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  18. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Sidi-Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  19. Core - Corona Model analysis of the Low Energy Beam Scan at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) in Brookhaven (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gemard; J. Aichelin

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of spectra of identified particles in collisions between ultrarelativistic heavy ions with a center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ is analyzed in the core - corona model. We show that at these energies the spectra can be well understood assuming that they are composed of two components whose relative fraction depends on the centrality of the interaction: The core component which describes an equilibrated quark gluon plasma and the corona component which is caused by nucleons close to the surface of the interaction zone which scatter only once and which is identical to that observed in proton-proton collisions. The success of this approach at 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ shows that the physics does not change between this energy and $\\sqrt{s}=200~ AGeV$ for which this model has been developed (Aichelin 2008). This presents circumstantial evidence that a quark gluon plasma is also created at center of mass energies as low as 11.5 $AGeV$.

  20. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS User Program - Visitor Information Site Access: Researchers who plan to come to Argonne for an ATLAS experiment are required to complete certain forms. All ATLAS Users need...

  1. Searches for heavy long-lived sleptons and R-hadrons with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for long-lived particles is performed using a data sample of 4.7 fb[superscript ?1] from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy ?s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No excess is ...

  2. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN logo U.S.-CERN Agreement Paves Way for New Era of Scientific Discovery A new agreement between the United States and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)...

  3. Initial state in relativistic nuclear collisions and Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gelis

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I discuss recent works related to the pre-hydrodynamical stages of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  4. Long-term operating experience for the ATLAS superconducting resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardo, R.; Zinkann, G.

    1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of the ATLAS accelerator have been operating now for over 21 years. The facility has accumulated several million resonator-hours of operation at this point and has demonstrated the long-term reliability of RF superconductivity. The overall operating performance of the ATLAS facility has established a level of beam quality, flexibility, and reliability not previously achieved with heavy-ion accelerator facilities. The actual operating experience and maintenance history of ATLAS are presented for ATLAS resonators and associated electronics systems. Solutions to problems that appeared in early operation as well as current problems needing further development are discussed.

  5. Study of heavy-flavor quarks produced in association with top-quark pairs at ?s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Using a sample of dilepton top-quark pair (t[bar over t]) candidate events, a study is performed of the production of top-quark pairs together with heavy-flavor (HF) quarks, the sum of t[bar over t] + b + X and t[bar over ...

  6. Search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson in the channel H?ZZ??[superscript +]?[superscript ?]q[bar over q] using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for a heavy Standard Model Higgs boson decaying via View the H?ZZ??[superscript +]?[superscript ?]q[bar over q], where ?=e,? is presented. The search is performed using a data set of pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV, ...

  7. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (or 630-252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Aspects of radiation safety at ATLAS: Health Physics Coverage at ATLAS is provided by Argonne National Laboratory. Health Physics...

  8. Recent QCD-related results from ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this presentation I will give a review of QCD-related results obtained and published by ATLAS. I will cover measurement results constraining parton distribution functions, soft and hard partonic resummation, higher order matrix element calculations, their matching to parton shower, and vector boson plus heavy flavor jets.

  9. Heavy Quarkonium Production at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Matthew

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    are not fully in agreement with predicted observables from either model. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is well suited to further explore heavy quarkonium production. The Heavy Flavor program...

  10. atlas electric matches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (s) Voltage (V) 0ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS Status of Optical Electronics K.K. Gan Ohio State University September 26 Gan, K. K. 5 ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS Physics Websites...

  11. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    State University. The workshop will be an opportunity to: (1) update everyone on the new capabilities of ATLAS and (2) refine the vision of the future of ATLAS. Thus,...

  12. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Data Management Plan This information is provided to inform users of the data management policies of ATLAS. All proposals for funding to the Office of Science require a data...

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guest Facilities User Agreement All ATLAS Facility Users must have an appointment at Argonne to work at the facility. In order for a non-Argonne person to perform research at ATLAS...

  14. The "ripples" on relativistically expanding fluid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Shuzhe [Tsinghua Univ., and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Liao, Jinfeng [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Zhuang, Pengfei [Tsinghua Univ., and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that fluctuations of various types play important roles in the evolution of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions and bear many phenomenological consequences for experimental observables. The bulk dynamics of the fireball is well described by relativistic hydrodynamic expansion and the fluctuations on top of such expanding background can be studied within the linearized hydrodynamic framework. In this paper we present complete and analytic sound wave solutions on top of both Bjorken flow and Hubble flow backgrounds.

  15. ATLAS Data Access Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS has fully supported the principle of open access in its publication policy. This document outlines the policy of ATLAS as regards open access to data at different levels as described in the DPHEP model. The main objective is to make the data available in a usable way to people external to the ATLAS collaboration.

  16. The "ripples" on relativistically expanding fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuzhe Shi; Jinfeng Liao; Pengfei Zhuang

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that fluctuations of various types play important roles in the evolution of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions and bear many phenomenological consequences for experimental observables. The bulk dynamics of the fireball is well described by relativistic hydrodynamic expansion and the fluctuations on top of such expanding background can be studied within the linearized hydrodynamic framework. In this work we present complete and analytic sound wave solutions on top of both Bjorken flow and Hubble flow backgrounds. We also briefly discuss the applications of these solutions in heavy ion collisions.

  17. Multipole expansion for relativistic Coulomb excitation H. Esbensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Multipole expansion for relativistic Coulomb excitation H. Esbensen Physics Division, Argonne a general expression for the multipole expansion of the electromagnetic interaction in relativistic heavy. The interaction has diagonal as well as off-diagonal multipole components, associated with the intrinsic

  18. Relativistic Anelasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Epstein; D. A. Burton; R. W. Tucker

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A formulation of Continuum Mechanics within the context of General Relativity is presented that allows for the incorporation of certain types of anelastic material behaviour, such as viscoelasticity and plasticity. The approach is based on the concept of a four-dimensional body-time complex structured as a principal bundle. The anelastic response is regarded as the result of a continuous distribution of inhomogeneities, whose evolution is dictated by a suggested relativistic version of the Eshelby tensor. The role played by various groups is emphasized throughout the presentation and illustrated by means of the example of an anelastic fluid.

  19. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Operations personnel, and to various experimental instrument specialists in the Physics Division. The PAC members will review each proposal for scientific merit and...

  20. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Funding Agencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission of France ARMINES (France) Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany German Academic Exchange Service Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany National...

  1. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transverse momenta, as observed in experimental data at RHIC. A similar dependence of the antikaon to pion ratio on transverse momentum is obtained, but it reaches a smaller value at intermediate transverse momenta. At high transverse momenta, the model...

  2. MESON PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnetzer, S.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by (kaon yield)*/*?. Fig. 27 Ion chamber voltage vs. T-Bcoincidences. Fig. ? 8 Ion chamber voltage vs. E tag29 Measured charge on the Ion chamber per beam particle vs.

  3. TOPICS IN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY-ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagamiya, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1051. M. Sobel, P.J. Siemens, J.P. BondorfandH.A. Bethe,talk at LBL (1979). P. J. Siemens and J. O. Rasmussen,·Phys.Randrup, A. Sandoval, P. Siemens, and J. Symons are grate-

  4. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golling, Tobias; ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector Tobias GollingUniversity of California. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixelof the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS

  5. ATLAS_Strategic_Plan_14_August _9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program requires: - Effective operation of ATLAS, - Increased ATLAS beam intensities and energies, - Increased availability of beam time through the proposed ATLAS multi-user...

  6. BNL ATLAS Grid Computing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Ernst

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    As the sole Tier-1 computing facility for ATLAS in the United States and the largest ATLAS computing center worldwide Brookhaven provides a large portion of the overall computing resources for U.S. collaborators and serves as the central hub for storing,

  7. ATLAS Virtual Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfarb, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world’s continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  8. Search for long-lived, heavy particles in final states with a muon and multi-track displaced vertex in proton–proton collisions at ?s =7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    Many extensions of the Standard Model posit the existence of heavy particles with long lifetimes. In this Letter, results are presented of a search for events containing one or more such particles, which decay at a significant ...

  9. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss Using Jets: Prospects from ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Grau; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Jets at the LHC are expected to provide the testing ground for studying QCD energy loss. In this contribution, we briefly outline the strategy that will be used to measure jets in ATLAS and how we will go about studying energy loss. We describe the utility of measuring the jet $R_{AA}$, the fragmentation function, and heavy flavor jets. Utilizing the collision energy provided by the LHC and the nearly hermetic and highly segmented calorimeter, ATLAS is expected to make important contributions to the understanding of parton energy loss using fully reconstructed jets.

  10. Top Physics at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Barisonzi

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider LHC is a top quark factory: due to its high design luminosity, LHC will produce about 200 millions of top quarks per year of operation. The large amount of data will allow to study with great precision the properties of the top quark, most notably cross-section, mass and spin. The Top Physics Working Group has been set up at the ATLAS experiment, to evaluate the precision reach of physics measurements in the top sector, and to study the systematic effects of the ATLAS detector on such measurements. This reports give an overview of the main activities of the ATLAS Top Physics Working Group in 2004.

  11. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the upgrade will replace the front end of the ATLAS Positive Ion Injector linac (PII) by a new bunching system, a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a new cryostat of...

  12. Distributed analysis in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, Alastair; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment accumulated more than 140 PB of data during the first run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The analysis of such an amount of data for the distributed physics community is a challenging task. The Distributed Analysis (DA) system of the ATLAS experiment is an established and stable component of the ATLAS distributed computing operations. About half a million user jobs are daily running on DA resources, submitted by more than 1500 ATLAS physicists. The reliability of the DA system during the first run of the LHC and the following shutdown period has been high thanks to the continuous automatic validation of the distributed analysis sites and the user support provided by a dedicated team of expert shifters. During the LHC shutdown, the ATLAS computing model has undergone several changes to improve the analysis workflows, including the re-design of the production system, a new analysis data format and event model, and the development of common reduction and analysis frameworks. We r...

  13. Relativistic Remnants of Non-Relativistic Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taro Kashiwa; Taisuke Yamaguchi

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrons obeying the Dirac equation are investigated under the non-relativistic $c \\mapsto \\infty$ limit. General solutions are given by derivatives of the relativistic invariant functions whose forms are different in the time- and the space-like region, yielding the delta function of $(ct)^2 - x^2$. This light-cone singularity does survive to show that the charge and the current density of electrons travel with the speed of light in spite of their massiveness.

  14. Analysis Preservation in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, Lukas; The ATLAS collaboration; Jones, Roger; Cranmer, Kyle

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long before data taking ATLAS established a policy that all analyses need to be preserved. In the initial data-taking period, this has been achieved by various tools and techniques. ATLAS is now reviewing the analysis preservation with the aim to bring coherence and robustness to the process and with a clearer view of the level of reproducibility that is reasonably achievable. The secondary aim is to reduce the load on the analysts. Once complete, this will serve for our internal preservation needs but also provide a basis for any subsequent sharing of analysis results with external parties.

  15. Optical Spectroscopic ATLAS of the MOJAVE/2cm AGN Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrealba, Janet; Cruz-González, Irene; Arshakian, Tigran G; Bertone, Emanuele; Rosa-González, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an optical spectroscopic atlas at intermediate resolution (8 -15 A) for 124 core-dominated radio-loud active galactic nuclei with relativistic jets, drawn from the MOJAVE/2cm sample at 15GHz. It is the first time that spectroscopic and photometric parameters for a large sample of such type of AGN are presented. The atlas includes spectral parameters for the emission lines Hbeta, [O III] 5007, Mg II 2798 and/or C IV 1549 and corresponding data for the continuum, as well as the luminosities and equivalent widths of the Fe II UV/optical. It also contains the homogeneous photometric information in the B-band for 242 sources of the sample, with a distribution peak at BJ=18.0 and a magnitude interval of 11.1< BJ <23.7.

  16. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R. B. [PPPL; Gobbin, M. [Euratom-ENEA Association

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  17. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  18. D-sJ(2317) meson production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions RID A-2398-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, L. W.; Ko, Che Ming; Liu, W.; Nielsen, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of D-sJ(2317) mesons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is studied. Using the quark coalescence model, we first determine the initial number of D-sJ(2317) mesons produced during hadronization...

  19. Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV...

  20. ATLAS_Strategic_Plan_09_v5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This program requires: Effective operation of ATLAS, Increased ATLAS beam intensities and energies, Development of unique new radioactive beam capabilities, especially for neutron-...

  1. The quarkonium saga in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tserruya, Itzhak

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J/psi suppression was proposed more than 25 years ago as an unambiguous signature for the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma in relativistic heavy ion collisions. After intensive efforts, both experimental and theoretical, the quarkonium saga remains exciting, producing surprising results and not fully understood. This talk focuses on recent results on quarkonium production at RHIC and the LHC.

  2. Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

  3. Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

  4. Higgs boson search at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Snyder; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the ATLAS Higgs boson search using about 5 fb^-1 of data recorded in 2011 is summarized. Proceedings from Physics at the LHC 2012 (Vancouver).

  5. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rodosta, Traci

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  6. First LHC Beams in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krieger, P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a talk on the ATLAS single beam running, to be given on February 9th at the Aspen Winter Conference.

  7. BioFuels Atlas Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kristi Moriarity's presentation on NREL's BioFuels Atlas from the May 12, 2011, Clean Cities and Biomass Program State webinar.

  8. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodosta, Traci

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  9. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Super Hercules and Nanoball Walter Reviol (Washington University) 7+3: Prompt and delayed conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei Andreas Heinz (Yale) 7+3:...

  10. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Miller; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb-1. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  11. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  12. Operationalization of Relativistic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Hartmann

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the Helmholtz program of basic measurements to relativistic motion. We define a spatiotemporal order by practical comparison: "longer than" if one object or process covers the other. To express its value also numerically (how many times more) we cover them by a locally regular grid of light clocks. We define basic measures from physical operations. Interrelation of measurement operations by different observers reveals a genetic derivation of formal Lorentz transformation. Operationally impracticable configurations for accelerating observers clarify the way out of apparent Twin paradox. From simple measurement-methodical principles - without mathematical presuppositions - we derive all equations of relativistic Kinematics (and next same for classical and relativistic Dynamics).

  13. A relativistic parton cascade with radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghi R. Shin; Berndt Müller

    2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the evolution of a parton system which is formed at the central rapidity region just after an ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision. The evolution of the system, which is composed of gluons, quarks and antiquarks, is described by a relativistic Boltzmann equations with collision terms including radiation and retardation effects. The equations are solved by the test particle method using Monte-Carlo sampling. Our simulations do not show any evidence of kinetic equilibration, unless the cross sections are artificially increased to unrealistically large values.

  14. Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard Stock

    2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive introduction is given to the field of relativistic nuclear collisions, and the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. The content of this complex of reviews is shown.

  15. RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyulassy, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

  16. Relativistic Point Coupling Model for Vibrational Excitations in the Continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, P.; Daoutidis, J. [Physics Department Technical University Munich, 85748 Garching (Germany); Litvinova, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An implementation of the relativistic random phase approximation with the proper treatment of the continuum has been developed for the relativistic point coupling model and applied to investigate collective excitations in spherical nuclei. The results are compared with the spectral implementation of the same model. In heavy nuclei, where the escape width is negligible, we find an excellent agreement between both methods in the region of giant resonance and some discrepancies in the region of low-lying pygmy resonance. The differences are more pronounced in light nuclei due to the larger values of the escape widths.

  17. Commissioning of ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The subdetector integration in recent milestone weeks is described, especially the cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6, focusing on simultaneous running and combined track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector. The liquid argon and tile calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The High-Level-Trigger infrastructure is installed and algorithms tested in technical runs. Problems with the inner detector cooling compressors are being fixed.

  18. Commissioning of ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The subdetector integration in recent milestone weeks is described, especially the cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6, focussing on combined running and track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector. The liquid argon and tile calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The High-Level-Trigger infrastructure is installed and algorithms tested in technical runs. Problems with the inner detector cooling compressors are being fixed.

  19. ATLAS Muon Detector Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Diehl; for the ATLAS muon collaboration

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of several major components: Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) for precision measurements in the bending plane of the muons, supplemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the high eta region; Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) for trigger and second coordinate measurement in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively; an optical alignment system to track the relative positions of all chambers; and, finally, the world's largest air-core magnetic toroid system. We will describe the status and commissioning of the muon system with cosmic rays and plans for commissioning with early beams.

  20. Studies of high transverse momentum phenomena in heavy ion collisions using the PHOBOS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenger, Edward (Edward Allen)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of high-pT particles as calibrated probes has proven to be an effective tool for understanding the properties of the system produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this thesis, two such measurements are ...

  1. Elliptic flow and energy loss of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Xu, Zhe [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-time propagation of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is studied within the partonic transport model Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings (BAMPS). In this model heavy quarks interact with the partonic medium via binary scatterings. The cross sections for these interactions are calculated with leading-order perturbative QCD, but feature a more precise Debye screening derived within the hard thermal loop approximation and obey the running of the coupling. Within this framework the elliptic flow and the nuclear modification factor of heavy quarks are computed for the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies and compared to available experimental data. It is found that binary scatterings alone cannot reproduce the data and therefore radiative corrections have to be taken into account.

  2. Relativistic Positioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolomé Coll

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of relativistic {\\em location systems} is sketched. An interesting class of these systems is that of relativistic {\\em positioning systems,} which consists in sets of four clocks broadcasting their proper time. Among them, the more important ones are the {\\em auto-located positioning systems,} in which every clock broadcasts not only its proper time but the proper times that it receives from the other three. At this level, no reference to any exterior system (the Earth surface, for example) and no synchronization are needed. Some properties are presented. In the SYPOR project, such a structure is proposed, eventually anchored to a classical reference system on the Earth surface, as the best relativistic structure for Global Navigation Satellite Systems.

  3. atlasUserMeeting14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GRETINA Mario Cromaz, LBNL Work supported under contract number DE-AC02-05CH11231. 2014 ATLAS User's Meeting ANL - May 15-16, 2014 The GRETINA Spectrometer 2 * first generation...

  4. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  5. Particle Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves A. Gallant

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the current status of Fermi acceleration theory at relativistic shocks. I first discuss the relativistic shock jump conditions, then describe the non-relativistic Fermi mechanism and the differences introduced by relativistic flows. I present numerical calculations of the accelerated particle spectrum, and examine the maximum energy attainable by this process. I briefly consider the minimum energy for Fermi acceleration, and a possible electron pre-acceleration mechanism.

  6. Numerical integration of thermal noise in relativistic hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clint Young

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal fluctuations affect the dynamics of systems near critical points, the evolution of the early universe, and two-particle correlations in heavy-ion collisions. For the latter, numerical simulations of nearly-ideal, relativistic fluids are necessary. The correlation functions of noise in relativistic fluids are calculated, stochastic integration of the noise in 3+1-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics is implemented, and the effect of noise on observables in heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Thermal fluctuations will cause significant variance in the event-by-event distributions of integrated v2 while changing average values even when using the same initial conditions, suggesting that including thermal noise will lead to refitting of the hydrodynamical parameters with implications for understanding the physics of hot QCD.

