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Sample records for atacama cosmology telescope

  1. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Atacama Cosmology...

  2. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Project: A Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; for the ACT Collaboration

    2006-08-25

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a project to map the microwave background radiation at arcminute angular resolution and high sensitivity in three frequency bands over substantial sky areas. Cosmological signals driving such an experiment are reviewed, and current progress in hardware construction is summarized. Complementary astronomical observations in other wavebands are also discussed.

  3. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Data Characterization and Map Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dünner, Rolando; Marriage, Tobias A; Sievers, Jon; Acquaviva, Viviana; Addison, Graeme E; Ade, Peter A R; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John William; Barrientos, L Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S; Bond, J Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Calabarese, Erminia; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon R; Doriese, W Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P; Gralla, Megan B; Fowler, Joseph W; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hilton, Gene C; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renée; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, David H; Hughes, John P; Infante, Leopoldo; Irwin, Kent D; Juin, Jean Baptiste; Kaul, Madhuri; Klein, Jeff; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lau, Judy M; Limon, Michele; Lin, Yen-Ting; Louis, Thibaut; Lupton, Robert H; Marsden, Danica; Martocci, Krista; Mauskopf, Phil; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Moseley, Harvey; Netterfield, Calvin B; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Michael R; Page, Lyman A; Parker, Lucas; Partridge, Bruce; Quintana, Hernán; Reid, Beth; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel S; Switzer, Eric R; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tucker, Carole; Warne, Ryan; Wilson, Grant; Wollack, Ed; Zhao, Yue

    2012-01-01

    We present a description of the data reduction and mapmaking pipeline used for the 2008 observing season of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The data presented here at 148 GHz represent 12% of the 90 TB collected by ACT from 2007 to 2010. In 2008 we observed for 136 days, producing a total of 1423 hours of data (11 TB for the 148 GHz band only), with a daily average of 10.5 hours of observation. From these, 1085 hours were devoted to a 850 deg^2 stripe (11.2 hours by 9.1 deg) centered on a declination of -52.7 deg, while 175 hours were devoted to a 280 deg^2 stripe (4.5 hours by 4.8 deg) centered at the celestial equator. We discuss sources of statistical and systematic noise, calibration, telescope pointing, and data selection. Out of 1260 survey hours and 1024 detectors per array, 816 hours and 593 effective detectors remain after data selection for this frequency band, yielding a 38% survey efficiency. The total sensitivity in 2008, determined from the noise level between 5 Hz and 20 Hz in the time-o...

  4. Design and Deployment of a Multichroic Polarimeter Array on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, R; Beall, J A; Becker, D; Coughlin, K P; Duff, S M; Gallardo, P A; Grace, E; Hasselfield, M; Henderson, S W; Hilton, G C; Ho, S P; Hubmayr, J; Koopman, B J; Lanen, J V; Li, D; McMahon, J; Munson, C D; Nati, F; Niemack, M D; Page, L; Pappas, C G; Salatino, M; Schmitt, B L; Schillaci, A; Simon, S M; Staggs, S T; Stevens, J R; Vavagiakis, E M; Ward, J T; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and the preliminary on sky performance with respect to beams and pass-bands of a multichroic polarimeter array covering the 90 and 146 GHz Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) bands and its enabling broadband optical system recently deployed on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The constituent pixels are feedhorn-coupled multichroic polarimeters fabricated at NIST. This array is coupled to the ACT telescope via a set of three silicon lenses incorporating novel broad-band metamaterial anti-reflection coatings. This receiver represents the first multichroic detector array deployed for a CMB experiment and paves the way for the extensive use of multichroic detectors and broadband optical systems in the next generation of CMB experiments.

  5. Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, N; Miyatake, H; Hasselfield, M; Gralla, M B; Allison, R; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Crichton, D; Devlin, M J; Dunkley, J; Dünner, R; Erben, T; Ferrara, S; Halpern, M; Hilton, M; Hill, J C; Hincks, A D; Hložek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, J P; Kneib, J P; Kosowsky, A; Makler, M; Marriage, T A; Menanteau, F; Miller, L; Moodley, K; Moraes, B; Niemack, M D; Page, L; Shan, H; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Sifón, C; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Taylor, J; Thornton, R; van Waerbeke, L; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The average weak lensing mass is $\\left(4.8\\pm0.8\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of $\\left(4.70\\pm1.0\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously neglected.

  6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmological Parameters from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    P. ; Amiri, M. ; Appel, J.W. ; Barrientos, L.F. ; Battistelli, E.S. ; Bond, J.R. ; Brown, B. ; Burger, B. ; Chervenak, J. ; Das, S. ; Devlin, M.J. ; Dicker, S.R. ; Doriese,...

  7. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmological Parameters from the 2008

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACE Observations

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmological Parameters from the 2008

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACE ObservationsPower Spectra (Journal

  9. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACE ObservationsPower Spectra (Journalvia the

  10. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACE ObservationsPower Spectra (Journalvia

  11. ANIR : Atacama Near-Infrared Camera for the 1.0-m miniTAO Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konishi, Masahiro; Tateuchi, Ken; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kato, Natsuko; Sako, Shigeyuki; Uchimoto, Yuka K; Toshikawa, Koji; Ohsawa, Ryou; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu; Asano, Kentaro; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Komugi, Shinya; Koshida, Shintaro; Manabe, Sho; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Minezaki, Takeo; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nakashima, Asami; Takagi, Toshinobu; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Uchiyama, Mizuho; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Handa, Toshihiro; Kato, Daisuke; Kawara, Kimiaki; Kohno, Kotaro; Miyata, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Okada, Kazushi; Soyano, Takao; Tamura, Yoichi; Tanaka, Masuo; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Yoshii, Yuzuru

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a near-infrared camera called ANIR (Atacama Near-InfraRed camera) for the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory 1.0m telescope (miniTAO) installed at the summit of Cerro Chajnantor (5640 m above sea level) in northern Chile. The camera provides a field of view of 5'.1 $\\times$ 5'.1 with a spatial resolution of 0".298 /pixel in the wavelength range of 0.95 to 2.4 $\\mu$m. Taking advantage of the dry site, the camera is capable of hydrogen Paschen-$\\alpha$ (Pa$\\alpha$, $\\lambda=$1.8751 $\\mu$m in air) narrow-band imaging observations, at which wavelength ground-based observations have been quite difficult due to deep atmospheric absorption mainly from water vapor. We have been successfully obtaining Pa$\\alpha$ images of Galactic objects and nearby galaxies since the first-light observation in 2009 with ANIR. The throughputs at the narrow-band filters ($N1875$, $N191$) including the atmospheric absorption show larger dispersion (~10%) than those at broad-band filters (a few %), indicating that ...

  12. Cosmological Questions for the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Tytler

    1996-08-12

    The next decade promises an observational revolution which will change cosmology forever. The precise measurement of the angular anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background should specify to a few percent all of the parameters of the cosmological model which effect astrophysics. The growth of structure will then be determined (but not yet observed) until gravitational collapse becomes highly non-linear and stars, galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) form. These processes are hard to model with basic physics because they are complex and allow a rich variety of expression. Instead observations will determine when the first stars and quasars formed, and how and when galaxies assembled. If we can reconcile the numerous contradictions which characterize the subject today, cosmology will become a mature subject, founded on the agreement between detailed, inclusive and realistic models, which make precise predictions, and the wealth of new data which will come from a wide variety of observations, at all wavelengths. This is an ambitious schedule, but nothing less is worthy of the outstanding capabilities of the 8 -- 10 m telescopes, the next generation space telescope, the opportunities at millimeterto sub-millimeter wavelengths and advanced computer modeling. The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) should play a major role in this revolution.

  13. APECS - The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Muders; H. Hafok; F. Wyrowski; E. Polehampton; A. Belloche; C. Koenig; R. Schaaf; F. Schuller; J. Hatchell; F. v. d. Tak

    2006-05-04

    APECS is the distributed control system of the new Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope located on the Llano de Chajnantor at an altitude of 5107 m in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. APECS is based on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) software and employs a modern, object-oriented design using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) as the middleware. New generic device interfaces simplify adding instruments to the control system. The Python based observer command scripting language allows using many existing software libraries and facilitates creating more complex observing modes. A new self-descriptive raw data format (Multi-Beam FITS or MBFITS) has been defined to store the multi-beam, multi-frequency data. APECS provides an online pipeline for initial calibration, observer feedback and a quick-look display. APECS is being used for regular science observations in local and remote mode since August 2005.

  14. Cosmology with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer using a space based astrometric reference frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Tytler

    1997-01-26

    Cosmology with large interferometric telescopes is a rich and largely unexplored subject, involving three types of measurement: astrometric measurement of absolute distances and proper motions, dispersions of relative proper motions, and images. The ground based interferometers can have huge apertures, which are necessary for faint cosmological targets. But, alone, they are limited to astrometry within the isoplanatic patch, and hence to relative positions, which are of little use for parallaxes and proper motions because reference stars have unknown parallaxes and huge (500 \\mu arcsec) unknown motions. We propose that space missions should measure global astrometric parallaxes and proper motions for (V > 16) reference stars within the isoplanatic patches of important cosmological and Galactic targets. Ground based interferometers can then measure absolute distances (parallaxes) and proper motions to 10 \\mu arcsec, tied to these reference stars. But cosmological observations stretch the VLTI technically. To observe the few best targets, we need to be able to measure positions to 16) near to important targets. Most of the science is at 1 --2 microns, where excellent adaptive optics will be needed on the 8-m telescopes.

  15. Exploring the Gamma Ray Horizon with the next generation of Gamma Ray Telescopes. Part 2: Extracting cosmological parameters from the observation of gamma-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Blanch; M. Martinez

    2004-06-02

    The potential of the new generation Cherenkov Telescopes to measure the energy spectrum of both, the already established extragalactic very high energy gamma-ray emitters and the best very high energy candidates from the EGRET catalogue is discussed. By a realistic simulation of the analysis of the expected extrapolated energy spectra, it is shown that the foreseen capability and precision of these instrument to measure the Gamma Ray Horizon may open the door to competitive measurements of the cosmological parameters.

  16. It's always darkest before the cosmic dawn : early results from novel tools and telescopes for 21 cm cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Joshua Shane

    2015-01-01

    21 cm cosmology, the statistical observation of the high redshift universe using the hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen, has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of cosmology and the astrophysical processes ...

  17. Cosmological data and indications for new physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benetti, Micol; Gerbino, Martina; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Kinney, William H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Riotto, Antonio E-mail: martina.gerbino@roma1.infn.it E-mail: Rocky.Kolb@uchicago.edu E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it E-mail: antonio.riotto@unige.ch

    2013-10-01

    Data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT), combined with the nine-year data release from the WMAP satellite, provide very precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular anisotropies down to very small angular scales. Augmented with measurements from Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations surveys and determinations of the Hubble constant, we investigate whether there are indications for new physics beyond a Harrison-Zel'dovich model for primordial perturbations and the standard number of relativistic degrees of freedom at primordial recombination. All combinations of datasets point to physics beyond the minimal Harrison-Zel'dovich model in the form of either a scalar spectral index different from unity or additional relativistic degrees of freedom at recombination (e.g., additional light neutrinos). Beyond that, the extended datasets including either ACT or SPT provide very different indications: while the extended-ACT (eACT) dataset is perfectly consistent with the predictions of standard slow-roll inflation, the extended-SPT (eSPT) dataset prefers a non-power-law scalar spectral index with a very large variation with scale of the spectral index. Both eACT and eSPT favor additional light degrees of freedom on top of the Harrison-Zel'dovich model. eACT is consistent with zero neutrino masses, while eSPT favors nonzero neutrino masses at more than 95% confidence.

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for a way to improve these results? The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Sehgal, Neelima ; Trac, Hy ;...

  19. A VIRTUAL SKY WITH EXTRAGALACTIC H I AND CO LINES FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY AND THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Heywood, I.; Rawlings, S.; Levrier, F.

    2009-10-01

    We present a sky simulation of the atomic H I-emission line and the first 10 {sup 12}C{sup 16}O rotational emission lines of molecular gas in galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The simulated sky field has a comoving diameter of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc; hence, the actual field of view depends on the (user-defined) maximal redshift z {sub max}; e.g., for z {sub max} = 10, the field of view yields approx4 x 4 deg{sup 2}. For all galaxies, we estimate the line fluxes, line profiles, and angular sizes of the H I and CO-emission lines. The galaxy sample is complete for galaxies with cold hydrogen masses above 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}. This sky simulation builds on a semi-analytic model of the cosmic evolution of galaxies in a LAMBDA cold dark matter (LAMBDACDM) cosmology. The evolving CDM distribution was adopted from the Millennium Simulation, an N-body CDM simulation in a cubic box with a side length of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc. This side length limits the coherence scale of our sky simulation: it is long enough to allow the extraction of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, yet the position and amplitude of the first acoustic peak will be imperfectly defined. This sky simulation is a tangible aid to the design and operation of future telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, Large Millimeter Telescope, and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The results presented in this paper have been restricted to a graphical representation of the simulated sky and fundamental dN/dz analyses for peak flux density limited and total flux limited surveys of H I and CO. A key prediction is that H I will be harder to detect at redshifts z approx> 2 than predicted by a no-evolution model. The future verification or falsification of this prediction will allow us to qualify the semi-analytic models.

  20. Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology and supergene alunite-group minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology 2010 Available online 18 October 2010 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: Atacama Desert Andes uplift Atacama Desert had been uplifted as early as the late Eocene and, thus, significantly prior

  1. HEAVY DUST OBSCURATION OF z = 7 GALAXIES IN A COSMOLOGICAL HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue

    2013-10-10

    Hubble Space Telescope observations with the Wide Field Camera 3/Infrared reveal that galaxies at z ? 7 have very blue ultraviolet (UV) colors, consistent with these systems being dominated by young stellar populations with moderate or little attenuation by dust. We investigate UV and optical properties of the high-z galaxies in the standard cold dark matter model using a high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. For this purpose, we perform panchromatic three-dimensional dust radiative transfer calculations on 198 galaxies of stellar mass 5 × 10{sup 8}-3 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ?} with three parameters: the dust-to-metal ratio, the extinction curve, and the fraction of directly escaped light from stars (f{sub esc}). Our stellar mass function is found to be in broad agreement with Gonzalez et al., independent of these parameters. We find that our heavily dust-attenuated galaxies (A{sub V} ? 1.8) can also reasonably match modest UV-optical colors, blue UV slopes, as well as UV luminosity functions, provided that a significant fraction (?10%) of light directly escapes from them. The observed UV slope and scatter are better explained with a Small-Magellanic-Cloud-type extinction curve, whereas a Milky-Way-type curve also predicts blue UV colors due to the 2175 Å bump. We expect that upcoming observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array will be able to test this heavily obscured model.

  2. Cosmological backreaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz

    2010-03-15

    This work summarises some of the attempts to explain the phenomenon of dark energy as an effective description of complex gravitational physics and the proper interpretation of observations. Cosmological backreaction has been shown to be relevant for observational (precision) cosmology, nevertheless no convincing explanation of dark energy by means of backreaction has been given so far.

  3. Cosmological Recombination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan Yan Wong

    2008-11-18

    In this thesis we focus on studying the physics of cosmological recombination and how the details of recombination affect the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We present a detailed calculation of the spectral line distortions on the CMB spectrum arising from the Lyman-alpha and the lowest two-photon transitions in the recombination of hydrogen (H), and the corresponding lines from helium (He). The peak of these distortions mainly comes from the Lyman-alpha transition and occurs at about 170 microns, which is the Wien part of the CMB. The major theoretical limitation for extracting cosmological parameters from the CMB sky lies in the precision with which we can calculate the cosmological recombination process. With this motivation, we perform a multi-level calculation of the recombination of H and He with the addition of the spin-forbidden transition for neutral helium (He I), plus the higher order two-photon transitions for H and among singlet states of He I. We find that the inclusion of the spin-forbidden transition results in more than a percent change in the ionization fraction, while the other transitions give much smaller effects. Last we modify RECFAST by introducing one more parameter to reproduce recent numerical results for the speed-up of helium recombination. Together with the existing hydrogen `fudge factor', we vary these two parameters to account for the remaining dominant uncertainties in cosmological recombination. By using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method with Planck forecast data, we find that we need to determine the parameters to better than 10% for He I and 1% for H, in order to obtain negligible effects on the cosmological parameters.

  4. Scaling Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfried Zimdahl; Diego Pavón

    2002-10-22

    We show that with the help of a suitable coupling between dark energy and cold dark matter it is possible to reproduce any scaling solution $\\rho _{X}\\propto \\rho_{M}a^{\\xi}$, where $\\rho_{X}$ and $\\rho_{M}$ are the densities of dark energy and dark matter, respectively. We demonstrate how the case $\\xi = 1$ alleviates the coincidence problem. Future observations of supernovae at high redshift as well as quasar pairs which are planned to discriminate between different cosmological models will also provide direct constraints on the coupling between dark matter and dark energy.

  5. Rastall cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Fabris; O. F. Piattella; D. C. Rodrigues; C. E. M. Batista; M. H. Daouda

    2012-05-06

    We review the difficulties of the generalized Chaplygin gas model to fit observational data, due to the tension between background and perturbative tests. We argue that such issues may be circumvented by means of a self-interacting scalar field representation of the model. However, this proposal seems to be successful only if the self-interacting scalar field has a non-canonical form. The latter can be implemented in Rastall's theory of gravity, which is based on a modification of the usual matter conservation law. We show that, besides its application to the generalized Chaplygin gas model, other cosmological models based on Rastall's theory have many interesting and unexpected new features.

  6. High resolution telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Massie, Norbert A. (San Ramon, CA); Oster, Yale (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  7. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  8. The supernova cosmology cookbook: Bayesian numerical recipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpenka, N V

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and observational cosmology have enjoyed a number of significant successes over the last two decades. Cosmic microwave background measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck, together with large-scale structure and supernova (SN) searches, have put very tight constraints on cosmological parameters. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) played a central role in the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011. The last decade has seen an enormous increase in the amount of high quality SN observations, with SN catalogues now containing hundreds of objects. This number is expected to increase to thousands in the next few years, as data from next-generation missions, such as the Dark Energy Survey and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope become available. In order to exploit the vast amount of forthcoming high quality data, it is extremely important to develop robust and efficient statistical analysis methods to answer cosmological q...

  9. Throat Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harling, B v

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, we study throats in the early, hot universe. Throats are a common feature of the landscape of type IIB string theory. If a throat is heated during cosmological evolution, energy is subsequently transferred to other throats and to the standard model. We calculate the heat transfer rate and the decay rate of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states in a ten-dimensional model. For the calculation, we employ the dual description of the throats in terms of gauge theories. We discuss modifications of the decay rate which arise in flux compactifications and for Klebanov-Strassler throats and emphasize the role of tachyonic scalars in such throats in mediating decays of Kaluza-Klein modes. Our results are also applicable to the energy transfer from the heated standard model to throats. We determine the resulting energy density in throats at our epoch in dependence of their infrared scales and of the reheating temperature. The Kaluza-Klein modes in the throats decay to other sectors with a highly suppresse...

  10. PLANETARY TRANSITS WITH THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY RADIO INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Barbosa, C. L.; Válio, Adriana

    2013-11-10

    Planetary transits are commonly observed at visible wavelengths. Here we investigate the shape of a planetary transit observed at radio wavelengths. Solar maps at 17 GHz are used as a proxy for the stellar eclipse by several sizes of planets from super-Earths to hot Jupiters. The relative depth at mid-transit is the same as observed at visible wavelengths, but the limb brightening of the stellar disk at 17 GHz is clearly seen in the shape of the transit light curve. Moreover, when the planet occults an active region the depth of the transit decreases even further, depending on the brightness of the active region relative to the surrounding disk. For intense active region, with 50 times the brightness temperature of the surrounding disk, the decrease can supercede the unperturbed transit depth depending on the size of the eclipsing planet. For a super-Earth (R{sub p} = 0.02 R{sub s} ) crossing, the decrease in intensity is 0.04%, increasing to 0.86% in the case when a strong active region is present. On the other hand, for a hot Jupiter with R{sub p} = 0.17R{sub s} , the unperturbed transit depth is 3% increasing to 4.7% when covering this strong active region. This kind of behavior can be verified with observation of planetary transits with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array radio interferometer.

  11. Brane-world Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wands, David [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Mercantile House, Portsmouth P01 2EG (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-19

    Brane-world models, where observers are restricted to a brane in a higher dimensional spacetime, offer a novel perspective on cosmology. I discuss some approaches to cosmology in extra dimensions and some interesting aspects of gravity and cosmology in brane-world models.

  12. Chapter Fourteen Telescope Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    206 Chapter Fourteen Telescope Consortium Paul Leath (1995-2000) When Allen Robbins stepped down, and all other universities. Also in 1998, U.S. News & World Report ranked the Rutgers program 16th.S. in High Energy Elementary Particle Physics, 6th among public universities.4 This assessment was followed

  13. Cosmological Surveys at Submillimetre Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Hughes

    2000-03-28

    One of the major goals of observational cosmology is to acquire empirical data that has the diagnostic power to develop the theoretical modelling of the high-redshift universe, ultimately leading to an accurate understanding of the processes by which galaxies and clusters form and subsequently evolve. New bolometer arrays operating on the world's largest submillimetre telescopes now offer a unique view of the high-redshift universe through unbiassed surveys with unprecedented sensitivity. For brevity, except when there is a need to be more specific, the FIR to millimetre wavelength regime (100um 1, and determine their contribution to the submm extragalactic background. The field of observational cosmology will be revolutionized during the course of the next 10 years due to the variety of powerful new ground-based, airborne and satellite facilities, particularly those operating at FIR to millimetre wavelengths. This review summarises the results from the recent blank-field submm surveys, and describes the future observations that will provide accurate source-counts over wider ranges of wavelength and flux-density, constrain the spectral energy distributions of the submm-selected galaxies and accurately constrain the redshift distribution and submm luminosity function by removing the current ambiguities in the optical, IR and radio counterparts.

  14. Perspectives on neutrino telescopes 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /Karlsruhe U., TTP

    2009-04-01

    Remarks at the roundtable on plans for the future at the XIII International Workshop on Neutrino Telescopes.

