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Sample records for atlas material testing

  1. Atlas Material Testing Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atlas Material Testing Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Atlas Material Testing Solutions Place: Chicago, IL Zip: 60613 Website: atlas-mts.com Coordinates: 41.9529209,...

  2. LANSCE | Materials Test Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Office Contact Administrative nav background Materials Test Station dotline ... Materials Test Station: the Preferred Alternative When completed, the Materials Test ...

  3. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Requirements for ATLAS Users All ATLAS Users must fulfill certain training requirements before they are allowed to have unescorted access to the ATLAS facility. These requirements are: Argonne Radiation Worker I Training ATLAS Site Specific Safety Training These training courses are computer based and will need to be completed every two years. The material covered in the training and the tests that must be completed with passing scores of 80% are available only on computers in the

  4. ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Basics The basics of ATLAS computing at PDSF Read More » Data Transfer DQ2 is the ATLAS data management and transfer tool. Read More » File Systems ATLAS has space on 4 elizas: 35TB on /eliza1, 35TB on /eliza2, 12TB on /eliza4 and 142TB on /eliza18. Read More » Running on Carver ATLAS software is obtained via cvmfs which is installed on PDSF nodes. There is presently no cvmfs installation available on Carver so it is not possible to run ATLAS jobs on Carver at this time. However, the

  5. Blade Materials and Substructures Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials and Substructures Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  6. Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation) Pern, J. 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ENCAPSULATION; PROCESSING; RELIABILITY; TESTING PV; MODULE...

  7. Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, J.

    2008-12-01

    Study of PV module encapsulation materials, processing, and testing shows that overall module reliability is determined by all component materials and processing factors.

  8. Blade Materials and Substructures Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Wind turbine blades are subjected to a higher number of complex loading cycles not ... polymers (composites) and other materials used to construct wind-turbine blades. ...

  9. Testing at Cryogenic Temperatures: Engineering, Materials, and Testing Support

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles By Pat Hipp, pat.hipp@ctd-materials.com, x128 Paul Fabian, Paul.Fabian@ctd-materials.com, x103 October 29, 2015 Testing at Cryogenic Temperatures Engineering, Materials, and Testing Support 2600 Campus Drive, Suite D * Lafayette, Colorado 80026 * Phone: 303-664-0394 * www.CTD-materials.com 2 Agenda * CTD Introduction * CTD

  10. Experimental and code simulation of a station blackout scenario for APR1400 with test facility ATLAS and MARS code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, X. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Choi, K. Y.; Park, H. S.; Cho, S.; Kang, K. H.; Choi, N. H.

    2012-07-01

    A SBO (station blackout) experiment named SBO-01 was performed at full-pressure IET (Integral Effect Test) facility ATLAS (Advanced Test Loop for Accident Simulation) which is scaled down from the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe). In this study, the transient of SBO-01 is discussed and is subdivided into three phases: the SG fluid loss phase, the RCS fluid loss phase, and the core coolant depletion and core heatup phase. In addition, the typical phenomena in SBO-01 test - SG dryout, natural circulation, core coolant boiling, the PRZ full, core heat-up - are identified. Furthermore, the SBO-01 test is reproduced by the MARS code calculation with the ATLAS model which represents the ATLAS test facility. The experimental and calculated transients are then compared and discussed. The comparison reveals there was malfunction of equipments: the SG leakage through SG MSSV and the measurement error of loop flow meter. As the ATLAS model is validated against the experimental results, it can be further employed to investigate the other possible SBO scenarios and to study the scaling distortions in the ATLAS. (authors)

  11. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1994-01-01

    Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges.

  12. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, B.P.

    1994-08-02

    Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges. 4 figs.

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Floorplan ATLAS Floorplan

  14. SPACE code simulation of cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS integral test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J.; Kim, K. D.

    2012-07-01

    SPACE code is a system analysis code for pressurized water reactors. This code uses a two-fluid and three-field model. For a few years, intensive validations have been performed to secure the prediction accuracy of models and correlations for two-phase flow and heat transfer. Recently, the code version 1.0 was released. This study is to see how well SPACE code predicts thermal hydraulic phenomena of an integral effect test. The target experiment is a cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS facility, which has the same two-loop features as APR1400. Predicted parameters were compared with experimental observations. (authors)

  15. Module Encapsulation Materials, Processing and Testing (Presentation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ENCAPSULATION; PROCESSING; RELIABILITY; TESTING PV; MODULE ENCAPSULATION; ...

  16. NREL: Technology Transfer - Materials Exposure Testing Market...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System In this video, NREL researchers Gary Jorgenson and Carl Bingham discuss the NREL-developed ultra...

  17. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    corrosion by limiting the transport of water and oxygen to the ceramic-metal interface. Thermal spray techniques for ceramic coating metallic structures are currently being explored. The mechanics of thermal spray resembles spray painting in many respects, allowing large surfaces and contours to be covered smoothly. All of the relevant thermal spray processes use a high energy input to melt or partially melt a powdered oxide material, along with a high velocity gas to impinge the molten droplets onto a substrate where they conform, quench, solidify and adhere mechanically. The energy input can be an arc generated plasma, an oxy-fuel flame or an explosion. The appropriate feed material and the resulting coating morphologies vary with technique as well as with application parameters. To date on this project, several versions of arc plasma systems, a detonation coating system and two variations of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) fired processes have been investigated, operating on several different ceramic materials.

  18. IHE material qualification tests description and criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slape, R J

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the qualification tests presently being used at Pantex Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory that are required by the Department of Energy prior to the approval for an explosive as an Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) material. The acceptance criteria of each test for IHE qualification is also discussed. 5 references, 10 figures.

  19. Alignment of the Pixel and SCT Modules for the 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Ahmad, A.; Andreazza, A.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Barr, A.J.; Beccherle, R.; Bell, P.J.; Bernabeu, J.; Broklova, Z.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Cauz, D.; Chevalier, L.; Chouridou, S.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cobal, M.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Darbo, G.; de Vivie, J.B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drohan, J.; Einsweiler, K.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Facius, K.; Ferrari, P.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrere, D.; Flick,, T.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagliardi, G.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B.J.; Gan, K.K.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorfine, G.; Gottfert, T.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Hansen, P.H.; Hara, K.; Hartel, R.; Harvey, A.; Hawkings, R.J.; Heinemann, F.E.W.; Henss, T.; Hill, J.C.; Huegging, F.; Jansen, E.; Joseph, J.; Unel, M. Karagoz; Kataoka, M.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kostyukhin, V.; Lacasta, C.; Lari, T.; Latorre, S.; Lester, C.G.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lourerio, K.F.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Mathes, M.; Meroni, C.; Mikulec, B.; Mindur, B.; Moed, S.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Moyse, E.W.J.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Nikolaev, K.; Parodi, F.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pater, J.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P.W.; Pinto, B.; Poppleton, A.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Reznicek, P.; Risso, P.; Robinson, D.; Roe, S.; Rozanov, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santi, L.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schultes, J.; Sfyrla, A.; Shaw, C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Toczek, B.; Troncon, C.; Tyndel, M.; Vernocchi, F.; Virzi, J.; Anh, T. Vu; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Wellsf, P.S.; Zhelezkow, A.

    2008-06-02

    A small set of final prototypes of the ATLAS Inner Detector silicon tracking system(Pixel Detector and SemiConductor Tracker), were used to take data during the 2004 Combined Test Beam. Data were collected from runs with beams of different flavour (electrons, pions, muons and photons) with a momentum range of 2 to 180 GeV/c. Four independent methods were used to align the silicon modules. The corrections obtained were validated using the known momenta of the beam particles and were shown to yield consistent results among the different alignment approaches. From the residual distributions, it is concluded that the precision attained in the alignmentof the silicon modules is of the order of 5 mm in their most precise coordinate.

  20. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

    2005-10-30

    The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

  1. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  2. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, D K

    2003-04-22

    The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100°F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles' Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

  3. Development of COTS ADC SEE Test System for the ATLAS LArCalorimeter Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Xue -Ye; Chen, Hu -Cheng; Chen, Kai; Mead, Joseph; Liu, Shu -Bin; An, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Radiation-tolerant, high speed, high density and low power commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are planned to be used in the upgrade to the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter front end (FE) trigger readout electronics. Total ionization dose (TID) and single event effect (SEE) are two important radiation effects which need to be characterized on COTS ADCs. In our initial TID test, Texas Instruments (TI) ADS5272 was identified to be the top performer after screening a total 17 COTS ADCs from different manufacturers with dynamic range and sampling rate meeting the requirements of the FE electronics. Another interesting feature of ADS5272 is its 6.5 clock cycles latency, which is the shortest among the 17 candidates. Based on the TID performance, we have designed a SEE evaluation system for ADS5272, which allows us to further assess its radiation tolerance. In this paper, we present a detailed design of ADS5272 SEE evaluation system and show the effectiveness of this system while evaluating ADS5272 SEE characteristics in multiple irradiation tests. According to TID and SEE test results, ADS5272 was chosen to be implemented in the full-size LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) demonstrator, which will be installed on ATLAS calorimeter during the 2014 Long Shutdown 1 (LS1).

  4. Development of COTS ADC SEE Test System for the ATLAS LArCalorimeter Upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Xue -Ye; Chen, Hu -Cheng; Chen, Kai; Mead, Joseph; Liu, Shu -Bin; An, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Radiation-tolerant, high speed, high density and low power commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are planned to be used in the upgrade to the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter front end (FE) trigger readout electronics. Total ionization dose (TID) and single event effect (SEE) are two important radiation effects which need to be characterized on COTS ADCs. In our initial TID test, Texas Instruments (TI) ADS5272 was identified to be the top performer after screening a total 17 COTS ADCs from different manufacturers with dynamic range and sampling rate meeting the requirements of the FE electronics. Another interesting feature of ADS5272more » is its 6.5 clock cycles latency, which is the shortest among the 17 candidates. Based on the TID performance, we have designed a SEE evaluation system for ADS5272, which allows us to further assess its radiation tolerance. In this paper, we present a detailed design of ADS5272 SEE evaluation system and show the effectiveness of this system while evaluating ADS5272 SEE characteristics in multiple irradiation tests. According to TID and SEE test results, ADS5272 was chosen to be implemented in the full-size LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) demonstrator, which will be installed on ATLAS calorimeter during the 2014 Long Shutdown 1 (LS1).« less

  5. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  6. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  7. Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture SNL has 40+ years ...

  8. Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity ... Title: Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - ...

  9. Irradiation Environment of the Materials Test Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2012-06-21

    Conceptual design of the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is now complete. The principal mission is the irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials for fast-spectrum nuclear reactor applications. The neutron spectrum in the fuel irradiation region of MTS is sufficiently close to that of fast reactor that MTS can match the fast reactor fuel centerline temperature and temperature profile across a fuel pellet. This is an important characteristic since temperature and temperature gradients drive many phenomena related to fuel performance, such as phase stability, stoichiometry, and fission product transport. The MTS irradiation environment is also suitable in many respects for fusion materials testing. In particular, the rate of helium production relative to atomic displacements at the peak flux position in MTS matches well that of fusion reactor first wall. Nuclear transmutation of the elemental composition of the fusion alloy EUROFER97 in MTS is similar to that expected in the first wall of a fusion reactor.

  10. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop - Supplemental Materials (Scripts and Procedures)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-02-01

    A variety of performance tests are described relating to: Material Transfers; Emergency Evacuation; Alarm Response Assessment; and an Enhanced Limited Scope Performance Test (ELSPT). Procedures are given for: nuclear material physical inventory and discrepancy; material transfers; and emergency evacuation.

  11. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  12. TEST DEVICE FOR MEASURING PERMEABILITY OF A BARRIER MATERIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Return to Search TEST DEVICE FOR ... Transfer Website Abstract: A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. ...

  13. Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How do you tell if materials are stressed-out? Conventional stress tests for irradiated materials require a significant amount of material, but a new nano-size technique can test the strength of materials using an infinitesimal amount. Learn more.

  14. Trusted materials using orthogonal testing. 2015 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Benthem, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to prove (or disprove) that a reasonable number of simple tests can be used to provide a unique data signature for materials, changes in which could serve as a harbinger of material deviation, prompting further evaluations. The routine tests are mutually orthogonal to any currently required materials specification tests.