  7. A Co-moving Coordinate System for Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2006-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations of relativistic hydrodynamics are transformed so that steps forward in time preserves local simultaneity. In these variables, the space-time coordinates of neighboring points on the mesh are simultaneous according to co-moving observers. Aside from the time step varying as a function of the location on the mesh, the local velocity gradient and the local density then evolve according to non-relativistic equations of motion. Analytic solutions are found for two one-dimensional cases with constant speed of sound. One solution has a Gaussian density profile when mapped into the new coordinates. That solution is analyzed for the effects of longitudinal acceleration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC, especially in regards to two-particle correlation measurements of the longitudinal size.

  8. Relativistic forces in Lagangian mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Muñoz Díaz

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a general definition of \\emph{relativistic force} in the context of Lagrangian mechanics. Once this is done we prove that the only relativistic forces which are linear on the velocities are those coming from differential 2-forms defined on the configuration space. In this sense, electromagnetic fields provide a mechanical system with the simplest type of relativistic forces.

  9. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H?ZZ??+?-??? Decay Channel with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for a heavy standard model Higgs boson decaying via H?ZZ??+?-??? , where ?=e, ?, is presented. It is based on proton-proton collision data at ?s=7??TeV, collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in the first ...

  10. A General Quadrature Solution for Relativistic, Non-relativistic, and Weakly-Relativistic Rocket Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Adam L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the traditional rocket problem, where the ejecta velocity is assumed constant, can be reduced to an integral quadrature of which the completely non-relativistic equation of Tsiolkovsky, as well as the fully relativistic equation derived by Ackeret, are limiting cases. By expanding this quadrature in series, it is shown explicitly how relativistic corrections to the mass ratio equation as the rocket transitions from the Newtonian to the relativistic regime can be represented as products of exponential functions of the rocket velocity, ejecta velocity, and the speed of light. We find that even low order correction products approximate the traditional relativistic equation to a high accuracy in flight regimes up to $0.5c$ while retaining a clear distinction between the non-relativistic base-case and relativistic corrections. We furthermore use the results developed to consider the case where the rocket is not moving relativistically but the ejecta stream is, and where the ejecta stream is massless.

  11. Anisotropic Flow and Jet Quenching in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Guang-You

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The exploration of the strong-interaction matter under extreme conditions is one of the main goals of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We provide some of the main results on the novel properties of quark-gluon plasma, with particular focus given to the strong collectivity and the color opaqueness exhibited by such hot and dense matter produced in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC and the LHC.

  12. Anisotropic Flow and Jet Quenching in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang-You Qin

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The exploration of the strong-interaction matter under extreme conditions is one of the main goals of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We provide some of the main results on the novel properties of quark-gluon plasma, with particular focus given to the strong collectivity and the color opaqueness exhibited by such hot and dense matter produced in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC and the LHC.

  13. Quarkonium production at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darren D Price

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of quarkonium is an important testing ground for QCD calculations. The J/\\psi\\ and \\Upsilon\\ production cross-sections are measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7~TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity. The fraction of J/\\psi\\ produced in B-hadron decays is also measured and the differential cross-sections of prompt and non-prompt J/\\psi\\ production determined separately. Measurements of the fiducial production cross-section of the \\Upsilon(1S) and observation of the \\chi_{c,bJ} states are also discussed.

  14. Commissioning ATLAS Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Bold; for Atlas Tdaq

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will face the challenge of efficiently selecting interesting candidate events in $pp$ collisions at 14 TeV centre-of-mass energy, whilst rejecting the enormous number of background events. Therefore it is equipped with a three level trigger system. The first level is is hardware based and uses coarse granularity calorimeter information and fast readout muon chambers. The second and third level triggers, which are software based, will need to reduce the first level trigger output rate of ~ 75 kHz to ~ 200 Hz written out to mass storage. The progress in commissioning of this system will be reviewed in this paper.

  15. Consumer Energy Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

  16. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TileCal is the Hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitised every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution will review in a first part the performances of the calorimeter during run 1, obtained from calibration data, and from studies of the response of particles from collisions. In a second part it will present the solutions being investigated for the ongoing and future upgrades of the calorimeter electronics.

  17. Class Generation for Numerical Wind Atlases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Class Generation for Numerical Wind Atlases Risø National Laboratory Wind Energy Department and The Technical University of Denmark Informatics and Mathematical Modelling Department Nicholas J. Cutler s000144 Constructing a Numerical Wind Atlas 5 2.1 Introduction

  18. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad, E-mail: mdjebli@usthb.dz [USTHB, Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, B.P. 32 Bab-Ezzouar, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  19. Recent results from the UrQMD hybrid model for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleicher, Marcus; Steinheimer, Jan; van Hees, Hendrik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings present recent results from transport-hydrodynamics-hybrid models for heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies. The main focus is on the absorption of (anti-)protons in the hadronic afterburner stage of the reaction, di-lepton production at SPS and heavy quark dynamics.

  20. Formation of Superdense Hadronic Matter in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba0-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the detail of a newly developed relativistic transport model (ART 1.0) for high energy heavy-ion collisions. Using this model, we first study the general collision dynamics between heavy ions at the AGS energies. We then show...

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ShinIchi Esumi

    2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Directed and elliptic event anisotropy parameters measured in the experiments at relativistic heavy-ion collider are presented. The possible origin of the measured elliptic anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and its sensitivity to the early phase of the high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  2. Extensivity and Relativistic Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dunning-Davies

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical properties associated with the widely accepted concept of the extensivity of many of the common thermodynamic variables are examined and some of their consequences considered. The possible conflict between some of these and currently accepted results of special relativistic thermodynamics is highlighted. Although several questions are raised, answers are not advanced as this seems an area demanding calm, widespread reflection which could conceivably lead to radical revision of part, or parts, of theoretical physics.

  3. Strangeness in Relativistic Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurgen Schaffner-Bielich; Stefan Schramm; Horst Stocker

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In these lecture notes, the role of strangeness in relativistic astrophysics of compact stars is addressed. The appearance of strange particles, as hyperons, kaons, and strange quarks, in the core of compact stars is examined and common features as well as differences are presented. Impacts on the global properties of compact stars and signals of the presence of exotic matter are outlined for the various strange phases which can appear in the interior at high densities.

  4. Noncommutative relativistic particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amorim, Ricardo; Ramirez, Walberto Guzman [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Abreu, Everton M. C. [Grupo de Fisica Teorica e Matematica Fisica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465-07, 23890-970, Seropedica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a relativistic formulation of noncommutative mechanics where the object of noncommutativity {theta}{sup {mu}{nu}}is considered as an independent quantity. Its canonical conjugate momentum is also introduced so that it permits one to obtain an explicit form for the generators of the extended Poincare group in the noncommutative case. The theory, which is invariant under reparametrization, generalizes recent nonrelativistic results. Free noncommutative bosonic particles satisfy an extended Klein-Gordon equation depending on two parameters.

  5. Acceleration of heavy ions in the AGS and CBA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, M.Q.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan has been developed to inject ion beams from the Brookhaven Tandem or a cyclotron added to the Tandem into the AGS. This beam could then be injected into a relativistic heavy ion collider. The availability of many CBA components adds to the attractiveness of this proposal.

  6. Initial Parton Distribution just after Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghi R. Shin; Kang S. Lee

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the initial distribution of a parton system which is formed just after relativistic heavy ion collision by the elastic scattering among the constituent partons in details and analyze the baryon and strangeness contents of the primary parton system. We present the rapidity and energy distributions of the system.

  7. ATLAS computing on CSCS HPC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Weber, Michele; Walker, Rodney; Hostettler, Michael Artur

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Piz Daint Cray XC30 HPC system at CSCS, the Swiss National Supercomputing centre, is in 2014 the highest ranked European system on TOP500, also featuring GPU accelerators. Event generation and detector simulation for the ATLAS experiment has been enabled for this machine. We report on the technical solutions, performance, HPC policy challenges and possible future opportunities for HEP on extreme HPC systems. In particular a custom made integration to the ATLAS job submission system has been developed via the Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware. Further, some GPU acceleration of the Geant4 detector simulations were implemented to justify the allocation request for this machine.

  8. Jet Analysis in Heavy Ion Collisions in CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Tonjes; for the CMS collaboration

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, jets have been a useful tool to probe the properties of the hot, dense matter created. At the Large Hadron Collider, collisions of Pb+Pb at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.5 TeV will provide a large cross section of jets at high $E_T$ above the minimum bias heavy ion background. Simulations of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's capability to measure jets in heavy ion collisions are presented. In particular, $\\gamma$-jet measurements can estimate the amount of energy lost by a jet interacting strongly with the medium, since the tagged photon passes through unaffected.

  9. Kaon differential flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Sustich, AT; Ko, Che Ming.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We find that in the absence of kaon potential the kaon differential flow is positive and increases with transverse momentum as that of nucleons. The repulsive kaon potential...

  10. Kaon differential flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Sustich, AT; Ko, Che Ming.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We find that in the absence of kaon potential the kaon differential flow is positive and increases with transverse momentum as that of nucleons. The repulsive kaon potential...

  11. Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at RHIC. The results are compared with those from the coalescence model. The deviation of deuteron elliptic flow from the constituent nucleon number scaling expected from the coalescence model and the comparison with the experimental data are discussed...

  12. Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . A555, 659 (1993). [31] D. E. Gonzalez Trotter et al., Phys. Rev. C 73, 034001 (2006). [32] PHENIX Collaboration, S. S. Adler et al., Phys. Rev. C 69, 034909 (2004). [33] R. A. Fisher and L. H. C. Tippett, Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 24, 180.... R. Tieger, and W. J. Burger, Phys. Rev. C 44, 24 (1991). [40] B. A. Li and C. M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 52, 2037 (1995); B. A. Li, A. T. Sustich, B. Zhang, and C. M. Ko, Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 10, 267 (2001). [41] W. Grein et al., Ann. Phys. (NY) 153...

  13. Multiphase transport model for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Pal, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ] by requiring events to each have at least one charged particle in both ends of the pseudorapidity intervals 3 CERN ISR data is different. From the comparison with the AMPT inelastic results (solid curves...+Au collisions thus provide the opportunity to study the properties of this so-called quark-gluon plasma (QGP). At the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will allow Pb+Pb collisions at ? sNN = 5.5 TeV, the produced quark-gluon plasma...

  14. RHIC | Physics of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics (the study of the atom's constituents), astrophysics (the study of stars and planets), condensed matter physics (the science of solid matter) and cosmology (the study of...

  15. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider | The Case for Continuing Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    make up 99 percent of visible matter in the universe today, everything from stars to planets to people. In addition to giving us a new way to explore and understand the nature of...

  16. COMPLEX FRAGMENT EMISSION IN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemaire, M.-C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Johannesburg, August 1978. P.J. Siemens and J.O. Rasmussen,g (1979) 880. (13a)P.J. Siemens and J. Kapusta, Preprint. (by the explosion model of Siemens and Rasmussen (13). Using

  17. Deuteron production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Lin, Zi-Wei; Ko, Che Ming.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hadronic transport model ART is extended to include the production and annihilation of deuterons via the reactions BB dM, where B and M stand for baryons and mesons, respectively, as well as their elastic scattering with mesons and baryons...

  18. Hydrodynamics and fluctuations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : centrality dependence Data > hydro Small discrepancy between STAR and PHENIX data Au-Au collision per nucleon is in the details! A small effect: Average value 0.3%, maximum value 3% Should we care? #12;A primer is independent of pT, as predicted by hydro. But... the value is significantly larger than 0.5 #12;More data

  19. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  20. Pion flow and antiflow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bao-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Pang, T. Schlagel, and S. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4406 ~1995!. @6# B.A. Li and C.M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 52, 2037 ~1995!. @7# P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec, Phys. Lett. 157B, 146 ~1985!. FIG. 4. The transverse momentum dependence of the strength R...

  1. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider spin flipper commissioning plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Makdisi, Y.; Meng, W.; Meot, F.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.; Roser, T.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The commissioning of the RHIC spin flipper in the RHIC Blue ring during the RHIC polarized proton run in 2009 showed the detrimental effects of global vertical coherent betatron oscillation induced by the 2-AC dipole plus 4-DC dipole configuration. This global orbital coherent oscillation of the RHIC beam in the Blue ring in the presence of collision modulated the beam-beam interaction between the two RHIC beams and affected Yellow beam lifetime. The experimental data at injection with different spin tunes by changing the snake current also demonstrated that it was not possible to induce a single isolated spin resonance with the global vertical coherent betatron oscillation excited by the two AC dipoles. Hence, RHIC spin flipper was re-designed to eliminate the coherent vertical betatron oscillation outside the spin flipper by adding three additional AC dipoles. This paper presents the experimental results as well as the new design.

  2. Incident energy dependence of p(t) correlations at relativistic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCDB; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jedynak, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Buren, GV; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, , as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at root SNN = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing...

  3. ATLAS Fast Tracker Simulation Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Jahred; The ATLAS collaboration; Borodin, Mikhail; Chakraborty, Dhiman; García Navarro, José Enrique; Golubkov, Dmitry; Kama, Sami; Panitkin, Sergey; Smirnov, Yuri; Stewart, Graeme; Tompkins, Lauren; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Volpi, Guido

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To deal with Big Data flood from the ATLAS detector most events have to be rejected in the trigger system. the trigger rejection is complicated by the presence of a large number of minimum-bias events – the pileup. To limit pileup effects in the high luminosity environment of the LHC Run-2, ATLAS relies on full tracking provided by the Fast TracKer (FTK) implemented with custom electronics. The FTK data processing pipeline has to be simulated in preparation for LHC upgrades to support electronics design and develop trigger strategies at high luminosity. The simulation of the FTK - a highly parallelized system - has inherent performance bottlenecks on general-purpose CPUs. To take advantage of the Grid Computing power, the FTK simulation is integrated with Monte Carlo simulations at the Production System level above the ATLAS workload management system PanDA. We report on ATLAS experience with FTK simulations on the Grid and next steps for accommodating the growing requirements for resources during the LHC R...

  4. atlas pixel chip: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ATLAS Pixel Detector. CERN Preprints Summary: In this article we describe the architecture of the Module Controller Chip for the ATLAS Pixel Detector. The project started in...

  5. atlas sct commissioning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detector cooling compressors are being fixed. Thomas, J 2008-01-01 15 ATLAS Muon Detector Commissioning HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists...

  6. 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the...

  7. atlas aupres du: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    du Haut Seksaoua, Haut Atlas Physics Websites Summary: Seksaoua, Haut Atlas occidental, Maroc) Syntectonic emplacement of the Ifri copper mineralization (High'exploration pour ce...

  8. atlas small animal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency...

  9. atlas level-1 central: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency...

  10. atlas central maroc: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency...

  11. atlas starts moving: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency...

  12. atlas reaches cooling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency...

  13. atlas und axis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency...

  14. atlas installation building: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency...

  15. atlas experimental area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector built to search the Higgs boson, look 12 Distributed processing and analysis of ATLAS experimental data CERN...

  16. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s quarks up to p(T) similar to 4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, R(dAu), for the phi meson increases above unity at intermediate p(T), similar to that for pions and protons, while R...

  17. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,6 L. C. Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,19 E. Braidot,28 A. V. Brandin,26 E. Bruna,51 S. Bueltmann,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,51 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,5 J. Callner...

  18. Relativistic dynamics without conservation laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that relativistic dynamics can be approached without using conservation laws (conservation of momentum, of energy and of the centre of mass). Our approach avoids collisions that are not easy to teach without mnemonic aids. The derivations are based on the principle of relativity and on its direct consequence, the addition law of relativistic velocities.

  19. Search for a CP-odd Higgs boson decaying to Zh in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for a heavy, CP-odd Higgs boson, A, decaying into a Z boson and a 125 GeV Higgs boson, h, with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The search uses proton–proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy ...

  20. Search for new phenomena in the WW??????? final state in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter reports a search for a heavy particle that decays to WW using events produced in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of ...

  1. Commissioning of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -F. Arguin; for the ATLAS Pixel Collaboration

    2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008. It is currently in a commissioning phase using cosmic-ray events. We present the highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system.

  2. Alignment strategy for the ATLAS tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS; Golling, T.

    2007-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment is a multi-purpose particle detector that will study high-energy particle collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider. For the reconstruction of charged particles, and their production and their decay vertices, ATLAS is equipped with a sophisticated tracking system, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the Inner Detector and the muon spectrometer requires an accurate alignment. The challenge of aligning the ATLAS tracking devices is discussed, and the ATLAS alignment strategy is presented and illustrated with both data and Monte Carlo results.

  3. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  4. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Calibration and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Meyer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief summary of the hadronic calorimeter calibration systems and performance results, in the ATLAS detector at the LHC is given.

  5. Bulk viscosity in heavy ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Roy; A. K. Chaudhuri

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a temperature dependent bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\zeta/s$) along with a constant shear viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\eta/s$) on the space time evolution of the fluid produced in high energy heavy ion collisions have been studied in a relativistic viscous hydrodynamics model. The boost invariant Israel-Stewart theory of causal relativistic viscous hydrodynamics is used to simulate the evolution of the fluid in 2 spatial and 1 temporal dimension. The dissipative correction to the freezeout distribution for bulk viscosity is calculated using Grad's fourteen moment method. From our simulation we show that the method is applicable only for $\\zeta/s<0.004$.

  6. Polyanalytic relativistic second Bargmann transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zouhair Mouayn

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct coherent states through special superpositions of photon number states of the relativistic isotonic oscillator. In each superposition the coefficients are chosen to be L 2 eingenfunctions of a sigma weight Maass Laplacian on the Poincare disk, which are associated with discrete eigenvalues. For each nonzero m the associated coherent states transform constitutes the m true polyanalytic extension of a relativistic version of the second Bargmann transform, whose integral kernel is expressed in terms of a special Appel Kampe de Feriet hypergeometric function. The obtained results could be used to extend the known semi classical analysis of quantum dynamics of the relativistic isotonic oscillator.

  7. ATLAS results on top properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Derue

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of top quark properties using $t{\\bar t}$ events produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider with centre of mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV and detected by the ATLAS experiment are presented. These results include top quark mass, the top and anti-top mass difference, the electric charge, the top quark polarization and spin correlation, the $t{\\bar t}$ charge asymmetry and the search for flavour changing neutral currents.

  8. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  9. Search for Pair Production of Heavy Top-Like Quarks Decaying to a High-p[subscript T]W Boson and a b Quark in the Lepton Plus Jets Final State at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search is presented for production of a heavy up-type quark (t[superscript ?]) together with its antiparticle, assuming a significant branching ratio for subsequent decay into a W boson and a b quark. The search is ...