  15. OPENENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. Why configurations of radioOPEN­ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: A GEOMETRICAL ANALYSIS Vladik Kreinovich, Scott A. The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio telescopes. During

  16. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrina, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    At about 40 km off the coast of Toulon (France), anchored at 2475 m deep in the Mediterranean Sea, there is ANTARES: the first undersea neutrino telescope and the only one currently operating. The detector consists of 885 photomultiplier tubes arranged into 12 strings of 450-metres high, with the aim to detect the Cherenkov light induced by the charged superluminal interaction products of neutrinos. Its main scientific target is the search for high-energy (TeV and beyond) neutrinos from cosmic accelerators, as predicted by hadronic interaction models, and the measurement of the cosmic neutrino diffuse flux, focusing in particular on events coming from below the horizon (up-going events) in order to significantly reduce the atmospheric muons background. Thanks to the development of a strategy for the identification of neutrinos coming from above the horizon (down-going events) the field of view of the telescope will be extended.

  17. Comparing NEO Search Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myhrvold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple terrestrial and space-based telescopes have been proposed for detecting and tracking near-Earth objects (NEOs). Detailed simulations of the search performance of these systems have used complex computer codes that are not widely available, which hinders accurate cross- comparison of the proposals and obscures whether they have consistent assumptions. Moreover, some proposed instruments would survey infrared (IR) bands, whereas others would operate in the visible band, and differences among asteroid thermal and visible light models used in the simulations further complicate like-to-like comparisons. I use simple physical principles to estimate basic performance metrics for the ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and three space-based instruments - Sentinel, NEOCam, and a Cubesat constellation. The performance is measured against two different NEO distributions, the Bottke et al. distribution of general NEOs, and the Veres et al. distribution of earth impacting NEO. The results of the comparis...

  18. THE ARMAGH-DUNSINK-HARVARD TELESCOPE: FROM DREAM TO OBLIVION C. J. BUTLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and they made important contributions to the emerging disciplines of cosmology, solar physics and stellar recognised achievements was his part in the setting up of a large Schmidt telescope, the ADH, in South Africa, nebulosity's - gosh!" At last, the project could move forward, now with the newly reopened Dunsink

  19. Beam calibration of radio telescopes with drones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chihway; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Glauser, Adrian; Casura, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-frequency far-field beam map for the 5m dish telescope at the Bleien Observatory measured using a commercially available drone. We describe the hexacopter drone used in this experiment, the design of the flight pattern, and the data analysis scheme. This is the first application of this calibration method to a single dish radio telescope in the far-field. The high signal-to-noise data allows us to characterise the beam pattern with high accuracy out to at least the 4th side-lobe. The resulting 2D beam pattern is compared with that derived from a more traditional calibration approach using an astronomical calibration source. We discuss the advantages of this method compared to other beam calibration methods. Our results show that this drone-based technique is very promising for ongoing and future radio experiments, where the knowledge of the beam pattern is key to obtaining high-accuracy cosmological and astronomical measurements.

  20. Grid Integration of Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Breitling; T. Granzer; H. Enke

    2009-03-23

    Robotic telescopes and grid technology have made significant progress in recent years. Both innovations offer important advantages over conventional technologies, particularly in combination with one another. Here, we introduce robotic telescopes used by the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam as ideal instruments for building a robotic telescope network. We also discuss the grid architecture and protocols facilitating the network integration that is being developed by the German AstroGrid-D project. Finally, we present three user interfaces employed for this purpose.

  1. The KELT-South Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pepper, Joshua; Siverd, Robert; James, David; Stassun, Keivan

    2012-01-01

    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a survey for new transiting planets around bright stars. KELT-South is a small-aperture, wide-field automated telescope located at Sutherland, South Africa. The telescope surveys a set of 26 degree by 26 degree fields around the southern sky, and targets stars in the range of 8 solar-type main-sequence stars.

  2. A Taste of Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Verde

    2015-04-22

    This is the summary of two lectures that aim to give an overview of cosmology. I will not try to be too rigorous in derivations, nor to give a full historical overview. The idea is to provide a "taste" of cosmology and some of the interesting topics it covers. The standard cosmological model is presented and I highlight the successes of cosmology over the past decade or so. Keys to the development of the standard cosmological model are observations of the cosmic microwave background and of large-scale structure, which are introduced. Inflation and dark energy and the outlook for the future are also discussed. Slides from the lectures are available from the school website: physicschool.web.cern.ch/PhysicSchool/CLASHEP/CLASHEP2011/.

  3. The Infrared Cloud Monitor for the MAGNUM Robotic Telescope at Haleakala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Suganuma; Y. Kobayashi; N. Okada; Y. Yoshii; T. Minezaki; T. Aoki; K. Enya; H. Tomita; S. Koshida

    2007-04-18

    We present the most successful infrared cloud monitor for a robotic telescope. This system was originally developed for the MAGNUM 2-m telescope, which has been achieving unmanned and automated monitoring observation of active galactic nuclei at Haleakala on the Hawaiian island of Maui since 2001. Using a thermal imager and two aspherical mirrors, it at once sees almost the whole sky at a wavelength of $\\lambda\\sim 10\\mu{\\rm m}$. Its outdoor part is weather-proof and is totally maintenance-free. The images obtained every one or two minutes are analysed immediately into several ranks of weather condition, from which our automated observing system not only decides to open or close the dome, but also selects what types of observations should be done. The whole-sky data accumulated over four years show that 50$-$60 % of all nights are photometric, and about 75 % are observable with respect to cloud condition at Haleakala. Many copies of this system are now used all over the world such as Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Atacama in Chile, and Okayama and Kiso in Japan.

  4. Productivity and impact of radio telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V; Zaich, P; Zaich, P

    2006-01-01

    not the whole story. Gamma-ray bursts and exoplanets appearthe other (cosmology, gamma-ray bursts, extrasolar- systemothers, cosmology, gamma-ray bursts, and exoplanets being

  5. OPENENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. #12; Why configurations of radioOPEN­ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: TOWARDS OPTIMAL DESIGN VLADIK KREINOVICH, SCOTT A, Russia ABSTRACT The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio

  6. Space Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Certifications required for all raw materials ­ Shelf Life (Polymerics) materials date controlled by QA · DesignsSpace Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory HST-COS FUV PER 11/8/00 FUV Detector System Materials;Space Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory HST-COS FUV PER 11/8/00 Materials and Processes · Materials

  7. Averaging Hypotheses in Newtonian Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Buchert

    1995-12-20

    Average properties of general inhomogeneous cosmological models are discussed in the Newtonian framework. It is shown under which circumstances the average flow reduces to a member of the standard Friedmann--Lema\\^\\i tre cosmologies. Possible choices of global boundary conditions of inhomogeneous cosmologies as well as consequences for the interpretation of cosmological parameters are put into perspective.

  8. Cosmological inference using gravitational wave observations alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Messenger

    2015-06-22

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cosmic distance scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained electromagnetically since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, recent Fisher matrix studies has shown that if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is indeed possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation gravitational wave detector which is designed to yield detections of $10^3-10^7$ binary neutron star systems per year. This study presents the first Bayesian investigation of the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters can be measured using observations of binary neutron star systems by the Einstein Telescope with the one year of observations. We find by direct simulation of $10^3$ detections of binary neutron stars that, within our simplifying assumptions, $H_0,\\Omega_m,\\Omega_\\Lambda,w_0$ and $w_1$ can be measured at the $95\\%$ level with an accuracy of $\\sim 8\\%,65\\%,39\\%,80\\%$ and $90\\%$, respectively. We also find, by extrapolation, that a measurement accuracy comparable with current measurements by Planck is reached for a number of observed events $O(10^{6-7})$

  9. Cosmology and New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2006-06-21

    A comparison of the standard models in particle physics and in cosmology demonstrates that they are not compatible, though both are well established. Basics of modern cosmology are briefly reviewed. It is argued that the measurements of the main cosmological parameters are achieved through many independent physical phenomena and this minimizes possible interpretation errors. It is shown that astronomy demands new physics beyond the frameworks of the (minimal) standard model in particle physics. More revolutionary modifications of the basic principles of the theory are also discussed.

  10. Massive neutrinos and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Lesgourgues; Sergio Pastor

    2006-05-29

    The present experimental results on neutrino flavour oscillations provide evidence for non-zero neutrino masses, but give no hint on their absolute mass scale, which is the target of beta decay and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Crucial complementary information on neutrino masses can be obtained from the analysis of data on cosmological observables, such as the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background or the distribution of large-scale structure. In this review we describe in detail how free-streaming massive neutrinos affect the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We summarize the current bounds on the sum of neutrino masses that can be derived from various combinations of cosmological data, including the most recent analysis by the WMAP team. We also discuss how future cosmological experiments are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses well into the sub-eV range.

  11. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ashok; Pino, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  12. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-06-22

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  13. Dark gravity and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Henry-Couannier; A. Tilquin; C. Tao; A. Ealet

    2007-10-24

    The previous version of this article was a first attempt to confront the Dark Gravity theory to cosmological data. However, more recent developments lead to the conclusion that the cosmological principle is probably not valid in Dark Gravity so that this kind of analysis is at best very premature. A more recent and living review of the Dark Gravity theory can be found in gr-qc/0610079

  14. Emergent cosmology revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bag, Satadru; Sahni, Varun; Shtanov, Yuri; Unnikrishnan, Sanil E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: sanil@lnmiit.ac.in

    2014-07-01

    We explore the possibility of emergent cosmology using the effective potential formalism. We discover new models of emergent cosmology which satisfy the constraints posed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We demonstrate that, within the framework of modified gravity, the emergent scenario can arise in a universe which is spatially open/closed. By contrast, in general relativity (GR) emergent cosmology arises from a spatially closed past-eternal Einstein Static Universe (ESU). In GR the ESU is unstable, which creates fine tuning problems for emergent cosmology. However, modified gravity models including Braneworld models, Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Asymptotically Free Gravity result in a stable ESU. Consequently, in these models emergent cosmology arises from a larger class of initial conditions including those in which the universe eternally oscillates about the ESU fixed point. We demonstrate that such an oscillating universe is necessarily accompanied by graviton production. For a large region in parameter space graviton production is enhanced through a parametric resonance, casting serious doubts as to whether this emergent scenario can be past-eternal.

  15. Cluster Observations with the South Pole Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plagge, Thomas Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope during the last stages ofwater vapor at the South Pole relative to two otherSZ Survey Instrument . 3 The South Pole Telescope Observing

  16. The strained state cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Starting from some relevant facts concerning the behaviour of the universe over large scale and time span, the analogy between the geometric approach of General Relativ- ity and the classical description of an elastic strained material continuum is discussed. Extending the elastic deformation approach to four dimensions it is shown that the accelerated expansion of the universe is recovered. The strain field of space-time repro- duces properties similar to the ones ascribed to the dark energy currently called in to explain the accelerated expansion. The strain field in the primordial universe behaves as radiation, but asymptotically it reproduces the cosmological constant. Subjecting the theory to a number of cosmological tests confirms the soundness of the approach and gives an optimal value for the one parameter of the model, i.e. the bulk modulus of the space-time continuum. Finally various aspects of the Strained State Cosmology (SSC) are discussed and contrasted with some non-linear massive gravity theor...

  17. Supernovae as cosmological probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Jeppe Trost

    2015-01-01

    The cosmological standard model at present is widely accepted as containing mainly things we do not understand. In particular the appearance of a Cosmological Constant, or dark energy, is puzzling. This was first inferred from the Hubble diagram of a low number of Type Ia supernovae, and later corroborated by complementary cosmological probes. Today, a much larger collection of supernovae is available, and here I perform a rigorous statistical analysis of this dataset. Taking into account how the supernovae are calibrated to be standard candles, we run into some subtleties in the analysis. To our surprise, this new dataset - about an order of bigger than the size of the original dataset - shows, under standard assumptions, only mild evidence of an accelerated universe.

  18. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  19. Modular Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orfeu Bertolami; Ricardo Schiappa

    1999-04-30

    We study solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation corresponding to an S-modular invariant N=1 supergravity model and a closed homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The issues of inflation and of the cosmological constant problem are addressed with the help of the relevant wave functions. We find that topological type inflation is consistent from the quantum mechanical point of view and that a solution for the cosmological constant problem along the lines of the strong CP problem naturally arises.

  20. Higgs boson cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian G. Moss

    2015-07-21

    The discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson opens up a range of speculative cosmological scenarios, from the formation of structure in the early universe immediately after the big bang, to relics from the electroweak phase transition one nanosecond after the big bang, on to the end of the present-day universe through vacuum decay. Higgs physics is wide-ranging, and gives an impetus to go beyond the Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology to explore the physics of ultra-high energies and quantum gravity.

  1. Higgs boson cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moss, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson opens up a range of speculative cosmological scenarios, from the formation of structure in the early universe immediately after the big bang, to relics from the electroweak phase transition one nanosecond after the big bang, on to the end of the present-day universe through vacuum decay. Higgs physics is wide-ranging, and gives an impetus to go beyond the Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology to explore the physics of ultra-high energies and quantum gravity.

  2. Scalar Field Inhomogeneous Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Feinstein; J. Ibáñez; P. Labraga

    1995-11-24

    Some exact solutions for the Einstein field equations corresponding to inhomogeneous $G_2$ cosmologies with an exponential-potential scalar field which generalize solutions obtained previously are considered. Several particular cases are studied and the properties related to generalized inflation and asymptotic behaviour of the models are discussed.

  3. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  4. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  5. Anisotropies of gravitational-wave standard sirens as a new cosmological probe without redshift information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Taruya, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Compact binary stars at cosmological distances are promising sources for gravitational waves (GWs), and these are thought to be powerful cosmological probes, referred to as the GW standard sirens. With future GW detectors such as the Einstein telescope (ET), we will be able to precisely measure their luminosity distances out to a redshift $z\\sim5$. While previously proposed cosmological studies using the GW standard sirens require redshift information for each source, which could be obtained through an extensive electromagnetic follow-up campaign, we here propose an alternative method only with the luminosity distances. Utilizing the anisotropies of the number density and luminosity distances originated from the large-scale structure, we discuss how this anisotropies can be measured and are sensitive to the cosmology, finding that the expected constraints on the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter $f_{\\rm NL}$ could become $\\sigma(f_{\\rm NL})=0.54$ with a network of ET-like detectors.

  6. Platform Deformation Refined Pointing and Phase Correction for the AMiBA Hexapod Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Patrick M; Chang, Yu-Yen; Huang, Yau-De; Raffin, Philippe; Chen, Ke-Yung; Chereau, Guillaume; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T P; Huang, Chih-Wie; Ibanez-Romano, Fabiola; Jiang, Homin; Liao, Yu-Wei; Lin, Kai-Yang; Liu, Guo-Chin; Molnar, Sandor M; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Altamirano, Pablo; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Han, Chi-Chiang; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is a radio interferometer for research in cosmology, currently operating 7 0.6m diameter antennas co-mounted on a 6m diameter platform driven by a hexapod mount. AMiBA is currently the largest hexapod telescope. We briefly summarize the hexapod operation with the current pointing error model. We then focus on the upcoming 13-element expansion with its potential difficulties and solutions. Photogrammetry measurements of the platform reveal deformations at a level which can affect the optical pointing and the receiver radio phase. In order to prepare for the 13-element upgrade, two optical telescopes are installed on the platform to correlate optical pointing tests. Being mounted on different locations, the residuals of the two sets of pointing errors show a characteristic phase and amplitude difference as a function of the platform deformation pattern. These results depend on the telescope's azimuth, elevation and polarization position. An analytical model ...

  7. Neutrino telescopes in the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernenwein, J.-P.

    2007-01-12

    Neutrino astronomy has rapidly developed these last years, being the only way to get specific and reliable information about astrophysical objects still poorly understood.Currently two neutrino telescopes are operational in the World: BAIKAL, in the lake of the same name in Siberia, and AMANDA, in the ices of the South Pole. Two telescopes of the same type are under construction in the Mediterranean Sea: ANTARES and NESTOR. All these telescopes belong to a first generation, with an instrumented volume smaller or equal to 0.02 km3. Also in the Mediterranean Sea, the NEMO project is just in its stag phase, within the framework of a cubic kilometer size neutrino telescope study. Lastly, the ICECUBE detector, with a volume reaching about 1 km3, is under construction on the site of AMANDA experiment, while an extension of the BAIKAL detector toward km3 is under study. We will present here the characteristics of these experiments, as well as the results of their observations.

  8. Status of the Cherenkov Telescope Array's Large Size Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortina, J

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory, will be deployed over two sites in the two hemispheres. Both sites will be equipped with four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), which are crucial to achieve the science goals of CTA in the 20-200 GeV energy range. Each LST is equipped with a primary tessellated mirror dish of 23 m diameter, supported by a structure made mainly of carbon fibre reinforced plastic tubes and aluminum joints. This solution guarantees light weight (around 100 tons), essential for fast repositioning to any position in the sky in Canary island of La Palma (Spain). In this talk we will outline the technical solutions adopted to fulfill the design requirem...

  9. Holography from quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rashki; S. Jalalzadeh

    2014-12-12

    The Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of deformation quantization is applied to the closed Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmological model. We show that the phase space average for the surface of the apparent horizon is quantized in units of the Planck's surface, and that the total entropy of the universe is also quantized. Taking into account these two concepts, it is shown that 't Hooft conjecture on the cosmological holographic principle (CHP) in radiation and dust dominated quantum universes is satisfied as a manifestation of quantization. This suggests that the entire universe (not only inside the apparent horizon) can be seen as a two-dimensional information structure encoded on the apparent horizon.

  10. Quantum cosmology: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bojowald

    2015-01-20

    In quantum cosmology, one applies quantum physics to the whole universe. While no unique version and no completely well-defined theory is available yet, the framework gives rise to interesting conceptual, mathematical and physical questions. This review presents quantum cosmology in a new picture that tries to incorporate the importance of inhomogeneity: De-emphasizing the traditional minisuperspace view, the dynamics is rather formulated in terms of the interplay of many interacting "microscopic" degrees of freedom that describe the space-time geometry. There is thus a close relationship with more-established systems in condensed-matter and particle physics even while the large set of space-time symmetries (general covariance) requires some adaptations and new developments. These extensions of standard methods are needed both at the fundamental level and at the stage of evaluating the theory by effective descriptions.

  11. Cosmology of Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Burdyuzha; G. Vereshkov

    2007-12-29

    Shortly the vacuum component of the Universe from the geometry point of view and from the point of view of the standard model of physics of elementary particles is discussed. Some arguments are given to the calculated value of the cosmological constant (Zeldovich approximation). A new component of space vacuum (the gravitational vacuum condensate) is involved the production of which has fixed time in our Universe. Also the phenomenon of vacuum selforganization must be included in physical consideration of the Universe evolution.

  12. Particle Physics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Pralavorio

    2014-12-04

    Today, both particle physics and cosmology are described by few parameter Standard Models, i.e. it is possible to deduce consequence of particle physics in cosmology and vice verse. The former is examined in this lecture, in light of the recent systematic exploration of the electroweak scale by the LHC experiments. The two main results of the first phase of the LHC, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle and the absence so far of new particles predicted by "natural" theories beyond the Standard Model (supersymmetry, extra-dimension and composite Higgs) are put in a historical context to enlighten their importance and then presented extensively. To be complete, a short review from the neutrino physics, which can not be probed at LHC, is also given. The ability of all these results to resolve the 3 fundamental questions of cosmology about the nature of dark energy and dark matter as well as the origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is discussed in each case.

  13. OPEN-ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    radio telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. Why configurationsOPEN-ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: A GEOMETRICAL ANALYSIS Vladik Kreinovich, Scott A. The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio telescopes. During

  14. Cherenkov Telescope Array Data Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamanna, G; Contreras, J L; Knödlseder, J; Kosack, K; Neyroud, N; Aboudan, A; Arrabito, L; Barbier, C; Bastieri, D; Boisson, C; Brau-Nogué, S; Bregeon, J; Bulgarelli, A; Carosi, A; Costa, A; De Cesare, G; Reyes, R de los; Fioretti, V; Gallozzi, S; Jacquemier, J; Khelifi, B; Kocot, J; Lombardi, S; Lucarelli, F; Lyard, E; Maier, G; Massimino, P; Osborne, J P; Perri, M; Rico, J; Sanchez, D A; Satalecka, K; Siejkowski, H; Stolarczyk, T; Szepieniec, T; Testa, V; Walter, R; Ward, J E; Zoli, A

    2015-01-01

    Very High Energy gamma-ray astronomy with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is evolving towards the model of a public observatory. Handling, processing and archiving the large amount of data generated by the CTA instruments and delivering scientific products are some of the challenges in designing the CTA Data Management. The participation of scientists from within CTA Consortium and from the greater worldwide scientific community necessitates a sophisticated scientific analysis system capable of providing unified and efficient user access to data, software and computing resources. Data Management is designed to respond to three main issues: (i) the treatment and flow of data from remote telescopes; (ii) "big-data" archiving and processing; (iii) and open data access. In this communication the overall technical design of the CTA Data Management, current major developments and prototypes are presented.

  15. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: Dark Energy Science Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    This white paper describes the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC), whose goal is the study of dark energy and related topics in fundamental physics with data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). It provides an overview of dark energy science and describes the current and anticipated state of the field. It makes the case for the DESC by laying out a robust analytical framework for dark energy science that has been defined by its members and the comprehensive three-year work plan they have developed for implementing that framework. The analysis working groups cover five key probes of dark energy: weak lensing, large scale structure, galaxy clusters, Type Ia supernovae, and strong lensing. The computing working groups span cosmological simulations, galaxy catalogs, photon simulations and a systematic software and computational framework for LSST dark energy data analysis. The technical working groups make the connection between dark energy science and the LSST system. The working groups have close linkages, especially through the use of the photon simulations to study the impact of instrument design and survey strategy on analysis methodology and cosmological parameter estimation. The white paper describes several high priority tasks identified by each of the 16 working groups. Over the next three years these tasks will help prepare for LSST analysis, make synergistic connections with ongoing cosmological surveys and provide the dark energy community with state of the art analysis tools. Members of the community are invited to join the LSST DESC, according to the membership policies described in the white paper. Applications to sign up for associate membership may be made by submitting the Web form at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/lsst/desc/signup.html with a short statement of the work they wish to pursue that is relevant to the LSST DESC.

  16. Cosmology of Bifundamental Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2008-12-17

    If a field theory contains gauged, non-Abelian, bi-fundamental fields i.e. fields that are charged under two separate non-Abelian gauge groups, the transition from a deconfined phase to a hadronic phase may be frustrated. Similar frustration may occur in non-Abelian gauge models containing matter only in higher dimensional representations e.g. models with pure glue, or if ordinary quarks are confined by two flux tubes, as implied in the triangular configuration of baryons within QCD. In a cosmological setting, such models can lead to the formation of a web of confining electric flux tubes that can potentially have observational signatures.