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solenoid (i.e., MRI magnet). It has been commissioned, tested and used at ATLAS with secondary short-lived beams. It also has the potential of being moved to other...

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Requirements Experimental Equipment Safety Data Management Users Group ATLAS Users Workshop 2009 25 Years of ATLAS Gretina Workshop ATLAS Users Workshop 2014 ATLAS...

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Schedule CARIBU Schedule ATLAS Future CARIBU Future Scheduling Considerations ATLAS Archive CARIBU Archive ATLAS Schedules Beamtime at ATLAS is normally scheduled in two-month...

  18. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  19. Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fracture | Department of Energy Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture SNL has 40+ years experience with effects of high-pressure hydrogen gas on materials hpwgw_matresearch_somerday.pdf (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications Mechanical Properties of Structural Steels in Hydrogen Materials Compatibility Properties, Behavior and Material Compatibility of Hydrogen,

  20. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fluid environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment The ...

  1. Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charpy impact test results on ...

  2. Impact Limiter Tests of Four Commonly Used Materials And Limiter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of four impact limiter materials was tested at four different load rates, quasi-statically, 44 feet per second (ftjs), (a 9 meter drop test per lOCF71), 33 fts and 22 fts. ...

  3. Means for ultrasonic testing when material properties vary

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1979-01-01

    A device is provided for maintaining constant sensitivity in an ultrasonic testing device, despite varying attenuation due to the properties of the material being tested. The device includes a sensor transducer for transmitting and receiving a test signal and a monitor transducer positioned so as to receive ultrasonic energy transmitted through the material to be tested. The received signal of the monitor transducer is utilized in analyzing data obtained from the sensor transducer.

  4. Material Testing Priorities for Hydrogen (H2) Infrastructure | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Material Testing Priorities for Hydrogen (H2) Infrastructure Material Testing Priorities for Hydrogen (H2) Infrastructure American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Boundary Needs, Tests and Data Requirements, Recent Testing by Secat, Inc. and Sandia pipeline_group_hayden_ms.pdf (979.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment Permeation, Diffusion, Solubility Measurements: Results and Issues From Cleanup to

  5. Corrosion Test Cell for Biopolar Plate Materials - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Corrosion Test Cell for Biopolar Plate Materials Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryA corrosion test cell for screening candidate bipolar plate materials for use in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells.DescriptionThe corrosion test cell has a transparent or translucent cell body having a pair of identical cell body members that seal against opposite sides of a bipolar plate. The cell

  6. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellenstein, J.A.; DellaCorte, C.

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  7. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  8. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  9. High temperature ultrasonic testing of materials for internal flaws

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kupperman, David S.; Linzer, Melvin

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for nondestructive evaluation of defects in hot terials, such as metals and ceramics, by sonic signals, which includes a zirconia buffer in contact with a hot material being tested, a liquid couplant of borax in contact with the zirconia buffer and the hot material to be tested, a transmitter mounted on the zirconia buffer sending sonic signals through the buffer and couplant into the hot material, and a receiver mounted on the zirconia buffer receiving sonic signals reflected from within the hot material through the couplant and the buffer.

  10. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  11. Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture Brian Somerday, Chris San Marchi, and Dorian Balch Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, GA August 30-31, 2005 SNL has 40+ years experience with effects of high-pressure hydrogen gas on materials * Design and maintenance of welded stainless steel pressure vessels for containment of high-pressure H 2 isotopes - Extensive testing of stainless steels exposed to

  12. CMI Unique Facility: Filtration Test Facility | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Filtration Test Facility filtration set up for CMI unique facility at Idaho National Laboratory The Filtration Test Facility is one of more than a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy. The chemical separation of materials is often water-intensive. It is important to establish filtration methods that are both efficient and environmentally sound. Mineral processing streams are particularly

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Years of ATLAS First Circulation Agenda Registration Attendees Presentations Photos of the Meeting Photos of History The ATLAS Research at ATLAS Dear Friend, This is the second...

  14. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  15. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

  16. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Davies

    2004-10-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

  17. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  18. METHOD OF TESTING THERMAL NEUTRON FISSIONABLE MATERIAL FOR PURITY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fermi, E.; Anderson, H.L.

    1961-01-24

    A process is given for determining the neutronic purity of fissionable material by the so-called shotgun test. The effect of a standard neutron absorber of known characteristics and amounts on a neutronic field also of known characteristics is measured and compared with the effect which the impurities derived from a known quantity of fissionable material has on the same neutronic field. The two readings are then made the basis of calculation from which the amount of impurities can be computed.

  19. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-01-01

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program initiated this quarter, provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principle activity during this first reporting period were preparing for and conducting a project kick-off meeting, working through plans for the project implementation, and beginning the conceptual design of the test section.

  20. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Beams Available from ATLAS Updated August, 2009 Beam currents listed in the table were obtained with naturally occurring material for the given isotope. The maximum energy quoted corresponds to the that computed with the optimal charge state. Higher energies are possible by using another charge state or by double stripping. a Other isotopes available with currents proportional to their abundance. For more beam current isotopically enriched material may be used, but the User should, in

  1. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Beams Available from ATLAS Updated August, 2009 Beam currents listed in the table were obtained with naturally occurring material for the given isotope. The maximum energy quoted corresponds to the that computed with the optimal charge state. Higher energies are possible by using another charge state or by double stripping. a Other isotopes available with currents proportional to their abundance. For more beam current isotopically enriched material may be used, but the User should, in

  2. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartsell, Brian; Campbell, Michael; Fitton, Michael; Hurh, Patrick; Ishida, Taku; Nakadaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    A compact fatigue testing machine that can be easily inserted into a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use has been carefully considered by limiting the size and weight of the machine, simplifying sample loading and test setup for operation via master-slave manipulator, and utilizing an efficient design to minimize maintenance. Funded from a US-Japan collaborative effort, the machine has been specifically designed to help characterize titanium material specimens. These specimens are flat cantilevered beams for initial studies, possibly utilizing samples irradiated at other sources of beam. The option to test spherically shaped samples cut from the T2K vacuum window is also available. The machine is able to test a sample to $10^7$ cycles in under a week, with options to count cycles and sense material failure. The design of this machine will be presented along with current status.

  3. Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with Ultra-Accelerated Weathering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System | NREL Materials Exposure Testing Market Expands with Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System In this video, NREL researchers Gary Jorgenson and Carl Bingham discuss the NREL-developed, ultra-accelerated weathering system and its ability to revolutionize the weathering industry

  4. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  5. Effects of Introduced Materials in the Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLoach, L; Jones, RL

    2002-01-11

    Water samples previously acquired from superheated (>140 C) zones within hydrological test boreholes of the Drift Scale Test (DST) show relatively high fluoride concentrations (5-66 ppm) and low pH (3.1-3.5) values. In these high temperature regions of the rock, water is present superheated vapor only--liquid water for sampling purposes is obtained during the sampling process by cooling. Based on data collected to date, it is evident that the source of the fluoride and low pH is from introduced man-made materials (Teflon{trademark} and/or Viton{trademark} fluoroelastomer) used in the test. The test materials may contribute fluoride either by degassing hydrogen fluoride (HF) directly to produce trace concentrations of HF gas ({approx}0.1 ppm) in the high temperature steam, or by leaching fluoride in the sampling tubes after condensation of the superheated steam. HF gas is known to be released from Viton{trademark} at high temperatures (Dupont Dow Elastomers L.L.C., Elkton, MD, personal communication) and the sample water compositions indicate near stoichiometric balance of hydrogen ion and fluoride ion, indicating dissolution of HF gas into the aqueous phase. These conclusions are based on a series of water samples collected to determine if the source of the fluoride is from the degradation of materials originally installed to facilitate measurements. Analyses of these water samples show that the source of the fluoride is the introduced materials, that is the Viton{trademark} packers used to isolate test zones and/or Teflon{trademark} tubing used to draw water and steam from the test zones. In particular, water samples collected from borehole (BH) 72 high temperatures ({approx} 170 C) prior to introduction of any Viton{trademark} or Teflon{trademark} show pH Values (4.8 to 5.5) and fluoride concentrations well below 1 ppm over a period of six months. These characteristics are typical of condensing DST steam that contains only some dissolved carbon dioxide generated

  6. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - ATLAS Pulsed-Power Generator The ATLAS pulsed-power generator is one of many alternatives to underground nuclear testing. Pulsed power can concentrate high total energies on larger (centimeter-scale) experimental targets for relatively long periods of times compared to other Stockpile Stewardship experiments. Instructions: Click the photograph THUMBNAIL to view the photograph details Click the Category, Number,

  7. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  8. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  9. Materials tests in support of an MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) coal combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Wang, D.Y.; Soppet, W.K.

    1989-11-01

    Corrosion tests were conducted to evaluate the compatibility of candidate alloys in simulated fireside and high-temperature, high- pressure waterside environments of slagging magnetohydrodynamic combustors. The fireside tests were conducted with uncoated specimens and specimens covered with deposit layers of slag or a mixture of slag and seed for as long as 750 h at 600 and 800{degree}F. The waterside corrosion tests were conducted at 450{degree}F in a high-pressure autoclave in which water with two different chemistries was used. Detailed results on the scaling kinetics are presented and the data are used to analyze the material options for different locations in the combustor system. 10 refs., 25 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AGFA AIRIS.pdf CHICO2 DGS.pdf FMA GODDESS GRETINA HELIOS PhoswichWall TapeStation ATLAS Strategic Plan (2009) ATLAS Strategic Plan (2014) Registered Participants ATLAS USERS...

  11. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  12. Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V) (2015)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V) (2015) Atlas V Complete Document [PDF-73.1MB] Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V) (2015) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is proud to release the fifth edition of the Carbon Storage Atlas (Atlas V). Production of Atlas V is the result of collaboration among carbon storage experts from local, State, and Federal agencies, as well as industry and academia. Atlas V provides a coordinated

  13. Materials Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04, 05, and 06

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Ingram, C; Simmons, L; Arganbright, R; Lyle, J; Wong, K

    2006-03-23

    The purpose of this work is to examine the environmental, safety, health and operational aspects of detonating a confined explosive test apparatus that has been designed to maximize the dynamics of impact on beryllium metal components for Contained Firing Facility (CFF) applications. A combination of experimental collection and evaluation methods were designed and implemented to provide an evaluation of immediately postdetonation by-products reflecting a potential worst-case scenario beryllium aerosolization explosive event. The collective Material Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04 - 06 provided explosive devices designed to scale for the dedicated METS firing tank that would provide a post-detonation internal environment comparable to the CFF. The experimental results provided appropriate information to develop operational parameters to be considered for conducting full-scale beryllium-containing experimental tests with similar designs within CFF and B801A. These operational procedures include the inclusion of chelating agents in pre-shot CFF cardboard containers with a minimum of 600 gallons content, an extended time period post-test before purging the CFF chamber, and an adaptation of approaches toward applications of the scrubber and HEPA systems during the post-shot sequence for an integrated environmental, safety, and health approach. In addition, re-entry and film retrieval procedures will be adapted, in line with abatement techniques for cleaning the chamber, that will be required for work inside a CFF that will contain an elevated concentration of spherical and highly aerosolizable beryllium particulate.

  14. DYNA3D Material Model 71 - Solid Element Test Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zywicz, E

    2008-01-24

    A general phenomenological-based elasto-plastic nonlinear isotropic strain hardening material model was implemented in DYNA3D for use in solid, beam, truss, and shell elements. The constitutive model, Model 71, is based upon conventional J2 plasticity and affords optional temperature and rate dependence (visco-plasticity). The expressions for strain hardening, temperature dependence, and rate dependence allow it to represent a wide variety of material responses. Options to capture temperature changes due to adiabatic heating and thermal straining are incorporated into the constitutive framework as well. The verification problem developed for this constitutive model consists of four uni-axial right cylinders subject to constant true strain-rate boundary conditions. Three of the specimens have different constant strain rates imposed, while the fourth specimen is subjected to several strain rate jumps. The material parameters developed by Fehlmann (2005) for 21-6-9 Nitronic steel are utilized. As demonstrated below, the finite element (FE) simulations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical responses and indicated the model is functioning as desired. Consequently, this problem serves as both a verification problem and regression test problem for DYNA3D.

  15. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion in graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.