  10. Heavy metal biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  11. Stress tensor and bulk viscosity in relativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fries, Rainer J.; Mueller, Berndt; Schaefer, Andreas.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Station, Texas 77843, USA 2RIKEN/BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 3Yukawa Institute of Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan 4Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North... at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The analysis of the data collected in these experiments [1?4] has shown that the matter flows very rapidly at the moment of its breakup into free-streaming hadrons. The collective flow also exhibits a large anisotropy...

  12. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Grau; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Very soon the LHC will provide beams for heavy ion collisions at 5.52 TeV/nucleon. This center-of-mass energy results in a large cross-section for producing high-$E_T$ ($>$ 50 GeV) jets that are distinct from the soft, underlying event. This brings with it the possibility of performing full jet reconstruction to directly study jet energy loss in the medium produced in heavy ion collisions. In this note, we present the current state of jet reconstruction performance studies in heavy ion events using the ATLAS detector. We also discuss the possibilities of energy loss measurements available with full jet reconstruction: single jet $R_{AA}$ and di-jet and $\\gamma$-jet correlations.

  13. Pixel Sensors for ATLAS Sally Seidel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidel, Sally

    Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA for the ATLAS Collaboration 8 May 1998 Abstract The design and fabrication the desire to provide bias to every pixel without attaching the readout integrated circuit. This is expectedPixel Sensors for ATLAS Sally Seidel Department of Physics and Astronomy University of New Mexico

  14. Gravitational Waves from Relativistic Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasufumi Kojima

    2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar pulsations in rotating relativistic stars are reviewed. Slow rotation approximation is applied to solving the Einstein equations. The rotational effects on the non-axisymmetric oscillations are explicitly shown in the polar and axial modes.

  15. Relativistic Motion with Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felicetti, S; Fuentes, I; Lamata, L; Romero, G; Solano, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the dynamical modulation of the qubit-field coupling strength in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture mimics the motion of the qubit at relativistic speeds. This allows us to propose a realistic experiment to detect microwave photons coming from simulated acceleration radiation. Moreover, by combining this technique with the dynamical Casimir physics, we enhance the toolbox for studying relativistic phenomena in quantum field theory with superconducting circuits.

  16. Renewable Energy Atlas of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Hlava, K. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Greenwood, H. [Environmentall Science Division] [Environmentall Science Division; Carr, A. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software. The report also includes: ? A description of each of the components of the Atlas; ? Lists of the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and ? A brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies. The Atlas includes the following: ? A GIS database organized as a set of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS Personal GeoDatabases, and ? ESRI ArcReader and ArcGIS project files providing an interactive map visualization and analysis interface.

  17. Relativistic Fractal Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo B. Ribeiro

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews an approach for constructing a simple relativistic fractal cosmology whose main aim is to model the observed inhomogeneities of the distribution of galaxies by means of the Lemaitre-Tolman solution of Einstein's field equations for spherically symmetric dust in comoving coordinates. This model is based on earlier works developed by L. Pietronero and J.R. Wertz on Newtonian cosmology, whose main points are discussed. Observational relations in this spacetime are presented, together with a strategy for finding numerical solutions which approximate an averaged and smoothed out single fractal structure in the past light cone. Such fractal solutions are shown, with one of them being in agreement with some basic observational constraints, including the decay of the average density with the distance as a power law (the de Vaucouleurs' density power law) and the fractal dimension in the range 1 fractal model we find that all Friedmann models look inhomogeneous along the backward null cone, with a departure from the observable homogeneous region at relatively close ranges. It is also shown that with these same observational relations the Einstein-de Sitter model can have an interpretation where it has zero global density, a result consistent with the "zero global density postulate" advanced by Wertz for hierarchical cosmologies and conjectured by Pietronero for fractal cosmological models. The article ends with a brief discussion on the possible link between this model and nonlinear and chaotic dynamics.

  18. Practical relativistic bit commitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommaso Lunghi; J?drzej Kaniewski; Felix Bussieres; Raphael Houlmann; Marco Tomamichel; Stephanie Wehner; Hugo Zbinden

    2015-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which Alice wishes to commit a secret bit to Bob. Perfectly secure bit commitment between two mistrustful parties is impossible through asynchronous exchange of quantum information. Perfect security is however possible when Alice and Bob each split into several agents exchanging classical information at times and locations suitably chosen to satisfy specific relativistic constraints. In this Letter we first revisit a previously proposed scheme that realizes bit commitment using only classical communication. We prove that the protocol is secure against quantum adversaries for a duration limited by the light-speed communication time between the locations of the agents. We then propose a novel multi-round scheme based on finite-field arithmetic that extends the commitment time beyond this limit, and we prove its security against classical attacks. Finally, we present an implementation of these protocols using dedicated hardware and we show how it could be used to realize commitments of duration ranging up to 212 milliseconds by agents occupying antipodal locations on the Earth.

  19. Relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation tensor with kinetically balanced rotational London orbitals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wenjian, E-mail: liuwjbdf@gmail.com [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Both kinetically balanced (KB) and kinetically unbalanced (KU) rotational London orbitals (RLO) are proposed to resolve the slow basis set convergence in relativistic calculations of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) coupling tensors of molecules containing heavy elements [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. While they perform rather similarly, the KB-RLO Ansatz is clearly preferred as it ensures the correct nonrelativistic limit even with a finite basis. Moreover, it gives rise to the same “direct relativistic mapping” between nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and NSR coupling tensors as that without using the London orbitals [Y. Xiao, Y. Zhang, and W. Liu, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 600 (2014)].

  20. Study of electromagnetic dissociation of heavy nuclei at the relativistic heavy ion collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makeev, Andrei

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented here is devoted to research which I have done within the BRAHMS collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the period from January 1999 until October 2001. The Texas A&M group in the BRAHMS experiment is responsible...

  1. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and R. Rapp, Phys. Rev. C 73, 034913 (2006). [8] C. M. Ko and W. Liu, Nucl. Phys. A783, 233c (2007). [9] B. Zhang, L.-W. Chen, and C.-M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 72, 024906 (2005). [10] P. B. Gossiaux and J. Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014904 (2008). [11] P..., Phys. Rev. C 65, 065203 (2002). [29] A. Selem and F. Wilczek, arXiv:hep-ph/0602128. [30] S. Ekelin, S. Fredriksson, M. Ja?ndel, and T. I. Larsson, Phys. Rev. D 28, 257 (1983). [31] R. L. Jaffe, Phys. Rep. 409, 1 (2005...

  2. Study of electromagnetic dissociation of heavy nuclei at the relativistic heavy ion collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makeev, Andrei

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page RHIC accelerator facility. Top view of the BRAHMS detectors and magnets. BRAHMS beam-beam counter arrays. The points are particles from GEANT simulations hitting the active detector volumes. . . . 11 Silicon strip... Calculated response of the ZDC to protons, electrons and muons. . . 22 ZDC module-photomultiplier assembly. 24 W-Cherenkov ZDC prototype spectra when hit with 100 and 160 GeV protons at CERN. 26 10 Measured ZDC energy resolution versus energy. 28 Because...

  3. Thermalization of heavy quarks in the quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) indicate the possibility that the D-meson v2 could be similar in magnitude to the one of light hadrons [10,11]. Since the c quark is rather heavy, this would be quite remarkable and could provide important... temperature) has been suggested as a mechanism to enhance partonic cross sections [12?14] to facilitate rapid thermalization of the bulk matter at RHIC as required in hy- drodynamical models. The notion of charmonium resonances in the QGP [15,16] has been...

  4. Core-Corona Separation in Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, Klaus [SUBATECH, University of Nantes-IN2P3/CNRS-EMN, Nantes 44000 (France)

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple geometrical considerations show that the collision zone in high energy nuclear collisions may be divided into a central part ('core'), with high energy densities, and a peripheral part ('corona'), with smaller energy densities, more like in pp or pA collisions. We present calculations that allow us to separate these two contributions, and which show that the corona contribution is quite small (but not negligible) for central collisions, but gets increasingly important with decreasing centrality. We will discuss consequences concerning results obtained in heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Super Proton Synchrotron.

  5. Commissioning of the ATLAS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juergen Thomas; for the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The sub-detector integration in recent milestone weeks is described. Cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6 included simultaneous data-taking and combined track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector, as well as combined analysis of muon detector and muon trigger. The calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The high-level-trigger infrastructure is being installed and algorithms tested in technical runs.

  6. Early Top Physics with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Schieck

    2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector is one of the two multi-purpose experiments located at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and is expected to collect first collision data in summer 2009. Due to the large top-quark production cross-section the LHC will function as a top-quark factory allowing to measure top-quark properties even at initial luminosities. We present some recently-performed studies, focussing on measurements of the top pair and single top production cross-sections with the first fb-1 of data. The potential for the measurement of other top-quark properties like the mass will be also briefly discussed.

  7. Recent QCD Results from ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Meyer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent QCD results from ATLAS taken at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy using the LHC are presented, including: dijet production, isolated photon production, isolated photon production associated with jets, jet shapes in top-quark pair events, the production cross-section of the phi(1020) meson, and underlying event in jet events. Good agreement with theory predictions is seen, in particular with those made by next-to-leading-order generators. These measurements highlight the importance of precision QCD measurements for improving state-of-the-art theoretical tools and searching for new physics.

  8. ATLAS Tracking Event Data Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Åkesson, P F; Costa, M J; Elsing, M; Fleischmann, S; Gaponenko, A N; Liebig, W; Moyse, E; Salzburger, A; Siebel, M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report the event data model (EDM) relevant for tracking in the ATLAS experiment is presented. The core component of the tracking EDM is a common track object which is suited to describe tracks in the innermost tracking sub-detectors and in the muon detectors in offline as well as online reconstruction. The design of the EDM was driven by a demand for modularity and extensibility while taking into account the different requirements of the clients. The structure of the track object and the representation of the tracking-relevant information are described in detail.

  9. Heavy quark production from jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Fries, Rainer J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA (Received 13 May 2008; published 12 September 2008) Recently, it has been demonstrated that the chemical composition of jets in heavy ion collisions is significantly altered... observables that could be measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [14]. In Ref. [12] it was found that conversions of light quarks to gluons could help solve the puzzle of very similar nuclear modification...

  10. Non-Relativistic Superstring Theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a supersymmetric version of the 'critical' non-relativistic bosonic string theory [1] with its manifest global symmetry. We introduce the anticommuting bc CFT which is the super partner of the {beta}{gamma} CFT. The conformal weights of the b and c fields are both 1/2. The action of the fermionic sector can be transformed into that of the relativistic superstring theory. We explicitly quantize the theory with manifest SO(8) symmetry and find that the spectrum is similar to that of Type IIB superstring theory. There is one notable difference: the fermions are non-chiral. We further consider 'noncritical' generalizations of the supersymmetric theory using the superspace formulation. There is an infinite range of possible string theories similar to the supercritical string theories. We comment on the connection between the critical non-relativistic string theory and the lightlike Linear Dilaton theory.

  11. K/pi Fluctuations at Relativistic Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, B.I.

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results for K/{pi} fluctuations from Au+Au collisions at {radical}sNN = 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Our results for K/{pi} fluctuations in central collisions show little dependence on the incident energies studied and are on the same order as results observed by NA49 at the Super Proton Synchrotron in central Pb+Pb collisions at {radical}sNN = 12.3 and 17.3 GeV. We also report results for the collision centrality dependence of K/{pi} fluctuations as well as results for K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}/{pi}{sup -}, and K{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} fluctuations. We observe that the K/{pi} fluctuations scale with the multiplicity density, dN/d{eta}, rather than the number of participating nucleons.

  12. RELATIVISTIC QUANTUM FIELD THEORY OF A HYPERNUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boguta, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 Nuclei in Relativistic Field Theory of Nuclear Matter, LBLRelativistic Quantum Field Theory of Finite Nuclei, LBL prein a Relativistic Mean-Field Theory, Stanford preprint F.E.

  13. Holographic view of non-relativistic physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Koushik

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the AdS/CFT correspondence for relativistic CFTs, it seems natural to generalize it to non-relativistic CFTs. Such a dual description could provide insight into strong coupling phenomena observed in condensed ...

  14. Exploiting heavy oil reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

  15. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Ring, P. [Physics Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  16. Quantum walks and relativistic quantum simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatt, Rainer

    in a quantum simulation of the Klein para- dox. The position and momentum of a relativistic Dirac particle

  17. Characteristic hypersurfaces in a relativistic superfluid theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Linet

    1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    By discussing the Cauchy problem, we determine the covariant equation of the characteristic hypersurfaces in a relativistic superfluid theory.

  18. Multimodality Imaging Atlas of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Patrick

    NEW HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES HAVE ENHANCED OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE CORONARY atherosclerotic disease process, and this atlas provides a multimodality pictorial review of the development of histologically verified ...

  19. ATLAS Sensitivity to Anomalous WWV Couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simic, Lj.; Vranjes, N.; Mendas, I.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the strategy in extracting information on triple gauge boson couplings in WW production and summarize the expected limits on WWV couplings from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

  20. ATLAS upgrade June09_v3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the upgrade will replace the front end of the ATLAS Positive Ion Injector linac (PII) by a new bunching system, a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a new cryostat of...

  1. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL

    1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

  2. Quantum gates via relativistic remote control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo Martin-Martinez; Chris Sutherland

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We harness general relativistic effects to gain quantum control on a stationary qubit in an optical cavity by controlling the non-inertial motion of a different probe atom. Furthermore, we show that by considering relativistic trajectories of the probe, we enhance the efficiency of the quantum control. We explore the possible use of these relativistic techniques to build universal quantum gates.

  3. Decomposition of Harmonic and Jet Contributions to Particle-pair Correlations at Ultra-relativistic Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; P. Chung; W. G. Holzmann; M. Issah; Roy A. Lacey; A. Shevel; A. Taranenko; P. Danielewicz

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methodology is presented for analysis of two-particle azimuthal angle correlation functions obtained in collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. We show that harmonic and di-jet contributions to these correlation functions can be reliably decomposed by two techniques to give an accurate measurement of the jet-pair distribution. Results from detailed Monte Carlo simulations are used to demonstrate the efficacy of these techniques in the study of possible modifications to jet topologies in heavy ion reactions.

  4. Relativistic Blastwaves and Synchrotron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Downes; P. Duffy; S. Komissarov

    2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic shocks accelerate particles by the first order Fermi mechanism. These particles then emit synchrotron emission in the post shock gas. We have developed a numerical code which integrates the relativistic Euler equations for fluid dynamics with a general equation of state, together with the Liouville equation for the accelerated particles. We present tests of this code and, in addition, we use it to study the gamma ray burst afterglow predicted by the fireball model, along with the hydrodynamics of a relativistic blastwave. We find that, while, broadly speaking, the behaviour of the emission is similar to that already predicted with semi-analytic approaches, the detailed behaviour is somewhat different. The ``breaks'' in the synchrotron spectrum behave differently with time, and the spectrum above the final break is harder than previously expected. These effects are due to the incorporation of the geometry of the (spherical) blastwave, along with relativistic beaming and adiabatic cooling of the energetic particles leading to a mix, in the observed spectrum, between recently injected "uncooled" particles and the older "cooled" population in different parts of the evolving, inhomogeneous flow.

  5. Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ván

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

  6. A relativistic constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlumpf, F.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the predictive power of a relativistic quark model formulated on the light-front. The nucleon electromagnetic form factors, the semileptonic weak decays of the hyperons and the magnetic moments of both baryon octet and decuplet are calculated and found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

  7. Radiologic atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is an ''atlas of rheumatic joint disease'' selected from 20 years of personal experience by the author. The author sets a goal of demonstrating the value of soft-tissue imaging in the diagnosis of early joint disease. This goal is achieved with high quality reproductions, many of which are presented in duplicate to illustrate bone and soft-tissue changes. The contents include an introductory overview of the ''Mosaic of Arthritis'' followed by sections on adult rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, classic collagen disease, enthesiopathies, and lastly a section on gout and psuedogout. The subject index is specific and indexes figures with boldface type. Each section is introduced by a brief outline or overview of the radiographic spectrum of the joint disorder to be illustrated.

  8. atlas control system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hadronic end-cap calorimeter of ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: At the ATLAS detector a SCADA system surveys and controls the sub- detectors. The link is realized by PVSS2...

  9. atlas control room: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hadronic end-cap calorimeter of ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: At the ATLAS detector a SCADA system surveys and controls the sub- detectors. The link is realized by PVSS2...

  10. atlas level1 endcap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hadronic end-cap calorimeter of ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: At the ATLAS detector a SCADA system surveys and controls the sub- detectors. The link is realized by PVSS2...

  11. atlas calorimeter system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hadronic end-cap calorimeter of ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: At the ATLAS detector a SCADA system surveys and controls the sub- detectors. The link is realized by PVSS2...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia and Atlas-Copco Secoroc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergySandia and Atlas-Copco Secoroc Advance to Phase 2 in Their Geothermal Energy Project Sandia and Atlas-Copco Secoroc Advance to Phase 2 in Their Geothermal Energy...

  13. atlas discovery reach: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status from ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: An overview of the latest results of the Higgs boson search with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, following its discovery, is presented....

  14. Alternative Size and Lifetime Measurements for High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Silvio Petriconi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-Particle correlations based on the interference of identical particles has provided the chief means for determining the shape and lifetime of sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, Strong and Coulomb induced correlations are shown to provide equivalent information.

  15. AGIS: Evolution of Distributed Computing Information system for ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anisenkov, Alexey; The ATLAS collaboration; Alandes Pradillo, Maria; Karavakis, Edward

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variety of the ATLAS Computing Infrastructure requires a central information system to define the topology of computing resources and to store the different parameters and configuration data which are needed by the various ATLAS software components. The ATLAS Grid Information System is the system designed to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of the computing infrastructure used by ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  16. ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, K. K.

    Silicon lid v­groove for fibre alignment 45 0 cut for light reflection passive alignment features ffl Silicon carrier cut outs for silicon tiles passive alignment features ffl Silicon tiles alignment marks encouragement, modifications ffl produce a few working packages in­house in the next few weeks ffl investigate

  17. ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENA could reduce need for animal drug testsDOE

  18. Search for New Physics with Top and Bottom Quarks with ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanov, Alexander

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies performed by the principal investigator during the period of the grant constitute the ground work for search for new physics in channels including top and bottom quarks with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The PI has been involved in search for heavy charged Higgs bosons decaying into top and bottom quark pairs, and top quark rare decays involving Higgs bosons and c-quarks. Both channels have the top quark pair production as their main background, which was studied in detail. The search for heavy charged Higgs and top quark rare decays requires signi#12;cant amount of data accumulated by the experiment. In case no signal is observed in the present data sample collected by ATLAS (5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at proton-anti proton center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 20 fb{sup -1} at 8 TeV), data from the upgraded detector running at 14 TeV needs to be analyzed. The PI has been working on physics and performance studies at upgraded detector.