  17. Cosmology with Mimetic Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: viatcheslav.Mukhanov@lmu.de

    2014-06-01

    We consider minimal extensions of the recently proposed Mimetic Dark Matter and show that by introducing a potential for the mimetic non-dynamical scalar field we can mimic nearly any gravitational properties of the normal matter. In particular, the mimetic matter can provide us with inflaton, quintessence and even can lead to a bouncing nonsingular universe. We also investigate the behaviour of cosmological perturbations due to a mimetic matter. We demonstrate that simple mimetic inflation can produce red-tilted scalar perturbations which are largely enhanced over gravity waves.

  18. Cosmological principle and honeycombs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Criado; N. Alamo

    2004-04-12

    We present the possibility that the gravitational growth of primordial density fluctuations leads to what can be considered a week version of the cosmological principle. The large scale mass distribution associated with this principle must have the geometrical structures known as a regular honeycombs. We give the most important parameters that characterize the honeycombs associated with the closed, open, and flat FLRW models. These parameters can be used to determine by means of observations which is the appropriate honeycomb. For each of these honeycombs, and for a nearly flat universe, we have calculated the probability that a randomly placed observer could detect the honeycomb as a function of the density parameters.

  19. Astrophysics & Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools to someoneAstrophysics & Cosmology

  20. Scalar field potentials for cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor H. Cardenas; Sergio del Campo

    2004-01-05

    We discuss different aspects of modern cosmology through a scalar field potential construction method. We discuss the case of negative potential cosmologies and its relation with oscillatory cosmic evolution, models with a explicit interaction between dark energy and dark matter which address the coincidence problem and also the case of non-zero curvature space.

  1. Presentations of bdj50 conference lectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speakers

    2012-06-23

      «??    Even  in  momentum   «??    Odd  in  frequency   «??    Net  spin!   ! F = !D E ex (T ) " # $ % & ' ~ 1nm ! F = !D k B T " # $ % & ' >>1nm «??    An?-­?Parallel  spin  pairing     Triplet vs Singlet Creating a... & optical: TES with antireflection coating (Sae Woo Nam et al., NIST) Gamma-ray: thick superconducting foil Atacama Cosmology Telescope South Pole Telescope •? Search for gravity waves from the Big Bang •? Constrain dark energy and dark matter...

  2. Time in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Brout; R. Parentani

    1999-02-05

    The notion of time in cosmology is revealed through an examination of transition matrix elements of radiative processes occurring in the cosmos. To begin with, the very concept of time is delineated in classical physics in terms of correlations between the succession of configurations which describe a process and a standard trajectory called the clock. The total is an isolated system of fixed energy. This is relevant for cosmology in that the universe is an isolated system which we take to be homogeneous and isotropic. Furthermore, in virtue of the constraint which arises from reparametrization invariance of time, it has total energy zero. Therefore the momentum of the scale factor is determined from the energy of matter. In the quantum theory this is exploited through use of the WKB approximation for the wave function of the scale factor, justified for a large universe. The formalism then gives rise to matrix elements describing matter processes. These are shown to take on the form of usual time dependent quantum amplitudes wherein the temporal dependence is given by a background which is once more fixed by the total energy of matter.

  3. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field ? which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter ?. The standard ?CDM model can be recovered by setting ? = 0. If diffusion takes place (? > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  4. The Advanced Compton Telescope Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven E. Boggs; James Kurfess; James Ryan; Elena Aprile; Neil Gehrels; Marc Kippen; Mark Leising; Uwe Oberlack; Cornelia Wunderer; Allen Zych; Peter Bloser; Michael Harris; Andrew Hoover; Alexei Klimenk; Dan Kocevski; Mark McConnell; Peter Milne; Elena I. Novikova; Bernard Phlips; Mark Polsen; Steven Sturner; Derek Tournear; Georg Weidenspointner; Eric Wulf; Andreas Zoglauer; Matthew Baring; John Beacom; Lars Bildsten; Charles Dermer; Dieter Hartmann; Margarita Hernanz; David Smith; Sumner Starrfield; for the larger ACT collaboration

    2006-08-24

    The Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT), the next major step in gamma-ray astronomy, will probe the fires where chemical elements are formed by enabling high-resolution spectroscopy of nuclear emission from supernova explosions. During the past two years, our collaboration has been undertaking a NASA mission concept study for ACT. This study was designed to (1) transform the key scientific objectives into specific instrument requirements, (2) to identify the most promising technologies to meet those requirements, and (3) to design a viable mission concept for this instrument. We present the results of this study, including scientific goals and expected performance, mission design, and technology recommendations.

  5. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, Roderick A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  6. Protein folding and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz; C. L. Siguenza

    1997-06-04

    Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

  7. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, ?i?li, ?stanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  8. Recent Results from Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, M

    2015-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum Xmax are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20 degrees radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 sigma. The measured Xmax is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 10^18.2 eV - 10^19.2 eV.

  9. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  10. Synergy between the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacon, David; Abdalla, Filipe B; Brown, Michael; Bull, Philip; Camera, Stefano; Fender, Rob; Grainge, Keith; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jarvis, Matt; Jackson, Neal; Kirk, Donnacha; Mann, Bob; McEwen, Jason; McKean, John; Newman, Jeffrey A; Raccanelli, Alvise; Sahlen, Martin; Santos, Mario; Tyson, Anthony; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.

  11. Thermodynamics in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Fang Li; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2008-12-18

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is very powerful to deal with the behavior of early universe. And the effective loop quantum cosmology gives a successful description of the universe in the semiclassical region. We consider the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe as a thermodynamical system and investigate the thermodynamics of LQC in the semiclassical region. The effective density and effective pressure in the modified Friedmann equation from LQC not only determine the evolution of the universe in LQC scenario but are actually also found to be the thermodynamic quantities. This result comes from the energy definition in cosmology (the Misner-Sharp gravitational energy) and is consistent with thermodynamic laws. We prove that within the framework of loop quantum cosmology, the elementary equation of equilibrium thermodynamics is still valid.

  12. Cross Calibration of Telescope Optical Throughput Efficiencies using Reconstructed Shower Energies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, A M W; Hofmann, W; Bernloehr, K

    2015-01-01

    For reliable event reconstruction of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs), calibration of the optical throughput efficiency is required. Within current facilities, this is achieved through the use of ring shaped images generated by muons. Here, a complementary approach is explored, achieving cross calibration of elements of IACT arrays through pairwise comparisons between telescopes, focussing on its applicability to the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Intercalibration of telescopes of a particular type using eventwise comparisons of shower image amplitudes has previously been demonstrated to recover the relative telescope optical responses. A method utilising the reconstructed energy as an alternative to image amplitude is presented, enabling cross calibration between telescopes of varying types within an IACT array. Monte Carlo studies for two plausible CTA layouts have shown that this calibration procedure recovers the relative telescope response efficiencies at the few percent level.

  13. Lectures on Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Christodoulakis

    2001-09-18

    The problems encountered in trying to quantize the various cosmological models, are brought forward by means of a concrete example. The Automorphism groups are revealed as the key element through which G.C.T.'s can be used for a general treatment of these problems. At the classical level, the time dependent automorphisms lead to significant simplifications of the line element for the generic spatially homogeneous geometry, without loss of generality. At the quantum level, the ''frozen'' automorphisms entail an important reduction of the configuration space --spanned by the 6 components of the scale factor matrix-- on which the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, is to be based. In this spirit the canonical quantization of the most general minisuperspace actions --i.e. with all six scale factor as well as the lapse function and the shift vector present-- describing the vacuum type II, I geometries, is considered. The reduction to the corresponding physical degrees of freedom is achieved through the usage of the linear constraints as well as the quantum version of the entire set of all classical integrals of motion.

  14. Constraints on cosmology from the cosmic microwave background...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ABUNDANCE; BACKGROUND RADIATION; COSMOLOGY; DETECTION; EV RANGE; FLUCTUATIONS; GALAXY CLUSTERS; HELIUM; INDEXES; LIMITING VALUES;...

  15. James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director, NASA James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director,...

  16. "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent Monitoring and Real-Time Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Thinking" Telescopes: An...

  17. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission You are...

  18. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Authors: Harrison,...

  19. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Authors: Harrison,...

  20. Cosmology and the S-matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    56710 Cosmology and the S-matrix Raphael Bousso Center for04/36 Cosmology and the S-matrix Raphael Bousso ? Center forassociated with an S-matrix. arXiv:hep-th/0412197v2 25 Jan

  1. Simulating Reionization in Numerical Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Sokasian; Tom Abel; Lars E. Hernquist

    2001-05-10

    The incorporation of radiative transfer effects into cosmological hydrodynamical simulations is essential for understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) makes the transition from a neutral medium to one that is almost fully ionized. Here, we present an approximate numerical method designed to study in a statistical sense how a cosmological density field is ionized by a set of discrete point sources. A diffuse background radiation field is also computed self-consistently in our procedure. The method requires relatively few time steps and can be employed with simulations having high resolution. We describe the details of the algorithm and provide a description of how the method can be applied to the output from a pre-existing cosmological simulation to study the systematic reionization of a particular ionic species. As a first application, we compute the reionization of He II by quasars in the redshift range 3 to 6.

  2. The cosmological parameters from supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente

    1997-10-02

    Supernovae are bright luminous stellar objects observable up to redshifts close to z~1. They are used to probe the geometry of the Universe and its expansion rate by applying different methods. In this article, I review various approaches used to measure the present expansion rate of the Universe, $H_{0}$, and the paths to determine its matter density $\\Omega_{M}$ and the possible contribution of a non-zero cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. An account is given of the numerical estimates of those cosmological parameters according to the present status of the research.

  3. The Cosmology - Particle Physics Connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Trodden

    2006-05-26

    Modern cosmology poses deep and unavoidable questions for fundamental physics. In this plenary talk, delivered in slightly different forms at the {\\it Particles and Nuclei International Conference} (PANIC05) in Santa Fe, in October 2005, and at the {\\it CMB and Physics of the Early Universe International Conference}, on the island of Ischia, Italy, in April 2006, I discuss the broad connections between cosmology and particle physics, focusing on physics at the TeV scale, accessible at the next and future generations of colliders

  4. The time evolution of cosmological redshift as a test of dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Balbi; C. Quercellini

    2007-11-12

    The variation of the expansion rate of the Universe with time produces an evolution in the cosmological redshift of distant sources (for example quasar Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorption lines), that might be directly observed by future ultra stable, high-resolution spectrographs (such as CODEX) coupled to extremely large telescopes (such as European Southern Observatory's Extremely Large Telescope, ELT). This would open a new window to explore the physical mechanism responsible for the current acceleration of the Universe. We investigate the evolution of cosmological redshift from a variety of dark energy models, and compare it with simulated data. We perform a Fisher matrix analysis and discuss the prospects for constraining the parameters of these models and for discriminating among competing candidates. We find that, because of parameter degeneracies, and of the inherent technical difficulties involved in this kind of observations, the uncertainties on parameter reconstruction can be rather large unless strong external priors are assumed. However, the method could be a valuable complementary cosmological tool, and give important insights on the dynamics of dark energy, not obtainable using other probes.

  5. Cosmological two-fluid thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfried Zimdahl; Diego Pavón

    2000-05-17

    We reveal unifying thermodynamic aspects of so different phenomena as the cosmological electron-positron annihilation, the evaporation of primordial black holes with a narrow mass range, and the ``deflationary'' transition from an initial de Sitter phase to a subsequent standard Friedmann-Lema\\^{\\i}tre-Robertson-Walker begin (FLRW) behavior.

  6. Summary & Outlook: Particles and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilfried Buchmuller

    2010-03-05

    We review new results on strong and electroweak interactions, flavour physics, cosmic rays and cosmology, which were presented at this conference, focussing on physics beyond the Standard Models. Special emphasis is given to the Higgs sector of the Standard Model of Particle Physics and recent results on high-energy cosmic rays and their implications for dark matter.

  7. Evidence for cosmological particle creation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pigozzo, C; Alcaniz, J S; Borges, H A; Fabris, J C

    2015-01-01

    A joint analysis of the linear matter power spectrum, distance measurements from type Ia supernovae and the position of the first peak in the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background indicates a cosmological, late-time dark matter creation at 99% confidence level.

  8. Holographic Complexity And Cosmological Singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbon, Jose L F

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of holographic complexity in various AdS/CFT models containing cosmological crunch singularities. We find that a notion of complexity measured by extremal bulk volumes tends to decrease as the singularity is approached in CFT time, suggesting that the corresponding quantum states have simpler entanglement structure at the singularity.

  9. iCosmo: an Interactive Cosmology Package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Refregier; Adam Amara; Thomas Kitching; Anais Rassat

    2011-04-28

    Aims: The interactive software package iCosmo, designed to perform cosmological calculations is described. Methods: iCosmo is a software package to perform interactive cosmological calculations for the low redshift universe. Computing distance measures, the matter power spectrum, and the growth factor is supported for any values of the cosmological parameters. It also computes derived observed quantities for several cosmological probes such as cosmic shear, baryon acoustic oscillations and type Ia supernovae. The associated errors for these observables can be derived for customised surveys, or for pre-set values corresponding to current or planned instruments. The code also allows for the calculation of cosmological forecasts with Fisher matrices which can be manipulated to combine different surveys and cosmological probes. The code is written in the IDL language and thus benefits from the convenient interactive features and scientific library available in this language. iCosmo can also be used as an engine to perform cosmological calculations in batch mode, and forms a convenient adaptive platform for the development of further cosmological modules. With its extensive documentation, it may also serve as a useful resource for teaching and for newcomers in the field of cosmology. Results: The iCosmo package is described with various examples and command sequences. The code is freely available with documentation at http://www.icosmo.org, along with an interactive web interface and is part of the Initiative for Cosmology, a common archive for cosmological resources.

  10. Detecting the cosmological recombination signal from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desjacques, Vincent; Silk, Joseph; de Bernardis, Francesco; Doré, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Spectral distortions of the CMB have recently experienced an increased interest. One of the inevitable distortion signals of our cosmological concordance model is created by the cosmological recombination process, just a little before photons last scatter at redshift $z\\simeq 1100$. These cosmological recombination lines, emitted by the hydrogen and helium plasma, should still be observable as tiny deviation from the CMB blackbody spectrum in the cm--dm spectral bands. In this paper, we present a forecast for the detectability of the recombination signal with future satellite experiments. We argue that serious consideration for future CMB experiments in space should be given to probing spectral distortions and, in particular, the recombination line signals. The cosmological recombination radiation not only allows determination of standard cosmological parameters, but also provides a direct observational confirmation for one of the key ingredients of our cosmological model: the cosmological recombination histo...

  11. How does pressure gravitate? Cosmological constant problem confronts observational cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narimani, Ali; Scott, Douglas; Afshordi, Niayesh E-mail: nafshordi@pitp.ca

    2014-08-01

    An important and long-standing puzzle in the history of modern physics is the gross inconsistency between theoretical expectations and cosmological observations of the vacuum energy density, by at least 60 orders of magnitude, otherwise known as the cosmological constant problem. A characteristic feature of vacuum energy is that it has a pressure with the same amplitude, but opposite sign to its energy density, while all the precision tests of General Relativity are either in vacuum, or for media with negligible pressure. Therefore, one may wonder whether an anomalous coupling to pressure might be responsible for decoupling vacuum from gravity. We test this possibility in the context of the Gravitational Aether proposal, using current cosmological observations, which probe the gravity of relativistic pressure in the radiation era. Interestingly, we find that the best fit for anomalous pressure coupling is about half-way between General Relativity (GR), and Gravitational Aether (GA), if we include Planck together with WMAP and BICEP2 polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. Taken at face value, this data combination excludes both GR and GA at around the 3 ? level. However, including higher resolution CMB observations (''highL'') or baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) pushes the best fit closer to GR, excluding the Gravitational Aether solution to the cosmological constant problem at the 4- 5 ? level. This constraint effectively places a limit on the anomalous coupling to pressure in the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) expansion, ?{sub 4} = 0.105 ± 0.049 (+highL CMB), or ?{sub 4} = 0.066 ± 0.039 (+BAO). These represent the most precise measurement of this parameter to date, indicating a mild tension with GR (for ?CDM including tensors, with 0?{sub 4}=), and also among different data sets.

  12. Telescopic nanotube device for hot nanolithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M

    2014-12-30

    A device for maintaining a constant tip-surface distance for producing nanolithography patterns on a surface using a telescopic nanotube for hot nanolithography. An outer nanotube is attached to an AFM cantilever opposite a support end. An inner nanotube is telescopically disposed within the outer nanotube. The tip of the inner nanotube is heated to a sufficiently high temperature and brought in the vicinity of the surface. Heat is transmitted to the surface for thermal imprinting. Because the inner tube moves telescopically along the outer nanotube axis, a tip-surface distance is maintained constant due to the vdW force interaction, which in turn eliminates the need of an active feedback loop.

  13. Active Optics in Modern, Large Optical Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lothar Noethe

    2001-11-07

    Active optics is defined as the control of the shape and the alignment of the components of an optical system at low temporal frequencies. For modern large telescopes with flexible monolithic or segmented primary mirrors and also flexible structures this technique is indispensable to reach a performance which is either diffraction limited for an operation in space or limited by the atmosphere for an operation on the ground. This article first describes the theory of active optics, both of the wavefront analysis and the correction mechanisms, then the design of three representative active optics systems, two in telescopes of the four and eight meter class with meniscus mirrors and one in a telescope with a segmented primary mirror, and, finally, presents practical experience with these active optics systems.

  14. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András; Csépány, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the sub-arcminute range which is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  15. The time evolution of cosmological redshift in non-standard dark energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbi, A

    2007-01-01

    The variation of the expansion rate of the universe with time produces an evolution in the cosmological redshift of distant sources (for example quasars), that might be directly observed (over a decade or so) by future ultra stable, high-resolution spectrographs (such as CODEX) coupled to extremely large telescopes (such as ESO's ELT). This would open a new window to explore the physical mechanism responsible for the current acceleration of the universe. We investigate the evolution of cosmological redshift from a variety of non-standard dark energy models, and compare it with simulated data based on realistic assumptions. We perform a Fisher matrix analysis, in order to estimate the expected constraints on the parameters of the models. We find that there are interesting prospects for constraining the parameters of non-standard dark energy models and for discriminating among competing candidates.

  16. A fast map-making preconditioner for regular scanning patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Næss, Sigurd K.; Louis, Thibaut E-mail: thibaut.louis@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution Maximum Likelihood map-making of the Cosmic Microwave Background is usually performed using Conjugate Gradients with a preconditioner that ignores noise correlations. We here present a new preconditioner that approximates the map noise covariance as circulant, and show that this results in a speedup of up to 400% for a realistic scanning pattern from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The improvement is especially large for polarized maps.

  17. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  18. Quantum coherent states in cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houri Ziaeepour

    2015-02-15

    Coherent states consist of superposition of infinite number of particles and do not have a classical analogue. We study their evolution in a FLRW cosmology and show that only when full quantum corrections are considered, they may survive the expansion of the Universe and form a global condensate. This state of matter can be the origin of accelerating expansion of the Universe, generally called dark energy, and inflation in the early universe. Additionally, such a quantum pool may be the ultimate environment for decoherence at shorter distances. If dark energy is a quantum coherent state, its dominant contribution to the total energy of the Universe at present provides a low entropy state which may be necessary as an initial condition for a new Big Bang in the framework of bouncing cosmology models.

  19. Cosmology, Thermodynamics and Matter Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; M. O. Calvao; I. Waga

    2007-08-24

    Several approaches to the matter creation problem in the context of cosmological models are summarily reviewed. A covariant formulation of the general relativistic imperfect simple fluid endowed with a process of matter creation is presented. By considering the standard big bang model, it is shown how the recent results of Prigogine et alii \\cite{1} can be recovered and, at the same time their limits of validity are explicited.

  20. The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT): A Small Robotic Telescope for Large-Area Synoptic Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua Pepper; Richard W. Pogge; D. L. DePoy; J. L. Marshall; K. Z. Stanek; Amelia M. Stutz; Shawn Poindexter; Robert Siverd; Thomas P. O'Brien; Mark Trueblood; Patricia Trueblood

    2007-07-30

    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a survey for planetary transits of bright stars. It consists of a small-aperture, wide-field automated telescope located at Winer Observatory near Sonoita, Arizona. The telescope surveys a set of 26 x 26 degree fields, together covering about 25% of the Northern sky, targeting stars in the range of 8

  1. Prototype of the SST-1M Telescope Structure for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemiec, J; B?ocki, J; Bogacz, L; Borkowski, J; Bulik, T; Cadoux, F; Christov, A; Cury?o, M; della Volpe, D; Dyrda, M; Favre, Y; Frankowski, A; Grudnik, ?; Grudzi?ska, M; Heller, M; Id?kowski, B; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Kasperek, J; Lalik, K; Lyard, E; Mach, E; Mandat, D; Marsza?ek, A; Micha?owski, J; Moderski, R; Montaruli, T; Neronov, A; Ostrowski, M; Pa?ko, P; Pech, M; Porcelli, A; Prandini, E; Rajda, P; Rameez, M; Schioppa, E jr; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Skowron, K; Sliusar, V; Sowi?ski, M; Stawarz, ?; Stodulska, M; Stodulski, M; Pujadas, I Troyano; Toscano, S; Walter, R; Wi?cek, M; Zagda?ski, A; Zi?tara, K

    2015-01-01

    A single-mirror small-size (SST-1M) Davies-Cotton telescope with a dish diameter of 4 m has been built by a consortium of Polish and Swiss institutions as a prototype for one of the proposed small-size telescopes for the southern observatory of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The design represents a very simple, reliable, and cheap solution. The mechanical structure prototype with its drive system is now being tested at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS in Krakow. Here we present the design of the prototype and results of the performance tests of the structure and the drive and control system.

  2. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O. E-mail: habib.mazhari@emu.edu.tr

    2014-11-01

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  3. String Gas Cosmology and Non-Gaussianities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Yi Wang; Wei Xue; Robert Brandenberger

    2008-03-05

    Recently it has been shown that string gas cosmology, an alternative model of the very early universe which does not involve a period of cosmological inflation, can give rise to an almost scale invariant spectrum of metric perturbations. Here we calculate the non-Gaussianities of the spectrum of cosmological fluctuations in string gas cosmology, and find that these non-Gaussianities depend linearly on the wave number and that their amplitude depends sensitively on the string scale. If the string scale is at the TeV scale, string gas cosmology could lead to observable non-Gaussianities, if it is close to the Planck scale, then the non-Gaussianities on current cosmological scales are negligible.