  16. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion inmore » graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.« less

  17. Material Open Test Assembly Specimen Retrieval from Hanford's Shielded Material Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valdez, Patrick LJ; Rinker, Michael W.

    2009-06-14

    Hanford’s 324 Building, the Shielded Material Facility (SMF), was developed to provide containment for research and fabrication development studies on highly radioactive metallic and ceramic nuclear reactor fuels and structural materials. Between 1983 and 1992, the SMF was used in support of the Department of Energy (DOE)-funded Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) program. In this program, metallurgical specimens were irradiated in FFTF and then sent to SMF for processing and storage in two cabinets. This effort was abruptly ended in early 1990s due to programmatic shifts within the DOE, leaving many specimens unexamined. In recent years, these specimens have become of high value to new DOE programs. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with retrieving specimens from one of the cabinets in support of fuel clad and duct development for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. Cesium contamination of the cell and failure of the overhead crane system utilized for opening the cabinets prevented PNNL from using the built-in hot cell equipment to gain access to the cabinets. PNNL designed and tested a lifting device to fit through a standard 10 inch diameter mechanical manipulator port in the SMF South Cell wall. The tool was successfully deployed in June 2008 with the support of Washington Closure Hanford.

  18. The materials test station: a fast spectrum irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitcher, Eric J.

    2007-07-01

    The Materials Test Station is a fast-neutron spectrum irradiation facility under design at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of the United States Department of Energy's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. The facility will be capable of rodlets-scale irradiations of candidate fuel forms being developed to power the next generation of fast reactors. Driven by a powerful proton beam, the fuel irradiation region exhibits a neutron spectrum similar to that seen in a fast reactor, with a peak neutron flux of 1.6 x 10{sup 15} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}. Site preparation and construction are estimated to take four years, with a cost range of $60 M to $90 M. (author)

  19. Micromechanical tests of ion irradiated materials: Atomistic simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, C.; Jin, H. H.; Kwon, J.

    2012-07-01

    We investigated irradiation effects on Fe-Cr binary alloys by using a nano-indentation combined with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique. We modeled the nano-indentation test by using a finite element method. We could extract the intrinsic hardness and the yield stress of an irradiation hardened region by using a so-called inverse method. SiC micro-pillars of various sizes were fabricated by mask and inductively coupled plasma etching technique and compressed by using flat punch nano-indentation. Compressive fracture strength showed a clear specimen size effect. Brittle-to-Ductile transition at room temperature was observed as the specimen size decreases. The effect of irradiation on the fracture strength of SiC micro-pillars was evaluated by performing ion irradiation with Si ions. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nano-indentation and nano-pillar compression tests. Radiation effect was observed which is found to be due to the interaction of dislocations nucleated by spherical indenter with pre-existing radiation defects (voids). These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials. (authors)

  20. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use ...

  1. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS 25th Anniversary Celebration Presentations Summary of the History of ATLAS W. F. Henning Reminiscences 1: From Whence did ATLAS arise? J. P. Schiffer Reminiscences 2: ATLAS 25th Anniversary Celebration R. Pardo Reminiscences 3: The Argonne-Notre Dame Gamma-ray Facility U. Garg Reminiscences 4: Atom Trap at ATLAS Z. T. Lu The Impact of ATLAS on SRF Development and Applications R. E. Laxdel Technical Challenges in Low-velocity SRF Development M. Kelly Offsprings of ATLAS - the Florida State

  2. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Safety Considerations at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Important general safety topics: ATLAS requires that everyone in the facility must have successfully completed the ATLAS Site Specific Training and the ATLAS Radiation Worker I equivalent training within the past two years. Please contact the ATLAS User Administrative Assistant (Barbara Weller) at extension 2-4044 if you need to take this training. The only exception to the

  3. Improved flywheel materials : characterization of nanofiber modified flywheel test specimen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Anderson, Benjamin John; Miller, William Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    As alternative energy generating devices (i.e., solar, wind, etc) are added onto the electrical energy grid (AC grid), irregularities in the available electricity due to natural occurrences (i.e., clouds reducing solar input or wind burst increasing wind powered turbines) will be dramatically increased. Due to their almost instantaneous response, modern flywheel-based energy storage devices can act a mechanical mechanism to regulate the AC grid; however, improved spin speeds will be required to meet the necessary energy levels to balance thesegreen' energy variances. Focusing on composite flywheels, we have investigated methods for improving the spin speeds based on materials needs. The so-called composite flywheels are composed of carbon fiber (C-fiber), glass fiber, and aglue' (resin) to hold them together. For this effort, we have focused on the addition of fillers to the resin in order to improve its properties. Based on the high loads required for standard meso-sized fillers, this project investigated the utility of ceramic nanofillers since they can be added at very low load levels due to their high surface area. The impact that TiO2 nanowires had on the final strength of the flywheel material was determined by athree-point-bend' test. The results of the introduction of nanomaterials demonstrated an increase instrength' of the flywheel's C-fiber-resin moiety, with an upper limit of a 30% increase being reported. An analysis of the economic impact concerning the utilization of the nanowires was undertaken and after accounting for new-technology and additional production costs, return on improved-nanocomposite investment was approximated at 4-6% per year over the 20-year expected service life. Further, it was determined based on the 30% improvement in strength, this change may enable a 20-30% reduction in flywheel energy storage cost (%24/kW-h).

  4. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  5. Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A.

    1996-11-12

    Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water.

  6. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) CWP (Cold Water Pipe) Laboratory Test Program. Materials Project Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Fiberglass sandwich wall structures emerged as leading candidates for the OTEC cold water pipe because of their high strength to weight ratio, their flexibility in selecting directional properties, their resistance to electrochemical interaction, their ease of deployment and their relative low cost. A review of the literature established reasonable confidence that FRP laminates could meet the OTEC requirements; however, little information was available on the performance of core materials suitable for OTEC applications. Syntactic foam cores of various composition and density were developed and tested for mechanical properties and seawater absorption.

  7. Abrasion and Erosion testing of Materials used in Power Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of wear test procedures and equipment. Research capabilities at ARC include Pin-on-Drum, Pin-on-Disk, and Dry SandRubber Wheel abrasion tests, Jaw Crusher gouging test, ...

  8. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Test device for measuring permeability of a ... Marketing Summary: Electrical Calcium Test for Measuring Barrier Permeability ...

  9. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  10. Post Test Evaluation of NSWCCD Materials at EERC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Eric Wuchina

    2001-12-31

    The higher combustion temperatures, particulate erosion, multivalent metal impurities, and local gas composition variations will all have dramatic effects on the performance of materials used for the cyclone combustor deflector cone.

  11. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future ATLAS Schedule Please contact Mrs. Barbara Weller (bweller@anl.gov) or go to here for your travel arrangement as far in advance of your arrival as possible. Future ATLAS Schedule

  12. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAC and Proposals Call for Proposals PAC Members Proposal Info Approved Experiments ATLAS Proposal Submission A call for ATLAS Proposals is made 2-3 times per year, depending on...

  13. LOCA simulation in the NRU reactor: materials test-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G.E.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Rausch, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This second experiment of the program produced peak fuel cladding temperatures of 1148K (1607/sup 0/F) and resulted in six ruptured fuel rods. Test data and initial results from the experiment are presented here in the form of photographs and graphical summaries. These results are also compared with the preceding prototypic thermal-hydraulic test results and with computer model test predictions.

  14. Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    was discovered after the fact that the methodology used was producing very low recoveries ... Week 2. The revised carbonyl sampling methodology used during the second week of testing ...

  15. Material test machine for tension-compression tests at high temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cioletti, Olisse C.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus providing a device for testing the properties of material specimens at high temperatures and pressures in controlled water chemistries includes, inter alia, an autoclave housing the specimen which is being tested. The specimen is connected to a pull rod which couples out of the autoclave to an external assembly which includes one or more transducers, a force balance chamber and a piston type actuator. The pull rod feeds through the force balance chamber and is compensated thereby for the pressure conditions existing within the autoclave and tending to eject the pull rod therefrom. The upper end of the push rod is connected to the actuator through elements containing a transducer comprising a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT). The housing and coil assembly of the LVDT is coupled to a tube which runs through a central bore of the pull rod into the autoclave where it is connected to one side of the specimen. The movable core of the LVDT is coupled to a stem which runs through the tube where it is then connected to the other side of the specimen through a coupling member. A transducer in the form of a load cell including one or more strain gages is located on a necked-down portion of the upper part of the pull rod intermediate the LVDT and force balance chamber.

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Data Management Plan This information is provided to inform users of the data management policies of ATLAS. All proposals for funding to the Office of Science require a data management plan. The Principal Investigator (PI) of any experiment performed at ATLAS is the owner of the data produced in his/her specific experiment. In this capacity, the PI is the main point of contact for all aspects of an experiment including data handling and storage, record keeping, etc. ATLAS Users who

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS User Group Executive Committee The current membership of the ATLAS User Group Executive Committee is: Dan Bardayan University of Notre Dame dbardaya@nd.edu Catherine Deibel Louisiana State University deibel@lsu.edu Nicholas Scielzo (chair) Lawrence Livermore National Lab scielzo1@llnl.gov Alan Wuosmaa University of Connecticut alan.wuosmaa@uconn.edu The ATLAS User Group Charter: The ATLAS User Group shall be formed from the members of the nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry and atomic

  18. Approved reference and testing materials for use in Nuclear Waste Management Research and Development Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Daniel, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    This document, addressed to members of the waste management research and development community summarizes reference and testing materials available from the Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center (MCC). These materials are furnished under the MCC's charter to distribute reference materials essential for quantitative evaluation of nuclear waste package materials under development in the US. Reference materials with known behavior in various standard waste management related tests are needed to ensure that individual testing programs are correctly performing those tests. Approved testing materials are provided to assist the projects in assembling materials data base of defensible accuracy and precision. This is the second issue of this publication. Eight new Approved Testing Materials are listed, and Spent Fuel is included as a separate section of Standard Materials because of its increasing importance as a potential repository storage form. A summary of current characterization information is provided for each material listed. Future issues will provide updates of the characterization status of the materials presented in this issue, and information about new standard materials as they are acquired. 7 references, 1 figure, 19 tables.

  19. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of themore » samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.« less

  20. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  1. 20th Hazmat Challenge tests skills of hazardous materials response teams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazmat Challenge tests skills of hazardous materials response teams 20th Hazmat Challenge tests skills of hazardous materials response teams Ten hazardous materials response teams from New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma and Nebraska test their skills in a series of graded, timed exercises. July 21, 2016 The Laboratory began the Hazmat Challenge in 1996 to hone the skills of its own hazmat team members. The Laboratory began the Hazmat Challenge in 1996 to hone the skills of its own hazmat team

  2. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Y. F

    2015-01-05

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  3. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS Program Advisory Committee (PAC) Since ATLAS is a National User Facility and available for experiments to anyone in the world, all experiments to be performed at ATLAS must be reviewed and approved by the ATLAS PAC. The PAC consists of 5-7 internationally recognized nuclear physicists, most of whom come from outside Argonne. The PAC members are appointed by the Scientific Director of ATLAS and typically serve for a term of two years. The PAC normally meets twice per year. At roughly

  4. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This is the second announcement of the ATLAS User Group Meeting that will take place on August 8-9, 2009. As stated in our original message (http://www.phy.anl.gov/atlas/workshop09/FirstAnnouncement.html), the workshop will be an opportunity to: (1) update everyone on the new capabilities of ATLAS and (2) refine the vision of the future of ATLAS. It is essential that this workshop be attended by as many users as possible as it will define the very future of the facility. In other words, if ATLAS

  5. Materials Test-2 LOCA Simulation in the NRU Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; King, I. L.; Marshall, R. K.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Russcher, G. E.; Webb, B. J.; Wildung, N. J.; Wilson, C. L.; Wismer, M. D.; Mohr, C. L.

    1982-03-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This third experiment of the program produced fuel cladding temperatures exceeding 1033 K (1400F) for 155 s and resulted in eight ruptured fuel rods. Experiment data and initial results are presented in the form of photographs and graphical summaries.

  6. High temperature materials experience at the Central Receiver Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    During four years of operation at the Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) ceramics have performed well in cyclic solar flux densities of less than 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Above 100 W/cm/sup 2/, serious limitations exist. Important application considerations include: the geometry, cyclic and long time exposures, flux density gradients, thermal shock, weathering, and soiling.