  19. Renewable energy atlas of the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.A.; Hlava, K.Greenwood, H.; Carr, A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. It is designed for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS) and other federal land management agencies to evaluate existing and proposed renewable energy projects. Much of the content of the Atlas was compiled at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to support recent and current energy-related Environmental Impact Statements and studies, including the following projects: (1) West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) (BLM 2008); (2) Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2010); (3) Supplement to the Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2011); (4) Upper Great Plains Wind Energy PEIS (WAPA/USFWS 2012, in progress); and (5) Energy Transport Corridors: The Potential Role of Federal Lands in States Identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 368(b) (in progress). This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software; describes each of the components of the Atlas; lists the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and provides a brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies.

  20. ATLAS Distributed Data Analysis: performance and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fassi, Farida; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the LHC operations era the key goal is to analyse the results of the collisions of high-energy particles as a way of probing the fundamental forces of nature. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC at CERN is recording and simulating several 10's of PetaBytes of data per year. The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concepts of Grid Computing. Large data volumes from the detectors and simulations require a large number of CPUs and storage space for data processing. To cope with this challenge a global network known as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) was built. This is the most sophisticated data taking and analysis system ever built. ATLAS accumulated more than 140 PB of data between 2009 and 2014. To analyse these data ATLAS developed, deployed and now operates a mature and stable distributed analysis (DA) service on the WLCG. The service is actively used: more than half a million user jobs run daily on DA resources, submitted by more than 1500 ATLAS physicists. A significant reliability of the...

  1. ATLAS Distributed Data Analysis: challenges and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fassi, Farida; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the LHC operations era the key goal is to analyse the results of the collisions of high-energy particles as a way of probing the fundamental forces of nature. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC at CERN is recording and simulating several 10's of PetaBytes of data per year. The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concepts of Grid Computing. Large data volumes from the detectors and simulations require a large number of CPUs and storage space for data processing. To cope with this challenge a global network known as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) was built. This is the most sophisticated data taking and analysis system ever built. ATLAS accumulated more than 140 PB of data between 2009 and 2014. To analyse these data ATLAS developed, deployed and now operates a mature and stable distributed analysis (DA) service on the WLCG. The service is actively used: more than half a million user jobs run daily on DA resources, submitted by more than 1500 ATLAS physicists. A significant reliability of the...

  2. Relativistic tunneling through opaque barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano; Leonardi, Vinicius [Department of Applied Mathematics, State University of Campinas, SP 13083-970, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an analytical study of relativistic tunneling through opaque barriers. We obtain a closed formula for the phase time. This formula is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations and corrects the standard formula obtained by the stationary phase method. An important result is found when the upper limit of the incoming energy distribution coincides with the upper limit of the tunneling zone. In this case, the phase time is proportional to the barrier width.

  3. Asymptotics of Relativistic Spin Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W Barrett; Christopher M Steele

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The stationary phase technique is used to calculate asymptotic formulae for SO(4) Relativistic Spin Networks. For the tetrahedral spin network this gives the square of the Ponzano-Regge asymptotic formula for the SU(2) 6j symbol. For the 4-simplex (10j-symbol) the asymptotic formula is compared with numerical calculations of the Spin Network evaluation. Finally we discuss the asymptotics of the SO(3,1) 10j-symbol.

  4. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P; The ATLAS collaboration; Brasolin, Franco; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Desmarais, Ron; Field, Laurence; Gable, Ian; Giordano, Domenico; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Hover, John; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Love, Peter; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Zaytsev, Alexandr

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This paper describes the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the virtual machine (VM) management systems used for harnessing infrastructure as a service (IaaS) resources are discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for ma...

  5. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P.; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, Peter; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Paterson, Michael; Gable, Ian; Sobie, Randall; Field, Laurence

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This work will describe the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the VM management systems used for harnessing IAAS resources will be discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for managing VM images across multiple clouds, ...

  6. A Cherenkov Detector for Monitoring ATLAS Luminosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbrizzi, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) is the monitor of the luminosity delivered by the LHC accelerator to the ATLAS experiment. The detector is made of two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. Each arm consists of an aluminum vessel containing 20 tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, and a Cherenkov gaseous radiator (C4F10) at about 1.1 bar absolute. The light generated by charged particles above the Cherenkov threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. Thanks to an intrinsically fast response and to its custom readout electronics, LUCID estimates the number of interactions per LHC bunch crossing and provides an interaction trigger to the ATLAS experiment. The relevant details of the detector design and the expexted performance based on Monte Carlo simulations are presented, together with the first results obtained with pp collisions produced by LHC.

  7. HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 1,2 Jacob I .RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY J I Fabrikant,

  8. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within Time Dependent Superfluid Local Density Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Stetcu; C. Bertulani; A. Bulgac; P. Magierski; K. J. Roche

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus $^{238}$U. The approach is based on Superfluid Local Density Approximation (SLDA) formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We have computed the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance and giant quadrupole modes were excited during the process. The one body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width $\\Gamma_\\downarrow \\approx 0.4$ MeV and the number of pre-equilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  9. General Relativistic Thermoelectric Effects in Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Ahmedov

    2007-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the general-relativistic contributions to occur in the electromagnetic properties of a superconductor with a heat flow. The appearance of general-relativistic contribution to the magnetic flux through a superconducting thermoelectric bimetallic circuit is shown. A response of the Josephson junctions to a heat flow is investigated in the general-relativistic framework. Some gravitothermoelectric effects which are observable in the superconducting state in the Earth's gravitational field are considered.

  10. The ATLAS Trigger System Commissioning and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hamilton

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009 and 2010 LHC running at centre of mass energies of 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV, and 7 TeV. This paper presents the ongoing work to commission the ATLAS trigger with proton collisions, including an overview of the performance of the trigger based on extensive online running. We describe how the trigger has evolved with increasing LHC luminosity and give a brief overview of plans for forthcoming LHC running.

  11. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  12. The Monitored Drift Tube Chambers of Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventura, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlas experiment has been designed to explore the high energy physics frontier at the TeV energy scale and to investigate on the physics of the Standard Model and beyond at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern. The Muon Spectrometer represents the most part of the Atlas detector. It has been designed to provide standalone measurement of the transverse muon momenta with a relative accuracy of 3% over a wide momentum range up to 10% for momenta of 1 TeV. This high accuracy is provided by the Monitored Drift-Tube chambers (MDT) which can determine the track trajectory with a precision of 40 {mu}m.

  13. Triggering events with GPU at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kama, Sami; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing complexity of events produced in LHC collisions demands more and more computing power both for the on line selection and for the offline reconstruction of events. In recent years, the explosive performance growth of massively parallel processors like Graphical Processing Units both in computing power and in low energy consumption, make GPU extremely attractive for using them in a complex high energy experiment like ATLAS. Together with the optimization of reconstruction algorithms exploiting this new massively parallel paradigm, a small scale prototype of the full ATLAS High Level Trigger exploiting GPU has been implemented. We discuss the integration procedure of this prototype, the achieved performance and the prospects for the future.

  14. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA 2University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616... at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is to quantify the properties of the QCD matter created in heavy-ion collisions at high energy [1]. One key property is the medium energy density, which can be probed by its effect on a fast parton propagating through...

  15. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the existence of a new state of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. This state has now been observed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory [2]. Many interesting... of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA 6University of California, Los Angeles...

  16. Relativistic Bernstein waves in a degenerate plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Muddasir; Hussain, Azhar [Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bernstein mode for a relativistic degenerate electron plasma is investigated. Using relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations, a general expression for the conductivity tensor is derived and then employing Fermi-Dirac distribution function a generalized dispersion relation for the Bernstein mode is obtained. Two limiting cases, i.e., non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic are discussed. The dispersion relations obtained are also graphically presented for some specific values of the parameters depicting how the propagation characteristics of Bernstein waves as well as the Upper Hybrid oscillations are modified with the increase in plasma number density.

  17. Quantum Mechanical Clock and Classical Relativistic Clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitoshi Kitada

    2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclic nature of quantum mechanical clock is discussed as ``quantization of time." Quantum mechanical clock is seen to be equivalent to the relativistic classical clock.

  18. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Paul Blaizot; Yacine Mehtar-Tani

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q $. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  19. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q $. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  20. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertella, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high-energy physics experiments, online selection is crucial to identify the few interesting collisions from the large data volume processed. In the overall ATLAS trigger strategy, b-jet triggers are designed to identify heavy-flavor content in real-time and, in particular, provide the only option to efficiently record events with fully hadronic final states containing b-jets. In doing so, two different, but related, challenges are faced. The physics goal is to optimise as far as possible the rejection of light jets from QCD processes, while retaining a high efficiency on selecting jets from beauty, while maintaining affordable trigger rates without raising jet energy thresholds. This maps into a challenging computing task, as charged tracks and their corresponding vertexes must be reconstructed and analysed for each jet above the desired threshold, regardless of the increasingly harsh pile-up conditions. The performance of b-jet triggers during the LHC Run 1 data-taking campaigns is presented, together wi...

  1. Chaotic distributions for relativistic particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawan Mustafa; Bernt Wennberg

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a modified Kac model where the classical kinetic energy is replaced by an arbitrary energy function $\\phi(v)$, $v\\in\\mathbb{R}$. The aim of this paper is to show that the uniform distribution with respect to the microcanonical measure is $Ce^{-z_0\\phi(v)} $-chaotic, $C,z_0\\in\\mathbb{R}_{+}$. The kinetic energy for relativistic particles is a special case. A generalization to the case $v\\in \\mathbb{R}^d$ which involves conservation momentum is also formally discussed.

  2. Pilot oil atlas for Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.; Gao, Weigang.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An interdisciplinary research team of engineers, geologists, and computer scientists was assembled at LSU to develop unproved methods for prospecting for bypassed oil and to support oil and gas producers in Louisiana. The overall objective of the project was to develop methods for extending the producing life of several types of reservoirs by reducing the amount of oil being bypassed and abandoned. As part of this work, the team collected information available from public sources for several example reservoirs. One task of the project was to develop a format for the compilation of the extensive but cumbersome Louisiana reservoir data so that it could be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The existing information system maintained by Louisiana is a Production Audit Reporting System (PARS). It was designed to allow auditing of oil and gas production and severance taxes associated with this production. It was not intended to be used as a database for determining reservoir recovery efficiency or prospecting for oil and gas. Its use for these purposes, however, has been increasing. The database format suggested in this report would allow production information to be easily displayed by reservoir as well as by lease, unit, or well. The data collected as part of the bypassed-oil study was used to illustrate the proposed new format. This pilot database, or atlas, contains information available for 15 reservoirs. It is recommended that LSU continue to compile and publish database information on the potential for bypassed oil in Louisiana's active reservoirs. This technology-transfer activity should focus each year on those active reservoirs involved in hearings of the Louisiana Office of Conservation. It should also focus on reservoirs being screened by LSU for EOR.

  3. Relativistic distribution function for particles with spin at local thermodynamical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becattini, F., E-mail: becattini@fi.infn.it [Università di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); FIAS, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)] [Germany; Chandra, V., E-mail: vinod.chandra@fi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Del Zanna, L., E-mail: ldz@arcetri.astro.it [Università di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Grossi, E., E-mail: grossi@fi.infn.it [Università di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extension of relativistic single-particle distribution function for weakly interacting particles at local thermodynamical equilibrium including spin degrees of freedom, for massive spin 1/2 particles. We infer, on the basis of the global equilibrium case, that at local thermodynamical equilibrium particles acquire a net polarization proportional to the vorticity of the inverse temperature four-vector field. The obtained formula for polarization also implies that a steady gradient of temperature entails a polarization orthogonal to particle momentum. The single-particle distribution function in momentum space extends the so-called Cooper–Frye formula to particles with spin 1/2 and allows us to predict their polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the freeze-out. -- Highlights: •Single-particle distribution function in local thermodynamical equilibrium with spin. •Polarization of spin 1/2 particles in a fluid at local thermodynamical equilibrium. •Prediction of a new effect: a steady gradient of temperature induces a polarization. •Application to the calculation of polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  4. Jet Studies at CMS and ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantinos Kousouris

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The jet reconstruction and jet energy calibration strategies adopted by the CMS and ATLAS experiments are presented. Jet measurements that can be done with early data to confront QCD at the highest transverse momentum scale and search for new physics are described.

  5. Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Management Act of 1996 requires the identification of essential fish habitat (EFH) for species included, and the Arctic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Catch data in this atlas were compiled from a suite of studies in the same year or in different years. A geographic position is obtained in the middle of each seine site

  6. ATLAS RPC QA results at INFN Lecce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianco, M.; Cazzato, A.; Coluccia, M. R.; Gorini, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Tassielli, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica - via Arnesano 73100, Lecce (Italy); INFN - via Arnesano 73100, Lecce (Italy); Borjanovic, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica - via Arnesano 73100, Lecce (Italy); Cataldi, G.; Chiodini, G.; Creti, P.; Grancagnolo, F.; Perrino, R.; Primavera, M.; Ventura, A. [INFN - via Arnesano 73100, Lecce (Italy)

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The main results of the quality assurance tests performed on the Resistive Plate Chamber used by the ATLAS experiment at LHC as muon trigger chambers are reported and discussed. These are dark current, gas volume tomography, gas tightness, efficiency, and noise rate.

  7. Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    & COOK COUNTY (STREET FINDER) MAPS G 1409 .C6 R37 1995 16. A (1) CITIES AND TOWNS OF TEXAS MAPS F 384 .C. A (2) THE MAPPING OF THE HEAVENS MAPS QB 15 .W45 1995 9. A (2) THE NASA ATLAS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEMMAPS G

  8. The Quantum-Relativistic Dynamics of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skalsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the analysis of the quantum and relativistic properties of the particles it results the unified quantum-relativistic dynamics of the physical reality (Universe).

  9. The European Solar Radiation Atlas 1 Page J., M. Albuisson, L. Wald, 2001. The European solar radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The European Solar Radiation Atlas 1 Page J., M. Albuisson, L. Wald, 2001. The European solar radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy, 71, 81-83, 2001.1 The European Solar Radiation Atlas European Solar Radiation Atlas (ESRA) is now available. It is published by Les Presses de l'Ecole des Mines

  10. Underlying event studies at ATLAS and CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, D.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding and modeling of the underlying event in high energy collider environment is important for more precise measurements at the LHC. CDF Run II data for the underlying event associated with Drell-Yan lepton pair production and early ATLAS data measuring underlying event activity with respect to the leading transverse momentum track are presented. The data are compared with several QCD Monte Carlo models. It is seen that no current standard Monte Carlo tune adequately describes all the early ATLAS data and CDF data simultaneously. The underlying event observables presented here are particularly important for constraining the energy evolution of multiple parton interaction models. One of the goals of these analyses is to provide data that can be used to test and improve MC models for current and future physics studies at the LHC. The underlying event observables presented here are particularly important for constraining the energy evolution of multiple partonic interaction models, since the plateau heights of the underlying event profiles are highly correlated to multiple parton interaction activity. The data at 7 TeV are crucial for MC tuning, since measurements are needed with at least two energies to constrain the energy evolution of MPI activity. PYTHIA tune A and tune AW do a good job in describing the CDF data on the underlying-event observables for leading jet and Drell-Yan events, respectively, although the agreement between predictions and data is not perfect. The leading-jet data show slightly more activity in the underlying event than PYTHIA Tune A, although they are very similar - which may indicate the universality of underlying event modeling. However, all pre-LHC MC models predict less activity in the transverse region (i.e in the underlying event) than is actually observed in ATLAS leading track data, for both center-of-mass energies. There is therefore no current standard MC tune which adequately describes all the early ATLAS data. However, using diffraction-limited minimum bias distributions and the plateau of the underlying event distributions presented here, ATLAS has developed a new PYTHIA tune AMBT1 (ATLAS Minimum Bias Tune 1) and a new HERWIG+ JIMMY tune AUET1 (ATLAS Underlying Event Tune 1) which model the p{sub T} and charged multiplicity spectra significantly better than the pre-LHC tunes of those generators. It is critical to have sensible underlying event models containing our best physical knowledge and intuition, tuned to all relevant available data.

  11. Relativistic kinematics for reactions involving massless particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. N. Basu; Tapan Mukhopadhyay

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Some useful kinematical relations for the absorption of a photon by a nucleus and its recoil are derived for the relativistic incident energies. These expressions provided for the relativistic kinematics of photoabsorption reactions, though simple, will be immensely useful for experimentalists as well as theoreticians.

  12. Relativistic models of kHz QPOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kluzniak

    2000-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing the general-relativistic ``gap'' model of accretion, I discuss its relation to the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in low-mass X-ray binaries. The ``300'' Hz frequency seen in some X-ray bursts may be a relativistic signature of keplerian rotation of the neutron star.

  13. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  14. Relativistic Nuclear Energy Density Functionals: adjusting parameters to binding energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Niksic; D. Vretenar; P. Ring

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a particular class of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals in which only nucleon degrees of freedom are explicitly used in the construction of effective interaction terms. Short-distance (high-momentum) correlations, as well as intermediate and long-range dynamics, are encoded in the medium (nucleon density) dependence of the strength functionals of an effective interaction Lagrangian. Guided by the density dependence of microscopic nucleon self-energies in nuclear matter, a phenomenological ansatz for the density-dependent coupling functionals is accurately determined in self-consistent mean-field calculations of binding energies of a large set of axially deformed nuclei. The relationship between the nuclear matter volume, surface and symmetry energies, and the corresponding predictions for nuclear masses is analyzed in detail. The resulting best-fit parametrization of the nuclear energy density functional is further tested in calculations of properties of spherical and deformed medium-heavy and heavy nuclei, including binding energies, charge radii, deformation parameters, neutron skin thickness, and excitation energies of giant multipole resonances.

  15. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  16. atlas helps shed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on natural resources under future conditions like population growth and climate change. Researchers are working to develop the Urban Atlas initially for 50 cities and towns...

  17. atlas rewards industry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: ATLAS INDUSTRI MEBEL KAYU DI JEPARA INDONESIA Jean-Marc Roda, Philippe Cadne, Philippe Guizol, Philippe Guizol, Levania...

  18. atlas sct endcap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collider (LHC) experiment. Although the system has been of the simulation results, the latency measurement and long run tests. I. INTRODUCTION After submitting the ATLAS...

  19. atlas tdaq system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and precise track reconstruction of full events in the Atlas experiment within an average latency of a few dozen microseconds. It consists of two pipelined processors: the...

  20. atlas experiment luminosity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and precise track reconstruction of full events in the Atlas experiment within an average latency of a few dozen microseconds. It consists of two pipelined processors: the...

  1. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009 Timothy P. Boyer John I. Antonov Olga K. Baranova ......................................................................................... 28 1.1.8. Application software interfaces

  2. atlas sct barrel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of processors receiving the full granularity of data from a dedicated detector (Resistive Plate Chambers in the Barrel). Salamanna, G; The ATLAS collaboration 2009-01-01 35...