  4. Optical Technology Needs for Future Space Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    , Visible, Near-IR, Far-IR, Sub-MM, Microwave, Radio Wave, Gravity Waves, etc. See Advanced Telescope / Spectroscopy (Vis-IR-FIR) Multi-Spectral Sensing (UV-Gamma) Laser / LIDAR Remote Sensing Microwave Instruments Structure #12;NASA's Science Missions Directorate Themes: Earth Science Sun-Solar System Connection Solar

  5. Dutch Open Telescope Virtual Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    telescope building. The DOT is open and is mounted on a 15 m high open tower to exploit the superior atmospheric seeing at La Palma brought by the oceanic trade wind. The clamshell bad-weather canopy is folded to feed the solar physics research by the small DOT group at Utrecht, but very much underexploits

  6. Cosmological Time Dilation in Gamma Ray Bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Band

    1994-07-01

    Norris et al. (1994) report that the temporal structure of faint gamma ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  7. A Medium Sized Schwarzschild-Couder Cherenkov Telescope Mechanical Design Proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrum, K; Benbow, W; Cameron, R; Criswell, S; Errando, M; Guarino, V; Kaaret, P; Kieda, D; Mukherjee, R; Naumann, D; Nieto, D; Northrop, R; Okumura, A; Roache, E; Rousselle, J; Schlenstedt, S; Sternberger, R; Vassiliev, V; Wakely, S; Zhao, H

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory. CTA will be implemented as southern and northern hemisphere arrays of tens of small, medium and large-sized imaging Cherenkov telescopes with the goal of improving the sensitivity over the current-generation experiments by an order of magnitude. CTA will provide energy coverage from ~20 GeV to more than 300 TeV. The Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) medium size (9.5m) telescopes will feature a novel aplanatic two-mirror optical design capable of accommodating a wide field-of-view with significantly improved angular resolution as compared to the traditional Davies-Cotton optical design. A full-scale prototype SC medium size telescope structure has been designed and will be constructed at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona during the fall of 2015. concentrate on the novel features of the design.

  8. Analysis of Thermal Conditions of the 6-m BTA Telescope Elements and the Telescope Dome Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emelianov, E V

    2015-01-01

    The results obtained using the temperature monitoring systems of the 6-m BTA telescope primary mirror, dome space, and external environment are reported. We consider the factors that affect the development of microturbulence in the near-mirror air layer and inside the dome space, variation of the telescope focal length with the temperature of its structures, variation of seeing due to temperature gradients inside the primary mirror of the 6-m telescope. The methods used in various observatories for reducing microturbulence are analyzed. We formulate suggestions concerning the improvement of the temperature monitoring system currently in operation and the system of automatic adjustment of the telescope focal length to compensate the thermal drift of the focus during observations.

  9. Detecting extended gamma-ray emission with the next generation Cherenkov telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, M Fernandez; Rovero, A C

    2015-01-01

    Very high energy (VHE $>$100 GeV) gamma rays coming from blazars can produce pairs when interacting with the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) and the Cosmic Microwave Background, generating an electromagnetic cascade. Depending on the Intergalactic Magnetic Field (IGMF) intensity, this cascade may result in an extended isotropic emission of photons around the source (halo), or in a broadening of the emission beam. The detection of these effects might lead to important constrains both on the IGMF intensity and the EBL density, quantities of great relevance in cosmological models. Using a Monte Carlo program, we simulate electromagnetic cascades for different values of the IGMF intensities and coming from a source similar to 1ES0229+200, a blazar with hard intrinsic spectrum at redshift $z=0.14$, which is an ideal distance for potentially observing the effect. We study the possible response of a generic future Cherenkov telescope using a simplified model for the sensitivity, effective area and angular resol...

  10. The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures...

  11. The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures ...

  12. The New Hampshire Astronomical Society Library Telescope Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The New Hampshire Astronomical Society Library Telescope Program The NHAS's Library Telescope are borrowed. Over the past three years NHAS has placed telescopes in nearly 30 New Hampshire libraries is a clinical social worker in private practice. Some may even recognize him as New Hampshire's most favorite

  13. Hubble Space Telescope characterized by using phase-retrieval algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fienup, James R.

    of the optical axis of a camera relay telescope relative to the main telescope. After we accounted for measured spherical aberration in the relay telescope,our estimate of the conicconstant of the primary mirror ofthe with the results of a blind test that was distributed to several groups. Section 4 describes some of the parameters

  14. Large fully retractable telescope enclosures still closable in strong wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    are too small to deteriorate the image in normal observing situations with wind speeds up to 20 mLarge fully retractable telescope enclosures still closable in strong wind Felix C.M. Bettonvil a the telescopes are in operation. The telescopes and enclosures also operate in hard wind. The prototypes

  15. AUTOMATIC GUIDING OF THE PRIMARY IMAGE OF SOLAR GREGORY TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTOMATIC GUIDING OF THE PRIMARY IMAGE OF SOLAR GREGORY TELESCOPES G. KÜVELER1, E. WIEHR2, D of solar Gregory telescopes is used for automatic guiding. This new system avoids temporal varying at the Gregory telescopes at Tenerife and at Locarno, is described. 1. Introduction Automatic guiding

  16. Modified Entropic Gravity and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Zumalacarregui

    2012-02-06

    It has been recently proposed that gravity might be an entropic force. Although a well defined fundamental description for such a mechanism is still lacking, it is still possible to address the viability of phenomenological models of entropic-inspired modified gravities. I will summarize some recent work directed to using cosmology as a tool to constraint scenarios in which the modifications are aimed to explain the physics behind dark energy and inflation. A phenomenological modification is able to explain cosmic acceleration at the background level and fit observations, but simple inflation models with higher curvature corrections are in conflict with late time matter domination.

  17. Cosmological Perturbations of Ultrarelativistic Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz

    1996-07-31

    Scalar cosmological perturbations of a weakly self-interacting plasma mixed with a perfect radiation fluid are investigated. Effects of this plasma are considered through order $\\lambda^{3/2}$ of perturbative thermal-field-theory in the radiation dominated universe. The breakdown of thermal perturbation theory at vastly subhorizon scales is circumvented by a Pad\\'e approximant solution. Compared to collisionless plasmas the phase speed and subhorizon damping of the plasma density perturbations are changed. An example for a self-interacting thermal field is provided by the neutrinos with effective 4-fermion interactions.

  18. Nucleosynthesis in slowly evolving Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pranav Kumar; Daksh Lohiya

    2008-02-08

    We explore aspects of Cosmological Nucleosynthesis in an FRW universe in which the scale factor evolves linearly with time: $a(t) \\sim t$. A high Lepton number density during the period when significant nucleosynthesis takes place would lead to a dominant screening of the Coulomb potential of colliding nucleii. This would lead to a significant enhancement of nucleosynthesis rates. We demonstrate how adequate amount of $^4He$ and a collataral metallicity, close to the lowest metallicity observed in metal poor Pop II stars and clouds, can be produced with such an evolution.

  19. Applications of Nash's Theorem to Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Maia

    2008-11-24

    The cosmological constant problem is seen as a symptom of the ambiguity of the Riemann curvature in general relativity. The solution of that ambiguity provided by Nash's theorem on gravitational perturbations along extra dimensions eliminate the direct comparison between the vacuum energy density and Einstein's cosmological constant, besides being compatible with the formation of structures and the accelerated expansion of the universe.

  20. Vacuum Fluctuations and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi Qi

    2006-04-29

    The hypothesis is proposed that under the approximation that the quantum equations of motion reduce to the classical ones, the quantum vacuum also reduces to the classical vacuum--the empty space. The vacuum energy of QED is studied under this hypothesis. A possible solution to the cosmological constant problem is provided and a kind of parameterization of the cosmological "constant" is derived.

  1. Cosmological birefringence induced by neutrino current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Q. Geng; S. H. Ho; J. N. Ng

    2007-11-29

    We review our recent work on the cosmological birefringence. We propose a new type of effective interactions in terms of the $CPT$-even dimension-six Chern-Simons-like term to generate the cosmological birefringence. We use the neutrino number asymmetry to induce a non-zero rotation polarization angle in the data of the cosmic microwave background radiation polarization.

  2. Cosmological electromagnetic fields and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Beltran Jimenez; Antonio L. Maroto

    2009-02-18

    We show that the presence of a temporal electromagnetic field on cosmological scales generates an effective cosmological constant which can account for the accelerated expansion of the universe. Primordial electromagnetic quantum fluctuations produced during electroweak scale inflation could naturally explain the presence of this field and also the measured value of the dark energy density. The behavior of the electromagnetic field on cosmological scales is found to differ from the well studied short-distance behavior and, in fact, the presence of a non-vanishing cosmological constant could be signalling the breakdown of gauge invariance on cosmological scales. The theory is compatible with all the local gravity tests, and is free from classical or quantum instabilities. Thus we see that, not only the true nature of dark energy can be established without resorting to new physics, but also the value of the cosmological constant finds a natural explanation in the context of standard inflationary cosmology. This mechanism could be discriminated from a true cosmological constant by upcoming observations of CMB anisotropies and large scale structure.

  3. An Alternative String Landscape Cosmology: Eliminating Bizarreness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clavelli, Louis J.

    An Alternative String Landscape Cosmology: Eliminating Bizarreness L. Clavelli and Gary R landscape models or whether there are scenarios in which it is avoided. If a viable alternative cosmology in mind that the alternative is not ruled out. In addition to being consistent with current observations

  4. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Reimer; P. F. Michelson; R. A. Cameron; S. W. Digel; D. J. Thompson; K. S. Wood

    2006-11-21

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  5. The Automated Palomar 60-Inch Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bradley Cenko; Derek B. Fox; Dae-Sik Moon; Fiona A. Harrison; S. R. Kulkarni; John R. Henning; C. Dani Guzman; Marco Bonati; Roger M. Smith; Robert P. Thicksten; Michael W. Doyle; Hal L. Petrie; Avishay Gal-Yam; Alicia M. Soderberg; Nathaniel L. Anagnostou; Anastasia C. Laity

    2006-08-15

    We have converted the Palomar 60-inch telescope (P60) from a classical night assistant-operated telescope to a fully robotic facility. The automated system, which has been operational since September 2004, is designed for moderately fast (t <~ 3 minutes) and sustained (R <~ 23 mag) observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows and other transient events. Routine queue-scheduled observations can be interrupted in response to electronic notification of transient events. An automated pipeline reduces data in real-time, which is then stored on a searchable web-based archive for ease of distribution. We describe here the design requirements, hardware and software upgrades, and lessons learned from roboticization. We present an overview of the current system performance as well as plans for future upgrades.

  6. Scrutinizing Exotic Cosmological Models Using ESSENCE Supernova...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    European Southern Observ. NOAO, Tucson Fermilab Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. Johns Hopkins U. Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek...

  7. Light propagation in inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleury, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The standard model of cosmology is based on the hypothesis that the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic. When interpreting most observations, this cosmological principle is applied stricto sensu: the light emitted by distant sources is assumed to propagate through a Friedmann-Lema\\^itre spacetime. The main goal of the present thesis was to evaluate how reliable this assumption is, especially when small scales are at stake. After having reviewed the laws of geometric optics in curved spacetime, and the standard interpretation of cosmological observables, the dissertation reports a comprehensive analysis of light propagation in Swiss-cheese models, designed to capture the clumpy character of the Universe. The resulting impact on the interpretation of the Hubble diagram is quantified, and shown to be relatively small, thanks to the cosmological constant. When applied to current supernova data, the associated corrections tend however to improve the agreement between the cosmological parameters inferre...

  8. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  9. The Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System A Proposal to Operate the Small Telescopes at CTIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) A Proposal to Operate the Small Observatory #12; The Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) ABSTRACT We propose to operate four telescopes located at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory (CTIO) for the period from

  10. Cosmological Hints of Modified Gravity ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleonora Di Valentino; Alessandro Melchiorri; Joseph Silk

    2015-09-24

    The recent measurements of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies made by the Planck satellite have provided impressive confirmation of the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. However interesting hints of slight deviations from $\\Lambda$CDM have been found, including a $95 \\%$ c.l. preference for a "modified gravity" structure formation scenario. In this paper we confirm the preference for a modified gravity scenario from Planck 2015 data, find that modified gravity solves the so-called $A_{lens}$ anomaly in the CMB angular spectrum, and constrains the amplitude of matter density fluctuations to $\\sigma_8=0.815_{-0.048}^{+0.032}$, in better agreement with weak lensing constraints. Moreover, we find a lower value for the reionization optical depth of $\\tau=0.059\\pm0.020$ (to be compared with the value of $\\tau= 0.079 \\pm 0.017$ obtained in the standard scenario), more consistent with recent optical and UV data. We check the stability of this result by considering possible degeneracies with other parameters, including the neutrino effective number, the running of the spectral index and the amount of primordial helium. The indication for modified gravity is still present at about $95\\%$ c.l., and could become more significant if lower values of $\\tau$ were to be further confirmed by future cosmological and astrophysical data.

  11. Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1995-11-29

    Statistical mechanical concepts and processes such as decoherence, correlation, and dissipation can prove to be of basic importance to understanding some fundamental issues of quantum cosmology and theoretical physics such as the choice of initial states, quantum to classical transition and the emergence of time. Here we summarize our effort in 1) constructing a unified theoretical framework using techniques in interacting quantum field theory such as influence functional and coarse-grained effective action to discuss the interplay of noise, fluctuation, dissipation and decoherence; and 2) illustrating how these concepts when applied to quantum cosmology can alter the conventional views on some basic issues. Two questions we address are 1) the validity of minisuperspace truncation, which is usually assumed without proof in most discussions, and 2) the relevance of specific initial conditions, which is the prevailing view of the past decade. We also mention how some current ideas in chaotic dynamics, dissipative collective dynamics and complexity can alter our view of the quantum nature of the universe.

  12. Development of a mid-sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.

    2012-06-28

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a ground-based observatory for very high-energy (10 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays, planned for operation starting in 2018. It will be an array of dozens of optical telescopes, known as Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs), of 8 m to 24 m diameter, deployed over an area of more than 1 square km, to detect flashes of Cherenkov light from showers initiated in the Earth's atmosphere by gamma rays. CTA will have improved angular resolution, a wider energy range, larger fields of view and an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over current ACT arrays such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Several institutions have proposed a research and development program to eventually contribute 36 medium-sized telescopes (9 m to 12 m diameter) to CTA to enhance and optimize its science performance. The program aims to construct a prototype of an innovative, Schwarzschild-Couder telescope (SCT) design that will allow much smaller and less expensive cameras and much larger fields of view than conventional Davies-Cotton designs, and will also include design and testing of camera electronics for the necessary advances in performance, reliability and cost. We report on the progress of the mid-sized SCT development program.

  13. Second Einstein Telescope Mock Data and Science Challenge: Low Frequency Binary Neutron Star Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meacher, Duncan; Hanna, Chad; Regimbau, Tania; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2015-01-01

    The Einstein Telescope is a conceived third generation gravitational-wave detector that is envisioned to be an order of magnitude more sensitive than advanced LIGO, Virgo and Kagra, which would be able to detect gravitational-wave signals from the coalescence of compact objects with waveforms starting as low as 1Hz. With this level of sensitivity, we expect to detect sources at cosmological distances. In this paper we introduce an improved method for the generation of mock data and analyse it with a new low latency compact binary search pipeline called gstlal. We present the results from this analysis with a focus on low frequency analysis of binary neutron stars. Despite compact binary coalescence signals lasting hours in the Einstein Telescope sensitivity band when starting at 5 Hz, we show that we are able to discern various overlapping signals from one another. We also determine the detection efficiency for each of the analysis runs conducted and and show a proof of concept method for estimating the numbe...

  14. Contrasting formulations of cosmological perturbations in a magnetic FLRW cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hector J. Hortua; Leonardo Castañeda

    2015-11-19

    In this paper we contrasted two cosmological perturbation theory formalisms, the 1+3 covariant gauge invariant and the gauge invariant by comparing their gauge invariant variables associated with magnetic field defined in each approach. In the first part we give an introduction to each formalism assuming the presence of a magnetic field. We found that gauge invariant quantities defined by 1+3 covariant approach are related with spatial variations of the magnetic field (defined in the gauge invariant formalism) between two closed fundamental observers. This relation was computed by choosing the comoving gauge in the gauge invariant approach in a magnetized universe. Furthermore, we have derived the gauge transformations for electromagnetic potentials in the gauge invariant approach and the Maxwell's equations have been written in terms of these potentials.

  15. Loop quantum cosmology and the fate of cosmological singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Parampreet

    2015-01-01

    Singularities in general relativity such as the big bang and big crunch, and exotic singularities such as the big rip are the boundaries of the classical spacetimes. These events are marked by a divergence in the curvature invariants and the breakdown of the geodesic evolution. Recent progress on implementing techniques of loop quantum gravity to cosmological models reveals that such singularities may be generically resolved because of the quantum gravitational effects. Due to the quantum geometry, which replaces the classical differential geometry at the Planck scale, the big bang is replaced by a big bounce without any assumptions on the matter content or any fine tuning. In this manuscript, we discuss some of the main features of this approach and the results on the generic resolution of singularities for the isotropic as well as anisotropic models. Using effective spacetime description of the quantum theory, we show the way quantum gravitational effects lead to the universal bounds on the energy density, ...

  16. Stochastic cosmology, theories of perturbations and Lifshitz gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalatnikov, I M

    2015-01-01

    We review some works of E M Lifshitz connected with gravity and cosmology and also some later works, connected with his ideas. The main topics of this review are the stochastic cosmology of an anisotropic universe and of an isotropic universe with the scalar field, the quasi-isotropic (gradient) expansion in cosmology and Horava-Lifshitz gravity and cosmology.

  17. Primordial Magnetic Fields in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain A. Brown

    2008-12-09

    Magnetic fields have been observed in galaxies, clusters of galaxies and probably in superclusters. While mechanisms exist to generate these in the late universe, it is possible that magnetic fields have existed since very early times. This thesis is concerned with methods to predict the form of such imprints. We review in detail a standard, linearised cosmology before introducing an electromagnetic field. We then consider the intrinsic statistics of the magnetic stresses in two ways, analytically and via static realisations. We construct the power spectra, some of which we present for the first time. At the one- and three-point level we find significant intrinsic non-Gaussianities. Finally we turn to the observable impacts a primordial magnetic field. Assuming coherence, the statistics of the source can be mapped onto the CMB in a simple manner. We demonstrate that our approach is valid by reproducing the signals for Gaussian power law fields on the microwave sky. [ABRIDGED

  18. Neutrino mass in cosmology: status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yvonne Y. Y. Wong

    2011-11-06

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrino masses in cosmology, focussing on the role they play in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the large-scale matter distribution can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future, as well as recent advances in the computation of the nonlinear matter power spectrum and related observables.

  19. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatión, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  20. Review of the Solar Array Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Smith

    2006-08-11

    For several years the only experiments sensitive to astrophysical gamma rays with energies beyond the reach of EGRET but below that of the Cherenkov imaging telescopes have been the "solar tower" detectors. They use >2000 m2 mirror areas to sample the Cherenkov wavefront generated by <100 GeV gamma rays, obtaining Crab sensitivities of more than 6$\\sigma$ in one ON-source hour. I will review the history of the solar tower Cherenkov experiments from 1992 to the present and their key design features. I will describe some successful analysis strategies, then summarize the principal results obtained.

  1. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ?1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  2. Spectral Gamma-ray Signatures of Cosmological Dark Matter Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Joakim Edsjo; Piero Ullio

    2001-12-13

    We propose a new signature for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter, a spectral feature in the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray radiation. This feature, a sudden drop of the gamma-ray intensity at an energy corresponding to the WIMP mass, comes from the asymmetric distortion of the line due to WIMP annihilation into two gamma-rays caused by the cosmological redshift. Unlike other proposed searches for a line signal, this method is not very sensitive to the exact dark matter density distribution in halos and subhalos. The only requirement is that the mass distribution of substructure on small scales follows approximately the Press-Schechter law, and that smaller halos are on the average denser than large halos, which is a generic outcome of N-body simulations of Cold Dark Matter, and which has observational support. The upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be eminently suited to search for these spectral features. For numerical examples, we use rates computed for supersymmetric particle dark matter, where a detectable signal is possible.

  3. Fake conformal symmetry in conformal cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pi, So-Young

    We examine the local conformal invariance (Weyl invariance) in tensor-scalar theories used in recently proposed conformal cosmological models. We show that the Noether currents associated with Weyl invariance in these ...

  4. An Issue to the Cosmological Constant Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Triay

    2005-04-07

    According to general relativity, the present analysis shows on geometrical grounds that the cosmological constant problem is an artifact due to the unfounded link of this fundamental constant to vacuum energy density of quantum fluctuations.

  5. Cosmology of hidden sector with Higgs portal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabi, Serkan

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we are investigating cosmological implications of hidden sector models which involve scalar fields that do not interact with the Standard Model gauge interactions, but couple directly to the Higgs field. ...

  6. Primordial nucleosynthesis: A cosmological point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, G. J.; Kusakabe, M.; Cheoun, M.-K.

    2014-05-09

    Primordial nucleosynthesis remains as one of the pillars of modern cosmology. It is the test-ing ground upon which all cosmological models must ultimately rest. It is our only probe of the universe during the first few minutes of cosmic expansion and in particular during the important radiation-dominated epoch. These lectures review the basic equations of space-time, cosmology, and big bang nucleosynthesis. We will then review the current state of observational constraints on primordial abundances along with the key nuclear reactions and their uncertainties. We summarize which nuclear measure-ments are most crucial during the big bang. We also review various cosmological models and their constraints. In particular, we summarize the constraints that big bang nucleosynthesis places upon the possible time variation of fundamental constants, along with constraints on the nature and origin of dark matter and dark energy, long-lived supersymmetric particles, gravity waves, and the primordial magnetic field.

  7. Dimensionless constants, cosmology and other dark matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Tegmark; Anthony Aguirre; Martin J Rees; Frank Wilczek

    2006-01-11

    We identify 31 dimensionless physical constants required by particle physics and cosmology, and emphasize that both microphysical constraints and selection effects might help elucidate their origin. Axion cosmology provides an instructive example, in which these two kinds of arguments must both be taken into account, and work well together. If a Peccei-Quinn phase transition occurred before or during inflation, then the axion dark matter density will vary from place to place with a probability distribution. By calculating the net dark matter halo formation rate as a function of all four relevant cosmological parameters and assessing other constraints, we find that this probability distribution, computed at stable solar systems, is arguably peaked near the observed dark matter density. If cosmologically relevant WIMP dark matter is discovered, then one naturally expects comparable densities of WIMPs and axions, making it important to follow up with precision measurements to determine whether WIMPs account for all of the dark matter or merely part of it.