  7. Enhanced In-pile Instrumentation for Material Testing Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; Joshua Daw; Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Kurt Davis; Robert Schley

    2012-07-01

    An increasing number of U.S. nuclear research programs are requesting enhanced in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiations. For example, fuel research and development funded by the U.S. Department of Energy now emphasize approaches that rely on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data must be miniature, reliable and able to withstand high flux/high temperature conditions. Depending on user requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these user needs, in-pile instrumentation development efforts have been initiated as part of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF), the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D), and the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) programs. This paper reports on recent INL achievements to support these programs. Specifically, an overview of the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to MTR users are identified. In addition, recent results and products available from sensor research and development are detailed. Specifically, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and thermal conductivity are reported. Results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are also summarized.

  8. RE Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RE Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: RE Atlas AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable...

  9. Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs

    2012-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

  10. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduling Considerations Beamtime at ATLAS is normally scheduled in two-month blocks. We make every effort to produce an accurate schedule at least two weeks prior to its approval in a scheduling meeting. The scheduling process is continuously ongoing with communication between ATLAS personnel and the Principal Investigator (PI) of each experiment approved by the PAC. The overriding consideration in developing the ATLAS schedule is to optimize the productive use of beam time. This involves

  11. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposed ATLAS efficiency and intensity upgrade Guy Savard and Robert V. F. Janssens June 12, 2009 The ATLAS facility is on a constant quest to improve and increase the capabilities it offers to its Users. ATLAS currently provides beams of essentially all stable isotopes at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. These can be used in conjunction with a suite of state-of-the-art instruments such as Gammasphere, the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF BURN TEST SPECIFICATIONS FOR FIRE PROTECTION MATERIALS IN RAM PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, N.

    2010-03-03

    The regulations in 10 CFR 71 require that the radioactive material (RAM) packages must be able to withstand specific fire conditions given in 10 CFR 71.73 during Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). This requirement is normally satisfied by extensive testing of full scale test specimens under required test conditions. Since fire test planning and execution is expensive and only provides a single snapshot into a package performance, every effort is made to minimize testing and supplement tests with results from computational thermal models. However, the accuracy of such thermal models depends heavily on the thermal properties of the fire insulating materials that are rarely available at the regulatory fire temperatures. To the best of authors knowledge no test standards exist that could be used to test the insulating materials and derive their thermal properties for the RAM package design. This paper presents a review of the existing industry fire testing standards and proposes testing methods that could serve as a standardized specification for testing fire insulating materials for use in RAM packages.

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Tom Mullen, Physics Division Safety Engineer. Please Note: If you have any comments or concerns regarding safety at ATLAS, please contact the Physics Division Safety ...

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS User Program - Visitor Information Site Access: Researchers who plan to come to Argonne for an ATLAS experiment are required to complete certain forms. All ATLAS Users need to have a Guest Facilities User Agreement completed and signed (click here). The amount of lead time needed and complexity involved will depend on their status. In any case, Users should contact either Mrs. Barbara Weller (bweller@anl.gov) or the ATLAS User Liaison Physicist, Shaofei Zhu (zhu@anl.gov) as far in

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Talks FirstAnnouncement SecondAnnouncement Registration Form Registered Participants ATLAS Upgrade Equipment Initiatives Stable Beams Radioactive Beams CARIBU Beams Workshop...

  16. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  17. BNL ATLAS Grid Computing

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Ernst

    2010-01-08

    As the sole Tier-1 computing facility for ATLAS in the United States and the largest ATLAS computing center worldwide Brookhaven provides a large portion of the overall computing resources for U.S. collaborators and serves as the central hub for storing,

  18. Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

    1980-07-31

    This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

  19. Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-03-01

    A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

  20. ATLAS note ATL-COM-PHYS-2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chekanov, S.; Boomsma, J.; High Energy Physics

    2009-12-22

    The program InvMass has been developed to perform a general model-independent search for new particles using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at CERN. The search is performed by examining statistically significant variations from the Standard Model predictions in exclusive event classes classified according to the number of identified objects. The program, called InvMass, finds all relevant particle groups identified with the ATLAS detector and analyzes their production rates, invariant masses and the total transverse momenta. The generic code of InvMass can easily be adapted for any particle types identified with the ATLAS detector. Several benchmark tests are presented.

  1. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  2. Regulatory and extra-regulatory testing to demonstrate radioactive material packaging safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Packages for the transportation of radioactive material must meet performance criteria to assure safety and environmental protection. The stringency of the performance criteria is based on the degree of hazard of the material being transported. Type B packages are used for transporting large quantities of radioisotopes (in terms of A{sub 2} quantities). These packages have the most stringent performance criteria. Material with less than an A{sub 2} quantity are transported in Type A packages. These packages have less stringent performance criteria. Transportation of LSA and SCO materials must be in {open_quotes}strong-tight{close_quotes} packages. The performance requirements for the latter packages are even less stringent. All of these package types provide a high level of safety for the material being transported. In this paper, regulatory tests that are used to demonstrate this safety will be described. The responses of various packages to these tests will be shown. In addition, the response of packages to extra-regulatory tests will be discussed. The results of these tests will be used to demonstrate the high level of safety provided to workers, the public, and the environment by packages used for the transportation of radioactive material.

  3. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  4. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 630-252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Aspects of radiation safety at ATLAS: Health Physics Coverage at ATLAS is provided by Argonne National Laboratory. Health Physics personnel must be notified if there is a possible contamination incident, or if target and/or detectors are to be removed from a beam line following an experiment. HP Contact information: Angel Garcia (HP Technician): 2-9179 (4-1352 pager) Dave

  5. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The purpose of this note is to announce an important workshop for the ATLAS users to be held at Argonne National Laboratory on AUGUST 8 and 9, 2009. As you are aware, major changes are in store for the ATLAS facility. First, the Energy Upgrade and the CARIBU (CAlifornium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade) projects are nearing completion. In addition, the role of ATLAS for the low-energy nuclear physics community needs to be revisited in light of the decision to site the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

  6. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REGISTRATION FORM Name: First Middle Last Organization: Department: Business Address: Street City State Zip Country Business Phone: Fax: E-mail: Citizenship: Additional information is needed for on-site access for non-US citizens who are not ATLAS Users. To download the form as a word document or pdf file, please go to the ATLAS user website (http://www.phy.anl.gov/atlas/users/visitor_info.html). Please return information to Barbara Weller by July 10, 2009. REGISTRATION Fees (If paying by check,

  7. Special Form Testing of Sealed Source Encapsulation for High-Alpha-Activity Actinide Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Oscar A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States all transportation of radioactive material is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Beginning in 2008 a new type of sealed-source encapsulation package was developed and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These packages contain high-alpha-activity actinides and are regulated and transported in accordance with the requirements for DOT Class 7 hazardous material. The DOT provides specific regulations pertaining to special form encapsulation designs. The special form designation indicates that the encapsulated radioactive contents have a very low probability of dispersion even when subjected to significant structural events. The special form designs have been shown to simplify the delivery, transport, acceptance, and receipt processes. It is intended for these sealed-source encapsulations to be shipped to various facilities making it very advantageous for them to be certified as special form. To this end, DOT Certificates of Competent Authority (CoCAs) have been sought for the design suitable for containing high-alpha-activity actinide materials. This design consists of the high-alpha-activity material encapsulated within a triangular zirconia canister, referred to as a ZipCan, tile that is then enclosed by a spherical shell. The spherical shell design, with ZipCan tile inside, was tested for compliance with the special form regulations found in 49 CFR 173.469. The spherical enclosure was subjected to 9-m impact, 1 m percussion, and 10-minute thermal tests at the Packaging Evaluation Facility located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN USA and operated by ORNL. Before and after each test, the test units were subjected to a helium leak check and a bubble test. The ZipCan tiles and core were also subjected to the tests required for ISO 2919:2012(E), including a Class IV impact test and heat test and subsequently subjected to helium leakage rate tests [49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i)]. The impact

  8. Adaptation of Crack Growth Detection Techniques to US Material Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Joy L. Rempe; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter

    2014-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some materials testing reactors (MTRs) outside the U.S., such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have deployed a technique to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. This technique incorporates a compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation. A crack in the specimen is monitored using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. A project is underway to develop and demonstrate the performance of a similar type of test rig for use in U.S. MTRs. The first year of this three year project was devoted to designing, analyzing, fabricating, and bench top testing a mechanism capable of applying a controlled stress to specimens while they are irradiated in a pressurized water loop (simulating PWR reactor conditions). During the second year, the mechanism will be tested in autoclaves containing high pressure, high temperature water with representative water chemistries. In addition, necessary documentation and safety reviews for testing in a reactor environment will be completed. In the third year, the assembly will be tested in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) and Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) will be performed.

  9. ADAPTATION OF CRACK GROWTH DETECTION TECHNIQUES TO US MATERIAL TEST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter; Joy L. Rempe

    2015-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some test reactors outside the United States, such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have developed techniques to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. The basic approach is to use a custom-designed compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation, while the crack in the specimen is monitored in-situ using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In 2012 the US Department of Energy commissioned the Idaho National Laboratory and the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT NRL) to take the basic concepts developed at the HBWR and adapt them to a test rig capable of conducting in-pile IASCC tests in US Material Test Reactors. The first two and half years of the project consisted of designing and testing the loader mechanism, testing individual components of the in-pile rig and electronic support equipment, and autoclave testing of the rig design prior to insertion in the MIT Reactor. The load was applied to the specimen by means of a scissor like mechanism, actuated by a miniature metal bellows driven by pneumatic pressure and sized to fit within the small in-core irradiation volume. In addition to the loader design, technical challenges included developing robust connections to the specimen for the applied current and voltage measurements, appropriate ceramic insulating materials that can endure the LWR environment, dealing with the high electromagnetic noise environment of a reactor core at full power, and accommodating material property changes in the specimen, due primarily to fast neutron damage, which change the specimen resistance without additional crack growth. The project culminated with an in

  10. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Nuclear Physics at the Department of Energy to upgrade the capabilities of ATLAS in the area of physics with rare isotopes. A copy of the proposal for the CAlifornium...

  11. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  12. BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy...

  13. Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Ken C; Naus, Dan J

    2008-09-01

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45? pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Recommended Vacuum Equipment This is the only vacuum equipment supported by the ATLAS Control System Cryo Pump Heater Blanket Temp/Controller 1 Temp/Controller 2 8200 Compressor 9600 Compressor Cryo Torr Interface Gate Valves All-Metal Hand Valves Foreline Valves Vac Gauge Modular Vac Gauge Controller Hand Valves Turbo Pumps (Ceramic) Turbo Pumps (MagLev) Turbo Pumps (Hybrid) Fore Pump (Scroll) Getter Pump Download Spreadsheet Category Manufacturer Model/Type Order Info Supplier Details

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Safety Considerations at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Electricity will probably present the greatest hazard potential of your visit to Argonne. Argonne and ATLAS have very specific requirements concerning working on or near electrical equipment. This generally means that you cannot work on a piece of equipment if the cover is off and current carrying conductors or components at 50V or greater are exposed. The preferred way

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Equipment Information There are several major pieces of experimental equipment at ATLAS. These are listed below along with contact information for the system experts: Gammasphere (Mike Carpenter) Fragment Mass Analyzer (Cary Davids or Darek Seweryniak ) Helical Orbit Spectrometer (Birger Back) Enge Split Pole Spectrograph (Ernst Rehm) Canadian Penning Trap (Guy Savard) Large Scattering Chamber (Shaofei Zhu) Atom Trap at ATLAS (Zheng-Tian Lu or Peter Mueller) There are additional

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guest Facilities User Agreement All ATLAS Facility Users must have an appointment at Argonne to work at the facility. In order for a non-Argonne person to perform research at ATLAS the Department of Energy requires that a Guest Facilities User Agreement be executed. The purpose of the User Agreement is to define administrative obligations such as safety, liability, ownership of property, and intellectual property rights. These rights and obligations vary based upon category of use.