  3. atlas trt barrel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of processors receiving the full granularity of data from a dedicated detector (Resistive Plate Chambers in the Barrel). Salamanna, G; The ATLAS collaboration 2009-01-01 27...

  4. atlas sct barrels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of processors receiving the full granularity of data from a dedicated detector (Resistive Plate Chambers in the Barrel). Salamanna, G; The ATLAS collaboration 2009-01-01 35...

  5. atlas discovery potential: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: This contribution summarizes the discovery potential of the Standard Model Higgs boson using the H gamma gamma decay with the ATLAS detector. The relevant detector...

  6. A Relativistic Dynamical Collapse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Pearle

    2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is discussed where all operators are constructed from a quantum scalar field whose energy spectrum takes on all real values. The Schr\\"odinger picture wave function depends upon space and time coordinates for each particle, as well as an inexorably increasing evolution parameter $s$ which labels a foliation of space-like hypersurfaces. The model is constructed to be manifestly Lorentz invariant in the interaction picture. Free particle states and interactions are discussed in this framework. Then, the formalism of the CSL (Continuous Spontaneous Localization) theory of dynamical collapse is applied. The collapse-generating operator is chosen to to be the particle number space-time density. Unlike previous relativistically invariant models, the vacuum state is not excited. The collapse dynamics depends upon two parameters, a parameter $\\Lambda$ which represents the collapse rate/volume and a scale factor $\\ell$. A common example of collapse dynamics, involving a clump of matter in a superposition of two locations, is analyzed. The collapse rate is shown to be identical to that of non-relativistic CSL when the GRW-CSL choice of $\\ell=a=10^{-5}$cm, is made, along with $\\Lambda=\\lambda/a^{3}$ (GRW-CSL choice $\\lambda=10^{-16}s^{-1}$). However, it is also shown that the change of mass of a nucleon over the age of the universe is then unacceptably large. The case where $\\ell$ is the size of the universe is then considered. It is shown that the collapse behavior is satisfactory and the change of mass over the age of the universe is acceptably small, when $\\Lambda= \\lambda/\\ell a^{2}$.

  7. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armesto, N; Borghini, N; Jeon, S; Wiedemann, U A; Abreu, S; Akkelin, V; Alam, J; Albacete, J L; Andronic, A; Antonuv, D; Arleo, F; Armesto, N; Arsene, I C; Barnafoldi, G G; Barrette, J; Bauchle, B; Becattini, F; Betz, B; Bleicher, M; Bluhm, M; Boer, D; Bopp, F W; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Busza, W; Cacciari, M; Capella, A; Casalderrey-Solana, J; Chatterjee, R; Chen, L; Cleymans, J; Cole, B A; delValle, Z C; Csernai, L P; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; de Deus, J D; Ding, H; Djordjevic, M; Drescher, H; Dremin, I M; Dumitru, A; El, A; Engel, R; d'Enterria, D; Eskola, K J; Fai, G; Ferreiro, E G; Fries, R J; Frodermann, E; Fujii, H; Gale, C; Gelis, F; Goncalves, V P; Greco, V; Gyulassy, M; van Hees, H; Heinz, U; Honkanen, H; Horowitz, W A; Iancu, E; Ingelman, G; Jalilian-Marian, J; Jeon, S; Kaidalov, A B; Kampfer, B; Kang, Z; Karpenko, I A; Kestin, G; Kharzeev, D; Ko, C M; Koch, B; Kopeliovich, B; Kozlov, M; Kraus, I; Kuznetsova, I; Lee, S H; Lednicky, R; Letessier, J; Levin, E; Li, B; Lin, Z; Liu, H; Liu, W; Loizides, C; Lokhtin, I P; Machado, M T; Malinina, L V; Managadze, A M; Mangano, M L; Mannarelli, M; Manuel, C; Martinez, G; Milhano, J G; Mocsy, A; Molnar, D; Nardi, M; Nayak, J K; Niemi, H; Oeschler, H; Ollitrault, J; Paic, G; Pajares, C; Pantuev, V S; Papp, G; Peressounko, D; Petreczky, P; Petrushanko, S V; Piccinini, F; Pierog, T; Pirner, H J; Porteboeuf, S; Potashnikova, I; Qin, G Y; Qiu, J; Rafelski, J; Rajagopal, K; Ranft, J; Rapp, R; Rasanen, S S; Rathsman, J; Rau, P; Redlich, K; Renk, T; Rezaeian, A H; Rischke, D; Roesler, S; Ruppert, J; Ruuskanen, P V; Salgado, C A; Sapeta, S; Sarcevic, I; Sarkar, S; Sarycheva, L I; Schmidt, I; Shoski, A I; Sinha, B; Sinyukov, Y M; Snigirev, A M; Srivastava, D K; Stachel, J; Stasto, A; Stocker, H; Teplov, C Y; Thews, R L; Torrieri, G; Pop, V T; Triantafyllopoulos, D N; Tuchin, K L; Turbide, S; Tywoniuk, K; Utermann, A; Venugopalan, R; Vitev, I; Vogt, R; Wang, E; Wang, X N; Werner, K; Wessels, E; Wheaton, S; Wicks, S; Wiedemann, U A; Wolschin, G; Xiao, B; Xu, Z; Yasui, S; Zabrodin, E; Zapp, K; Zhang, B

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2006, the CERN Theory Unit announced to restructure its visitor program and to create a 'CERN Theory Institute', where 1-3 month long specific programs can take place. The first such Institute was held from 14 May to 10 June 2007, focusing on 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions'. It brought together close to 100 scientists working on the theory of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The aim of this workshop was to review and document the status of expectations and predictions for the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider LHC before its start. LHC will explore heavy ion collisions at {approx} 30 times higher center of mass energy than explored previously at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC. So, on the one hand, the charge of this workshop provided a natural forum for the exchange of the most recent ideas, and allowed to monitor how the understanding of heavy ion collisions has evolved in recent years with the data from RHIC, and with the preparation of the LHC experimental program. On the other hand, the workshop aimed at a documentation which helps to distinguish pre- from post-dictions. An analogous documentation of the 'Last Call for Predictions' [1] was prepared prior to the start of the heavy-ion program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC, and it proved useful in the subsequent discussion and interpretation of RHIC data. The present write-up is the documentation of predictions for the LHC heavy ion program, received or presented during the CERN TH Institute. The set-up of the CERN TH Institute allowed us to aim for the wide-most coverage of predictions. There were more than 100 presentations and discussions during the workshop. Moreover, those unable to attend could still participate by submitting predictions in written form during the workshop. This followed the spirit that everybody interested in making a prediction had the right to be heard. To arrive at a concise document, we required that each prediction should be summarized on at most two pages, and that predictions should be presented, whenever possible, in figures which display measurable quantities. Full model descriptions were not accepted--the authors were encouraged to indicate the relevant references for the interested reader. Participants had the possibility to submit multiple contributions on different topics, but it was part of the subsequent editing process to ensure that predictions on neighboring topics were merged wherever possible. The contributions summarized here are organized in several sections,--though some of them contain material related with more than one section--roughly by going from low transverse momentum to high transverse momentum and from abundant to rare measurements. In the low transverse momentum regime, we start with predictions on multiplicity distributions, azimuthal asymmetries in particle production and hadronic flavor observables, followed by correlation and fluctuation measurements. The contributions on hard probes at the LHC start with predictions for single inclusive high transverse momentum spectra, and jets, followed by heavy quark and quarkonium measurements, leptonic probes and photons. A final section 'Others' encompasses those predictions which do not fall naturally within one of the above-mentioned categories, or discuss the more speculative phenomena that may be explored at the LHC.

  8. Relativistic Electron Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marvel, Robert E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an undergraduate laboratory experiment to make independent measurements of the momentum and kinetic energy of relativistic electrons from a \\beta -source. The momentum measurements are made with a magnetic spectrometer and a silicon surface-barrier detector is used to measure the kinetic energy. A plot of the kinetic energy as a function of momentum compared to the classical and relativistic predictions clearly shows the relativistic nature of the electrons. Accurate values for the rest mass of the electron and the speed of light are also extracted from the data.

  9. A Relativistic-Plasma Compton Maser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James C. Weatherall

    2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic pair-plasma which contains a high excitation of electrostatic turbulence could produce intense radiation at brightness temperature in excess of 10^22 K by stimulated scattering. Important relativistic effects would include the broadband frequency response of the plasma and Compton-boosting of the scattered radiation. In radio-frequency relativistic plasma, the optical depth can be as small as hundreds of meters. When the plasma wave excitation and particle distributions are one-dimensional, the frequency-dependent angular distribution of the emission exhibits characteristics of pulsar emission.

  10. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  11. ATLAS Distributed Computing in LHC Run2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campana, Simone; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run2. An increased data rate and computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (ProdSys2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward the flexible computing model. The flexible computing utilization exploring the opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model, the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover a new data management strategy, based on defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defin...

  12. Triggering events with GPUs at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kama, Sami; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing complexity of events produced in LHC collisions demands more and more computing power both for the online selection and for the offline reconstruction of events. In recent years, the explosive performance growth of massively parallel processors like Graphics Processing Units~(GPU) both in computing power and in low energy consumption, make GPU extremely attractive for using them in a complex high energy experiment like ATLAS. Together with the optimization of reconstruction algorithms this new massively parallel paradigm is exploited. For this purpose a small scale prototype of the full ATLAS High Level Trigger involving GPU has been implemented. We discuss the integration procedure of this prototype, the achieved performance and the prospects for the future

  13. Vortex in a weakly relativistic Bose gas at zero temperature and relativistic fluid approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bogoliubov procedure in quantum field theory is used to describe a relativistic almost ideal Bose gas at zero temperature. Special attention is given to the study of a vortex. The radius of the vortex in the field description is compared to that obtained in the relativistic fluid approximation. The Kelvin waves are studied and, for long wavelengths, the dispersion relation is obtained by an asymptotic matching method and compared with the non relativistic result.

  14. Axigluon Phenomenology using ATLAS dijet data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Bastian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest on axigluons as part of a possible extension of strong interactions at high energies. In this work, we use recent ATLAS measurements of the dijet spectrum in order to set limits on the axigluon mass and coupling to quarks. We pay special attention to the methodology used to extract the resonant contribution from theoretical simulations. Finally, we present some predictions for the next LHC run at $\\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV.

  15. Axigluon Phenomenology using ATLAS dijet data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian Diaz; Alfonso R. Zerwekh

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest on axigluons as part of a possible extension of strong interactions at high energies. In this work, we use recent ATLAS measurements of the dijet spectrum in order to set limits on the axigluon mass and coupling to quarks. We pay special attention to the methodology used to extract the resonant contribution from theoretical simulations. Finally, we present some predictions for the next LHC run at $\\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV.

  16. Optical Link of the Atlas Pixel Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. K. Gan

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The on-detector optical link of the ATLAS pixel detector contains radiation-hard receiver chips to decode bi-phase marked signals received on PIN arrays and data transmitter chips to drive VCSEL arrays. The components are mounted on hybrid boards (opto-boards). We present results from the irradiation studies with 24 GeV protons up to 32 Mrad (1.2 x 10^15 p/cm^2) and the experience from the production.

  17. Recent Higgs results from the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brendlinger, Kurt [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents recent results on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The Collaboration reports on measurements of the signal strength, couplings, and spin of the Higgs in several decay channels. We find all measurements to be consistent with Standard Model predictions. The Higgs branching fraction to invisible particles is constrained and no evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  18. Charged Particle Multiplicities in Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  19. Introduction and guide to LLNL's relativistic 3-D nuclear hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zingman, J.A.; McAbee, T.L.; Alonso, C.T.; Wilson, J.R.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a relativistic hydrodynamic model to investigate Bevalac and higher energy, heavy-ion collisions. The basis of the model is a finite-difference solution to covariant hydrodynamics, which will be described in the rest of this paper. This paper also contains: a brief review of the equations and numerical methods we have employed in the solution to the hydrodynamic equations, a detailed description of several of the most important subroutines, and a numerical test on the code. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Jet Quenching in Heavy-Ion Collisions - The Transition Era from RHIC to LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A status report on the jet quenching physics in heavy-ion collisions is given as it appears after more than 10 years of collecting and analysing data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and ~1.5 years of physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The (theoretical) predictions and expectations before the start of the LHC program are contrasted with the most recent experimental results, focussing on the nuclear modification factor R_{AA}, the elliptic flow v_2 of high-p_T particles, and on the problem of initial conditions.

  1. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Hannah; Auvinen, Jussi; Bleicher, Marcus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  2. The beam energy dependence of collective flow in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah Petersen; Jan Steinheimer; Jussi Auvinen; Marcus Bleicher

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goals of heavy ion research are to explore the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and to investigate the properties of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter created at high temperatures and/or densities. Collective anisotropic flow is one of the most promising observables to gain insights about the properties of the system created in relativistic heavy ion reactions. The current status of the beam energy dependence of the first three Fourier coefficients of the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles $v_1$ to $v_3$ within hybrid transport plus hydrodynamics approaches are summarized.

  3. The luminosity monitor of the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villa, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) apparatus is composed by two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. The purpose of this detector, installed in summer 2008, is to monitor the luminosity delivered by the LHC machine to the ATLAS experiment. Each arm of the LUCID detector is based on an aluminum vessel containing 20 Cherenkov tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, filled with C4F10 radiator gas at about 1.1 bar. The Cherenkov light generated by charged particles above the threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. The intrinsically fast response of the detector and its readout electronics makes it ideal to follow the number of interactions per LHC bunch crossing therefore providing also an interaction trigger to the ATLAS experiment. The electronic boards performing the on-the-fly evaluation of the LHC luminosity with different algorithms will be discussed together with the results of a recent beam test on seve...

  4. Cosmic Ray Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Ostrowski

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical studies of cosmic ray particle acceleration in the first-order Fermi process at relativistic shocks are reviewed. At the beginning we discuss the acceleration processes acting at mildly relativistic shock waves. An essential role of oblique field configurations and field perturbations in forming the particle energy spectrum and changing the acceleration time scale is discussed. Then, we report on attempts to consider particle acceleration at ultra-relativistic shocks, often yielding an asymptotic spectral index sigma = 2.2 at large shock Lorentz factors. We explain why this result is limited to the cases of highly turbulent conditions near shocks. We conclude that our present knowledge of the acceleration processes acting at relativistic shocks is insufficient to allow for realistic modelling of the real shocks. The present review is a modified, extended and updated version of Ostrowski (1999).

  5. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilets, L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  6. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilets, L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  7. Heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC: analysis of the underlying effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic; Marko Djordjevic

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppressions of light and heavy flavor observables are considered to be excellent probes of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Suppression predictions of quark and gluon jets appear to suggest a clear hierarchy according to which neutral pions should be more suppressed than D mesons, which in turn should be more suppressed than single electrons. However, joint comparison of neutral pion (light probe) and non-photonic single electron (heavy probe) suppression data at RHIC unexpectedly showed similar jet suppression for these two probes, which presents the well-known heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC. We here analyze which effects are responsible for this unexpected result, by using the dynamical energy loss formalism. We find that the main effect is a surprising reversal in the suppression hierarchy between neutral pions and D mesons, which is due to the deformation of the suppression patterns of light partons by fragmentation functions. Furthermore, we find that, due to the decay functions, the single electron suppression approaches the D meson suppression. Consequently, we propose that these two effects, taken together, provide a clear intuitive explanation of this longstanding puzzle.

  8. Development of fluorocarbon evaporative cooling recirculators and controls for the ATLAS pixel and semiconductor tracking detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayer, C; Bonneau, P; Bosteels, Michel; Burckhart, H J; Cragg, D; English, R; Hallewell, G D; Hallgren, Björn I; Kersten, S; Kind, P; Langedrag, K; Lindsay, S; Merkel, M; Stapnes, Steinar; Thadome, J; Vacek, V

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of fluorocarbon evaporative cooling recirculators and controls for the ATLAS pixel and semiconductor tracking detectors

  9. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Parallel Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joni J. P. Virtanen; Rami Vainio

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of test-particle simulations on both the first- and the second-order Fermi acceleration for relativistic parallel shock waves. Our studies suggest that the role of the second-order mechanism in the turbulent downstream of a relativistic shock may have been underestimated in the past, and that the stochastic mechanism may have significant effects on the form of the particle spectra and its time evolution.

  10. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S. [JLAB; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering ? quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  11. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty...

  12. Heavy Quark production at HERA and Heavy Quark contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detlef Bartsch, University of Bonn on behalf of the ZEUS and H1 Collaborations · Introduction · Heavy 1500 0 100 200 300 400 electrons positrons low E HERA-1 HERA-2 Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production at HERA, Feb. 23rd 2008 3 #12;pQCD approximations Massive scheme

  13. atlas test beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atlas test beam First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Test beam results of ATLAS Pixel...

  14. Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999 Lynne D. Talley a,*, Pavel properties from CTD and discrete bottle sample profiles covering the Japan (East) Sea in summer, 1999: Japan sea; Ocean chemistry; Ocean atlas; Marginal seas; Water masses 1. Introduction The Japan or East

  15. The reach of the ATLAS experiment in SUSY parameter space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janet Dietrich

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Already with very first data, the ATLAS experiment should be sensitive to a SUSY signal well beyond the regions explored by the Tevatron. We present a detailed study of the ATLAS discovery reach in the parameter space for various SUSY models. The expected uncertainties on the background estimates are taken ito account.