  8. Cosmology on the Beach: Kendrick Smith

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  9. Nonsingular cosmology from evolutionary quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Cianfrani; Giovanni Montani; Fabrizio Pittorino

    2014-10-30

    We provide a cosmological implementation of the evolutionary quantum gravity, describing an isotropic Universe, in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and a massive (preinflationary) scalar field. We demonstrate that the considered Universe has a nonsingular quantum behavior, associated to a primordial bounce, whose ground state has a high occupation number. Furthermore, in such a vacuum state, the super-Hamiltonian eigenvalue is negative, corresponding to a positive emerging dust energy density. The regularization of the model is performed via a polymer quantum approach to the Universe scale factor and the proper classical limit is then recovered, in agreement with a preinflationary state of the Universe. Since the dust energy density is redshifted by the Universe deSitter phase and the cosmological constant does not enter the ground state eigenvalue, we get a late-time cosmology, compatible with the present observations, endowed with a turning point in the far future.

  10. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: David Hughes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Hughes

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  11. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Anne Green

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ann Green

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.  

  12. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Simon White

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  13. Cosmology on the Beach - George Smoot

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  14. Cosmological applications of weak gravitational flexion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Barnaby Thomas Peter

    Modern cosmology has reached an important juncture, at which the ability to make measurements of unprecedented accuracy has led to conclusions that are a fundamental challenge to natural science. The discovery that, in ...

  15. Conformally Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01

    In a universe where, according to the standard cosmological models, some 97% of the total mass-energy is still "missing in action" it behooves us to spend at least a little effort critically assessing and exploring radical alternatives. Among possible, (dare we say plausible), nonstandard but superficially viable models, those spacetimes conformal to the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker class of cosmological models play a very special role --- these models have the unique and important property of permitting large non-perturbative geometric deviations from Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology without unacceptably distorting the cosmic microwave background. Performing a "cosmographic" analysis, (that is, temporarily setting aside the Einstein equations, since the question of whether or not the Einstein equations are valid on galactic and cosmological scales is essentially the same question as whether or not dark matter/dark energy actually exist), and using both supernova data and informat...

  16. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kuster; H. Bräuninger; S. Cébrian; M. Davenport; C. Elefteriadis; J. Englhauser; H. Fischer; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; F. H. Heinsius; D. H. H. Hoffmann; G. Hoffmeister; J. N. Joux; D. Kang; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; T. Papaevangelou; C. Lasseur; A. Lippitsch; G. Lutz; J. Morales; A. Rodríguez; L. Strüder; J. Vogel; K. Zioutas

    2007-05-10

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100~MeV--300~GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4 sigma significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 232 sources are considered as identifie...

  18. Primordial nucleosynthesis in higher dimensional cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Chatterjee

    2009-11-13

    We investigate nucleosynthesis and element formation in the early universe in the framework of higher dimensional cosmology. For this purpose we utilize a previous solution of the present author, which may be termed as the generalized Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model. We find that temperature decays less rapidly in higher dimensional cosmology, which we believe may have nontrivial consequences \\emph{vis-a-vis} primordial physics.

  19. Quasi-local energy for cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang-Mei Chen; Jian-Liang Liu; James M. Nester

    2007-05-15

    First we briefly review our covariant Hamiltonian approach to quasi-local energy, noting that the Hamiltonian-boundary-term quasi-local energy expressions depend on the chosen boundary conditions and reference configuration. Then we present the quasi-local energy values resulting from the formalism applied to homogeneous Bianchi cosmologies. Finally we consider the quasi-local energies of the FRW cosmologies. Our results do not agree with certain widely accepted quasi-local criteria.

  20. Gravitational particle production in bouncing cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Haro; Emilio Elizalde

    2015-09-03

    It is argued that the Universe reheating in bouncing cosmologies could be explained via gravitational particle production, as due to a sudden phase transition in the contracting regime. To this end, it is shown that gravitational production of massive particles conformally coupled with gravity in a matter-ekpyrotic bouncing Universe, where the sudden phase transition occurs in the contracting regime, yields a reheating temperature which is in good agreement with cosmological observations.

  1. $O(d,d)$-Covariant String Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gasperini; G. Veneziano

    1991-12-17

    The recently discovered $O(d,d)$ symmetry of the space of slowly varying cosmological string vacua in $d+1$ dimensions is shown to be preserved in the presence of bulk string matter. The existence of $O(d,d)$ conserved currents allows all the equations of string cosmology to be reduced to first-order differential equations. The perfect-fluid approximation is not $O(d,d)$-invariant, implying that stringy fluids possess in general a non-vanishing viscosity.

  2. The University of Durham Mark 6 VHE gamma ray telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, P. M.; Dickinson, M. R.; Dipper, N. A.; Holder, J.; Kendall, T. R.; McComb, T. J. L.; Orford, K. J.; Rayner, S. M.; Roberts, I. D.; Shaw, S. E.; Turver, K. E.

    1997-05-10

    The operation of the University of Durham Mark 6 atmospheric Cerenkov telescope is discussed. The telescope has been used to detect gamma rays at energies {>=}150 GeV and to achieve good discrimination between gamma ray and hadron initiated showers, using both conventional imaging and novel fluctuation measures. The telescope was commissioned in 1995 and a description of its operation is presented. Verification of the performance during observations of PSR B1706-44 is described.

  3. Loop quantum cosmology and the fate of cosmological singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parampreet Singh

    2015-09-30

    Singularities in general relativity such as the big bang and big crunch, and exotic singularities such as the big rip are the boundaries of the classical spacetimes. These events are marked by a divergence in the curvature invariants and the breakdown of the geodesic evolution. Recent progress on implementing techniques of loop quantum gravity to cosmological models reveals that such singularities may be generically resolved because of the quantum gravitational effects. Due to the quantum geometry, which replaces the classical differential geometry at the Planck scale, the big bang is replaced by a big bounce without any assumptions on the matter content or any fine tuning. In this manuscript, we discuss some of the main features of this approach and the results on the generic resolution of singularities for the isotropic as well as anisotropic models. Using effective spacetime description of the quantum theory, we show the way quantum gravitational effects lead to the universal bounds on the energy density, the Hubble rate and the anisotropic shear. We discuss the geodesic completeness in the effective spacetime and the resolution of all of the strong singularities. It turns out that despite the bounds on energy density and the Hubble rate, there can be divergences in the curvature invariants. However such events are geodesically extendible, with tidal forces not strong enough to cause inevitable destruction of the in-falling objects.

  4. Cosmological Constraints from Hubble Parameter on f(R) Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. C. Carvalho; E. M. Santos; J. S. Alcaniz; J. Santos

    2008-11-10

    Modified $f(R)$ gravity in the Palatini approach has been presently applied to Cosmology as a realistic alternative to dark energy. In this concern, a number of authors have searched for observational constraints on several $f(R)$ gravity functional forms using mainly data of type Ia supenovae (SNe Ia), Cosmic Microwave Background ({\\rm CMB}) radiation and Large Scale Structure ({\\rm LSS}). In this paper, by considering a homogeneous and isotropic flat universe, we use determinations of the Hubble function $H(z)$, which are based on differential age method, to place bounds on the free parameters of the $f(R) = R - \\beta/R^{n}$ functional form. We also combine the $H(z)$ data with constraints from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations ({\\rm BAO}) and {\\rm CMB} measurements, obtaining ranges of values for $n$ and $\\beta$ in agreement with other independent analyses. We find that, for some intervals of $n$ and $\\beta$, models based on $f(R) = R - \\beta/R^{n}$ gravity in the Palatini approach, unlike the metric formalism, can produce the sequence of radiation-dominated, matter-dominated, and accelerating periods without need of dark energy.

  5. The Robotic Super-LOTIS Telescope: Results & Future Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Williams; P. A. Milne; H. S. Park; S. D. Barthelmy; D. H. Hartmann; A. Updike; K. Hurley

    2008-02-29

    We provide an overview of the robotic Super-LOTIS (Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System) telescope and present results from gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow observations using Super-LOTIS and other Steward Observatory telescopes. The 0.6-m Super-LOTIS telescope is a fully robotic system dedicated to the measurement of prompt and early time optical emission from GRBs. The system began routine operations from its Steward Observatory site atop Kitt Peak in April 2000 and currently operates every clear night. The telescope is instrumented with an optical CCD camera and a four position filter wheel. It is capable of observing Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) error boxes as early or earlier than the Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Super-LOTIS complements the UVOT observations by providing early R- and I-band imaging. We also use the suite of Steward Observatory telescopes including the 1.6-m Kuiper, the 2.3-m Bok, the 6.5-m MMT, and the 8.4-m Large Binocular Telescope to perform follow-up optical and near infrared observations of GRB afterglows. These follow-up observations have traditionally required human intervention but we are currently working to automate the 1.6-m Kuiper telescope to minimize its response time.

  6. A generation of astronomical telescopes, their users, and publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2010-01-01

    optical telescopes. Publications of the Astronomical Society737. Abt, H. A. (2009). Publications of the Astronomicaltelescopes, their users, and publications Table 3 Papers and

  7. Early science with the large millimeter telescope: exploring...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Early science with the large millimeter telescope: exploring the effect of AGN activity on the relationships between molecular gas, dust, and star formation Citation Details...

  8. SIMULATION STUDY OF BACKGROUND PARTICLES IN THE MUON TELESCOPE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIMULATION STUDY OF BACKGROUND PARTICLES IN THE MUON TELESCOPE DETECTOR AT THE STAR EXPERIMENT Matthew Breen Thanks to Dr. Mioduszewski and Yanfang Liu Overview Background ...

  9. Spectral Energy Distribution of Radio Sources in Nearby Clusters of Galaxies: Implications for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen-Ting Lin; Bruce Partridge; J. C. Pober; Khadija El Bouchefry; Sarah Burke; Jonathan Klein; Joseph Coish; Kevin Huffenberger

    2009-04-04

    To explore the high frequency radio spectra of galaxies in clusters, we used NRAO's Very Large Array at four frequencies, 4.9-43 GHz, to observe 139 galaxies in low redshift (z22 GHz, implying a higher flux than would be expected from an extrapolation of the lower frequency flux measurements. Our results quantify the need for careful source subtraction in increasingly sensitive measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in clusters of galaxies (as currently being conducted by, for instance, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope groups).

  10. Cosmological Hints of Modified Gravity ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Silk, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The recent measurements of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies made by the Planck satellite have provided impressive confirmation of the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. However interesting hints of slight deviations from $\\Lambda$CDM have been found, including a $95 \\%$ c.l. preference for a "modified gravity" structure formation scenario. In this paper we confirm the preference for a modified gravity scenario from Planck 2015 data, find that modified gravity solves the so-called $A_{lens}$ anomaly in the CMB angular spectrum, and constrains the amplitude of matter density fluctuations to $\\sigma_8=0.815_{-0.048}^{+0.032}$, in better agreement with weak lensing constraints. Moreover, we find a lower value for the reionization optical depth of $\\tau=0.059\\pm0.020$ (to be compared with the value of $\\tau= 0.079 \\pm 0.017$ obtained in the standard scenario), more consistent with recent optical and UV data. We check the stability of this result by considering possible degeneraci...

  11. The ART of Cosmological Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Gottloeber; Anatoly Klypin

    2008-03-31

    We describe the basic ideas of MPI parallelization of the N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code. The code uses self-adaptive domain decomposition where boundaries of the domains (parallelepipeds) constantly move -- with many degrees of freedom -- in the search of the minimum of CPU time. The actual CPU time spent by each MPI task on previous time-step is used to adjust boundaries for the next time-step. For a typical decomposition of 5^3 domains, the number of possible changes in boundaries is 3^{84}. We describe two algorithms of finding minimum of CPU time for configurations with a large number of domains. Each MPI task in our code solves the N-body problem where the large-scale distribution of matter outside of the boundaries of a domain is represented by relatively few temporary large particles created by other domains. At the beginning of a zero-level time-step, domains create and exchange large particles. Then each domain advances all its particles for many small time-steps. At the end of the large step, the domains decide where to place new boundaries and re-distribute particles. The scheme requires little communications between processors and is very efficient for large cosmological simulations.

  12. Cosmology with Strong Lensing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shuo; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 118 strong gravitational lensing systems from SLACS, BELLS, LSD and SL2S surveys and use them to constrain the cosmic equation of state. In particular we consider two cases of dark energy phenomenology: $XCDM$ model where dark energy is modeled by a fluid with constant $w$ equation of state parameter and in Chevalier - Polarski - Linder (CPL) parametrization where $w$ is allowed to evolve with redshift: $w(z) = w_0 + w_1 \\frac{z}{1+z}$. We assume spherically symmetric mass distribution in lensing galaxies, but relax the rigid assumption of SIS model in favor to more general power-law index $\\gamma$, also allowing it to evolve with redshifts $\\gamma(z)$. Our results for the $XCDM$ cosmology show the agreement with values (concerning both $w$ and $\\gamma$ parameters) obtained by other authors. We go further and constrain the CPL parameters jointly with $\\gamma(z)$. The resulting confidence regions for the parameters are much better than those obtained with a similar metho...

  13. Initial data for rotating cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Bizo?; Stefan Pletka; Walter Simon

    2015-08-28

    We revisit the construction of maximal initial data on compact manifolds in vacuum with positive cosmological constant via the conformal method. We discuss, extend and apply recent results of Hebey et al. [19] and Premoselli [31] which yield existence, non-existence, (non-)uniqueness and (linearisation-) stability of solutions of the Lichnerowicz equation, depending on its coefficients. We then focus on so-called $(t,\\phi)$-symmetric data as "seed manifolds", and in particular on Bowen-York data on the round hypertorus $\\mathbb{S}^2 \\times \\mathbb{S}$ (a slice of Nariai) and on Kerr-deSitter. In the former case, we clarify the bifurcation structure of the axially symmetric solutions of the Lichnerowicz equation in terms of the angular momentum as bifurcation parameter, using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. As to the latter example, we show how dynamical data can be constructed in a natural way via conformal rescalings of Kerr-deSitter data.

  14. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  15. Observational constraints and cosmological parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2006-04-02

    I discuss the extraction of cosmological parameter constraints from the recent WMAP 3-year data, both on its own and in combination with other data. The large degeneracies in the first year data can be largely broken with the third year data, giving much better parameter constraints from WMAP alone. The polarization constraint on the optical depth is crucial to obtain the main results, including n_s < 1 in basic six-parameter models. Almost identical constraints can also be obtained using only temperature data with a prior on the optical depth. I discuss the modelling of secondaries when extracting parameter constraints, and show that the effect of CMB lensing is about as important as SZ and slightly increases the inferred value of the spectral index. Constraints on correlated matter isocurvature modes are not radically better than before, and the data is consistent with a purely adiabatic spectrum. Combining WMAP 3-year data with data from the Lyman-alpha forest suggests somewhat higher values for sigma_8 than from WMAP alone.

  16. Initial data for rotating cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Bizo?; Stefan Pletka; Walter Simon

    2015-06-09

    We revisit the construction of maximal initial data on compact manifolds in vacuum with positive cosmological constant via the conformal method. We discuss, extend and apply recent results of Hebey et al. [19] and Premoselli [31] which yield existence, non-existence, (non-)uniqueness and (linearisation-) stability of solutions of the Lichnerowicz equation, depending on its coefficients. We then focus on so-called $(t,\\phi)$-symmetric data as "seed manifolds", and in particular on Bowen-York data on the round hypertorus $\\mathbb{S}^2 \\times \\mathbb{S}$ (a slice of Nariai) and on Kerr-deSitter. In the former case, we clarify the bifurcation structure of the axially symmetric solutions of the Lichnerowicz equation in terms of the angular momentum as bifurcation parameter, using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. As to the latter example, we show how dynamical data can be constructed in a natural way via conformal rescalings of Kerr-deSitter data.

  17. Liquid Mirror Telescopes: A progress report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ermanno F. Borra; Marc Ferrari; Luc Girard; Gilberto Moretto; Gregoire Tremblay; Gerard Lemaitre

    1996-08-23

    We review the present status of liquid mirror telescopes. Interferometric tests of liquid mirrors (the largest one having a diameter of 2.5 meters ) show excellent optical qualities. The basic technology is now sufficiently reliable that it can be put to work. Indeed, a handful of liquid mirrors have now been built that are used for scientific work. A 3.7-m diameter LMT is presently being built in the new Laval upgraded testing facilities. Construction of the mirror can be followed on the Web site: http://astrosun.phy.ulaval.ca/lmt/lmt- home.html. Finally we address the issue of the field accessible to LMTs equipped with novel optical correctors. Optical design work, and some exploratory laboratory work, indicate that a single LMT should be able to access, with excellent images, small regions anywhere inside fields as large as 45 degrees.

  18. The AMiBA Hexapod Telescope Mount

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Patrick M; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Jiang, Homin; Lin, Kai-Yang; Umetsu, Keiichi; Huang, Yau-De; Raffin, Philippe; Chen, Ke-Jung; Ibanez-Romano, Fabiola; Chereau, Guillaume; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T P; Pausch, Konrad; Willmeroth, Klaus; Altamirano, Pablo; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Han, Chih-Chiang; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Liu, Guo-Chin; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Wei, Ta-Shun; Birkinshaw, Mark; Lancaster, Katy; Lo, Kwok Yung; Martin, Robert N; Molnar, Sandor M; Patt, Ferdinand; Romeo, Bob

    2009-01-01

    AMiBA is the largest hexapod astronomical telescope in current operation. We present a description of this novel hexapod mount with its main mechanical components -- the support cone, universal joints, jack screws, and platform -- and outline the control system with the pointing model and the operating modes that are supported. The AMiBA hexapod mount performance is verified based on optical pointing tests and platform photogrammetry measurements. The photogrammetry results show that the deformations in the inner part of the platform are less than 120 micron rms. This is negligible for optical pointing corrections, radio alignment and radio phase errors for the currently operational 7-element compact configuration. The optical pointing error in azimuth and elevation is successively reduced by a series of corrections to about 0.4 arcmin rms which meets our goal for the 7-element target specifications.

  19. Using SPICA Space Telescope to characterize Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Goicoechea; B. Swinyard; G. Tinetti; T. Nakagawa; K. Enya; M. Tamura; M. Ferlet; K. G. Isaak; M. Wyatt; A. D. Aylward; M. Barlow; J. P. Beaulieu; A. Boccaletti; J. Cernicharo; J. Cho; R. Claudi; H. Jones; H. Lammer; A. Leger; J. Martín-Pintado; S. Miller; F. Najarro; D. Pinfield; J. Schneider; F. Selsis; D. M. Stam; J. Tennyson; S. Viti; G. White

    2008-09-15

    We present the 3.5m SPICA space telescope, a proposed Japanese-led JAXA-ESA mission scheduled for launch around 2017. The actively cooled ( 18 um). SPICA is one of the few space missions selected to go to the next stage of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 selection process. In this White Paper we present the main specifications of the three instruments currently baselined for SPICA: a mid-infrared (MIR) coronagraph (~3.5 to ~27 um) with photometric and spectral capabilities (R~200), a MIR wide-field camera and high resolution spectrometer (R~30,000), and a far-infrared (FIR ~30 to ~210 um) imaging spectrometer - SAFARI - led by a European consortium. We discuss their capabilities in the context of MIR direct observations of exo-planets (EPs) and multiband photometry/high resolution spectroscopy observations of transiting exo-planets. We conclude that SPICA will be able to characterize the atmospheres of transiting exo-planets down to the super-Earth size previously detected by ground- or space-based observatories. It will also directly detect and characterize Jupiter/Neptune-size planets orbiting at larger separation from their parent star (>5-10 AU), by performing quantitative atmospheric spectroscopy and studying proto-planetary and debris disks. In addition, SPICA will be a scientific and technological precursor for future, more ambitious, IR space missions for exo-planet direct detection as it will, for example, quantify the prevalence exo-zodiacal clouds in planetary systems and test coronographic techniques, cryogenic systems and lightweight, high quality telescopes. (abridged)

  20. Flasher and muon-based calibration of the GCT telescopes proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Anthony M; Chadwick, Paula M; Daniel, Michael; White, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The GCT is a dual-mirror Small-Sized-Telescope prototype proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. Calibration of the GCT's camera is primarily achieved with LED-based flasher units capable of producing $\\sim4$ ns FWHM pulses of 400 nm light across a large dynamic range, from 0.1 up to 1000 photoelectrons. The flasher units are housed in the four corners of the camera's focal plane and illuminate it via reflection from the secondary mirror. These flasher units are adaptable to allow several calibration scenarios to be accomplished: camera flat-fielding, linearity measurements (up to and past saturation), and gain estimates from both single pe measurements and from the photon statistics at various high illumination levels. In these proceedings, the performance of the GCT flashers is described, together with ongoing simulation work to quantify the efficiency of using muon rings as an end-to-end calibration for the optical throughput of the GCT.

  1. Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fienup, James R.

    Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes Samuel T. Thurman and James R Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 Abstract: Fourier spectroscopy can be performed with multi Society of America OCIS codes: (300.6300) Spectroscopy, Fourier transforms; (110.6770) Telescopes; (120

  2. Representations and image classification methods for Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malagon, C.; Parcerisa, D. S.; Barrio, J. A.; Nieto, D.

    2008-05-29

    The problem of identifying gamma ray events out of charged cosmic ray background (so called hadrons) in Cherenkov telescopes is one of the key problems in VHE gamma ray astronomy. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to this problem by implementing different classifiers relying on the information of each pixel of the camera of a Cherenkov telescope.

  3. VERITAS: Very LArge Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Weekes; C. Akerlof; S. Biller; A. C. Breslin; J. H. Buckley; D. A. Carter-Lewis; M. Catanese; M. F. Cawley; B. Dingus; G. G. Fazio; D. J. Fegan; J. Finley; G. Fishman; J. Gaidos; G. H. Gillanders; P. Gorham; J. E. Grindlay; A. M. Hillas; J. Huchra; P. Kaaret; M. Kertzman; D. Kieda; F. Krennrich; R. C. Lamb; M. J. Lang; A. P. Marscher; S. Matz; T. McKay; D. Muller; R. Ong; W. Purcell; J. Rose; G. Sembroski; F. D. Seward; P. Slane; S. Swordy; T. Tumer; M. Ulmer; M. Urban; B. J. Wilkes

    1997-06-15

    A next generation atmospheric Cherenkov observatory is described based on the Whipple Observatory $\\gamma$-ray telescope. A total of nine such imaging telescopes will be deployed in an array that will permit the maximum versatility and give high sensitivity in the 50 GeV - 50 TeV band (with maximum sensitivity from 100 GeV to 10 TeV).