  18. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Initiatives at ATLAS Birger B. Back June 10, 2009. HELIOS Description: The Helical Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS) is a novel spectrometer that will enable us to carry out detailed nuclear structure studies via inverse kinematics reactions using re-accelerated, neutron-rich beams from the new CARIBU injector as well as radioactive beams produced by the in-flight method at ATLAS. The spectrometer design has several advantages over conventional techniques using large-area Si detectors. These

  19. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 ATLAS User’s Meeting: May 15-16, 2014 Dear Colleagues, The ATLAS accelerator complex at Argonne National Laboratory restarted operation after an extended shutdown to complete its intensity and efficiency upgrade. This upgrade project consisted of a reconfigured injection line and a positive-ion injector that now includes a high-intensity CW RFQ for initial acceleration. In addition, a major reconfiguration of the booster section was also part of the project. A new cryostat with

  20. LONG-TERM CORROSION TESTING OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE CONTAINMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estill, J. C.; Doughty, S.; Gdowski, G. E.; Gordon, S.; King, K.; McCright, R. D.; Wang, F.

    1997-10-01

    Preliminary results are presented from the long-term corrosion test program of candidate materials for the high-level radioactive waste packages that would be emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The present waste package design is based on a multi-barrier concept having an inner container of a corrosion resistant material and an outer container of a corrosion allowance material. Test specimens have been exposed to simulated bounding environments that may credibly develop in the vicinity of the waste packages. Corrosion rates have been calculated for weight loss and crevice specimens, and U-bend specimens have been examined for evidence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Galvanic testing has been started recently and initial results are forthcoming. Pitting characterization of test specimens will be conducted in the coming year. This test program is expected to continue for a minimum of five years so that long-term corrosion data can be determined to support corrosion model development, performance assessment, and waste package design.

  1. Examination of a Size-Change Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Gu, X.; Ji, L.; Kelly, G.; Gu, X.; Nickel, N.; Norum, P.; Shioda, T.; Tamizhmani, G.

    2012-08-01

    We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/- 5C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/- 5% between laboratories.

  2. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherer, Carolynn P; Bushlya, Anatoly V; Efimenko, Vladimir F; Ilyanstev, Anatoly; Regoushevsky, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  3. NETL NATCARB - Atlas | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATCARB/Atlas Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V) (2015) Carbon Storage Atlas The primary purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Storage Atlas is to provide a coordinated update of carbon capture and storage (CCS) potential across the United States and other portions of North America. DOE has released five versions of the atlas with the most recent, "DOE's Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V)," made publicly available in August 2015. Atlas V contains

  4. RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A

    2008-12-31

    The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

  5. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  6. Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.A.; Miron, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

  7. Preliminary results for HIP bonding Ta to W targets for the materials test station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dombrowski, David E; Maloy, Stuart A

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten targets for the Materials Test Station (MTS) were clad with thin tantalum cover plates and a tantalum frame using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). A preliminary HIP parameter study showed good bonding and intimate mechanical contact for Ta cover plate thicknesses of 0.25 mm (0.010 inch) and 0.38 mm (0.015 inch). HIP temperatures of full HIP runs were 1500 C (2732 F). HIP pressure was 203 MPa (30 ksi).

  8. Abrasion and erosion testing of materials used in power production from coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.

    2003-09-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of studying abrasive wear, related to mineral testing, handling, and processing. The center has also been instrumental in the design and development of wear test procedures and equipment. Research capabilities at ARC include Pin-on-Drum, Pin-on-Disk, and Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel abrasion tests, Jaw Crusher gouging test, Ball-on-Ball Impact test, and Jet erosion tests. Abrasive and erosive wear studies have been used to develop both new alloys and improved heat treatments of commercial alloys. As part of ARC’s newest iteration on wear testing to evaluate materials for use in new and existing pulverized coal combustion and gasifier power systems, the ARC has designed and constructed a new High Temperature Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear Test (HAET). This new piece of test apparatus is designed for erosive particle velocities of 10-40 m/sec and temperatures from room temperature (23°C) to 800+°C, with special control over the gas atmosphere. A variable speed whirling arm design is used to vary the impact energy of the gravity fed erosive particles. The specimens are mounted at the edge of a disk and allow a full range of impingement angles to be selected. An electric furnace heats the specimens in an enclosed retort to the selected temperature. Tests include both oxidizing conditions and reducing conditions. A range of gases, including CO, CO2, CH4, H2, H2S, HCl, N2, O2, and SO2 can be mixed and delivered to the retort. During the erosion testing a stream of abrasive powder is delivered in front of the specimens. This apparatus is designed to use low abrasive fluxes, which simulate real operating conditions in commercial power plants. Currently ~270 μm SiO2 particles are being used to simulate the abrasive impurities typically found in coal. Since operators are always striving for longer lifetimes and higher operating temperatures, this apparatus can help elucidate mechanisms of wastage and identify superior

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS: MODELING AND TESTING FOR AIR AND WATER EXPOSURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, D.; James, C.; Cortes-Concepcion, J.; Tamburello, D.; Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2010-05-18

    To make commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using these materials. A rigorous set of environmental reactivity tests have been developed based on modified testing procedures codified by the United Nations for the transportation of dangerous goods. Potential hydrogen storage material, 2LiBH4{center_dot}MgH2 and NH3BH3, have been tested using these modified procedures to evaluate the relative risks of these materials coming in contact with the environment in hypothetical accident scenarios. It is apparent that an ignition event will only occur if both a flammable concentration of hydrogen and sufficient thermal energy were available to ignite the hydrogen gas mixture. In order to predict hydride behavior for hypothesized accident scenarios, an idealized finite element model was developed for dispersed hydride from a breached system. Empirical thermodynamic calculations based on precise calorimetric experiments were performed in order to quantify the energy and hydrogen release rates and to quantify the reaction products resulting from water and air exposure. Both thermal and compositional predictions were made with identification of potential ignition event scenarios.

  10. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  11. FOURTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-03-05

    Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAMS environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Further understanding of the variability of softwood fiberboard properties will require testing of additional material.

  12. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  13. Dynamic materials testing and constitutive modeling of structural sheet steel for automotive applications. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cady, C.M.; Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III

    1996-08-23

    The objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic mechanical properties of four different structural sheet steels used in automobile manufacture. The analysis of a drawing quality, special killed (DQSK) mild steel; high strength, low alloy (HSLA) steel; interstitial free (IF); and a high strength steel (M-190) have been completed. In addition to the true stress-true strain data, coefficients for the Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong, and Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive models have been determined from the mechanical test results at various strain rates and temperatures and are summarized. Compression, tensile, and biaxial bulge tests and low (below 0.1/s) strain rate tests were completed for all four steels. From these test results it was determined to proceed with the material modeling optimization using the through thickness compression results. Compression tests at higher strain rates and temperatures were also conducted and analyzed for all the steels. Constitutive model fits were generated from the experimental data. This report provides a compilation of information generated from mechanical tests, the fitting parameters for each of the constitutive models, and an index and description of data files.

  14. Examination of an Optical Transmittance Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Bengoechea, J.; Bokria, J. G.; Kohl, M.; Powell, N. E.; Smith, M. E.; White, M. D.; Wilson, H. R.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  15. Examination of an Optical Transmittance Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Bengoechea, J.; Bokria, J.; Kohl, M.; Powell, N. E.; Smith, M. E.; White, M. D.; Wilson, H. R.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dear Friend, Please, mark the dates of Friday October 22 and Saturday October 23, 2010! We are planning a symposium to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the dedication of ATLAS which took place on June 25, 1985. ATLAS was the world's first superconducting linac for ions. Since its dedication as a National User Facility, more than a thousand experiments by well over 2000 users world-wide, have taken advantage of the unique capabilities it provides. The 1-1/2 day symposium will highlight the

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS USERS WORKSHOP: AGENDA Saturday, August 8 (Bldg. 203 Auditorium) 8:45 - 9:15 Registration & Coffee 9:15 - 9:30 Welcome & introduction to the meeting: W. Loveland An updated Strategic Plan: Why? R. Janssens 9:30 - 10:00 Status of ATLAS (& Energy Upgrade) R. Pardo 10:00 - 10:30 Status of CARIBU R. Pardo & G. Savard 10:30 - 10:45 Coffee 10:45 - 12:45 Status report on existing equipment & Planned Upgrades*: 10:45 - 11:00 HELIOS A. Wuosmaa 11:00 - 11:15 Gammasphere M.

  18. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 ATLAS User’s Meeting: May 15-16, 2014 Dear Colleagues, The ATLAS accelerator complex at Argonne National Laboratory is restarting operation after an extended shutdown to complete its intensity and efficiency upgrade. This upgrade project consisted of a reconfigured injection line and a positive-ion injector that now includes a high-intensity CW RFQ for initial acceleration. In addition, a major reconfiguration of the booster section was also part of the project. A new cryostat with

  19. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2-3, 2010 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  20. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 22-23, 2011 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  1. Biofuels Atlas (United States) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atlas (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biofuels Atlas (United States) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Potentials & Scenarios...

  2. Atlas Solar Innovations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Innovations Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Atlas Solar Innovations Name: Atlas Solar Innovations Address: 2640 NW 15th Court Place: Pompano Beach, Florida Zip: 33069 Sector:...

  3. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dress":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Screenshot References: EPRI1 River Atlas2 The...

  4. Template:AtlasTabs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AtlasTabs Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTemplate:AtlasTabs&oldid686795...

  5. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) ATLAS is an integrated web-based logistics management system allowing users to manage inbound and outbound freight ...

  6. Analysis of molybdenum-99 production capability in the materials test station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitcher, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    The United States of America currently relies on foreign suppliers to meet all of it needs for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) used in medical diagnostic procedures. The current US demand is at least 5000 six-day curies per week. Neutronics calculations have been performed to assess whether the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) could potentially generate Mo-99. Two target material options have been explored for Mo-99 production in the MTS: low enriched uranium (LEU) and Tc-99. For LEU, scoping calculations indicate that MTS can supply nearly half of the current US demand with only minor neutronic impact on the MTS primary mission. For the Tc-99 option, the MTS could produce about one-tenth of the US demand.

  7. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Big Sky Carbon Atlas is an online geoportal designed for you to discover, interpret, and access geospatial data and maps relevant to decision support and education on carbon sequestration in the Big Sky Region. In serving as the public face of the Partnership's spatial Data Libraries, the Atlas provides a gateway to geographic information characterizing CO2 sources, potential geologic sinks, terrestrial carbon fluxes, civil and energy infrastructure, energy use, and related themes. In addition to directly serving the BSCSP and its stakeholders, the Atlas feeds regional data to the NatCarb Portal, contributing to a national perspective on carbon sequestration. Established components of the Atlas include a gallery of thematic maps and an interactive map that allows you to: • Navigate and explore regional characterization data through a user-friendly interface • Print your map views or publish them as PDFs • Identify technical references relevant to specific areas of interest • Calculate straight-line or pipeline-constrained distances from point sources of CO2 to potential geologic sink features • Download regional data layers (feature under development) (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  8. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS Program Advisory Committee (PAC) Current PAC Membership: Gordon Ball TRIUMF Dan Bardayan University of Notre Dame Peter Butler University of Liverpool Michael Carpenter Argonne National Laboratory Alexandra Gade Michigan State University Walter Loveland (Chair) Oregon State University Thomas Papenbrock The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Nicolas Scielzo (UEC Chair) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Ingo Wiedenhoever Florida State University

  9. Solar tests of aperture plate materials for solar thermal dish collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, L.D.

    1983-08-15

    In parabolic dish solar collectors, walk-off of the spot of concentrated sunlight can be a hazard if a malfunction causes the concentration to stop following the sun. Therefore, a test program was carried out to evaluate the behavior of various ceramics, metals, and polymers under solar irradiation of about 7000 kW/m/sup 2/ (peak) for 15 minutes. The only materials that did not slump or shatter were two grades of medium-grain extruded graphite. High-purity, slip-cast silica might be satisfactory at somewhat lower flux. Oxidation of the graphite appeared acceptable during tests simulating walk-off, acquisition (2000 cycles on/off sun), and spillage (continuous on-sun operation).

  10. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  11. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Understanding and manipulating the most fundamental properties of materials can lead to major breakthroughs in solar power, reactor fuels, optical computing, telecommunications. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Yu Seung Kim (left) and Kwan-Soo Lee (right) New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost A new class of fuel cells based on a newly discovered polymer-based material could bridge

  12. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodosta, Traci

    2013-04-19

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  13. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rodosta, Traci

    2014-06-27

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  14. BioFuels Atlas Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Kristi Moriarity's presentation on NREL's BioFuels Atlas from the May 12, 2011, Clean Cities and Biomass Program State webinar.