  16. Construction, assembly and tests of the ATLAS electromagnetic barrel calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubert, B; Colas, Jacques; Delebecque, P; Di Ciaccio, L; El-Kacimi, M; Ghez, P; Girard, C; Gouanère, M; Goujdami, D; Jérémie, A; Jézéquel, S; Lafaye, R; Massol, N; Perrodo, P; Przysiezniak, H; Sauvage, G; Thion, J; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y; Alforque, R; Chen, H; Farrell, J; Gordon, H; Grandinetti, R; Hackenburg, R W; Hoffmann, A; Kierstead, J A; Köhler, J; Lanni, F; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Makowiecki, D S; Müller, T; Norton, S; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Rehak, M; Rajagopalan, S; Rescia, S; Sexton, K; Sondericker, J; Stumer, I; Takai, H; Belymam, A; Benchekroun, D; Driouichi, C; Hoummada, A; Hakimi, M; Knee, Michael; Stroynowski, R; Wakeland, B; Datskov, V I; Drobin, V; Aleksa, Martin; Bremer, J; Carli, T; Chalifour, M; Chevalley, J L; Djama, F; Ema, L; Fabre, C; Fassnacht, P; Gianotti, F; Gonidec, A; Hansen, J B; Hervás, L; Hott, T; Lacaste, C; Marin, C P; Pailler, P; Pleskatch, A; Sauvagey, D; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vuillemin, V; Wilkens, H; Albrand, S; Belhorma, B; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Dzahini, D; Ferrari, A; Fulachier, J; Gallin-Martel, M L; Hostachy, J Y; Laborie, G; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Martin, P; Muraz, J F; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Saboumazrag, S; Viret, S; Othegraven, R; Zeitnitz, C; Banfi, D; Carminati, L; Cavalli, D; Citterio, M; Costa, G; Delmastro, M; Fanti, M; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Tartarelli, F; Augé, E; Baffioni, S; Bonis, J; Bonivento, W; Bourdarios, C; de La Taille, C; Fayard, L; Fournier, D; Guilhem, G; Imbert, P; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Le Meur, G; Mencik, M; Noppe, J M; Parrour, G; Puzo, P; Rousseau, D; Schaffer, A C; Seguin-Moreau, N; Serin, L; Unal, G; Veillet, J J; Wicek, F; Zerwas, D; Astesan, F; Bertoli, W; Canton, B; Fleuret, F; Imbault, D; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Schwemling, P; Abouelouafa, M; Ben-Mansour, A; Cherkaoui, R; El-Mouahhidi, Y; Ghazlane, H; Idrissi, A; Bazizi, K; England, D; Glebov, V; Haelen, T; Lobkowicz, F; Slattery, P F; Belorgey, J; Besson, N; Boonekamp, M; Durand, D; Ernwein, J; Mansoulié, B; Molinie, F; Meyer, J P; Perrin, P; Schwindling, J; Taguet, J P; Zaccone, Henri; Lund-Jensen, B; Rydström, S; Tayalati, Y; Botchev, B; Finocchiaro, G; Hoffman, J; McCarthy, R L; Rijssenbeek, M; Steffens, J; Zdrazil, M; Braun, H M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction and assembly of the two half barrels of the ATLAS central electromagnetic calorimeter and their insertion into the barrel cryostat are described. The results of the qualification tests of the calorimeter before installation in the LHC ATLAS pit are given.

  17. Atlas: A Novel Kinematic Architecture for Six DOF Motion Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, John

    Atlas: A Novel Kinematic Architecture for Six DOF Motion Platforms M.J.D. HAYES, R.G. LANGLOIS alternative motion platform configurations and developed a novel concept that overcomes existing limitations. This paper presents an overview of the Atlas platform: a novel six DOF motion platform architecture

  18. RisR1252(EN) The Numerical Wind Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential from high quality wind measurements. It estimates the local influences on the wind by small hillsRisø­R­1252(EN) The Numerical Wind Atlas -- the KAMM/WAsP Method Helmut P. Frank, Ole Rathmann The method of combining the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale Model, KAMM, with the Wind Atlas Analysis

  19. WIND ATLAS FOR EGYPT: MEASUREMENTS, MICRO-AND MESOSCALE MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricity-producing wind turbine and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityWIND ATLAS FOR EGYPT: MEASUREMENTS, MICRO- AND MESOSCALE MODELLING Niels G. Mortensen1 , Jens

  20. atlas construction site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atlas construction site First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Constructing 2d curve atlases...

  1. Relativistic R matrix and continuum shell model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grineviciute; Dean Halderson

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The $R$ matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has proven to be a convenient reaction theory for solving many-coupled channel systems. The theory provides solutions to bound states, scattering states, and resonances for microscopic models in one formalism. Purpose: The first purpose is to extend this formalism to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The second purpose is to employ this formalism in a relativistic continuum shell model. Methods: Expressions for the collision matrix and the scattering amplitude, from which observables may be calculated, are derived. The formalism is applied to the 1p-1h relativistic continuum shell model with an interaction extracted from relativistic mean-field theory. Results: The simplest of the $\\sigma +\\omega +\\rho$ exchange interactions produces a good description of the single-particle energies in $^{16}$O and $^{90}$Zr and a reasonable description of proton scattering from $^{15}$N. Conclusions: The development of a calculable, relativistic $R$ matrix and its implementation in a $1p-1h$ relativistic continuum shell model provide a simple relatively self-consist, physically justifiable model for use in knockout reactions.

  2. Relativistic point-form approach to hadron properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Plessas

    2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review of the description of hadron properties along an invariant mass operator in the point form of Poincar\\'e-invariant relativistic dynamics. The quark-quark interaction is furnished by a linear confinement, consistent with the QCD string tension, and a hyperfine interaction derived from Goldstone-boson exchange. The main advantage of the point-form approach is the possibility of calculating manifestly covariant observables, since the generators of Lorentz transformations remain interaction-free. We discuss the static properties of the mass-operator eigenstates, such as the invariant mass spectra of light- and heavy-flavor baryons, the characteristics of the eigenstates in terms of their spin, flavor, and spatial dependences as well as their classification into spin-flavor multiplets. Regarding dynamical observables we address the electroweak structures of the nucleon and hyperon ground states, including their electric radii, magnetic moments as well as axial charges, and in addition a recently derived microscopic description of the $\\pi NN$ as well as $\\pi N\\Delta$ interaction vertices. Except for hadronic resonance decays, which are not addressed here due to space limitations, all of these observables are obtained in good agreement with existing phenomenology. Relativistic (boost) effects are generally sizable. We conclude that low-energy hadrons can be well described by an effective theory with a finite number of degrees of freedom, as long as the symmetries of low-energy quantum chromodynamics (spontaneously broken chiral symmetry) as well as special relativity (Poincar\\'e invariance) are properly taken into account. The latter requirement is particularly well and efficiently met in the point-form approach.

  3. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  4. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  5. Heavy Quark Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice calculations of heavy quark systems provide very good measures of the lattice spacing, a key element in recent determinations of the strong coupling constant using lattice methods. They also provide excellent testing grounds for lattice methods in general. I review recent phenomenological and technical developments in this field.

  6. Recent results on electroweak probes in lead-lead and proton-lead collisions from the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photons and weak bosons do not interact strongly with the dense and hot medium formed in nuclear collisions, and thus they should be sensitive to the nuclear modification of parton distribution functions (nPDFs). In particular, proton-lead collisions provide an excellent opportunity to test nPDFs in a less dense environment than lead-lead. The ATLAS detector, optimized for searching new physics in proton-proton collisions, is especially well equipped to measure photons, Z and W bosons in the high occupancy environment produced in heavy ion collisions. Using the full data samples of 2.76 TeV lead-lead and 5.02 TeV proton-lead collisions we will present recent results on the prompt photon, Z and W boson yields as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity, from the ATLAS experiment. The binary collision scaling of the yields will be discussed in detail.

  7. Shear-Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio of a Relativistic Hadron Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasser Demir; Steffen A. Bass

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are thought to have produced a state of matter called the Quark-Gluon-Plasma, characterized by a very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$, near the lower bound predicted for that quantity by Anti-deSitter space/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) methods. As the produced matter expands and cools, it evolves through a phase described by a hadron gas with rapidly increasing $\\eta/s$. We calculate $\\eta/s$ as a function of temperature in this phase and find that its value poses a challenge for viscous relativistic hydrodynamics, which requires small values of $\\eta/s$ throughout the entire evolution of the reaction in order to successfully describe the collective flow observables at RHIC. We show that the inclusion of non-unit fugacities will reduce $\\eta/s$ in the hadronic phase, yet not sufficiently to be compatible with viscous hydrodynamics. We therefore conclude that the origin of the low viscosity matter at RHIC must be in the partonic phase of the reaction.

  8. Non-relativistic high-energy physics: top production and dark matter annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beneke, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-relativistic physics is often associated with atomic physics and low-energy phenomena of the strong interactions between nuclei and quarks. In this review we cover three topics in contemporary high-energy physics at or close to the TeV scale, where non-relativistic dynamics plays an important if not defining role. We first discuss in detail the third-order corrections to top-quark pair production in electron-positron collisions in the threshold region, which plays a major role at a future high-energy e+ e- collider. Threshold effects are also relevant in the production of heavy particles in hadronic collisions, where in addition to the Coulomb force soft gluon radiation contributes to enhanced quantum corrections. We review the joint resummation of non-relativistic and soft gluon effects for pair production of top quarks and supersymmetric particles to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The third topic deals with pair annihilation of dark matter particles within the framework of the Minimal Sup...

  9. Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Laplace

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-situ commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter is taking place since three years. During this period, it has been fully tested by means of frequent calibration runs, and the analysis of the large cosmic muon data samples and of the few beam splash events that occurred on September 10th, 2008. This has allowed to obtain a stable set of calibration constants for the first collisions, and to measure the in-situ calorimeter performances that were found to be at the expected level.

  10. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisa Musto

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

  11. Astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B. B.; Clark, J. A.; Pardo, R. C.; Rehm, K. E., E-mail: rehm@anl.gov; Savard, G. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions involving short-lived nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics, especially in explosive scenarios which occur in novae, supernovae or X-ray bursts. This article describes the nuclear astrophysics program with radioactive ion beams at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. The CARIBU facility as well as recent improvements for the in-flight technique are discussed. New detectors which are important for studies of the rapid proton or the rapid neutron-capture processes are described. At the end we briefly mention plans for future upgrades to enhance the intensity, purity and the range of in-flight and CARIBU beams.

  12. Atlas Material Testing Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy ResourcesInformationGuide | OpenAthensAtlas Material

  13. Template:AtlasTabs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechint Spa JumpTVCEtTemperature"AtlasTabs Jump

  14. Atlas Solar Innovations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name:EthanolAtlas Solar

  15. Global Atlas | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <Glacial Energy HoldingsGlacialReport |Atlas for

  16. Biofuels Atlas (United States) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof AlternativeBioenergia Brasil S A MS JumpBioflameAtlas

  17. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  18. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  19. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  20. The ATLAS Experiment: Getting Ready for the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenni, Peter (CERN) [CERN

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At CERN the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is well advanced. First proton-proton collisions at the high-energy frontier are expected for the second half of 2007. In parallel to the collider construction the powerful general-purpose ATLAS detector is being assembled in its underground cavern by a world-wide collaboration. ATLAS will explore new domains of particle physics. After briefly overviewing the LHC construction and installation progress, the status of the ATLAS experiment will be presented, including examples of the exciting prospects for new physics.

  1. On strategy of relativistic quantum theory construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri A. Rylov

    2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different strategies of the relativistic quantum theory construction are considered and evaluated. The first strategy is the conventional strategy, based on application of the quantum mechanics technique to relativistic systems. This approach cannot solve the problem of pair production. The apparent success of QFT at solution of this problem is conditioned by the inconsistency of QFT, when the commutation relations are incompatible with the dynamic equations. (The inconsistent theory "can solve" practically any problem, including the problem of pair production). The second strategy is based on application of fundamental principles of classical dynamics and those of statistical description to relativistic dynamic systems. It seems to be more reliable, because this strategy does not use quantum principles, and the main problem of QFT (join of nonrelativistic quantum principles with the principles of relativity) appears to be eliminated.

  2. Fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palastro, J. P.; Ross, J. S.; Pollock, B.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering in unmagnetized plasmas valid to all orders in the normalized electron velocity, beta->=v->/c. The form factor is compared to a previously derived expression where the lowest order electron velocity, beta->, corrections are included [J. Sheffield, Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation (Academic Press, New York, 1975)]. The beta-> expansion approach is sufficient for electrostatic waves with small phase velocities such as ion-acoustic waves, but for electron-plasma waves the phase velocities can be near luminal. At high phase velocities, the electron motion acquires relativistic corrections including effective electron mass, relative motion of the electrons and electromagnetic wave, and polarization rotation. These relativistic corrections alter the scattered emission of thermal plasma waves, which manifest as changes in both the peak power and width of the observed Thomson-scattered spectra.

  3. Quarkonium and hydrogen spectra with spin dependent relativistic wave equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vikram H. Zaveri

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-linear non-perturbative relativistic atomic theory introduces spin in the dynamics of particle motion. The resulting energy levels of Hydrogen atom are exactly same as the Dirac theory. The theory accounts for the energy due to spin-orbit interaction and for the additional potential energy due to spin and spin-orbit coupling. Spin angular momentum operator is integrated into the equation of motion. This requires modification to classical Laplacian operator. Consequently the Dirac matrices and the k operator of Dirac's theory are dispensed with. The theory points out that the curvature of the orbit draws on certain amount of kinetic and potential energies affecting the momentum of electron and the spin-orbit interaction energy constitutes a part of this energy. The theory is developed for spin 1/2 bound state single electron in Coulomb potential and then further extended to quarkonium physics by introducing the linear confining potential. The unique feature of this quarkonium model is that the radial distance can be exactly determined and does not have a statistical interpretation. The established radial distance is then used to determine the wave function. The observed energy levels are used as the input parameters and the radial distance and the string tension are predicted. This ensures 100% conformance to all observed energy levels for the heavy quarkonium.

  4. Assessment of the MUSTA approach for numerical relativistic dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakely, P. M.; Nikiforakis, N.; Henshaw, W. D.

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    waves 1. Introduction The numerical solution of the relativistic hydrodynamical equa- tions is of importance to the simulation of astrophysical phe- nomena such as gamma-ray bursts, supernova core-collapse, and relativistic wind accretion. Although...

  5. Variational generalization of free relativistic top

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Matsyuk

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that well known first-order (in spin, momentum, and space-time coordinates) equations of motion of relativistic top are equivalent to the third-order equations of Mathisson on the surface of the Mathisson-Pirani auxiliary constraint. We then consider these third-order equations in flat space-time with constant spin 4-vector and invent a Lagrange function for them. Allowing physical interpretation to be applied to the complete set of extremals yields a whole spectrum of spin-dependent effective 'proper mass' of the relativistic top.

  6. Relativistic Brownian motion on a graphene chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Pototsky; Fabio Marchesoni; Feodor V. Kusmartsev; Peter Hänggi; Sergey E. Savel'ev

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic Brownian motion can be inexpensively demonstrated on a graphene chip. The interplay of stochastic and relativistic dynamics, governing the transport of charge carrier in graphene, induces noise-controlled effects such as (i) a stochastic effective mass, detectable as a suppression of the particle mobility with increasing the temperature; (ii) a transverse ratchet effect, measurable as a net current orthogonal to an ac drive on an asymmetric substrate, and (iii) a chaotic stochastic resonance. Such properties can be of practical applications in the emerging graphene technology.

  7. optical links for the atlas pixel detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stucci, Stefania Antonia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical links are necessary to satisfy the high speed readout over long distances for advanced silicon detector systems. We report on the optical readout used in the newly installed central pixel layer (IBL) in the ATLAS experiment. The off detector readout employs commercial optical to analog converters, which were extensively tested for this application. Performance measurements during installation and commissioning will be shown. With the increasing instantaneous luminosity in the next years, the next layers outwards of IBL of the ATLAS Pixel detector (Layer 1 and Layer 2) will reach their bandwidth limits. A plan to increase the bandwidth by upgrading the off detector readout chain is put in place. The plan also involves new optical readout components, in particular the optical receivers, for which commercial units cannot be used and a new design has been made. The latter allows for a wider operational range in term of data frequency and light input power to match the on-detector sending units on the pres...

  8. The Database Driven ATLAS Trigger Configuration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution describes the trigger selection configuration system of the ATLAS low- and high-level trigger (HLT) and the upgrades it received in preparation for LHC Run 2. The ATLAS trigger configuration system is responsible for applying the physics selection parameters for the online data taking at both trigger levels and the proper connection of the trigger lines across those levels. Here the low-level trigger consists of the already existing central trigger (CT) and the new Level-1 Topological trigger (L1Topo), which has been added for Run 2. In detail the tasks of the configuration system during the online data taking are Application of the selection criteria, e.g. energy cuts, minimum multiplicities, trigger object correlation, at the three trigger components L1Topo, CT, and HLT On-the-fly, e.g. rate-dependent, generation and application of prescale factors to the CT and HLT to adjust the trigger rates to the data taking conditions, such as falling luminosity or rate spikes in the detector readout ...

  9. Optical links for the ATLAS Pixel detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stucci, Stefania Antonia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical links are necessary to satisfy the high speed readout over long distances for advanced silicon detector systems. We report on the optical readout used in the newly installed central pixel layer (IBL) in the ATLAS experiment. The off detector readout employs commercial optical to analog converters, which were extensively tested for this application. Performance measurements during installation and commissioning will be shown. With the increasing instantaneous luminosity in the next years, the next layers outwards of IBL of the ATLAS Pixel detector (Layer 1 and Layer 2) will reach their bandwidth limits. A plan to increase the bandwidth by upgrading the off detector readout chain is put in place. The plan also involves new optical readout components, in particular the optical receivers, for which commercial units cannot be used and a new design has been made. The latter allows for a wider operational range in term of data frequency and light input power to match the on-detector sending units on the pres...

  10. The luminosity monitor of the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruschi, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) apparatus is composed by two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. The purpose of this detector, installed in summer 2008, is to monitor the luminosity delivered by the LHC machine to the ATLAS experiment, and to provide an interaction trigger when running at low luminosity. An absolute luminosity calibration is needed and it will be provided by a Roman Pot type detector with the two arms placed at about 240 m from the interaction point. Each arm of the LUCID detector is based on an aluminum vessel containing 20 Cherenkov tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, filled with C4F10 radiator gas at about 1.1 bar. The Cherenkov light generated by charged particles above the threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. The intrinsically fast response of the detector and its readout electronics makes it ideal to follow the number of interactions per LHC bunch crossing therefore providi...

  11. Sobolev inequality for localization of pseudo-relativistic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Balinsky; A. E. Tyukov

    2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present Sobolev-type inequalities for the localization of pseudo-relativistic energy.

  12. Search for High-Mass States with One Lepton Plus Missing Transverse Momentum in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} with the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; /Freiburg U. /Oklahoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Geneva U. /Oxford U. /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Oklahoma State U. /Michigan State U. /Tel Aviv U. /Orsay, LAL /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Udine /ICTP, Trieste /Brookhaven /Hampton U. /Yale U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Munich U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W{prime},W*), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of ppcollisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb{sup -1}. No excess beyond standard model expectations is observed. A W{prime} with sequential standard model couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level for masses below 1.49 TeV, and a W* (charged chiral boson) for masses below 1.35 TeV.

  13. A two-fluid model for relativistic heat conduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Monsalvo, César S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago it was presented in these proceedings the relativistic dynamics of a multi-fluid system together with various applications to a set of topical problems [1]. In this talk, I will start from such dynamics and present a covariant formulation of relativistic thermodynamics which provides us with a causal constitutive equation for the propagation of heat in a relativistic setting.

  14. An energy atlas of five Central American countries. Un atlas energetico de cinco paises Centroamericanos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trocki, L.; Newman, C.K.; Gurule, F.; Aragon, P.C.; Peck, C.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a series of maps and figures, this atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.

  15. atlas slhc upgrade: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The outer shell of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC consists of a system of toroidal air-core magnets in order to allow for the precise measurement of the transverse momentum pT...

  16. atlas production system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the...