  4. VERITAS The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekes, T C; Biller, S D; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; Dingus, B L; Fazio, G G; Fegan, D J; Finley, J; Fishman, G; Gaidos, J A; Gillanders, G H; Gorham, P W; Grindlay, J E; Hillas, A M; Huchra, J P; Kaaret, P E; Kertzman, M P; Kieda, D B; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Lang, M J; Marscher, A P; Matz, S; McKay, T; Müller, D; Ong, R; Purcell, W; Rose, J; Sembroski, G H; Seward, F D; Slane, P O; Swordy, S P; Tümer, T O; Ulmer, M P; Urban, M; Wilkes, B J

    1997-01-01

    A next generation atmospheric Cherenkov observatory is described based on the Whipple Observatory $\\gamma$-ray telescope. A total of nine such imaging telescopes will be deployed in an array that will permit the maximum versatility and give high sensitivity in the 50 GeV - 50 TeV band (with maximum sensitivity from 100 GeV to 10 TeV).

  5. Rapid GRB Followup with the 2m Robotic Liverpool Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomboc, Andreja

    Rapid GRB Follow­up with the 2­m Robotic Liverpool Telescope Andreja Gomboc #,+ , Michael F. Bode. We present the capabilities of the 2­m robotic Liverpool Telescope (LT), owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University and situated at ORM, La Palma. Robotic control and scheduling of the LT

  6. Collecting Light with Telescopes Two Fundamentally Different Spectral Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    ;Observing problems due to Earth's atmosphere 1. Light Pollution #12;Star viewed with ground-based telescope. · Location/technology can help overcome light pollution and turbulence. · Nothing short of going to space canCollecting Light with Telescopes #12;Two Fundamentally Different Spectral Mechanisms Spectral lines

  7. Adaptive Optics at the Subaru Telescope: current capabilities and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyon, Olivier

    Adaptive Optics at the Subaru Telescope: current capabilities and development Olivier Guyona Barbara, CA 93106, USA ABSTRACT Adaptive optics is a key component of Subaru Telescope's current-limited images in near-IR. In its LGS mode, laser light is transported from the solid state laser to the launch

  8. Silicon Photomultiplier Research and Development Studies for the Large Size Telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rando, Riccardo; Dazzi, Francesco; De Angelis, Alessandro; Dettlaff, Antonios; Dorner, Daniela; Fink, David; Fouque, Nadia; Grundner, Felix; Haberer, Werner; Hahn, Alexander; Hermel, Richard; Korpar, Samo; Mezek, Gašper Kukec; Maier, Ronald; Manea, Christian; Mariotti, Mosè; Mazin, Daniel; Mehrez, Fatima; Mirzoyan, Razmik; Podkladkin, Sergey; Reichardt, Ignasi; Rhode, Wolfgang; Rosier, Sylvie; Schultz, Cornelia; Stella, Carlo; Teshima, Masahiro; Wetteskind, Holger; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the the next generation facility of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes; two sites will cover both hemispheres. CTA will reach unprecedented sensitivity, energy and angular resolution in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. Each CTA array will include four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), designed to cover the low-energy range of the CTA sensitivity ($\\sim$20 GeV to 200 GeV). In the baseline LST design, the focal-plane camera will be instrumented with 265 photodetector clusters; each will include seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with an entrance window of 1.5 inches in diameter. The PMT design is based on mature and reliable technology. Recently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging as a competitor. Currently, SiPMs have advantages (e.g. lower operating voltage and tolerance to high illumination levels) and disadvantages (e.g. higher capacitance and cross talk rates), but this technology is still young and rapidly evolving. SiPM technology has a strong pot...

  9. Cosmological constraints on superconducting dark energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltán Keresztes; László Á. Gergely; Tiberiu Harko; Shi-Dong Liang

    2015-09-01

    We consider cosmological tests of a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy is included in the total action through a gauge invariant, electromagnetic type contribution. The ground state of dark energy, corresponding to a constant potential $V$ is a Bose-Einstein type condensate with spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry. In another words dark energy appears as a massive vector field emerging from a superposition of a massless vector and a scalar field, the latter corresponding to the Goldstone boson. Two particular cosmological models, corresponding to pure electric and pure magnetic type potentials, respectively are confronted with Type IA Supernovae and Hubble parameter data. In the electric case good fit is obtained along a narrow inclined stripe in the $\\Omega _{m}-\\Omega _{V}$ parameter plane, which includes the $\\Lambda $CDM limit. The other points on this admissible region represent superconducting dark energy as a sum of a cosmological constant and a time-evolving contribution. In the magnetic case the cosmological test selects either i) parameter ranges of the superconducting dark energy allowing for the standard baryonic plus dark matter or ii) a unified superconducting dark matter and dark energy model, additionally including only the baryonic sector. The cosmological data is best matched when the matter decouples from both the scalar and vector sectors of dark energy, hence favoring matter conservation as opposed to particle creation in an irreversible process.

  10. Inhomogeneity-induced variance of cosmological parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Wiegand; Dominik J. Schwarz

    2012-02-18

    Modern cosmology relies on the assumption of large-scale isotropy and homogeneity of the Universe. However, locally the Universe is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. So, how can local measurements (at the 100 Mpc scale) be used to determine global cosmological parameters (defined at the 10 Gpc scale)? We use Buchert's averaging formalism and determine a set of locally averaged cosmological parameters in the context of the flat Lambda cold dark matter model. We calculate their ensemble means (i.e. their global values) and variances (i.e. their cosmic variances). We apply our results to typical survey geometries and focus on the study of the effects of local fluctuations of the curvature parameter. By this means we show, that in the linear regime cosmological backreaction and averaging can be reformulated as the issue of cosmic variance. The cosmic variance is found largest for the curvature parameter and discuss some of its consequences. We further propose to use the observed variance of cosmological parameters to measure the growth factor. [abbreviated

  11. Fluctuations in strongly coupled cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonometto, Silvio A. [Department of Physics, Astronomy Unit, Trieste University, Via Tiepolo 11, I 34143 Trieste (Italy); Mainini, Roberto, E-mail: bonometto@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: mainini@mib.infn.it [Department of Physics G. Occhialini, Milano-Bicocca University, Piazza della Scienza 3, I 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    In the early Universe, a dual component made of coupled CDM and a scalar field ?, if their coupling ? > (3){sup 1/2}/2, owns an attractor solution, making them a stationary fraction of cosmic energy during the radiation dominated era. Along the attractor, both such components expand ?a{sup ?4} and have early density parameters ?{sub d} = 1/(4?{sup 2}) and ?{sub c} = 2 ?{sub d} (field and CDM, respectively). In a previous paper it was shown that, if a further component, expanding ?a{sup ?3}, breaks such stationary expansion at z ? 3–5 × 10{sup 3}, cosmic components gradually acquire densities consistent with observations. This paper, first of all, considers the case that this component is warm. However, its main topic is the analysis of fluctuation evolution: out of horizon modes are then determined; their entry into horizon is numerically evaluated as well as the dependence of Meszaros effect on the coupling ?; finally, we compute: (i) transfer function and linear spectral function; (ii) CMB C{sub l} spectra. Both are close to standard ?CDM models; in particular, the former one can be so down to a scale smaller than Milky Way, in spite of its main DM component being made of particles of mass < 1 keV. The previously coupled CDM component, whose present density parameter is O(10{sup ?3}), exhibits wider fluctuations ??/?, but approximately ?-independent ?? values. We discuss how lower scale features of these cosmologies might ease quite a few problems that ?CDM does not easily solve.

  12. Beyond the Cosmological Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin Joyce; Bhuvnesh Jain; Justin Khoury; Mark Trodden

    2014-12-15

    After a decade and a half of research motivated by the accelerating universe, theory and experiment have a reached a certain level of maturity. The development of theoretical models beyond \\Lambda, or smooth dark energy, often called modified gravity, has led to broader insights into a path forward, and a host of observational and experimental tests have been developed. In this review we present the current state of the field and describe a framework for anticipating developments in the next decade. We identify the guiding principles for rigorous and consistent modifications of the standard model, and discuss the prospects for empirical tests. We begin by reviewing attempts to consistently modify Einstein gravity in the infrared, focusing on the notion that additional degrees of freedom introduced by the modification must screen themselves from local tests of gravity. We categorize screening mechanisms into three broad classes: mechanisms which become active in regions of high Newtonian potential, those in which first derivatives become important, and those for which second derivatives are important. Examples of the first class, such as f(R) gravity, employ the familiar chameleon or symmetron mechanisms, whereas examples of the last class are galileon and massive gravity theories, employing the Vainshtein mechanism. In each case, we describe the theories as effective theories. We describe experimental tests, summarizing laboratory and solar system tests and describing in some detail astrophysical and cosmological tests. We discuss future tests which will be sensitive to different signatures of new physics in the gravitational sector. Parts that are more relevant to theorists vs. observers/experimentalists are clearly indicated, in the hope that this will serve as a useful reference for both audiences, as well as helping those interested in bridging the gap between them.

  13. Design of a telescope pointing and tracking subsystem for the Big Bear Solar Observatory New Solar Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of a telescope pointing and tracking subsystem for the Big Bear Solar Observatory New Solar Telescope J. R. Varsika and G.Yangb aBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, California, U.S.A.; bNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A. ABSTRACT The New Solar

  14. Cosmological and astrophysical aspects of finite-density QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz

    1998-07-23

    The different phases of QCD at finite temperature and density lead to interesting effects in cosmology and astrophysics. In this work I review some aspects of the cosmological QCD transition and of astrophysics at high baryon density.

  15. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the ``initial data`` for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models.

  16. Gravitational collapse and the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshingkar, S. S.; Jhingan, S.; Chamorro, A.; Joshi, P. S.

    2001-06-15

    We consider here the effects of a nonvanishing cosmological term on the final fate of a spherical inhomogeneous collapsing dust cloud. It is shown that, depending on the nature of the initial data from which the collapse evolves, and for a positive value of the cosmological constant, we can have a globally regular evolution where a bounce develops within the cloud. We characterize precisely the initial data causing such a bounce in terms of the initial density and velocity profiles for the collapsing cloud. In the cases otherwise, the result of collapse is either the formation of a black hole or a naked singularity resulting as the end state of collapse. We also show here that a positive cosmological term can cover a part of the singularity spectrum which is visible in the corresponding dust collapse models for the same initial data.

  17. An oblique membrane paradigm for cosmological horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tower Wang

    2014-11-24

    The membrane paradigm is a formalism for studying the event horizon of black holes. After analyzing it with some technical details and realizing it in the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, we extend the paradigm to cosmological horizons. A standard membrane paradigm is established for the pure de Sitter horizon, and an oblique membrane paradigm is proposed for the trapping horizon of the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe. In the latter case, the cosmological stretched horizon is oblique, thus the running of renormalization parameter is nonzero in the timelike direction and gives a correction to the membrane pressure. In this paradigm, the cosmological equations come from continuity equations of the membrane fluid and the bulk fluid respectively.

  18. Cosmological constraints on superconducting dark energy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    We consider cosmological tests of a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy is included in the total action through a gauge invariant, electromagnetic type contribution. The ground state of dark energy, corresponding to a constant potential $V$ is a Bose-Einstein type condensate with spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry. In another words dark energy appears as a massive vector field emerging from a superposition of a massless vector and a scalar field, the latter corresponding to the Goldstone boson. Two particular cosmological models, corresponding to pure electric and pure magnetic type potentials, respectively are confronted with Type IA Supernovae and Hubble parameter data. In the electric case good fit is obtained along a narrow inclined stripe in the $\\Omega _{m}-\\Omega _{V}$ parameter plane, which includes the $\\Lambda $CDM limit. The other points on this admissible region represent superconducting dark energy as a sum of a cosmological constant and a time-evolving contribution...

  19. The Gemini 8M Telescopes Project M. Mountain, F. Gillett, R. Kurz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Gemini 8­M Telescopes Project M. Mountain, F. Gillett, R. Kurz Gemini Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719 Gemini Preprint # 5 #12; The Gemini 8­M Telescopes Project Matt Mountain

  20. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  1. The Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-06-20

    It will be argued here that the cosmological constant problem exists because of the way the vacuum is defined in quantum field theory. It has been known for some time that for QFT to be gauge invariant certain terms--such as part of the vacuum polarization tensor--must be eliminated either explicitly or by some form of regularization followed by renormalization. It has recently been shown that lack of gauge invariance is a result of the way the vacuum is defined, and redefining the vacuum so that the theory is gauge invariant may also offer a solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  2. Cosmology as Science?: From Inflation to Eternity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The last decade or two have represented the golden age of observational cosmology, producing a revolution in our picture of the Universe on its largest scales, and perhaps also its smallest ones. I will argue that these recent development bring to the forefront some vexing questions about whether various fundamental assumptions about the universe are in fact falsifiable. I will focus on 3 issues: (1) "Proving" Inflation, (2) Dark Energy and Anthropic Arguments, and (3) Cosmology of the far future.Interview with Lawrence M. Krauss

  3. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  4. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iorio; G. Lambiase

    2014-11-28

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, that cannot be explained by the conventional cosmology and particle physics.

  5. Thermodynamics of Ideal Gas in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying-Qiu Gu

    2009-10-04

    The equation of state and the state functions for the gravitational source are necessary conditions for solving cosmological model and stellar structure. The usual treatments are directly based on the laws of thermodynamics, and the physical meanings of some concepts are obscure. This letter show that, we can actually derive all explicit fundamental state functions for the ideal gas in the context of cosmology via rigorous dynamical and statistical calculation. These relations have clear physical meanings, and are valid in both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic cases. Some features of the equation of state are important for a stable structure of a star with huge mass.

  6. Accelerating Horndeski cosmologies screening the vacuum energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin-Moruno, Prado; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2015-01-01

    In the context of Horndeski cosmologies, we consider a dynamical adjustment mechanism able to screen any value of the vacuum energy of the matter fields leading to a fixed de Sitter geometry. Thus, we present the most general scalar-tensor cosmological models without higher than second order derivatives in the field equation that have a fixed spatially flat de Sitter critical point for any kind of material content or vacuum energy. These models allow us to understand the current accelerated expansion of the universe as the result of the evolution towards the critical point when it is an attractor.

  7. Viable cosmological solutions in massive bimetric gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koennig, Frank; Amendola, Luca [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, Heidelberg, 69120 (Germany); Patil, Aashay, E-mail: koennig@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: aashay@students.iiserpune.ac.in, E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune, 411008 (India)

    2014-03-01

    We find the general conditions for viable cosmological solution at the background level in bigravity models. Furthermore, we constrain the parameters by comparing to the Union 2.1 supernovae catalog and identify, in some cases analytically, the best fit parameter or the degeneracy curve among pairs of parameters. We point out that a bimetric model with a single free parameter predicts a simple relation between the equation of state and the density parameter, fits well the supernovae data and is a valid and testable alternative to ?CDM. Additionally, we identify the conditions for a phantom behavior and show that viable bimetric cosmologies cannot cross the phantom divide.

  8. Cosmological String Backgrounds from Gauged WZW Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Kounnas; D. Luest

    1992-05-18

    We discuss the four-dimensional target-space interpretation of bosonic strings based on gauged WZW models, in particular of those based on the non-compact coset space $SL(2,{\\bf R})\\times SO(1,1)^2 /SO(1,1)$. We show that these theories lead, apart from the recently broadly discussed black-hole type of backgrounds, to cosmological string backgrounds, such as an expanding Universe. Which of the two cases is realized depends on the sign of the level of the corresponding Kac-Moody algebra. We discuss various aspects of these new cosmological string backgrounds.

  9. Dynamics of substructures in warm dark-matter cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian Arnold; Alexander Knebe; Chris Power; Brad K. Gibson

    2008-11-13

    We performed cosmological simulations based upon both a cold dark matter (CDM) and a warm dark matter (WDM) model. The focus of our investigations lies with selected spatial and kinematic properties of substructure halos (subhalos) orbiting within host halos, that form in both dark-matter cosmologies. We aim at using the dynamics of the subhalos as a probe of the respective cosmology.

  10. Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, Chris; Taylor, Stuart; Wren, James; Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae

    2010-11-30

    The RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) observatory network consists of several robotic astronomical telescopes primarily designed to search for astrophysical transients called a gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although intrinsically bright, GRBs are difficult to detect because of their short duration. Typically, they are first observed by satellites that then relay the coordinates of the GRB to a ground station which, in turn, distributes the coordinates over the internet so that ground based observers can perform follow-up observations. Typically the ground based observations begin after the GRB has ended and only residual emiSSion (the 'afterglow') is left. However, if the satellite relays the GRB coordinates quickly enough, a 'fast' robotic telescope on the ground may be able to catch the GRB in progress. The RAPTOR telescope system is one of only a few in the world to have accomplished this feat. In order to achieve these results, the RAPTOR telescopes must operate autonomously at a high duty-cycle and in peak operating condition. Currently the telescopes are maintained in an ad hoc manner, often in a run-to-failure mode. The RAPTOR project could benefit greatly from a structural health monitoring (SHM) system, especially as more complex units are added to the suite of telescopes. This paper will summarize preliminary results from an SHM study performed on one of the RAPTOR telescopes. Damage scenarios that are of concern and that have been previously observed are first summarized. Then a specific study of damage to the telescope drive mechanism is presented where the data acquisition system is first described. Next, damage detection algorithms are developed with LANL's new publically available software SHMTools and the results of this process are discussed in detail. The paper will conclude with a summary of future planned refinemenls of the RAPTOR SHM system.

  11. Measurements of Secodary Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies with the South Pole Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lueker, Martin Van

    2010-01-01

    6 The South Pole Telescope Atmospheric Conditionsat the South Pole Telescope and Optical Design . . . . . . .interplay of cable delays, poles, resonances and zeroes in

  12. Software design for the control system for Small-Size Telescopes with single-mirror of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; B?ocki, J; Bogacz, L; Borkowski, J; Bulik, T; Cadoux, F; Christov, A; Cury?o, M; della Volpe, D; Dyrda, M; Favre, Y; Frankowski, A; Grudnik, ?; Grudzi?ska, M; Heller, M; Id?kowski, B; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Kasperek, J; Lalik, K; Lyard, E; Mach, E; Mandat, D; Marsza?ek, A; Micha?owski, J; Moderski, R; Rameez, M; Montaruli, T; Neronov, A; Niemiec, J; Ostrowski, M; Pa?ko, P; Pech, M; Porcelli, A; Prandini, E; Rajda, P; Schioppa, E jr; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Skowron, K; Sliusar, V; Sowi?ski, M; Stawarz, ?; Stodulska, M; Stodulski, M; Pujadas, I Troyano; Toscano, S; Walter, R; Wi?cek, M; Zagda?ski, A; Zi?tara, K; Zychowski, P

    2015-01-01

    The Small-Size Telescope with single-mirror (SST-1M) is a 4 m Davies-Cotton telescope and is among the proposed telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). It is conceived to provide the high-energy ($>$ few TeV) coverage. The SST-1M contains proven technology for the telescope structure and innovative electronics and photosensors for the camera. Its design is meant to be simple, low-budget and easy-to-build industrially. Each device subsystem of an SST-1M telescope is made visible to CTA through a dedicated industrial standard server. The software is being developed in collaboration with the CTA Medium-Size Telescopes to ensure compatibility and uniformity of the array control. Early operations of the SST-1M prototype will be performed with a subset of the CTA central array control system based on the Alma Common Software (ACS). The triggered event data are time stamped, formatted and finally transmitted to the CTA data acquisition. The software system developed to control the devices of an SS...

  13. New Cosmologies on the Horizon. Cosmology and Holography in bigravity and massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolley, Andrew James

    2013-03-31

    The goal of this research program is to explore the cosmological dynamics, the nature of cosmological and black hole horizons, and the role of holography in a new class of infrared modified theories of gravity. This will capitalize of the considerable recent progress in our understanding of the dynamics of massive spin two fields on curved spacetimes, culminating in the formulation of the first fully consistent theories of massive gravity and bigravity/bimetric theories.

  14. Cluster Cores, Gravitational Lensing, and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo A. Flores; Joel R. Primack

    1995-12-11

    Many multiply--imaged quasars have been found over the years, but none so far with image separation in excess of $8\\arcsec$. The absence of such large splittings has been used as a test of cosmological models: the standard Cold Dark Matter model has been excluded on the basis that it predicts far too many large--separation double images. These studies assume that the lensing structure has the mass profile of a singular isothermal sphere. However, such large splittings would be produced by very massive systems such as clusters of galaxies, for which other gravitational lensing data suggest less singular mass profiles. Here we analyze two cases of mass profiles for lenses: an isothermal sphere with a finite core radius (density $\\rho \\propto (r^2+r_{core}^2)^{-1})$, and a Hernquist profile ($\\rho \\propto r^{-1}(r+a)^{-3}$). We find that small core radii $r_{core} \\sim 30 h^{-1}$ kpc, as suggested by the cluster data, or large $a \\gsim 300 h^{-1}$ kpc, as needed for compatibility with gravitational distortion data, would reduce the number of large--angle splittings by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, it appears that these tests are sensitive both to the cosmological model (number density of lenses) and to the inner lens structure, which is unlikely to depend sensitively on the cosmology, making it difficult to test the cosmological models by large--separation quasar lensing until we reliably know the structure of the lenses themselves.

  15. Vacuum Fluctuations Cannot Mimic a Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Klauber

    2007-11-05

    When the vacuum fluctuation pressure is calculated directly from fundamental principles of quantum field theory, in the same manner as vacuum fluctuation energy density is commonly calculated, one finds it is not equal to the negative of the vacuum fluctuation energy density. Thus, vacuum fluctuations cannot manifest as a cosmological constant of any order.

  16. Cosmological model with movement in fifth dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Belayev

    2001-10-24

    Presented cosmological model is 3D brane world sheet moved in extra dimension with variable scale factor. Analysis of the geodesic motion of the test particle gives settle explanation of the Pioneer effect. It is found that for considered metric the solution of the semi-classical Einstein equations with various parameters conforms to isotropic expanded and anisotropic stationary universe.

  17. Fluctuation, Dissipation and Irreversibility in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1993-02-18

    We discuss the appearance of time-asymmetric behavior in physical processes in cosmology and in the dynamics of the Universe itself. We begin with an analysis of the nature and origin of irreversibility in well-known physical processes such as dispersion, diffusion, dissipation and mixing, and make the distinction between processes whose irreversibility arises from the stipulation of special initial conditions, and those arising from the system's interaction with a coarse-grained environment. We then study the irreversibility associated with quantum fluctuations in cosmological processes like particle creation and the `birth of the Universe'. We suggest that the backreaction effect of such quantum processes can be understood as the manifestation of a fluctuation-dissipation relation relating fluctuations of quantum fields to dissipations in the dynamics of spacetime. For the same reason it is shown that dissipation is bound to appear in the dynamics of minisuperspace cosmologies. This provides a natural course for the emergence of a cosmological and thermodynamic arrow of time and suggests a meaningful definition of gravitational entropy. We conclude with a discussion on the criteria for the choice of coarse-grainings and the stability of persistent physical structures. Invited Talk given at the Conference on The Physical Origin of Time-Asymmetry Huelva, Spain, Oct. 1991, Proceedings eds. J. J. Halliwell, J. Perez-Mercader and W. H. Zurek, Cambridge University Press, 1993

  18. Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Sethi, Shiv K. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Pandey, Kanhaiya [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

  19. Backreaction in late-time cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Buchert; Syksy Rasanen

    2012-10-24

    We review the effect of the formation of nonlinear structures on the expansion rate, spatial curvature and light propagation in the universe, focusing on the possibility that it could explain cosmological observations without the introduction of dark energy or modified gravity. We concentrate on explaining the relevant physics and highlighting open questions.