  15. FUNDAMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIAL 2LIBH4 MGH2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, C.; Anton, D.; Cortes-Concepcion, J.; Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2012-01-10

    While the storage of hydrogen for portable and stationary applications is regarded as critical in bringing PEM fuel cells to commercial acceptance, little is known of the environmental exposure risks posed in utilizing condensed phase chemical storage options as in complex hydrides. It is thus important to understand the effect of environmental exposure of metal hydrides in the case of accident scenarios. Simulated tests were performed following the United Nations standards to test for flammability and water reactivity in air for a destabilized lithium borohydride and magnesium hydride system in a 2 to 1 molar ratio respectively. It was determined that the mixture acted similarly to the parent, lithium borohydride, but at slower rate of reaction seen in magnesium hydride. To quantify environmental exposure kinetics, isothermal calorimetry was utilized to measure the enthalpy of reaction as a function of exposure time to dry and humid air, and liquid water. The reaction with liquid water was found to increase the heat flow significantly during exposure compared to exposure in dry or humid air environments. Calorimetric results showed the maximum normalized heat flow the fully charged material was 6 mW/mg under liquid phase hydrolysis; and 14 mW/mg for the fully discharged material also occurring under liquid phase hydrolysis conditions.

  16. Long-term materials test program. Quarterly report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-03-01

    Exposure of gas turbine materials to a PFBC effluent under the Long-Term Materials Test Program has reached 1507 hours. Unprotected nickel and cobalt base blade and vane alloys show susceptibility to hot corrosion at 1500/sup 0/F (gas temperature), 1300/sup 0/F, and 1100/sup 0/F (air-cooled pins). Precious metal aluminide and M (Co,Fe) CrAlY overlay coatings continue to show good resistance to corrosion above 1450/sup 0/F, but are susceptible to varying degrees of pitting attack between 1050 and 1300/sup 0/F. Significant erosion/corrosion degradation of both base alloys and protective coatings/claddings has been observed on airfoil specimens exposed at 1350/sup 0/F, 800 to 900 fps and dust loadings less than 100 ppM for 1085 hours. Corrosion predominately occurred in areas of direct particle impaction; i.e., leading edge and pressure surface, indicating an erosion/corrosion synergism. At gas velocities of 1200 to 1400 fps, a platinum-aluminide coated IN-738 pin experienced a metal recession rate of 8 mils/1000-hours. The PFBC facility continues to show excellent operational reliability, accumulating over 1100 test hours this quarter. The only concern from an operations standpoint is the gradual thinning of the in-bed heat exchanger tubing at a rate of about 5 mils/100 hours off the diameter.

  17. EA-1954: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with its proposal to resume testing of nuclear fuels and materials under transient high-power test conditions at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The State of Idaho and Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are cooperating agencies.

  18. FIFTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.; Dunn, K.

    2014-04-15

    Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAC storage environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Additional samples will be added to each aging environment, to support development of an aging model specific to softwood fiberboard. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Two additional softwood fiberboard source packages have been obtained and will begin to provide data on the range of variability of this material.

  19. Laboratory corrosion tests for simulating fireside wastage of superheater materials in waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, N.; Kawahara, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Hosoda, T.

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were performed to clarify the effects of relative amounts of fused salts in tube deposits on corrosion rates of superheater materials in WTE plants. All test exposures were at 550 C and of 100 hour duration. The nine synthetic ashes used as corrodents consisted of mixtures of chlorides, sulfates and oxides. The test materials were alloy steel T22, stainless steels TP347H, TP310HCbN, and alloys HR11N and 625. The gas atmosphere consisted of 500 to 3000 ppm HCl-30ppm SO{sub 2}-10%O{sub 2}-10%CO{sub 2}-20%H{sub 2}O-bal.N{sub 2}. Generally, the relative amount of fused salts in non-fused ash constituents at 550 C increased with increasing the chlorine content of the ashes. The corrosion rate of T22 steel did not depend directly on ash chlorine content, but for ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rate depended on the calculated amount of fused salt at 500 C. The corrosion rates of TP347H steel and alloy 625 were maximum for ashes of 6--8 wt%Cl. For ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rates of T22 steel, stainless steels, and alloys increased with ashes having higher amounts of fused salts. Increased HCl content of the gas caused higher corrosion of the stainless steels and high-nickel alloys, but there was no clear corrosion-exacerbating effect with T22 steel.

  20. Sixth Status Report: Testing of Aged Softwood Fiberboard Material for the 9975 Shipping Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2015-03-31

    Samples have been prepared from several 9975 lower fiberboard subassemblies fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in some environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the two most aggressive environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAC storage environment for up to 15 years. Samples from an additional 3 softwood fiberboard assemblies have begun aging during the past year to provide information on the variability of softwood fiberboard behavior. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected to support development of an aging model specific to softwood fiberboard.

  1. ATLAS Support Center | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Support Center Our mission is to support ATLAS physics analyses and hardware R&D, in particular for U.S. ATLAS physicists. We are one of the three ATLAS Support Centers in the U.S. We offer for ATLAS users: A model Tier-3 (T3g) for ATLAS analysis Meeting and office space for visitors A dedicated video conference facility Computer accounts ATLAS software expertise and consultation T3g setup expertise and consultation Analysis expertise and consultation The support center is operated by

  2. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion cold water pipe at-sea test program status report. Design, fabrication, materials testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    This report describes the selection, testing, fabrication, and eventual deployment of a piping system for an OTEC platform.

  4. Fracture toughness testing of bi-material joints with high strength mis-match

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocak, M.; Hornet, P.; Cornec, A.; Schwalbe, K.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the influence of strength mis-match on CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) R-curves obtained from homogeneous and electron beam (EB) welded bimaterial CT and SENB specimens of two aluminum alloys. The R-curves of metal-metal bimaterial specimens are compared with the R-curves of each alloy to determine the effect of strength mismatch on the locally measured CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) fracture toughness properties. The homogeneous specimens of two different aluminum alloys, namely 2024-FC and 2024-T351 with yield strengths of 80 and 360 MPa respectively, as well as EB welded bi-material 5 mm thick CT and SENB specimens (a/W = 0.15 and 0.5) have been tested at room temperature. The local CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) fracture toughness measurements on such composite specimen configurations produced generally strength mis-match and geometry independent R-curves.

  5. A Virtual Test Approach to Incorporate Materials and Manufacturing Processes to Aid Design choices in High Performance Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Murillo, C.; Price, M.

    2011-05-04

    The increasing use of fibre reinforced composites in structural components in the aerospace industry is providing many challenges to designers in understanding how they can be used more effectively to exploit their advantages. One of the main challenges is the selection of lay-ups for a given application. The difficulty lies in the variability that is achievable with composites. Each new layup or configuration is effectively a new material and requires and extensive test programme to validate the performance, from coupons which give basic material characteristics, up through the test pyramid through to large sub-component which contains basic assemblies. This variety of testing gives confidence in understanding the material behaviour and performance in structural assemblies. On the other hand, the manufacturing process is also important here with different processes sometimes needed for different materials or thicknesses. This is a time consuming and expensive process requiring many thousands of small tests leading up to a few major tests which are complex to set up and carry out. This research is attempting to address this by developing a virtual test system which will sit hand-in-hand with a physical test system. The goal of virtual tests appears reachable using the finite element analysis technique in which many experimental tests can be replaced by high fidelity simulations. The payoff in reduced cycle time and costs for designing and certifying composite structures is very attractive; and the possibility also arises of considering material configurations that are too complex to certify by purely empirical methods. The validated simulations could then be subsequently used for variants or derivatives of composites to inform design choices and establish new validation programmes where appropriate. This paper presents a series of simulations of the critical testing procedures needed to validate high performance composites materials using linear and non

  6. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  7. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  8. Characterization and testing of amidoxime-based adsorbent materials to extract uranium from natural seawater

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary

    2015-11-19

    Extraction of uranium (U) from seawater for use as a nuclear fuel is a significant challenge due to the low concentration of U in seawater (~3.3 ppb) and difficulties to selectively extract U from the background of major and trace elements in seawater. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) s Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) has been serving as a marine test site for determining performance characteristics (adsorption capacity, adsorption kinetics, and selectivity) of novel amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under natural seawater exposure conditions. This report describes the performance of three formulations (38H, AF1, AI8)more » of amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent produced at ORNL in MSL s ambient seawater testing facility. The adsorbents were produced in two forms, fibrous material (40-100 mg samples) and braided material (5-10 g samples), exposed to natural seawater using flow-through columns and recirculating flumes. All three formulations demonstrated high 56 day uranium adsorption capacity (>3 gU/kg adsorbent). The AF1 formulation had the best uranium adsorption performance, with 56-day capacity of 3.9 g U/kg adsorbent, saturation capacity of 5.4 g U/kg adsorbent, and ~25 days half-saturation time. The two exposure methods, flow-through columns and flumes were demonstrated to produce similar performance results, providing confidence that the test methods were reliable, that scaling up from 10 s of mg quantities of exposure in flow-through columns to gram quantities in flumes produced similar results, and that the manufacturing process produces a homogenous adsorbent. Adsorption kinetics appear to be element specific, with half-saturation times ranging from minutes for the major cations in seawater to 8-10weeks for V and Fe. Reducing the exposure time provides a potential pathway to improve the adsorption capacity of U by reducing the V/U ratio on the adsorbent.« less

  9. Hybrid statistical testing for nuclear material accounting data and/or process monitoring data in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Tom; Hamada, Michael S.; Ticknor, Larry; Sprinkle, James

    2015-01-01

    The aim of nuclear safeguards is to ensure that special nuclear material is used for peaceful purposes. Historically, nuclear material accounting (NMA) has provided the quantitative basis for monitoring for nuclear material loss or diversion, and process monitoring (PM) data is collected by the operator to monitor the process. PM data typically support NMA in various ways, often by providing a basis to estimate some of the in-process nuclear material inventory. We develop options for combining PM residuals and NMA residuals (residual = measurement - prediction), using a hybrid of period-driven and data-driven hypothesis testing. The modified statistical tests can be used on time series of NMA residuals (the NMA residual is the familiar material balance), or on a combination of PM and NMA residuals. The PM residuals can be generated on a fixed time schedule or as events occur.

  10. Hybrid statistical testing for nuclear material accounting data and/or process monitoring data in nuclear safeguards

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burr, Tom; Hamada, Michael S.; Ticknor, Larry; Sprinkle, James

    2015-01-01

    The aim of nuclear safeguards is to ensure that special nuclear material is used for peaceful purposes. Historically, nuclear material accounting (NMA) has provided the quantitative basis for monitoring for nuclear material loss or diversion, and process monitoring (PM) data is collected by the operator to monitor the process. PM data typically support NMA in various ways, often by providing a basis to estimate some of the in-process nuclear material inventory. We develop options for combining PM residuals and NMA residuals (residual = measurement - prediction), using a hybrid of period-driven and data-driven hypothesis testing. The modified statistical tests canmore » be used on time series of NMA residuals (the NMA residual is the familiar material balance), or on a combination of PM and NMA residuals. The PM residuals can be generated on a fixed time schedule or as events occur.« less

  11. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  12. Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the BI-GAS coal-gasification pilot plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurkewycz, R.; Firestone, R.F.