  17. atlas detector commissioning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the...

  18. atlas magnet system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the...

  19. atlas daq system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the...

  20. atlas high level: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    s of data per board from the detector front-end on multiple high-speed serial links, low-latency data processing, data buffering, and data transmission to the ATLAS trigger and...

  1. atlas trigger system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the...

  2. atlas point-1 system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the...

  3. atlas mdt muon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the next millennium, a large general-purpose high-energy physics experiment, the ATLAS project, is being designed by a world-wide...

  4. Anatomical atlas-guided diffuse optical tomography of brain activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Custo, Anna

    We describe a neuroimaging protocol that utilizes an anatomical atlas of the human head to guide diffuse optical tomography of human brain activation. The protocol is demonstrated by imaging the hemodynamic response to ...

  5. atlas morocco peridotite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 16 Modle de formation du gisement d'argent d'Imiter (Anti-Atlas oriental, Maroc). Nouveaux apports de l'analyse Physics Websites Summary: de l'analyse structurale et...

  6. atlas mountains morocco: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011-01-01 20 Modle de formation du gisement d'argent d'Imiter (Anti-Atlas oriental, Maroc). Nouveaux apports de l'analyse Physics Websites Summary: de l'analyse structurale et...

  7. The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer analysis project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network has profiled and analyzed large numbers of human tumors to discover molecular aberrations at the DNA, RNA, protein and epigenetic levels. The resulting rich data provide a ...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - ATLAS_upgrade_physics_program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intensity of stable beams from ATLAS by factor >10 * Replace buncher and part of PII by new buncher, RFQ and two new cryostats, rearrange rest of linac - Increase intensity...

  9. atlas experimental cavern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exotic signatures using the ATLAS detector at the LHC is given. The results presented use data collected at center-of-mass energies of sqrts 7 TeV and sqrts 8 TeV,...

  10. accelerator facility atlas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exotic signatures using the ATLAS detector at the LHC is given. The results presented use data collected at center-of-mass energies of sqrts 7 TeV and sqrts 8 TeV,...

  11. atlas barrel level-1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resolved allowing the SCT to be operated and participate in combined ATLAS Cosmic ray data taking runs. The results of these runs have been used to determine the hit efficiency...

  12. atlas central solenoid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exotic signatures using the ATLAS detector at the LHC is given. The results presented use data collected at center-of-mass energies of sqrts 7 TeV and sqrts 8 TeV,...

  13. atlas cavern side: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exotic signatures using the ATLAS detector at the LHC is given. The results presented use data collected at center-of-mass energies of sqrts 7 TeV and sqrts 8 TeV,...

  14. atlas underground area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exotic signatures using the ATLAS detector at the LHC is given. The results presented use data collected at center-of-mass energies of sqrts 7 TeV and sqrts 8 TeV,...

  15. atlas search strategy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preprints Summary: This talk covers the results of a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The datasets used...

  16. atlas combined testbeam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Higgs Properties Measurements in ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: The discovery of a Higgs boson with a mass of approximately 126 GeV in 2012 at the LHC has opened up a new era in...

  17. atlas analysis model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a wide range of physics aspects, out of which the search for the God particle - Higgs boson - is its most significant mission. In 2012 ATLAS already recorded collisions data,...

  18. atlas experiment messung: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The discovery of a new particle consistent with the SM-like Higgs boson, with a mass of about 125 GeV, was announced by the ATLAS and CMS experiments on...

  19. atlas experiment studie: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The discovery of a new particle consistent with the SM-like Higgs boson, with a mass of about 125 GeV, was announced by the ATLAS and CMS experiments on...

  20. atlas barrel tracker: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    online in 2008, the LHC and ATLAS will work to discover, among other things, the Higgs boson and any other signatures for physics beyond the Standard Model. As part of the...

  1. atlas event production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration 2012-01-01 13 Search for chargino and neutralino production with a Higgs boson in the decay chain in 1 or 3 leptons final state events with ATLAS CERN Preprints...

  2. avec atlas au: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    document comprises of three parts related to different aspects in the search for the Higgs boson in the gammagamma channel with the ATLAS detector. A study of the intrinsic...

  3. atlas cni experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CERN Preprints Summary: The discovery of a new particle consistent with the SM-like Higgs boson, with a mass of about 125 GeV, was announced by the ATLAS and CMS experiments on...

  4. atlas experiment status: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at 4 TeV per proton beam energy and aiming to provide enough statistics for the Higgs boson discovery. ATLAS is one of four major experiments accumulating data since the LHC...

  5. atlas trigger design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designed to select events of interest for the diverse ATLAS physics program such as Higgs Boson decays. At the same time the rate of events has to be reduced in order to stay...

  6. atlas pixel sensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G; Tsiskaridtze, S; Tsurin, I; Unno, Y; Weigel, P; Wittig, T 2012-01-01 5 Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Sensors Using Leakage Current Measurement System CERN Preprints...

  7. atlas pixel sensors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G; Tsiskaridtze, S; Tsurin, I; Unno, Y; Weigel, P; Wittig, T 2012-01-01 5 Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Sensors Using Leakage Current Measurement System CERN Preprints...

  8. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  9. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahai, Aakash A., E-mail: aakash.sahai@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a{sub 0}>1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-? traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary.

  12. Super Heavy Nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 Career DaySunShotSuper Heavy

  13. Status of the Forward Physics Projects in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ask, Stefan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is building several detector systems for forward physics studies and to determine the luminosity. The main forward systems consist of a Cerenkov detector called LUCID, a Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) and Roman Pots which will house a scintillating fiber tracker system called ALFA. Here we report some of the forward physics activities that are foreseen in ATLAS together with the status of the related detector systems.

  14. Current generation in a relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic dynamics of fast current carriers are rich in intriguing phenomena not appearing in the Newtonian limit. It is shown that because of these dynamics there is a bound to the efficiency of driving current in a tokamak either by waves or other means. Analytic techniques uncover the current-drive scheme which yields the maximum attainable efficiency.

  15. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

  16. Tearing instability in relativistic magnetically dominated plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Komissarov; M. Barkov; M. Lyutikov

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Many astrophysical sources of high energy emission, such as black hole magnetospheres, superstrongly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars), and probably relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma Ray Bursts involve relativistically magnetically dominated plasma. In such plasma the energy density of magnetic field greatly exceeds the thermal and the rest mass energy density of particles. Therefore the magnetic field is the main reservoir of energy and its dissipation may power the bursting emission from these sources, in close analogy to Solar flares. One of the principal dissipative instabilities that may lead to release of magnetic energy is the tearing instability. In this paper we study, both analytically and numerically, the development of tearing instability in relativistically magnetically-dominated plasma using the framework of resistive magnetodynamics. We confirm and elucidate the previously obtained result on the growth rate of the tearing mode: the shortest growth time is the same as in the case of classical non-relativistic MHD, namely $\\tau =\\sqrt{\\tau_a \\tau_d}$ where $\\tau_a$ is the \\Alfven crossing time and $\\tau_d$ is the resistive time of a current layer.

  17. Relativistic Wave Equations and Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Robson; S. H. Sutanto

    2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently proposed eight-component relativistic wave equation is applied to the scattering of a photon from a free electron (Compton scattering). It is found that in spite of the considerable difference in the structure of this equation and that of Dirac the cross section is given by the Klein-Nishina formula.

  18. Relativistic Dynamics of a Charged Particle in an Electroscalar Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Podgainy; O. A. Zaimidoroga

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This article devoted to relativistic dynamics of a charged massive particle in an electroscalar field. It represents a continuation of paper [1] where the authors constructed a non-relativistic theory which describes transverse electromagnetic waves along with longitudinal electroscalar ones, responsible for the wave transport of the Coulomb field. A new type of relativistic force exerted by electroscalar field on an electrically charged particle and the relativistic law of superposition of electromagnetic transverse and electroscalar longitudinal fields are established. Also, a relativistically invariant form of a Lagrangian describing the interaction between an electroscalar field and massive electrically charged particle is defined.

  19. Relativistic Dynamics of a Charged Particle in an Electroscalar Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgainy, D V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article devoted to relativistic dynamics of a charged massive particle in an electroscalar field. It represents a continuation of paper [1] where the authors constructed a non-relativistic theory which describes transverse electromagnetic waves along with longitudinal electroscalar ones, responsible for the wave transport of the Coulomb field. A new type of relativistic force exerted by electroscalar field on an electrically charged particle and the relativistic law of superposition of electromagnetic transverse and electroscalar longitudinal fields are established. Also, a relativistically invariant form of a Lagrangian describing the interaction between an electroscalar field and massive electrically charged particle is defined.

  20. Charged particle rapidity distributions at relativistic energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), which includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions, we study the rapidity distributions of charged particles such as protons, antiprotons, pions, and kaons in heavy ion collisions at RHIC...

  1. Spin dynamics in relativistic light-matter interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiko Bauke; Sven Ahrens; Christoph H. Keitel; Rainer Grobe

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Various spin effects are expected to become observable in light-matter interaction at relativistic intensities. Relativistic quantum mechanics equipped with a suitable relativistic spin operator forms the theoretical foundation for describing these effects. Various proposals for relativistic spin operators have been offered by different authors, which are presented in a unified way. As a result of the operators' mathematical properties only the Foldy-Wouthuysen operator and the Pryce operator qualify as possible proper relativistic spin operators. The ground states of highly charged hydrogen-like ions can be utilized to identify a legitimate relativistic spin operator experimentally. Subsequently, the Foldy-Wothuysen spin operator is employed to study electron-spin precession in high-intensity standing light waves with elliptical polarization. For a correct theoretical description of the predicted electron-spin precession relativistic effects due to the spin angular momentum of the electromagnetic wave has to be taken into account even in the limit of low intensities.

  2. Strategy for early SUSY searches at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimpei Yamamoto; for the ATLAS collaboration

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to commence operation in 2008 and inclusive searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) will be one of our primary tasks in the first days of LHC operation. It is certain that the final state of multijets + missing transverse energy will provide a superior performance in SUSY searches. Strategies to understand the instrumental background and to understand the Standard Model (SM) background are still under development and are urgent issues for the coming data. We describe the strategy for early SUSY searches at the ATLAS experiment using the fist data corresponding to an integrated luminosity up to 1fb^-1, which comprises much progress in the data-driven technique for the SM background estimations.

  3. Evolution of the ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odier, Jerome; The ATLAS collaboration; Fulachier, Jerome; Lambert, Fabian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI) can be considered to be a mature application because it has existed for at least 10 years. Over the years, the number of users and the number of functions provided for these users has increased. It has been necessary to adapt the hardware infrastructure in a seamless way so that the Quality of Service remains high. We will describe the evolution of the application from the initial one, using single server with a MySQL backend database, to the current state, where we use a cluster of Virtual Machines on the French Tier 1 Cloud at Lyon, an ORACLE database backend also at Lyon, with replication to CERN using ORACLE streams behind a back-up server.

  4. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heelan, Louise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design ...

  5. Calibration Systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olof Lundberg

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. A brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems is given and the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability are presented.

  6. EVAPORATIVE COOLING - CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR ATLAS SCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niinikoski, T O

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an evaporative two-phase flow cooling system for the ATLAS SCT detector is described, using perfluorinated propane (C3F8) as a coolant. Comparison with perfluorinated butane (C4F10) is made, although the detailed design is presented only for C3F8. The two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are calculated in order to determine the dimensions of the cooling pipes and module contacts for the Barrel SCT. The region in which the flow is homogeneous is determined. The cooling cycle, pipework, compressor, heat exchangers and other main elements of the system are calculated in order to be able to discuss the system control, safety and reliability. Evaporative cooling appears to be substantially better than the binary ice system from the point of view of safety, reliability, detector thickness, heat transfer coefficient, cost and simplicity.

  7. ATLAS Tracker Upgrade: Silicon Strip Detectors for the sLHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 2.6% 1.8% 1.0% 3 Sep 2010 5S.Burdin / Atlas Tracker Upgrade #12;3 Sep 2010 S.Burdin / Atlas Tracker

  8. atlas hadronic end-cap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hadronic end-cap calorimeter of ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: At the ATLAS detector a SCADA system surveys and controls the sub- detectors. The link is realized by PVSS2...

  9. Mapping Ocean Observations in a Dynamical Framework: A 2004-06 Ocean Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, Gael

    This paper exploits a new observational atlas for the near-global ocean for the best-observed 3-yr period from December 2003 through November 2006. The atlas consists of mapped observations and derived quantities. Together ...

  10. Scaling of elliptic flow, recombination, and sequential freeze-out of hadrons in heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Min; Fries, Rainer J.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    partons deconfine and chiral symmetry is restored [1]. One major finding by the experimental program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Labora- tory is the large azimuthal anisotropy of hadron transverse- momentum (p..., Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA 2RIKEN/BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA (Received 9 June 2010; revised manuscript received 31 August 2010; published 21 September 2010) The scaling...

  11. Pion and photon production in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. David

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of neutral pions and direct photons are closely connected experimentally, on the other hand they probe quite different aspects of relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this short review of the $\\pi^0$ results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC our focus is on the $\\phi$-integrated nuclear modification factor, its energy and system size dependence, and the impact of these results on parton energy loss models. We also discuss the current status of high $p_T$ and thermal direct photon measurements both in $p$ + $p$ and Au+Au collisions. Recognizing the advantages of measuring not only the "signal", but also all the "references" needed for proper interpretation in the same experiments (with same or similar systematics) we argue that RHIC should regularly include $d$ + A and even $d$ + $d$ collisions into its system size and energy scan.

  12. RELATIVISTIC MODIFICATIONS OF COVALENT BONDING IN HEAVY ELEMENTS: CALCULATIONS FOR TlH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science, U. Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. s. Department ofEnergy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER This document

  13. Centrality dependence of two-particle correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Youngsoo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results on the centrality dependence of two-particle correlations in Au+Au collisions at ... 200GeV are presented. A particular focus is devoted to investigating any anomalous behavior in the centrality dependence of ...

  14. Scaling properties at freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Ruan, L.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , United Kingdom 3Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA 4University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 5University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA 6University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA... Collider (RHIC) is believed to result in a novel state of hot and dense matter with properties strikingly different from that of a hadron gas or ordinary nuclear matter [2]. The bulk properties of particle production are studied using identified...

  15. Nuclear modification and azimuthal anisotropy of D mesons produced in relativistic heavy ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younus, Mohammed

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a phenomenological treatment of charm quark energy loss before fragmenting into D mesons and calculate nuclear modification factor, '$R_{AA}$' and azimuthal anisotropy, '$v_2$' of D mesons for lead on lead collision at LHC energy of $\\sqrt{s}$=2.76 A TeV.

  16. Partonic effects on the elliptic flow at relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , C.M. Ko, B.A. Li, and B. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2534 ~1999!. @7# K.H. Ackermann et al., STAR Collaboration, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 402 ~2001!. @8# R.A. Lacey, PHENIX Collaboration, Nucl. Phys. A698, 559 ~2002!. @9# R.J. Snellings, STAR... ~2002!. @12# H. Heiselberg and R. Mattiello, Phys. Rev. C 60, 044902 ~1999!. @13# M. Gyulassy, I. Vitev, and X.N. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2537 ~2001!. @14# X.N. Wang, Phys. Rev. C 63, 054902 ~2001!. @15# P. Huovinen, P.F. Kolb, U. Heinz, P...

  17. J/psi production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from a multiphase transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Pal, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .A. Schuler, K. Sridhar, and R. Vogt, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 10, 3043 ~1995!. @49# K. Tsushima, D.H. Lu, A.W. Thomas, K. Saito, and R.H. Lan- dau, Phys. Rev. C 59, 2824 ~1999!. @50# A. Hayashigaki, Phys. Lett. B 487, 96 ~2000!. @51# W. Weise, Proceedings....M. Xu, D. Kharzeev, H. Satz, and X.N. Wang, Phys. Rev. C 53, 3051 ~1996!. @11# S. Gavin and R. Vogt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1006 ~1997!. 054909- fragmentation model @21,22# indicates that the feeddown should be small for central collisions. We thus...

  18. Effects of triangular flow on di-hadron azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Phys. A 774, 577 (2006). [17] T. Renk and J. Ruppert, Phys. Rev. C 73, 011901 (2006). [18] C. B. Chiu and R. C. Hwa, Phys. Rev. C 74, 064909 (2006). [19] W. Li, S. Zhang, Y. G. Ma, X. Z. Cai, J. H. Chen, H. Z. Huang, G. L. Ma, and C. Zhong, Phys...). [7] K. Adcox et al. (PHENIX Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 022301 (2002). [8] C. Adler et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 202301 (2002). [9] C. Adler et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 082302 (2003). [10] C...

  19. Charm elliptic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions RID A-2398-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 031901(R) (2004). [23] Z. W. Lin, C. M. Ko, and S. Pal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 152301 (2002). [24] K. H. Ackermann et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 402 (2001). [25] J. Adams et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 062301... Foundation of China under grant 10105008 (L.W.C.). [1] S. Batsouli, S. Kelly, M. Gyulassy, and J. L. Nagle, Phys. Lett. B557, 26 (2003). [2] K. Adcox et al. (PHENIX Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 192303 (2002); Nucl. Phys. A715, 695 (2003). [3] V...

  20. Scaling properties at freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Ruan, L.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Kurnadi,6 M. A. C. Lamont,3 J. M. Landgraf,3 S. LaPointe,50 J. Lauret,3 A. Lebedev,3 R. Lednicky,18 C-H. Lee,34 J. H. Lee,3 W. Leight,23 M. J. LeVine,3 C. Li,38 L. Li,43 N. Li,51 W. Li,40 X. Li,33 X. Li,39 Y. Li,44 Z. M. Li,51 M. A. Lisa,28 F. Liu,51 H...

  1. P(t) Dependence of Transverse Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bao-An; Ko, Che Ming; Li, GQ.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF TRANSVERS b . A slight increase in b or decrease in T results in a dra- matic increase in the ratio R(pt). These results indicate that the pt dependence of the ratio R(pt) indeed carries interest- ing information about the strength of transverse flow...(pt) at high transverse momenta. We now turn to our study using the relativisitc transport model ~ART 1.0! @15#. This model was developed by includ- ing more baryon and meson resonances as well as their in- teractions in the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck ~BUU...

  2. Kaon dispersion relation and flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the scatter- ings of kaons with other hadrons, and the real part of the self-energy is given by the mean-field potential. Although various approaches have been used to evaluate the kaon dis- persion relation in a dense medium ~e.g., @1,13?19#!, we shall... 52, 2037 ~1995!; 53, R22 ~1996!; Nucl. Phys. A601, 457 ~1996!. @10# Q. Li, J.Q. Wu, and C.M. Ko, Phys. Rev. C 39, 849 ~1989!. @11# S.J. Wang, B.A. Li, W. Bauer, and J. Randrup, Ann. Phys. ~N.Y.! 209, 251 ~1991!. @12# W. Bauer, Prog. Part. Nucl...