  20. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  1. REVIEW ARTICLE Inhomogeneous cosmological models: exact solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasinski, Andrzej

    are treated as an alternative to the FLRW models. In fact, they are not an alternative, but an exact believed to have worked well, but future and more precise observations will not be properly analysed unless, they are not suitable for including dark energy in any other form than cosmological constant. On the contrary

  2. Cosmology with Coupled Gravity and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ti-Pei Li

    2015-01-13

    Dark energy is a fundamental constituent of our universe, its status in the cosmological field equation should be equivalent to that of gravity. Here we construct a dark energy and matter gravity coupling (DEMC) model of cosmology in a way that dark energy and gravity are introduced into the cosmological field equation in parallel with each other from the beginning. The DEMC universe possesses a composite symmetry from global Galileo invariance and local Lorentz invariance. The observed evolution of the universe expansion rate at redshift z>1 is in tension with the standard LCDM model, but can be well predicted by the DEMC model from measurements of only nearby epochs. The so far most precise measured expansion rate at high z is quite a bit slower than the expectations from LCDM, but remarkably consistent with that from DEMC. It is hoped that the DEMC scenario can also help to solve other existing challenges to cosmology: large scale anomalies in CMB maps and large structures up to about 10^3 Mpc of a quasar group. The DEMC universe is a well defined mechanical system. From measurements we can quantitatively evaluate its total rest energy, present absolute radius and expanding speed.

  3. Observed Cosmological Redshifts Support Contracting Accelerating Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-02

    The main argument that Universe is currently expanding is observed redshift increase by distance. However, this conclusion may not be correct, because cosmological redshift depends only on the scaling factors, the change in the size of the universe during the time of light propagation and is not related to the speed of observer or speed of the object emitting the light. An observer in expanding universe will measure the same redshift as observer in contracting universe with the same scaling. This was not taken into account in analysing the SN Ia data related to the universe acceleration. Possibility that universe may contract, but that the observed light is cosmologically redshifted allows for completely different set of cosmological parameters $\\Omega_M, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}$, including the solution $\\Omega_M=1, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0$. The contracting and in the same time accelerating universe explains observed deceleration and acceleration in SN Ia data, but also gives significantly larger value for the age of the universe, $t_0 = 24$ Gyr. This allows to reconsider classical cosmological models with $\\Lambda =0$. The contracting stage also may explain the observed association of high redshifted quasars to low redshifted galaxies.

  4. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey - II: Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jee, M James; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude r_{lim}~27 (5 sigma), is designed as a pre-cursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing >10 sq. deg cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9-year results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives Omega_m=0.293_{-0.014}^{+0.012}, sigma_8=0.833_{-0.018}^{+0.011}, H_0=68.6_{-1.2}^{+1.4} km/s/Mpc, and Omega_b=0.0475+-0.0012 for LCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ~50%. When we do not assume flatness for LCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint Omega_k=-0...

  5. SHARP - III: First Use Of Adaptive Optics Imaging To Constrain Cosmology With Gravitational Lens Time Delays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Geoff C F; Wong, Kenneth C; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Chiueh, Tzihong; Halkola, Aleksi; Hu, I Shing; Auger, Matthew W; Koopmans, Leon V E; Lagattuta, David J; McKean, John P; Vegetti, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubble constant with an uncertainty of $\\sim 7\\%$. Since HST will not last forever, we explore adaptive-optics (AO) imaging as an alternative that can provide higher angular resolution than HST imaging but has a less stable point spread function (PSF) due to atmospheric distortion. To make AO imaging useful for time-delay-lens cosmography, we develop a method to extract the unknown PSF directly from the imaging of strongly lensed quasars. In a blind test with two mock data sets created with different PSFs, we are able to recover the important cosmological parameters (time-delay distance, external shear, lens mass profile slope, and total Einstein radius). Our analysis of the Keck AO image of the strong lens system RXJ1...

  6. The South Pole Telescope bolometer array and the measurement of secondary Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy at small angular scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirokoff, Erik D.

    2011-01-01

    iii 2 The South Pole Telescope 2.1 The Telescope . . . . .modifications . . . . II The South Pole Telescope SZ Cameraand exciting as the South Pole Telescope. Fewer still do so

  7. Multiobjective optimization of a radio telescope array with site constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohanim, Babak, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    The next generation of radio telescope interferometric arrays requires careful design of the array configuration to optimize the performance and minimize the cost of the overall system while adhering to site constraints. ...

  8. Design and optimization of lightweight space telescope structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Andrzej Matthew

    2007-01-01

    As mankind attempts to look deeper into the universe, increasingly larger space telescopes will be needed to achieve the levels of resolution required to perform these missions. Due to this increase in size, increasing ...

  9. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobbs, Matt

    2008-01-01

    for Large Scale Bolometer Arrays”, Monterey Far-IR, Sub-mmand mm Detector Technology Workshop proceedings, 2002, pp.Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes Matt Dobbs,

  10. CTA telescopes as deep-space lasercom ground receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vergaz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The amount of scientific data to be transmitted from deep-space probes is very limited due to RF-communications constraints. Free-space optical communication can alleviate this bottleneck, increasing data rate while reducing weight, mass and power of communication onboard equipment. Nevertheless, optimizing the power delivery from spacecraft to Earth is needed. In RF communications, the strategy has been to increase the aperture of ground terminals. Free-space optical communications can also follow it, as they share the limitation of low power received on Earth. As the cost of big telescopes increases exponentially with aperture, new ideas are required to maximize the aperture-to-cost ratio. This work explores the feasibility of using telescopes of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array as optical-communication ground stations. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has the same power limitation, hence Cherenkov telescopes are designed to maximize receiver's aperture with minimum cost and some relaxed requirements. B...

  11. Robotic Telescopes and Networks: New Tools for Education and Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. R. Querci; M. Querci

    1999-11-02

    Nowadays many telescopes around the world are automated and some networks of robotic telescopes are active or planned as shown by the lists we draw up. Such equipment could be used for the training of students and for science in the Universities of Developing Countries and of New Astronomical Countries, by sending them observational data via Internet or through remotely controlled telescopes. It seems that it is time to open up for discussion with UN and ESA organizations and also with IAU, how to implement links between robotic telescopes and such Universities applying for collaborations. Many scientific fields could thus be accessible to them, for example on stellar variability, near-earth object follow-up, gamma-ray burst counterpart tracking, and so on.

  12. South Pole Telescope Software Systems: Control, Monitoring, and Data Acquisition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Story, K; Ade, P; Aird, K A; Austermann, J E; Beall, J A; Becker, D; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Britton, J; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiang, H C; Cho, H-M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Datesman, A; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Everett, W; Ewall-Wice, A; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N; Henning, J W; Hilton, G C; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Huang, N; Hubmayr, J; Irwin, K D; Karfunkle, M; Keisler, R; Kennedy, J; Lee, A T; Li, D; Lueker, M; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Montgomery, J; Montroy, T E; Nagy, J; Natoli, T; Nibarger, J P; Niemack, M D; Novosad, V; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Smecher, G; Stalder, B; Tucker, C; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Wang, G; Williamson, R; Yefremenko, V; Yoon, K W; Young, E; 10.1117/12.925808

    2012-01-01

    We present the software system used to control and operate the South Pole Telescope. The South Pole Telescope is a 10-meter millimeter-wavelength telescope designed to measure anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at arcminute angular resolution. In the austral summer of 2011/12, the SPT was equipped with a new polarization-sensitive camera, which consists of 1536 transition-edge sensor bolometers. The bolometers are read out using 36 independent digital frequency multiplexing (\\dfmux) readout boards, each with its own embedded processors. These autonomous boards control and read out data from the focal plane with on-board software and firmware. An overall control software system running on a separate control computer controls the \\dfmux boards, the cryostat and all other aspects of telescope operation. This control software collects and monitors data in real-time, and stores the data to disk for transfer to the United States for analysis.

  13. A generation of astronomical telescopes, their users, and publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2010-01-01

    Tele- scope in the Canary Islands, followed by 7 mirrors ofTelescopia Canarias in the Canary Islands. Table 3 attemptsKea, Hawaii, and the Canary Islands) have many telescopes

  14. The first GCT camera for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Gamma Cherenkov Telescope (GCT) is proposed to be part of the Small Size Telescope (SST) array of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The GCT dual-mirror optical design allows the use of a compact camera of diameter roughly 0.4 m. The curved focal plane is equipped with 2048 pixels of ~0.2{\\deg} angular size, resulting in a field of view of ~9{\\deg}. The GCT camera is designed to record the flashes of Cherenkov light from electromagnetic cascades, which last only a few tens of nanoseconds. Modules based on custom ASICs provide the required fast electronics, facilitating sampling and digitisation as well as first level of triggering. The first GCT camera prototype is currently being commissioned in the UK. On-telescope tests are planned later this year. Here we give a detailed description of the camera prototype and present recent progress with testing and commissioning.

  15. NectarCAM : a camera for the medium size telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicenstein, J-F; Barrio, J-A; Blanch~Bigas, O; Bolmont, J; Bouyjou, F; Brun, P; Chabanne, E; Champion, C; Colonges, S; Corona, P; Delagnes, E; Delgado, C; Ginzov, C Diaz; Durand, D; Ernenwein, J-P; Fegan, S; Ferreira, O; Fesquet, M; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Fouque, N; Gascon, D; Giebels, B; Henault, F; Hermel, R; Hoffmann, D; Horan, D; Houles, J; Jean, P; Jocou, L; Karkar, S; Knoedlseder, J; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; LeFlour, T; Lenain, J-P; Leveque, A; Louis, F; Martinez, G; Moudden, Y; Moulin, E; Nayman, P; Nunio, F; Olive, J-F; Panazol, J-L; Pavy, S; Petrucci, P-O; Pierre, E; Prast, J; Punch, M; Ramon, P; Rateau, S; Ravel, T; Rosier-Lees, S; Sanuy, A; Shayduk, M; Sizun, P-Y; Sulanke, K-H; Tavernet, J-P; Tejedor~Alvarez, L-A; Toussenel, F; Vasileiadis, G; Voisin, V; Waegebert, V; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01

    NectarCAM is a camera proposed for the medium-sized telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) covering the central energy range of ~100 GeV to ~30 TeV. It has a modular design and is based on the NECTAr chip, at the heart of which is a GHz sampling Switched Capacitor Array and a 12-bit Analog to Digital converter. The camera will be equipped with 265 7-photomultiplier modules, covering a field of view of 8 degrees. Each module includes the photomultiplier bases, high voltage supply, pre-amplifier, trigger, readout and Ethernet transceiver. The recorded events last between a few nanoseconds and tens of nanoseconds. The camera trigger will be flexible so as to minimize the read-out dead-time of the NECTAr chips. NectarCAM is designed to sustain a data rate of more than 4 kHz with less than 5\\% dead time. The camera concept, the design and tests of the various subcomponents and results of thermal and electrical prototypes are presented. The design includes the mechanical structure, cooling of the electro...

  16. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwanke, U; Sulanke, K -H; Vorobiov, S; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E>20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger wi...

  17. Satellite Characterization of four candidate sites for the Cherenkov Telescope Array telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavazzani, S; Bulik, T; Ortolani, S

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we have evaluated the amount of available telescope time at four sites which are candidate to host the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). We use the GOES 12 data for the years 2008 and 2009. We use a homogeneous methodology presented in several previous papers to classify the nights as clear (completely cloud-free), mixed (partially cloud-covered), and covered. Additionally, for the clear nights, we have evaluated the amount of satellite stable nights which correspond to the amount of ground based photometric nights, and the clear nights corresponding to the spectroscopic nights. We have applied this model to two sites in the Northern Hemisphere (San Pedro Martir (SPM), Mexico; Izana, Canary Islands) and to two sites in the Southern Hemisphere (El Leoncito, Argentine; San Antonio de Los Cobres (SAC), Argentine). We have obtained, from the two years considered, a mean amount of cloud free nights of 68.6% at Izana, 76.0% at SPM, 70.6% at Leoncito and 70.0% at SAC. We have evaluated, among the...

  18. The Optical System for the Large Size Telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayashida, M; Teshima, M; de Almeida, U Barres; Chikawa, M; Cho, N; Fukami, S; Gadola, A; Hanabata, Y; Horns, D; Jablonski, C; Katagiri, H; Kagaya, M; Ogino, M; Okumura, A; Saito, T; Stadler, R; Steiner, S; Straumann, U; Vollhardt, A; Wetteskind, H; Yamamoto, T; Yoshida, T

    2015-01-01

    The Large Size Telescope (LST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is designed to achieve a threshold energy of 20 GeV. The LST optics is composed of one parabolic primary mirror 23 m in diameter and 28 m focal length. The reflector dish is segmented in 198 hexagonal, 1.51 m flat to flat mirrors. The total effective reflective area, taking into account the shadow of the mechanical structure, is about 368 m$^2$. The mirrors have a sandwich structure consisting of a glass sheet of 2.7 mm thickness, aluminum honeycomb of 60 mm thickness, and another glass sheet on the rear, and have a total weight about 47 kg. The mirror surface is produced using a sputtering deposition technique to apply a 5-layer coating, and the mirrors reach a reflectivity of $\\sim$94% at peak. The mirror facets are actively aligned during operations by an active mirror control system, using actuators, CMOS cameras and a reference laser. Each mirror facet carries a CMOS camera, which measures the position of the light spot of the optical ...

  19. Bias-limited extraction of cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimon, Meir; Itzhaki, Nissan; Rephaeli, Yoel, E-mail: meirs@wise.tau.ac.il, E-mail: nitzhaki@post.tau.ac.il, E-mail: yoelr@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2013-03-01

    It is known that modeling uncertainties and astrophysical foregrounds can potentially introduce appreciable bias in the deduced values of cosmological parameters. While it is commonly assumed that these uncertainties will be accounted for to a sufficient level of precision, the level of bias has not been properly quantified in most cases of interest. We show that the requirement that the bias in derived values of cosmological parameters does not surpass nominal statistical error, translates into a maximal level of overall error O(N{sup ?½}) on |?P(k)|/P(k) and |?C{sub l}|/C{sub l}, where P(k), C{sub l}, and N are the matter power spectrum, angular power spectrum, and number of (independent Fourier) modes at a given scale l or k probed by the cosmological survey, respectively. This required level has important consequences on the precision with which cosmological parameters are hoped to be determined by future surveys: in virtually all ongoing and near future surveys N typically falls in the range 10{sup 6}?10{sup 9}, implying that the required overall theoretical modeling and numerical precision is already very high. Future redshifted-21-cm observations, projected to sample ? 10{sup 14} modes, will require knowledge of the matter power spectrum to a fantastic 10{sup ?7} precision level. We conclude that realizing the expected potential of future cosmological surveys, which aim at detecting 10{sup 6}?10{sup 14} modes, sets the formidable challenge of reducing the overall level of uncertainty to 10{sup ?3}?10{sup ?7}.

  20. Testing the Bimodal/Schizophrenic Neutrino Hypothesis in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Barry; Rabindra N. Mohapatra; Werner Rodejohann

    2011-06-27

    The standard assumption is that all three neutrino mass states are either Dirac or Majorana. However, it was recently suggested by Allaverdi, Dutta and one of the authors (R.N.M.) that mixed, or bimodal, flavor neutrino scenarios are conceivable and are consistent with all known observations (these were called "schizophrenic" in the ADM paper). In that case each individual mass eigenstate can be either Dirac or Majorana, so that the flavor eigenstates are "large" admixtures of both. An example of this "bimodal" situation is to consider one mass state as a Dirac particle (with a sterile partner), while the other two are of Majorana type. Since only Majorana particles contribute to neutrinoless double beta decay, the usual dependence of this observable on the neutrino mass is modified within this scenario. We study this in detail and, in particular, generalize the idea for all possible bimodal combinations. Inevitably, radiative corrections will induce a pseudo-Dirac nature to the Dirac states at the one-loop level, and the effects of the pseudo-Dirac mass splitting will show up in the flavor ratios of neutrinos from distant cosmological sources. Comparison of the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay as well as flavor ratios at neutrino telescopes, for different pseudo-Dirac cases and with their usual phenomenology, can distinguish the different bimodal possibilities.

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

    2006-08-26

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

  2. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, D L; Richmond, M W; Annis, J; Smith, J A; Allam, S S; Rodgers, C T; Stute, J L; Adelman-McCarthy, J K; Brinkmann, J; Doi, M; Finkbeiner, D; Fukugita, M; Goldston, J; Greenway, B; Gunn, J E; Hendry, J S; Hogg, D W; Ichikawa, S I; Ivezic, Z; Knapp, G R; Lampeitl, H; Lee, B C; Lin, H; McKay, T A; Merrelli, A; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Richards, G T; Schlegel, D J; Stoughton, C; Uomoto, A; Yanny, B

    2006-01-01

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the s...

  3. 3D acoustic imaging applied to the Baikal Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Kebkal; R. Bannasch; O. G. Kebkal; A. I. Panfilov; R. Wischnewski

    2008-11-07

    A hydro-acoustic imaging system was tested in a pilot study on distant localization of elements of the Baikal underwater neutrino telescope. For this innovative approach, based on broad band acoustic echo signals and strictly avoiding any active acoustic elements on the telescope, the imaging system was temporarily installed just below the ice surface, while the telescope stayed in its standard position at 1100 m depth. The system comprised an antenna with four acoustic projectors positioned at the corners of a 50 meter square; acoustic pulses were "linear sweep-spread signals" - multiple-modulated wide-band signals (10-22 kHz) of 51.2 s duration. Three large objects (two string buoys and the central electronics module) were localized by the 3D acoustic imaging, with a accuracy of ~0.2 m (along the beam) and ~1.0 m (transverse). We discuss signal forms and parameters necessary for improved 3D acoustic imaging of the telescope, and suggest a layout of a possible stationary bottom based 3D imaging setup. The presented technique may be of interest for neutrino telescopes of km3-scale and beyond, as a flexible temporary or as a stationary tool to localize basic telescope elements, while these are completely passive.

  4. Finite Future Cosmological Singularity Times and Maximum Predictability Times in a Nonlinear FRW-KG Scalar Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Max Wilson; Keith Andrew

    2012-07-27

    We investigate the relative time scales associated with finite future cosmological singularities, especially those classified as Big Rip cosmologies, and the maximum predictability time of a coupled FRW-KG scalar cosmology with chaotic regimes. Our approach is to show that by starting with a FRW-KG scalar cosmology with a potential that admits an analytical solution resulting in a finite time future singularity there exists a Lyapunov time scale that is earlier than the formation of the singularity. For this singularity both the cosmological scale parameter a(t) and the Hubble parameter H(t) become infinite at a finite future time, the Big Rip time. We compare this time scale to the predictability time scale for a chaotic FRW-KG scalar cosmology. We find that there are cases where the chaotic time scale is earlier than the Big Rip singularity calling for special care in interpreting and predicting the formation of the future cosmological singularity.

  5. The software design of the Gemini 8m telescopes Stephen Wampler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The software design of the Gemini 8m telescopes Stephen Wampler Gemini 8m Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85726 ABSTRACT The design of the software for the Gemini 8m Telescopes is nearly. Keywords: telescope software design, design processes, Gemini software 1. INTRODUCTION The Gemini 8m

  6. Conformal Structures Admitted by a Class of FRW Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Threlfall; Susan M. Scott

    2012-12-16

    In this paper we demonstrate that there are large classes of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmologies that admit isotropic conformal structures of Quiescent Cosmology. FRW models have long been known to admit singularities such as Big Bangs and Big Crunches [1, 2] but recently it has been shown that there are other cosmological structures that these solutions contain. These structures are Big Rips, Sudden Singularities and Extremality Events [1, 2]. Within the Quiescent Cosmology framework [3] there also exist structures consistent with a cosmological singularity known as the Isotropic Past Singularity (IPS) [4, 5]. There also exists a cosmological final state known as a Future Isotropic Universe (FIU) [4], which strictly speaking, doesn't fit with the fundamental ideals of Quiescent Cosmology. In this paper, we compare the cosmological events of a large class of FRW solutions to the conformal structures of Quiescent Cosmology [4]. In the first section of this paper we present the relevant background information and our motivation. In the second section of this paper we construct conformal relationships for relevant FRW models. The third section contains a thorough discussion of a class of FRW solutions that cannot represent any of the previously constructed isotropic conformal structures from Quiescent Cosmology. The final section contains our remarks and future outlook for further study of this field.

  7. Chaos and Quantum Chaos in Cosmological Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Graham

    1994-05-17

    Spatially homogeneous cosmological models reduce to Hamiltonian systems in a low dimensional Minkowskian space moving on the total energy shell $H=0$. Close to the initial singularity some models (those of Bianchi type VIII and IX) can be reduced further, in a certain approximation, to a non-compact triangular billiard on a 2-dimensional space of constant negative curvature with a separately conserved positive kinetic energy. This type of billiard has long been known as a prototype chaotic dynamical system. These facts are reviewed here together with some recent results on the energy level statistics of the quantized billiard and with direct explicit semi-classical solutions of the Hamiltonian cosmological model to which the billiard is an approximation. In the case of Bianchi type IX models the latter solutions correspond to the special boundary conditions of a `no-boundary state' as proposed by Hartle and Hawking and of a `wormhole' state.

  8. EUNHA: a new cosmological hydro simulation code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shina, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S; Park, Changbom

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a parallel cosmological hydrodynamic simulation code designed for the study of formation and evolution of cosmological structures. The gravitational force is calculated using the TreePM method and the hydrodynamics is implemented based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The initial displacement and velocity of simulation particles are calculated according to second-order linear perturbation theory using the power spectra of dark matter and baryonic matter. The initial background temperature is given by Recfast and the temperature uctuations at the initial particle position are determined by the adiabatic model. We use a time-limiter scheme over the individual time steps to capture shock-fronts and to ease the time-step tension between the shock and preshock particles. We also include the astrophysical gas processes of radiative heating/cooling, star formation, metal enrichment, and supernova feedback. We have tested the code in several standard cases such as one-dimensional Riemann prob...