    1982-02-01

    Corrosion monitoring of test materials was conducted in the BI-GAS coal gasification pilot plant from 1976 through 1981. Montana Rosebud subbituminous coal was processed at pressures of 750 psia (5175 kPa). Metals were exposed at low to moderate temperatures (700/sup 0/F (371/sup 0/C)) in the coal preparation area, gasifier slag quench, and the product gas scrubbing system. Refractories and metals were evaluated in the gasifier high temperature (1372/sup 0/F (744/sup 0/C)-1915/sup 0/F (1046/sup 0/C)) test sites at the top of stage II. In the moderate temperature aqueous environments, alloys 26-1, Types 329, 304, 316, 405, and IN-825 were superior in performance to Monel 400, carbon steel A515, and 2-1/4Cr-1Mo. Stress corrosion cracking was not observed in welded U-bend samples (A515, 304, 316, 329, 26-1). First-exposure gasifier corrosion test results generally indicated that uncoated alloys with 23.0 to 26.2 wt % Cr and less than 30 wt % Ni exhibited the best performance. Alloy Types 446 and 310 experienced the least corrosion attack with linear corrosion rates less than 20 mpy (0.51 mm/y); marginal performing alloys were Type 314, 22-13-5, and RA-333. During the second exposure, all uncoated alloys incurred acceptable corrosion losses. Alloys with Co, Cr, and Ni (N155, 556) in approximately equal proportions, at concentrations of approx. 20 wt %, ranked higher in performance than alloys such as Type 310, IN-800, Cru-25, and RA-333. Gasifier exposure of pack-aluminized alloys IN-800(A1) and Type 310(A1)showed that the coating provided corrosion protection. Cracks in the bulk coating were filled with Fe-Al rich oxides. The refractories were changed very little by exposure with two exceptions: tar was removed from a tar-impregnated brick, and a lightweight insulating castable deteriorated greatly.

  13. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design andmore » implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.« less

  14. High-Heat-Flux Testing of Irradiated Tungsten-Based Materials for Fusion Applications Using Infrared Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design and implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36-× 36-× 18-cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.

  15. Testing of nuclear grade lubricants and their effects on A540 B24 and A193 B7 bolting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was performed on eleven commonly used lubricants by the nuclear power industry. The investigation included EDS analysis of the lubricants, notched-tensile constant extension rate testing of bolting materials with the lubricants, frictional testing of the lubricants and weight loss testing of a bonded solid film lubricant. The report generally concludes that there is a significant amount of variance in the mechanical properties of common bolting materials; that MoS/sub 2/ can hydrolyze to form H/sub 2/S at 100/sup 0/C and cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of bolting materials, and that the use of copper-containing lubricants can be potentially detrimental to high strength steels in an aqueous environment. Additionally, the testing of various lubricants disclosed that some lubricants contain potentially detrimental elements (e.g. S, Sb) which can promote SCC of the common bolting materials. One of the most significant findings of this report is the observation that both A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials are susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking in demineralized H/sub 2/O at 280/sup 0/C in notched tensile tests.

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Beams Delivered by ATLAS Updated July, 2009 a Beams produced using the "In-flight" method (Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 380 (2008)) (see below). b Beams produced using the "Two-accelerator" or "Batch" method (see below). c Allowed maximum radiation may limit beam current. d Used so far for implantation only. Ion Half-Life Reaction Intensity (ions/sec/pnA) Opening Angle (degrees) Production Energy (MeV) Max. Rate (ions/sec) 6Hea,c 0.807 sec d(7Li,6He)3He 150 19

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Considerations at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Equipment Safety Reviews are required whenever new equipment is brought in for an experiment. The review is conducted by the Physics Division safety committee. If you plan to bring in your own detectors or other equipment for an experiment, it will need to reviewed. If a safety review is required for your equipment, you will need to fill out a Hazard Analysis form. Forms

  18. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information Shaofei Zhu ATLAS User Liaison Physicist zhu@anl.gov (630) 252-4412 Shaofei Zhu Barbara Weller Administrative Secretary bweller@anl.gov (630) 252-4044 Barbara Weller Tom Mullen Safety Engineer tpmullen@anl.gov (630) 252-2879 Tom Mullen John P. Greene Target Making greene@anl.gov (630) 252-5364 Target Lab Homepage John Greene Beamline and Equipment Support John Rohrer rohrer@phy.anl.gov (630) 252-4047 John Rohrer Detector Support Dale Henderson (STA) henderson@phy.anl.gov

  19. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Beams Delivered by ATLAS Updated July, 2009 a Beams produced using the "In-flight" method (see below). b Beams produced using the "Two-accelerator" or "Batch" method (see below). c Allowed maximum radiation may limit beam current. d Used so far for implantation only. Ion Half-Life Reaction Intensity (ions/sec/pnA) Opening Angle (degrees) Production Energy (MeV) Max. Rate (ions/sec) 6Hea,c 0.807 sec d(7Li,6He)3He 150 19 75 1 x 104 8Lia,c 0.838 sec

  20. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  1. From whence did ATLAS arise?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    whence did ATLAS arise? (the quarter century: 1960-85) Once upon a time, there was an Argonne tandem (started 1960) Here is a typical schedule from the 60-s. 2 We even had an...

  2. ATLAS upgrade June09_v3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS efficiency and intensity upgrade Guy Savard and Robert V. F. Janssens June 12, 2009 The ATLAS facility is on a constant quest to improve and increase the capabilities it...

  3. Global Atlas | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Atlas Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 11 February, 2013 - 15:18 IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential data...

  4. Atlas Lighting: Order (2015-CE-48001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Atlas Lighting Products to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Atlas Lighting had failed to certify that certain models of illuminated exit signs comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  5. High-Heat Flux Testing of Irradiated Tungsten based Materials for Fusion Applications using Infrared Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans Jr, James O; Schaich, Charles Ross; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Byun, Thak Sang

    2014-01-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research has proved challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat flux testing facility based on water-wall Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) is now being used for materials and small component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12,000 C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, are currently in use. The first PAL system provides a maximum incident heat flux of 4.2 MW/m2 over an area of 9x12 cm2. The second PAL available at ORNL provides a maximum incident heat flux of 27 MW/m2 over an area of 1x10 cm2. The absorbed heat fluxes into a tungsten target for the two PALs are approximately 1.97 and 12.7 MW/m2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design of the new PAL facilities as well as the design and implementation of the Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interested, such as those for plasma facing components. Moreover, IMTS designs are underway to extend the testing of small mock-ups for assessing the combined heating and thermomechanical effects of cooled, irradiated components. For the testing of material coupons , the specimens are placed in a shallow recess within the molybdenum holder that is attached to a water-cooled copper alloy rod. As the measurement of the specimen temperature for PAL is historically challenging since traditional approaches of temperature measurement cannot be employed due to the infrared heating and proximity of the PAL reflector to the specimen that does not allow a direct line of site, experiments for temperature calibration are presented. Finally, results for the high-heat flux testing of tungsten-based materials using the PAL are presented. As a demonstration of the system, results will be

  6. ATLAS_Strategic_Plan_14_August _9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Accelerator Facility Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL June 2014 2 Introduction This strategic plan is developed jointly by the ATLAS user community and the Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory. This plan is a public document, hence available to the entire ATLAS user community, and is updated as the need arises. In practice, the community discusses this plan at regular ATLAS Users Workshops, the most recent of which was held on May 15-16, 2014. The users'

  7. European Wind Atlas: Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontenteuropean-wind-atlas-offshore,http:c Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This...

  8. European Wind Atlas: Onshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontenteuropean-wind-atlas-onshore,http:cl Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This...

  9. European Wind Atlas: France | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontenteuropean-wind-atlas-france,http:cle Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This...

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-08-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials' and consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 02-42-01, Condo Release Storage Yd - North; CAS 02-42-02, Condo Release Storage Yd - South; CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; CAS 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; CAS 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and CAS 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. Closure activities were conducted from March to July 2009 according to the FF ACO (1996, as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 166 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007b). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities are summarized. CAU 166, Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, consists of seven CASs in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the NTS. The closure alternatives included No Further Action and Clean Closure. This CR provides a summary of completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and confirmation that remediation goals were met. The following site closure activities were performed at CAU 166 as documented in this CR: (1) At CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area, approximately 40 gal of lead shot were removed and are currently pending treatment and disposal as MW, and approximately 50 small pieces of DU were removed and disposed as LLW. (2) At CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard, approximately 7.5 yd{sup 3} of soil impacted with lead and Am-241 were removed and disposed as LLW. As a BMP, approximately 22 ft{sup 3} of asbestos tile were removed from a portable building and disposed as ALLW, approximately 55 gal of oil were drained from accumulators and are currently pending disposal as HW, the portable building was removed and disposed as

  11. Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy invites the public to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment it has prepared for a proposal to resume transient testing of nuclear fuels and materials at either Idaho National Laboratory (INL) or Sandia National Laboratories (SNL).

  12. Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooks, Daniel E; Morris, John S; Hill, Larry G; Francois, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

  13. Performance evaluation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) as a booster material for insensitive high explosives using the onionskin test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S; Francois, Elizabeth G; Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Harry, Herbert H

    2010-11-09

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in DAAF for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemisphericallHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  14. Consumer Energy Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approved ATLAS Experiments Sorted by PAC meetings: November 6-7, 2015 March 8-9, 2015 September 19, 2014 November 22-23, 2013 December 14-15, 2012 January 13-14, 2012 April 22-23, 2011 April 2-3, 2010 June 26-27, 2009 June 27-28, 2008 November 2-3, 2007 September 15-16, 2006 January 20-21, 2006 May 20-21, 2005 June 4-5, 2004 September 19-20, 2003 February 7-8, 2003 May 3, 2002 October 5, 2001 March 2, 2001 Sep 11, 2000 March 3, 2000 October 11, 1999 May 21, 1999 November 9. 1998 May 8, 1998

  16. On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

  17. Final Technical Report: Electromagnetic Pump Insulation Materials Development and Testing (PLM-DOC-0005-2465) Report # DOEGEHB00613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, John; Reed, Claude; Loewen, Eric

    2015-10-29

    Final Technical Report: Electromagnetic Pump Insulation Materials Development and Testing (Report # DOEGEHB00613) summarizes the information gathered from the analysis of the 160 m3/min EM Pump insulation that was tested in 2000-2002 and additional evaluations of new resilient, engineered insulation system evaluated and tested at both GRC and ANL. This report provides information on Tasks 1 and 2 of the entire project. This report also provides information in three broad areas: Historical and current data; Conclusions based on test data; and Insulation specifications for use in EM Pumps. The research for Task 2 builds upon Task 1: Update EM Pump Databank, which is summarized within this report. Where research for Task 3 and 4 Next-Generation EM Pump Analysis Tools identified parameters or analysis model that benefits Task 2 research, those items are noted within this report. The important design variables for the manufacture and operation of an EM Pump that the insulation research can evaluate are: space constraints; voltage capability of insulation system; maximum flux density through iron; flow rate and outlet pressure; efficiency and manufacturability. The development summary of the Electromagnetic Pump Insulation Materials Development and Testing was completed to include: Historical and current data; Conclusions based on test data; and Insulation specifications for use in EM Pumps.

  18. Hybrid Statistical Testing for Nuclear Material Accounting Data and/or Process Monitoring Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Hamada, Michael Scott; Sprinkle, James K.; Burr, Thomas Lee

    2015-04-14

    The two tests employed in the hybrid testing scheme are Page’s cumulative sums for all streams within a Balance Period (maximum of the maximums and average of the maximums) and Crosier’s multivariate cumulative sum applied to incremental cumulative sums across Balance Periods. The role of residuals for both kinds of data is discussed.

  19. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF SPRING ENERGIZED C-RINGS FOR USE IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS CONTAINING TRITIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P; Kurt Eberl, K

    2007-10-23

    This paper describes the sealing performance testing and results of silver-plated inconel Spring Energized C-Rings used for tritium containment in radioactive shipping packagings. The test methodology used follows requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) summarized in ASME Pressure Vessel Code (B&PVC), Section V, Article 10, Appendix IX (Helium Mass Spectrometer Test - Hood Technique) and recommendations by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) described in ANSI N14.5-1997. The tests parameters bound the predicted structural and thermal responses from conditions defined in the Code of Federal Regulations 10 CFR 71. The testing includes an evaluation of the effects of pressure, temperature, flange deflection, surface roughness, permeation, closure torque, torque sequencing and re-use on performance of metal C-Ring seals.

  20. Leaching tests as a tool in waste management to evaluate the potential for utilization of waste materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloot, H.A. van der; Kosson, D.S.

    1995-12-01

    Several waste materials from large scale industrial processes possess technical properties that would allow their use in certain construction applications, e.g. coal fly ash, slags from large scale industrial melting and ore processing, and incinerator residues. The disposal of such materials requires space and controlled landfills to minimize long term environmental risks. The beneficial use of such bulk materials is an attractive alternative, if it can be shown that such applications are environmentally acceptable. For this management of wastes and the decision to either dispose or use, information on the environmental properties of materials is needed. Leaching tests have been developed to assess such properties. These have been designed typically in relation to regulatory tools, not as instruments to guide the management of wastes and the possibilities to improve material properties. New methods have been designed to address this aspect, in which maximum benefit can be derived from knowledge of the systematic behaviour of materials and the already existing knowledge in other countries producing similar residues. After initial detailed characterization, concise procedures can be used for control purposes focused on the typical aspects of a certain residue stream. Examples of existing knowledge in this field will be presented.