  3. Applications of the lahet simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, L.; Gavron, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.

  4. Effect of running coupling on photons from jet - plasma interaction in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lusaka Bhattacharya; Pradip Roy

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the role of collisional energy loss on high $p_T$ photon data measured by PHENIX collaboration by calculating photon yield in jet-plasma interaction. The phase space distribution of the participating jet is dynamically evolved by solving Fokker-Planck equation. We treat the strong coupling constant ($\\alpha_s$) as function of momentum and temperature while calculating the drag and diffusion coefficients. It is observed that the quenching factor is substantially modified as compared to the case when $\\alpha_s$ is taken as constant. It is shown that the data is reasonably well reproduced when contributions from all the relevant sources are taken into account. Predictions at higher beam energies relevant for LHC experiment have been made.

  5. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic HeavyIon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d + Au and peripheral Au + Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au + Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06}(syst), independent of p{sub {perpendicular}}.

  6. System-size independence of directed flow at the RelativisticHeavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Coll

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}) and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

  7. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic heavy ions in a fixed target experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikkelsen, Rune E; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the emission of bremsstrahlung from lead and argon ions in A Fixed Target ExpeRiment (AFTER) that uses the LHC beams. With nuclear charges of $Ze$ equal $208$ and $18$ respectively, these ions are accelerated to energies of $7$ TeV$\\times Z $. The bremsstrahlung peaks around $\\approx 100$ GeV and the spectrum exposes the nuclear structure of the incoming ion. The peak structure is significantly different from the flat power spectrum pertaining to a point charge. Photons are predominantly emitted within an angle of $1/\\gamma$ to the direction of ion propagation. Our calculations are based on the Weizs\\"{a}cker-Williams method of virtual quanta with application of existing experimental data on photonuclear interactions.

  8. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic heavy ions in a fixed target experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rune E. Mikkelsen; Allan H. Sørensen; Ulrik I. Uggerhøj

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the emission of bremsstrahlung from lead and argon ions in A Fixed Target ExpeRiment (AFTER) that uses the LHC beams. With nuclear charges of $Ze$ equal $208$ and $18$ respectively, these ions are accelerated to energies of $7$ TeV$\\times Z $. The bremsstrahlung peaks around $\\approx 100$ GeV and the spectrum exposes the nuclear structure of the incoming ion. The peak structure is significantly different from the flat power spectrum pertaining to a point charge. Photons are predominantly emitted within an angle of $1/\\gamma$ to the direction of ion propagation. Our calculations are based on the Weizs\\"{a}cker-Williams method of virtual quanta with application of existing experimental data on photonuclear interactions.

  9. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 064902 (2009) Deuteron production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V and also with those obtained from the coalescence model based on freeze-out nucleons in the transport model Carolina 27858, USA (Received 13 October 2009; published 3 December 2009) The hadronic transport model ART in the hadronic matter. This new hadronic transport model is used to study the transverse momentum spectrum

  10. Comparison of accelerator codes for a RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milutinovic, J.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of comparison of performances of several tracking or/and analysis codes. The basic purpose of this program was to assess reliability and accuracy of these codes, i.e., to determine the so-called ''error bars'' for the predicted values of tunes and other lattice functions as a minimum and, if possible, to discover potential difficulties with underlying physical models in these codes, inadequate algorithms, residual bugs and the like. Not only have we been able to determine the error bars, which for instance for the tunes at dp/p = +1% are ..delta nu../sub xi/ = 0.0027, ..delta nu../sub y/ = 0.0010, but also our program has brought about improvements of several codes. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. In-Medium Effects on K0 Mesons in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; B. Bannier; R. Bassini; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Díaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Heilmann; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; D. Mishra; E. Morinière; J. Mousa; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. PérezCavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebac; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wüstenfel; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou; P. Zumbruch

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the transverse momentum spectra and rapidity distributions of $\\pi^{-}$ and K$^0_S$ in Ar+KCl reactions at a beam kinetic energy of 1.756 A GeV measured with the spectrometer HADES. The reconstructed K$^0_S$ sample is characterized by good event statistics for a wide range in momentum and rapidity. We compare the experimental $\\pi^{-}$ and K$^0_S$ distributions to predictions by the IQMD model. The model calculations show that K$^0_S$ at low tranverse momenta constitute a particularly well suited tool to investigate the kaon in-medium potential. Our K$^0_S$ data suggest a strong repulsive in-medium K$^0$ potential of about 40 MeV strength.

  12. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb.Information 91, 20159,Final

  13. Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station. Introduction The European Wind Atlas in combination with the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAs (DEWI), EbertstraÃ?e 96, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany Abstract The practice of using the European Wind

  14. Climatology, Variability and Extrema of Ocean Waves -The Web-based KNMI/ERA-40 Wave Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    the main features of the atlas. The atlas contains some explanatory text, a basic description of the wind book of Hogben et al. (1986) and the Atlas of the ocean wind and wave climate of Young and HollandClimatology, Variability and Extrema of Ocean Waves - The Web-based KNMI/ERA-40 Wave Atlas Andreas

  15. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Binnington; Eric Poisson

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  16. Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  17. Electromagnetic radiation from relativistic nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles Gale; Kevin L. Haglin

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some of the results obtained in the study of the production of electromagnetic radiation in relativistic nuclear collisions. We concentrate on the emission of real photons and dileptons from the hot and dense strongly interacting phases of the reaction. We examine the contributions from the partonic sector, as well as those from the nonperturbative hadronic sector. We examine the current data, some of the predictions for future measurements, and comment on what has been learnt so far.

  18. Particle acceleration in the driven relativistic reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Lyubarsky; Michael Liverts

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the compression driven magnetic reconnection in the relativistic electron-positron plasma. Making use of a 2.5D particle-in-cell code, we simulated compression of a magnetized plasma layer containing a current sheet within it. We found that the particle spectrum within the reconnecting sheet becomes non-thermal; it could be approximated by a power-law distribution with an index of -1 and an exponential cutoff.

  19. Bose-Einstein Condensate general relativistic stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. H. Chavanis; T. Harko

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the possibility that due to their superfluid properties some compact astrophysical objects may contain a significant part of their matter in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate. To study the condensate we use the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, with arbitrary non-linearity. By introducing the Madelung representation of the wave function, we formulate the dynamics of the system in terms of the continuity equation and of the hydrodynamic Euler equations. The non-relativistic and Newtonian Bose-Einstein gravitational condensate can be described as a gas, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state. In the case of a condensate with quartic non-linearity, the equation of state is polytropic with index one. In the framework of the Thomas-Fermi approximation the structure of the Newtonian gravitational condensate is described by the Lane-Emden equation, which can be exactly solved. The case of the rotating condensate is also discussed. General relativistic configurations with quartic non-linearity are studied numerically with both non-relativistic and relativistic equations of state, and the maximum mass of the stable configuration is determined. Condensates with particle masses of the order of two neutron masses (Cooper pair) and scattering length of the order of 10-20 fm have maximum masses of the order of 2 M_sun, maximum central density of the order of 0.1-0.3 10^16 g/cm^3 and minimum radii in the range of 10-20 km. In this way we obtain a large class of stable astrophysical objects, whose basic astrophysical parameters (mass and radius) sensitively depend on the mass of the condensed particle, and on the scattering length. We also propose that the recently observed neutron stars with masses in the range of 2-2.4 M_sun are Bose-Einstein Condensate stars.

  20. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O. (Oriente Universidad, Cumana (Venezuela); Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  1. Dirac oscillators and the relativistic R matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grineviciute; Dean Halderson

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dirac oscillators are shown to be an excellent expansion basis for solutions of the Dirac equation by $R$-matrix techniques. The combination of the Dirac oscillator and the $R$-matrix approach provides a convenient formalism for reactions as well as bound state problems. The utility of the $R$-matrix approach is demonstrated in relativistic impulse approximation calculations where exchange terms can be calculated exactly, and scattering waves made orthogonal to bound state wave functions.

  2. Relativistic particle: Dirac observables and Feynman propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freidel, Laurent; Girelli, Florian; Livine, Etera R. [Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline St North, Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); SISSA, Via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 Allee d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the algebra of Dirac observables of the relativistic particle in four space-time dimensions. We show that the position observables become noncommutative and the commutation relations lead to a structure very similar to the noncommutative geometry of deformed special relativity (DSR). In this framework, it appears natural to consider the 4D relativistic particle as a five-dimensional massless particle. We study its quantization in terms of wave functions on the 5D light cone. We introduce the corresponding five-dimensional action principle and analyze how it reproduces the physics of the 4D relativistic particle. The formalism is naturally subject to divergences (due to the 5D representation), and we show that DSR arises as a natural regularization: the 5D light cone is regularized as the de Sitter space. We interpret the fifth coordinate as the particle's proper time while the fifth moment can be understood as the mass. Finally, we show how to formulate the Feynman propagator and the Feynman amplitudes of quantum field theory in this context in terms of Dirac observables. This provides new insights for the construction of observables and scattering amplitudes in DSR.

  3. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of the expression 'CSC studies' ('computing system commissioning'), which is occasionally referred to in these volumes. The work reported does generally assume that the detector is fully operational, and in this sense represents an idealised detector: establishing the best performance of the ATLAS detector with LHC proton-proton collisions is a challenging task for the future. The results summarised here therefore represent the best estimate of ATLAS capabilities before real operational experience of the full detector with beam. Unless otherwise stated, simulations also do not include the effect of additional interactions in the same or other bunch-crossings, and the effect of neutron background is neglected. Thus simulations correspond to the low-luminosity performance of the ATLAS detector. This report is broadly divided into two parts: firstly the performance for identification of physics objects is examined in detail, followed by a detailed assessment of the performance of the trigger system. This part is subdivided into chapters surveying the capabilities for charged particle tracking, each of electron/photon, muon and tau identification, jet and missing transverse energy reconstruction, b-tagging algorithms and performance, and finally the trigger system performance. In each chapter of the report, there is a further subdivision into shorter notes describing different aspects studied. The second major subdivision of the report addresses physics measurement capabilities, and new physics search sensitivities. Individual chapters in this part discuss ATLAS physics capabilities in Standard Model QCD and electroweak processes, in the top quark sector, in b-physics, in searches for Higgs bosons, supersymmetry searches, and finally searches for other new particles predicted in more exotic models.

  4. BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof Alternative Sources ofBeyondPVBioCleanBioPowerAtlas

  5. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern...

  6. Scalable Database Access Technologies for ATLAS Distributed Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vaniachine; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS event data processing requires access to non-event data (detector conditions, calibrations, etc.) stored in relational databases. The database-resident data are crucial for the event data reconstruction processing steps and often required for user analysis. A main focus of ATLAS database operations is on the worldwide distribution of the Conditions DB data, which are necessary for every ATLAS data processing job. Since Conditions DB access is critical for operations with real data, we have developed the system where a different technology can be used as a redundant backup. Redundant database operations infrastructure fully satisfies the requirements of ATLAS reprocessing, which has been proven on a scale of one billion database queries during two reprocessing campaigns of 0.5 PB of single-beam and cosmics data on the Grid. To collect experience and provide input for a best choice of technologies, several promising options for efficient database access in user analysis were evaluated successfully. We present ATLAS experience with scalable database access technologies and describe our approach for prevention of database access bottlenecks in a Grid computing environment.

  7. Rankine-Hugoniot Relations in Relativistic Combustion Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a foundational element describing relativistic reacting waves of relevance to astrophysical phenomena, the Rankine-Hugoniot relations classifying the various propagation modes of detonation and deflagration are analyzed in the relativistic regime, with the results properly degenerating to the non-relativistic and highlyrelativistic limits. The existence of negative-pressure downstream flows is noted for relativistic shocks, which could be of interest in the understanding of the nature of dark energy. Entropy analysis for relativistic shock waves are also performed for relativistic fluids with different equations of state (EoS), denoting the existence of rarefaction shocks in fluids with adiabatic index \\Gamma < 1 in their EoS. The analysis further shows that weak detonations and strong deflagrations, which are rare phenomena in terrestrial environments, are expected to exist more commonly in astrophysical systems because of the various endothermic reactions present therein. Additional topics of relevanc...

  8. Relativistic equation of state at subnuclear densities in the Thomas-Fermi approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. W.; Shen, H., E-mail: shennankai@gmail.com [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-uniform nuclear matter using the self-consistent Thomas-Fermi approximation with a relativistic mean-field model. The non-uniform matter is assumed to be composed of a lattice of heavy nuclei surrounded by dripped nucleons. At each temperature T, proton fraction Y{sub p} , and baryon mass density ? {sub B}, we determine the thermodynamically favored state by minimizing the free energy with respect to the radius of the Wigner-Seitz cell, while the nucleon distribution in the cell can be determined self-consistently in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. A detailed comparison is made between the present results and previous calculations in the Thomas-Fermi approximation with a parameterized nucleon distribution that has been adopted in the widely used Shen equation of state.

  9. Relativistic all-order calculations of Th, Th$^{+}$ and Th$^{2+}$ atomic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Safronova; U. I. Safronova; Charles W. Clark

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitation energies, term designations, and $g$-factors of Th, Th$^{+}$ and Th$^{2+}$ are determined using a relativistic hybrid configuration interaction (CI) + all-order approach that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster methods. The results are compared with other theory and experiment where available. We find some "vanishing" $g$-factors, similar to those known in lanthanide spectra. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for Th$^{2+}$. To estimate the uncertainties of our results, we compared our values with the available experimental lifetimes for higher $5f7p\\ ^3G_{4}$, $7s7p\\ ^3P_{0}$, $7s7p\\ ^3P_{1}$, and $6d7p\\ ^3F_{4}$ levels of Th$^{2+}$. These calculations provide a benchmark test of the CI+all-order method for heavy systems with several valence electrons and yield recommended values for transition rates and lifetimes of Th$^{2+}$.

  10. Relativistic Particle Acceleration in a Folded Current Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zenitani; M. Hoshino

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional particle simulations of a relativistic Harris current sheet of pair plasmashave demonstrated that the system is unstable to the relativistic drift kink instability (RDKI) and that a new kind of acceleration process takes place in the deformed current sheet. This process contributes to the generation of non-thermal particles and contributes to the fast magnetic dissipation in the current sheet structure. The acceleration mechanism and a brief comparison with relativistic magnetic reconnection are presented.

  11. Distributed Data Collection for the ATLAS EventIndex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, Javier; The ATLAS collaboration; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS EventIndex contains records of all events processed by ATLAS, in all processing stages. These records include the references to the files containing each event (the GUID of the file) and the internal “pointer” to each event in the file. This information is collected by all jobs that run at Tier-0 or on the Grid and process ATLAS events. Each job produces a snippet of information for each permanent output file. This information is packed and transferred to a central broker at CERN using an ActiveMQ messaging system, and then is unpacked, sorted and reformatted in order to be stored and catalogued into a central Hadoop server. This contribution describes in detail the Producer/Consumer architecture to convey this information from the running jobs through the messaging system to the Hadoop server.

  12. Atlas of uranium emission intensities in a hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, B.A.; Keller, R.A.; Engleman, R. Jr.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium emission spectrum from a hollow cathode discharge is displayed from 11,000 to 26,000 cm/sup -1/. This atlas lists 4928 spectral lines of uranium; 3949 are classified to the neutral spectrum and 431 are classified to the singly ionized spectrum. Listed wavenumbers are accurate to +-0.003 cm/sup -1/ and the listed relative intensities to +-8%. The richness of the spectrum makes this atlas useful for wavenumber calibration of lasers, spectrographs, and monochromators to an accuracy of 1 part in 10/sup 7/. This atlas is also useful as a guide to the uranium spectrum, and relative oscillator strengths (gf values) can be calculated from the intensities to a precision of +-20%.

  13. ATLAS Metadata Infrastructure Evolution for Run 2 and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Gemmeren, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration; Malon, David; Vaniachine, Alexandre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS developed and employed for Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider a sophisticated infrastructure for metadata handling in event processing jobs. This infrastructure profits from a rich feature set provided by the ATLAS execution control framework, including standardized interfaces and invocation mechanisms for tools and services, segregation of transient data stores with concomitant object lifetime management, and mechanisms for handling occurrences asynchronous to the control framework’s state machine transitions. This metadata infrastructure is evolving and being extended for Run 2 to allow its use and reuse in downstream physics analyses, analyses that may or may not utilize the ATLAS control framework. At the same time, multiprocessing versions of the control framework and the requirements of future multithreaded frameworks are leading to redesign of components that use an incident-handling approach to asynchrony. The increased use of scatter-gather architectures, both local and distributed, requires ...

  14. Recent Results of the ATLAS Barrel Combined Test Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmastro, Marco [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Universita degli Studi, Milan (Italy); INFN, Milan (Italy)

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In summer 2004 a full slice of the ATLAS detector -- including all detector subsystems from the inner tracker, the calorimetry to the muon system -- was exposed to particle beams (electrons, pions, photons, muons, protons) with different energies (from 1 GeV to 350 GeV). The aim was to study the combined performance of the different detector subsystems in ATLAS-like conditions.We present the electronics calibration scheme of the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) and its complete implementation. The calibrated response of the EMC is compared to the Monte Carlo simulations, showing that a very good description of the data has been achieved. Results of the combined data analysis are presented, focusing on the combined reconstruction of converted photons using the EMC and the ATLAS inner tracker.

  15. Heavy Flavour in a Nutshell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Lambert

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Moriond QCD brings together particle physicists of varied interests. This review and introduction to heavy flavour physics is aimed at those not in the heavy-flavour field to describe the motivation and methodology of precision flavour physics, and introduce the most tantalising searches for new physics. The LHC experiments are expected to make great inroads into constraining the new physics parameter space and discover the new physics which I will argue \\emph{must} be present to describe our observed universe.

  16. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  17. The Relativistic Binary Pulsar B1913+16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Weisberg; J. H. Taylor

    2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the results of a relativistic analysis of our observations of binary pulsar B1913+16, up to the latest measurements in 2001 August.

  18. Causality and chance in relativistic quantum field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Healey

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Bell appealed to the theory of relativity in formulating his principle of local causality. But he maintained that quantum field theories do not conform to that principle, even when their field equations are relativistically covariant and their observable algebras satisfy a relativistically motivated microcausality condition. A pragmatist view of quantum theory and an interventionist approach to causation prompt the reevaluation of local causality and microcausality. Local causality cannot be understood as a reasonable requirement on relativistic quantum field theories: it is unmotivated even if applicable to them. But microcausality emerges as a sufficient condition for the consistent application of a relativistic quantum field theory.

  19. Light propagation around a relativistic vortex flow of dielectric medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Linet

    2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the path of the light around a dielectric vortex described by the relativistic vortex flow of a perfect fluid.

  20. acids relativistic effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The relativistic effect in galaxy clustering is significant on large scales, in which dark energy models or alternative theories of modified gravity deviate from general...