  1. EIS-0017: Fusion Materials Irradiation Testing Facility, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with proposed construction and operation of an irradiation test facility, the Deuterium-Lithium High Flux Neutron Source Facility, at the Hanford Reservation.

  2. Document issued in preparation for the ATLAS User Workshop 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    goals, in the context of long- term plans for the ATLAS facility. The current ATLAS Strategic Plan was crafted in 2009 by the Executive Committee of the ATLAS Users group and...

  3. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  4. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  5. Development of a testing method for asbestos fibers in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Kida, Akiko; Noma, Yukio; Terazono, Atsushi; Sakai, Shin-ichi

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A high sensitive and selective testing method for asbestos in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes was developed. • Asbestos can be determined at a limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg g{sup −1}. • High temperature melting treatment samples were determined by this method. Asbestos fiber concentration were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 10{sup 6} g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Appropriate treatment of asbestos-containing wastes is a significant problem. In Japan, the inertization of asbestos-containing wastes based on new treatment processes approved by the Minister of the Environment is promoted. A highly sensitive method for testing asbestos fibers in inertized materials is required so that these processes can be approved. We developed a method in which fibers from milled treated materials are extracted in water by shaking, and are counted and identified by transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of this method by using asbestos standards and simulated slag samples confirmed that the quantitation limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg/g in a sample of 50 mg per filter. We used this method to assay asbestos fibers in slag samples produced by high-temperature melting of asbestos-containing wastes. Fiber concentrations were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 10{sup −6} f/g. Because the evaluation of treated materials by TEM is difficult owing to the limited amount of sample observable, this testing method should be used in conjunction with bulk analytical methods for sure evaluation of treated materials.

  6. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Austin Douglas; Runnels, Joel T.; Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk Patrick

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  7. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  8. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Rare Earth Substitutes: A Test-bed for Accelerated Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedict, Lorin X.

    2015-10-26

    Hard permanent magnets in wide use typically involve expensive Rare Earth elements. In this effort, we investigated candidate permanent magnet materials which contain no Rare Earths, while simultaneously exploring improvements in theoretical methodology which enable the better prediction of magnetic properties relevant for the future design and optimization of permanent magnets. This included a detailed study of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies, and the use of advanced simulation tools to better describe magnetic properties at elevated temperatures.

  9. Failure Atlas for Rolling Bearings in Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallian, T. E.

    2006-01-01

    systems used, and by several indexes. The present Atlas is intended as a supplement to the book. It has the same structure but contains only Plate pages, arranged in chapters, each with a chapter heading page giving a short definition of the failure mode illustrated. Each Plate page is self contained, with images, bearing and application data, and descriptions of the failure mode, the images and the suspected causes. Images are provided in two resolutions: The text page includes 6 by 9 cm images. In addition, high resolution image files are attached, to be retrieved by clicking on their 'push pin' icon. While the material in the present Atlas is self-contained, it is nonetheless a supplement to the book and the complete interpretation of the terse image descriptions and of the system underlying the failure code presupposes familiarity with the book. Since this Atlas is a supplement to the book, its chapter numbering follows that of the book. Not all failure modes covered in the book have been found among the observed wind turbines. For that reason, and because of the omission of introductory matter, the chapter numbers in this Atlas are not a continuous sequence.

  10. The ATLAS Positron Experiment -- APEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Dunford, R.; Kutschera, W.; Rhein, M.D.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wilt, P.; Wuosmaa, A.; Austin, S.M.; Kashy, E.; Winfield, J.S.; Yurkon, J.E.; Bazin, D.; Calaprice, F.P.; Young, A.; Chan, K.C.; Chisti, A.; Chowhury, P.; Greenberg, J.S.; Kaloskamis, N.; Lister, C.J.; Fox, J.D.; Roa, E.; Freedman, S.; Maier, M.R.; Freer, M.; Gazes, S.; Hallin, A.L.; Liu, M.; Happ, T.; Perera, A.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Trainor, T.; Wolanski, M. |

    1994-03-01

    APEX -- the ATLAS Positron Experiment -- is designed to measure electrons and positrons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. Its scientific goal is to gain insight into the puzzling positron-line phenomena observed at the GSI Darmstadt. It is in operation at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab. The assembly of the apparatus is finished and beginning 1993 the first positrons produced in heavy-ion collisions were observed. The first full scale experiment was carried out in December 1993, and the data are currently being analyzed. In this paper, the principles of operation are explained and a status report on the experiment is given.

  11. ATLAS Science and Technology Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    th Anniversary Celebration October 22-23, 2010 Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory Building 203, Auditorium Friday, October 22: The Past as Prologue 8:00 - 8:30 Registration and coffee Chair: R.V.F. Janssens 8:30 - 8:45 Welcome by Laboratory Director and ALD E. Isaacs/S. Streiffer 8:45 - 9:30 Summary of the History of ATLAS W.F. Henning Chair: B.B. Back 9:30 - 10:30 Reminiscences 10:30 - 10:50 Break Chair: J. Nolen 10:50 - 11:25 The Impact of ATLAS on SRF Development and Applications

  12. Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atlas (PACA Region - France) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) AgencyCompany Organization: MINES ParisTech Sector:...

  13. Wind Energy Atlas of Brazil | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atlas of Brazil Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Energy Atlas of Brazil Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website:...

  14. Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials &...

  15. 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    10 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the...

  16. ATLAS diboson excesses from the stealth doublet model (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ATLAS diboson excesses from the stealth doublet model Title: ATLAS diboson excesses from the stealth doublet model Authors: Chao, Wei Search DOE PAGES for author "Chao, Wei" Search...

  17. Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy AgencyCompany Organization: International Renewable Energy...

  18. PBX 9404 detonation copper cylinder tests: a comparison of new and aged material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mier, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Briggs, Matthew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation copper cylinder test results on aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% CEF, 2.9 wt% NC, 0.1 wt% DPA) explosive. The charges were newly pressed from 37.5 year-old molding powder. We compare these results to equivalent data performed on the same lot when it was 3.5 years old. Comparison of the detonation energy inferred from detonation speed to that inferred from wall motion suggests that the HMX energy is unchanged but the NC energy has decreased to {approx}25% of its original value. The degradation of explosives and their binders is a subject of continual interest. Secondary explosives such as HMX are sufficiently stable near room temperature that they do not measurably degrade over a period of at least several decades. For formulated systems the bigger concern is binder degradation, for which the three main issues are strength, initiation safety, and (if the binder is energetic) energy content. In this paper we examine the detonation energy of new and aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% tris-{beta} chloroethylphosphate (CEF), 2.9 wt% nitrocellulose (NC), 0.1 wt% diphenylamine (DPA) [1, 2]), measured via the detonation copper cylinder test. In 1959, two independent PBX 9404 accidents [3] raised serious concerns about the safety of the formulation. Over about a decade's time, Los Alamos pursued a safer, energetically equivalent replacement, which ultimately became PBX 9501. In order to accurately compare the performance of the PBX 9404 and PBX 9501 formulations, W. Campbell and R. Engelke (C & E) developed a stringent cylinder test protocol that they called the Los Alamos Precision Cylinder Test [4]. The present aging study is possible because excellent PBX 9404 data from those qualification tests endures.

  19. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated

  20. Ames test mutagenicity studies of the subfractions of the mild gasification composite material, MG-120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-17

    Mutagenicity of six mild gasification product samples was studied using the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system. The results of the Ames testing of the MG-119 and MG-120 subfractions indicate significant mutagenic activity only in the nonpolar neutral fraction. The activity was evident on bacterial strains, TA98 and TA100, with and without metabolic activation for MG-120, and with metabolic activation for MG-119. Previous testing of MG-119 and MG-120 when solvated in DMSO had shown possible, but unconfirmable, mutagenic activity. Tween 80-solvated MG-119 and MG-120 showed low, but significant, mutagenic activity only on TA98 with metabolic activation. Comparison of these results indicate an inhibition of the mutagenic components by nonmutagenic components in the complex mixture. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiefel, Denis E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Grosse, Christian

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSOR NETWORK TEST BED FOR ISD MATERIALS AND STRUCUTRAL CONDITION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeigler, K.; Ferguson, B.; Karapatakis, D.; Herbst, C.; Stripling, C.

    2011-07-06

    The P Reactor at the Savannah River Site is one of the first reactor facilities in the US DOE complex that has been placed in its end state through in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of remote sensors to provide verification of ISD system conditions and performance characteristics, an ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The test bed addresses the DOE-EM Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of: (1) Groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring; (2) Strain gauges for crack growth monitoring; (3) Tiltmeters for settlement monitoring; and (4) A communication system for data collection. Preliminary baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment.

  3. Materials experience of the public domain portions of Tube Bank E' during Test Series A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The tube banks at the Grimethorpe pressurized fluidized bed combustion facility are discussed. Tube Bank E'' was designed for operation as the in bed heat exchanger during Test Series A2 at the Grimethorpe PFBC Establishment between March and November 1987. The supply of the tube bank resulted from an agreement between Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC), the US Department of Energy, and the Operating Agent for the British Coal/CEGB Joint Programme on PFBC. The tube bank incorporated features, designed to produce acceptable and predictable wastage characteristics, suggested by both FWDC and BCC/CEGB interests. As part of the agreement between the various parties, it was agreed only data from 55% of the tube bank would enter the public domain. This report describes the tube bank, and describes and discusses the public domain wastage results following a total operating period approaching 1450 hours. It is concluded that although conditions varied throughout Test Series A2, there were no major differences in the aggressiveness of the bed. Armouring devices suggested by FWDC were not successful, but their chromised coatings offered promise. The results from UK proprietary parts of the tube bank indicated that the tube bank metal wastage need not be a life limiting problem for PFBC in-bed heat exchangers. 5 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G. Scott, S. Haymes, D. Heimiller, R. George National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia July 2003 * NRELTP-500-33544 Wind Energy Resource...

  5. ATLAS_Strategic_Plan_09_v5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IL November 2009 2 Introduction This strategic plan is developed jointly by the ATLAS user community and the Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory. This plan is a...

  6. ATLAS APPROVED IN-BEAM EXPERIMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 785 Baktash Band Termination, Superdeformation and Complex Clusters in 32S 5 TOTAL 82 ATLAS APPROVED SOURCE EXPERIMENTS (Depending on Gammasphere Availability) Exp Spokesperson...

  7. Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, ...

  8. Seismic energy data analysis of Merapi volcano to test the eruption time prediction using materials failure forecast method (FFM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anggraeni, Novia Antika

    2015-04-24

    The test of eruption time prediction is an effort to prepare volcanic disaster mitigation, especially in the volcano’s inhabited slope area, such as Merapi Volcano. The test can be conducted by observing the increase of volcanic activity, such as seismicity degree, deformation and SO2 gas emission. One of methods that can be used to predict the time of eruption is Materials Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Materials Failure Forecast Method (FFM) is a predictive method to determine the time of volcanic eruption which was introduced by Voight (1988). This method requires an increase in the rate of change, or acceleration of the observed volcanic activity parameters. The parameter used in this study is the seismic energy value of Merapi Volcano from 1990 – 2012. The data was plotted in form of graphs of seismic energy rate inverse versus time with FFM graphical technique approach uses simple linear regression. The data quality control used to increase the time precision employs the data correlation coefficient value of the seismic energy rate inverse versus time. From the results of graph analysis, the precision of prediction time toward the real time of eruption vary between −2.86 up to 5.49 days.

  9. World Bank eAtlas of Global Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    World Bank eAtlas of Global Development1 "This eAtlas, a new online companion to Atlas of Global Development, third edition, builds on the Atlas topics, allowing you to...

  10. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-11-01

    The high resistance of cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure is one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate such deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisted of a high-resolution video camera, light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources, and the in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. In this study eleven (11) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., 6 FeCrAl alloys and 5 nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800°C while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys and/or for relatively thick wall specimens.