  9. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  10. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  11. Numerical Cosmology: Building a Dynamical Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, David

    2010-10-11

    In this talk I discuss an often over-looked aspect of most cosmological models, dynamical interactions caused by gravitational waves. I begin by reviewing our current state of cosmological knowledge and gravitational waves. Then, I review work done to understand the nature of primordial magnetic fields. Finally, I combine the ideas of gravitational wave theory and plasma turbulence to develop a new theory of cosmic structure formation. Eventually, this work could help to explain the distribution of mass-energy in the observable universe as well as the anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background without a heavy dependence on dark matter. This work seeks to explain how the dense, hot, turbulent plasma of protons, neutrons, electrons and neutrinos cooled in the presence of gravitational waves to form into structures and develop a statistical mechanics to describe this dynamical system.

  12. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) cosmological measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Don N.

    2014-11-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmological constant.

  13. Cosmological Constant Problems and Renormalization Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilya L. Shapiro; Joan Sola

    2007-01-05

    The Cosmological Constant Problem emerges when Quantum Field Theory is applied to the gravitational theory, due to the enormous magnitude of the induced energy of the vacuum. The unique known solution of this problem involves an extremely precise fine-tuning of the vacuum counterpart. We review a few of the existing approaches to this problem based on the account of the quantum (loop) effects and pay special attention to the ones involving the renormalization group.

  14. On the cosmological mass function theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo

    2006-09-06

    This paper provides, from one side, a review of the theory of the cosmological mass function from a theoretical point of view, starting from the seminal paper of Press & Shechter (1974) to the last developments (Del Popolo & Gambera (1998, 1999), Sheth & Tormen 1999 (ST), Sheth, Mo & Tormen 2001 (ST1), Jenkins et al. 2001 (J01), Shet & Tormen 2002 (ST2), Del Popolo 2002a, Yagi et al. 2004 (YNY)), and from another side some improvements on the multiplicity function models in literature. ...

  15. The Construction of Sudden Cosmological Singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Barrow; S. Cotsakis; A. Tsokaros

    2010-03-04

    Solutions of the Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmological equations of general relativity have been found with finite-time singularities that are everywhere regular, have regular Hubble expansion rate, and obey the strong-energy conditions but possess pressure and acceleration singularities at finite time that are not associated with geodesic incompleteness. We show how these solutions with sudden singularities can be constructed using fractional series methods and find the limiting form of the equation of state on approach to the singularity.

  16. Brane-world cosmology and varying $G$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo Amarilla; Hector Vucetich

    2009-08-20

    We consider a brane-world cosmological model coupled to a bulk scalar field. Since the brane tension turns out to be proportional to Newton coupling $G$, in such a model a time variation of $G$ naturally occurs. By resorting to available bounds on the variation of $G$, the parameters of the model are constrained. The constraints coming from nucleosynthesis and CMB result to be the severest ones.

  17. Physical space and cosmology. I: Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy P. Polulyakh

    2011-02-01

    The nature of the physical space seems the most important subject in physics. A present paper proceeds from the assumption of physical reality of space contrary to the standard view of the space as a purely relational nonexistence - void. The space and its evolution are the primary sources of phenomena in Mega- and micro-worlds. Thus cosmology and particle physics have the same active agent - physical space.

  18. Matter bispectrum in cubic Galileon cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bellini, Emilio; Matarrese, Sabino [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ''G. Galilei'', Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Bertacca, Daniele, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: emilio.bellini@pd.infn.it, E-mail: daniele.bertacca@gmail.com, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it [Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa)

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we obtain the bispectrum of dark matter density perturbations in the frame of covariant cubic Galileon theories. This result is obtained by means of a semi-analytic approach to second-order perturbations in Galileon cosmologies, assuming Gaussian initial conditions. In particular, we show that, even in the presence of large deviations of the linear growth-rate w.r.t. the ?CDM one, at the bispectrum level such deviations are reduced to a few percent.

  19. Can Compactifications Solve the Cosmological Constant Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there have been claims in the literature that the cosmological constant problem can be dynamically solved by specific compactifications of gravity from higher-dimensional toy models. These models have the novel feature that in the four-dimensional theory, the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ is much smaller than the Planck density and in fact accumulates at $\\Lambda=0$. Here we show that while these are very interesting models, they do not properly address the real cosmological constant problem. As we explain, the real problem is not simply to obtain $\\Lambda$ that is small in Planck units in a toy model, but to explain why $\\Lambda$ is much smaller than other mass scales (and combinations of scales) in the theory. Instead, in these toy models, all other particle mass scales have been either removed or sent to zero, thus ignoring the real problem. To this end, we provide a general argument that the included moduli masses are generically of order Hubble, so sending them to zero trivially sends the cos...

  20. $C$-field cosmological models: revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Yadav; A. T. Ali; Saibal Ray; F. Rahaman; I. H. Sardar

    2015-10-15

    We investigate plane symmetric space-time filled with perfect fluid in the $C$-field cosmology of Hoyle and Narlikar. A new class of exact solutions have been obtained by considering the creation field $C$ as a function of time only. To get the deterministic solution, it has been assumed that the rate of creation of matter-energy density is proportional to the strength of the existing $C$-field energy density. Several physical aspects and geometrical properties of the models are discussed in detail, especially it is shown that some of our solutions of $C$-field cosmology are free from singularity in contrast to the Big Bang cosmology. A comparative study has been carried out between two models, one singular and the other nonsingular, by contrasting the behaviour of the physical parameters and noted that the model in a unique way represents both the features of the accelerating as well as decelerating Universe depending on the parameters and thus seems provides glimpses of the oscillating or cyclic model of the Universe without invoking any other agent or theory in allowing cyclicity.

  1. Cosmological parameters and the WMAP data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2003-10-07

    I discuss whether the standard cosmological models fit the WMAP data well enough to justify parameter estimation with standard assumptions. The observed quadrupole is low (but has significant foreground uncertainty) and drives weak evidence for theoretical models predicting low values, such as models with a running spectral index. Other more seriously outlying points of the WMAP power spectrum appear not to fit the expectations of simple Gaussian models very well. The effective temperature chi-squared is however acceptable on large scales. There also appears to be evidence for an anisotropic distribution of power, which taken together with the other points may indicate that either there is a problem with the WMAP data or that standard cosmological models are incorrect. These issues should be clarified before cosmological parameter extraction for the usual standard models can be trusted, and hint that maybe the CMB is more interesting than we imagined. I also discuss various systematic and analysis issues, and comment on various oddities in the publicly available first year WMAP data and code.

  2. Photon Consumption in Minihalos during Cosmological Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltan Haiman; Tom Abel; Piero Madau

    2000-12-12

    At the earliest epochs of structure formation in cold dark matter (CDM) cosmologies, the smallest nonlinear objects are the numerous small halos that condense with virial temperatures below 10,000 K. Such ``minihalos'' are not yet resolved in large-scale three-dimensional cosmological simulations. Here we employ a semi-analytic method, combined with three-dimensional simulations of individual minihalos, to examine their importance during cosmological reionization. We show that, depending on when reionization takes place, they potentially play an important role as sinks of ionizing radiation. If reionization occurs at sufficiently high redshifts (z_r > 20), the intergalactic medium is heated to 10,000 K and most minihalos never form. On the other hand, if z_r 10 percent) of all baryons have already collapsed into minihalos, and are subsequently removed from the halos by photoevaporation as the ionizing background flux builds up. We show that this process can require a significant budget of ionizing photons; exceeding the production by a straightforward extrapolation back in time of known quasar and galaxy populations by a factor of up to 10 and 3, respectively.

  3. Superbounce and Loop Quantum Cosmology Ekpyrosis from Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2015-04-07

    As is known, in modified cosmological theories of gravity many of the cosmologies which could not be generated by standard Einstein gravity, can be consistently described by $F(R)$ theories. Using known reconstruction techniques, we investigate which $F(R)$ theories can lead to a Hubble parameter describing two types of cosmological bounces, the superbounce model, related to supergravity and non-supersymmetric models of contracting ekpyrosis and also the Loop Quantum Cosmology modified ekpyrotic model. Since our method is an approximate method, we investigate the problem at large and small curvatures. As we evince, both models yield power law reconstructed $F(R)$ gravities, with the most interesting new feature being that both lead to accelerating cosmologies, in the large curvature approximation. The mathematical properties of the some Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes $M$, that describe superbounce-like cosmologies are also pointed out, with regards to the group of curvature collineations $CC(M)$.

  4. First-order quantum-gravitational correction to Friedmannian cosmology from covariant, holomorphic spinfoam cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Röken

    2015-07-01

    The first-order loop quantum gravity correction of the simplest, classical general-relativistic Friedmann Hamiltonian constraint, emerging from a holomorphic spinfoam cosmological model peaked on homogeneous, isotropic geometries, is studied. The quantum Hamiltonian constraint, satisfied by the EPRL transition amplitude between the boundary cosmological coherent states, includes a contribution of the order of the Planck constant $\\hbar$ that also appears in the corresponding semiclassical symplectic model. The analysis of this term gives a quantum-gravitational correction to the classical Friedmann dynamics of the scale factor yielding a small decelerating expansion (small accelerating contraction) of the universe. The robustness of the physical interpretation is established for arbitrary refinements of the boundary graphs. Also, mathematical equivalences between the semiclassical cosmological model and certain classical fluid and scalar field theories are explored.

  5. Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Floerchinger; Nikolaos Tetradis; Urs Achim Wiedemann

    2015-03-10

    The dissipation of energy from local velocity perturbations in the cosmological fluid affects the time evolution of spatially averaged fluid dynamic fields and the cosmological solution of Einstein's field equations. We show how this backreaction effect depends on shear and bulk viscosity and other material properties of the dark sector, as well as the spectrum of perturbations. If sufficiently large, this effect could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion.

  6. A Cosmology Calculator for the World Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward L. Wright

    2006-10-10

    A cosmology calculator that computes times and distances as a function of redshift for user-defined cosmological parameters is available on the World Wide Web. This note gives the formulae used by the cosmology calculator and discusses some of its implementation. A version of the calculator that allows one to specify the equation of state parameter w and w' and neutrino masses, and a version for converting the light travel times usually given in the popular press into redshifts are also available.

  7. Cosmological singularities in Born-Infeld determinantal gravity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cosmological singularities in Born-Infeld determinantal gravity Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on December 16, 2015 Title:...

  8. Regularizing future cosmological singularities with varying speed of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Shojai; A. Shojai; M. Sanati

    2015-07-09

    Cosmological models may result in future singularities. We show that, in the framework of dynamical varying speed of light theories, it is possible to regularize those singularities.

  9. Dark Matter Production in Non-Standard Early Universe Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehagen, Thomas Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Expansion rate of the Universe for the standard cosmology,epoch, instead of when the Universe is radiation dominated.Fluctuation and Nonsingular Universe. (In Russian). JETP

  10. Water Vapour Radiometers for the Australia Telescope Compact Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indermuehle, Balthasar T; Crofts, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed Water Vapour Radiometers (WVRs) for the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) that are capable of determining path fluctuations by virtue of measuring small temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere using the 22.2 GHz water vapour line for each of the six antennae. By measuring the line of sight variations of the water vapour, the induced path excess and thus the phase delay can be estimated and corrections can then be applied during data reduction. This reduces decorrelation of the source signal. We demonstrate how this recovers the telescope's efficiency and image quality as well as how this improves the telescope's ability to use longer baselines at higher frequencies, thereby resulting in higher spatial resolution. A description of the WVR hardware design, their calibration and water vapour retrieval mechanism is given.

  11. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradbury, S M; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Criswell, S; Dingus, B L; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Grindlay, J; Hillas, A M; Harris, K; Hermann, G; Kaaret, P E; Kieda, D B; Knapp, J; Krennrich, F; Le Bohec, S; Lessard, R W; Lloyd-Evans, J; McKernan, B; Müller, D; Ong, R; Quenby, J J; Quinn, J; Rochester, G D; Rose, H J; Salamon, M B; Sembroski, G H; Sumner, T J; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01

    We give an overview of the current status and scientific goals of VERITAS, a proposed hexagonal array of seven 10 m aperture imaging Cherenkov telescopes. The selected site is Montosa Canyon (1390 m a.s.l.) at the Whipple Observatory, Arizona. Each telescope, of 12 m focal length, will initially be equipped with a 499 element photomultiplier camera covering a 3.5 degree field of view. A central station will initiate the readout of 500 MHz FADCs upon receipt of multiple telescope triggers. The minimum detectable flux sensitivity will be 0.5% of the Crab Nebula flux at 200 GeV. Detailed simulations of the array's performance are presented elsewhere at this meeting. VERITAS will operate primarily as a gamma-ray observatory in the 50 GeV to 50 TeV range for the study of active galaxies, supernova remnants, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts.

  12. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bradbury; I. H. Bond; A. C. Breslin; J. H. Buckley; D. A. Carter-Lewis; M. Catanese; S. Criswell; B. L. Dingus; D. J. Fegan; J. P. Finley; J. Gaidos; J. Grindlay; A. M. Hillas; K. Harris; G. Hermann; P. Kaaret; D. Kieda; J. Knapp; F. Krennrich; S. LeBohec; R. W. Lessard; J. Lloyd-Evans; B. McKernan; D. Mueller; R. Ong; J. J. Quenby; J. Quinn; G. Rochester; H. J. Rose; M. Salamon; G. H. Sembroski; T. Sumner; S. Swordy; V. V. Vassiliev; T. C. Weekes

    1999-07-19

    We give an overview of the current status and scientific goals of VERITAS, a proposed hexagonal array of seven 10 m aperture imaging Cherenkov telescopes. The selected site is Montosa Canyon (1390 m a.s.l.) at the Whipple Observatory, Arizona. Each telescope, of 12 m focal length, will initially be equipped with a 499 element photomultiplier camera covering a 3.5 degree field of view. A central station will initiate the readout of 500 MHz FADCs upon receipt of multiple telescope triggers. The minimum detectable flux sensitivity will be 0.5% of the Crab Nebula flux at 200 GeV. Detailed simulations of the array's performance are presented elsewhere at this meeting. VERITAS will operate primarily as a gamma-ray observatory in the 50 GeV to 50 TeV range for the study of active galaxies, supernova remnants, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts.

  13. The Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony A. Stark; John Bally; Simon P. Balm; T. M. Bania; Alberto D. Bolatto; Richard A. Chamberlin; Gregory Engargiola; Maohai Huang; James G. Ingalls; Karl Jacobs; James M. Jackson; Jacob W. Kooi; Adair P. Lane; K. -Y. Lo; Rodney D. Marks; Christopher L. Martin; Dennis Mumma; Roopesh Ojha; Rudolf Schieder; Johannes Staguhn; Juergen Stutzki; Christopher K. Walker; Robert W. Wilson; Gregory A. Wright; Xiaolei Zhang; Peter Zimmermann; Ruediger Zimmermann

    2000-12-15

    AST/RO, a 1.7 m diameter telescope for astronomy and aeronomy studies at wavelengths between 200 and 2000 microns, was installed at the South Pole during the 1994-1995 Austral summer. The telescope operates continuously through the Austral winter, and is being used primarily for spectroscopic studies of neutral atomic carbon and carbon monoxide in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. The South Pole environment is unique among observatory sites for unusually low wind speeds, low absolute humidity, and the consistent clarity of the submillimeter sky. Four heterodyne receivers, an array receiver, three acousto-optical spectrometers, and an array spectrometer are installed. A Fabry-Perot spectrometer using a bolometric array and a Terahertz receiver are in development. Telescope pointing, focus, and calibration methods as well as the unique working environment and logistical requirements of the South Pole are described.

  14. The X-ray Telescope of the CAST Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kotthaus; H. Braeuninger; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; D. Kang; M. Kuster; G. Lutz; L. Strueder

    2005-11-14

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) searches for solar axions employing a 9 Tesla superconducting dipole magnet equipped with 3 independent detection systems for X-rays from axion-photon conversions inside the 10 m long magnetic field. Results of the first 6 months of data taking in 2003 imply a 95 % CL upper limit on the axion-photon coupling constant of 1.16x10(-10) GeV(-1) for axion masses CAST is a X-ray telescope consisting of a Wolter I type mirror system and a fully depleted pn-CCD as focal plane detector. Exploiting the full potential of background suppression by focussing X-rays emerging from the magnet bore, the axion sensitivity obtained with telescope data taken in 2004, for the first time in a controlled laboratory experiment, will supersede axion constraints derived from stellar energy loss arguments.

  15. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01

    Ahigh resolution(?International Linear Collider providing test beam infrastructure to detector R&D groups. The telescope consists of six sensor planes with a pixel pitch of either 18.4 ?m or 10 ?mand canbe operated insidea solenoidal magnetic fieldofupto1.2T.Ageneral purpose cooling, positioning, data acquisition (DAQ) and offine data analysis tools are available for the users. The excellent resolution, readout rate andDAQintegration capabilities made the telescopea primary beam tests tool also for several CERN based experiments. In this report the performance of the final telescope is presented. The plans for an even more flexible telescope with three differentpixel technologies(ATLASPixel, Mimosa,Timepix) withinthenew European detector infrastructure project AIDA are presented.

  16. MACHO Mass Determination Based on Space Telescope Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mareki Honma

    1999-03-24

    We investigate the possibility of lens mass determination for a caustic crossing microlensing event based on a space telescope observation. We demonstrate that the parallax due to the orbital motion of a space telescope causes a periodic fluctuation of the light curve, from which the lens distance can be derived. Since the proper motion of the lens relative to the source is also measurable for a caustic crossing event, one can find a full solution for microlensing properties of the event, including the lens mass. To determine the lens mass with sufficient accuracy, the light curve near the caustic crossing should be observed within uncertainty of $\\sim$ 1%. We argue that the Hubble Space Telescope observation of the caustic crossing supplied with ground-based observations of the full light curve will enable us to determine the mass of MACHOs, which is crucial for understanding the nature of MACHOs.

  17. Relay telescope for high power laser alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2006-09-19

    A laser system includes an optical path having an intracavity relay telescope with a telescope focal point for imaging an output of the gain medium between an image location at or near the gain medium and an image location at or near an output coupler for the laser system. A kinematic mount is provided within a vacuum chamber, and adapted to secure beam baffles near the telescope focal point. An access port on the vacuum chamber is adapted for allowing insertion and removal of the beam baffles. A first baffle formed using an alignment pinhole aperture is used during alignment of the laser system. A second tapered baffle replaces the alignment aperture during operation and acts as a far-field baffle in which off angle beams strike the baffle a grazing angle of incidence, reducing fluence levels at the impact areas.

  18. Lee Sang Gak Telescope (LSGT): A Remotely Operated Robotic Telescope for Education and Research at Seoul National University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Myungshin; Kim, Kihyun

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the Lee Sang Gak Telescope (LSGT), a remotely operated, robotic 0.43-meter telescope. The telescope was installed at the Siding Spring Observatory, Australia, in 2014 October, to secure regular and exclusive access to the dark sky and excellent atmospheric conditions in the southern hemisphere from the Seoul National University (SNU) campus. Here, we describe the LSGT system and its performance, present example images from early observations, and discuss a future plan to upgrade the system. The use of the telescope includes (i) long-term monitoring observations of nearby galaxies, active galactic nuclei, and supernovae; (ii) rapid follow-up observations of transients such as gamma-ray bursts and gravitational wave sources; and (iii) observations for educational activities at SNU. Based on observations performed so far, we find that the telescope is capable of providing images to a depth of R=21.5 mag (point source detection) at 5-sigma with 15 min total integration time under good observing condi...

  19. An Optical Reflector System for the CANGAROO-II Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiko Kawachi

    1999-11-30

    We have developed light and durable mirrors made of CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) laminates for the reflector of the new CANGAROO-II 7 m telescope. The reflector has a parabolic shape (F/1.1) with a 30 m^2 effective area which consists of 60 small spherical mirrors. The attitude of each mirror can be remotely adjusted by stepping motors. After the first adjustment work, the re ector offers a point image of about 0.14 degree (FWHM) on the optic axis. The telescope has been in operation since May 1999 with an energy threshold of ~ 300 GeV.

  20. An Optical Reflector System for the CANGAROO-II Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawachi, A

    1999-01-01

    We have developed light and durable mirrors made of CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) laminates for the reflector of the new CANGAROO-II 7 m telescope. The reflector has a parabolic shape (F/1.1) with a 30 m^2 effective area which consists of 60 small spherical mirrors. The attitude of each mirror can be remotely adjusted by stepping motors. After the first adjustment work, the re ector offers a point image of about 0.14 degree (FWHM) on the optic axis. The telescope has been in operation since May 1999 with an energy threshold of ~ 300 GeV.

  1. Cosmological perturbations in Hybrid Loop Quantum Cosmology: Mukhanov-Sasaki variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Castelló Gomar; Mikel Fernández-Méndez; Guillermo A. Mena Marugán; Javier Olmedo

    2014-09-08

    We study cosmological perturbations in the framework of Loop Quantum Cosmology, using a hybrid quantization approach and Mukhanov-Sasaki variables. The formulation in terms of these gauge invariants allows one to clarify the independence of the results on choices of gauge and facilitates the comparison with other approaches proposed to deal with cosmological perturbations in the context of Loop Quantum Theory. A kind of Born-Oppenheimer ansatz is employed to extract the dynamics of the inhomogeneous perturbations, separating them from the degrees of freedom of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry. With this ansatz, we derive an approximate Schr\\"odinger equation for the cosmological perturbations and study its range of validity. We also prove that, with an alternate factor ordering, the dynamics deduced for the perturbations is similar to the one found in the so-called "dressed metric approach", apart from a possible scaling of the matter field in order to preserve its unitary evolution in the regime of Quantum Field Theory in a curved background and some quantization prescription issues. Finally, we obtain the effective equations that are naturally associated with the Mukhanov-Sasaki variables, both with and without introducing the Born-Oppenheimer ansatz, and with the different factor orderings that we have studied.

  2. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Filipe Abdalla; Sarah Bridle; Steve Rawlings

    2004-09-13

    We argue that the Square Kilometre Array has the potential to make both redshift (HI) surveys and radio continuum surveys that will revolutionize cosmological studies, provided that it has sufficient instantaneous field-of-view that these surveys can cover a hemisphere in a timescale ~1 yr. Adopting this assumption, we focus on two key experiments which will yield fundamental new measurements in cosmology, characterizing the properties of the mysterious dark energy which dominates the dynamics of today's Universe. Experiment I will map out ~10^9 HI galaxies to redshift z~1.5, providing the premier measurement of the clustering power spectrum of galaxies: accurately delineating the acoustic oscillations and the `turnover'. Experiment II will quantify the cosmic shear distortion of ~10^10 radio continuum sources, determining a precise power spectrum of the dark matter, and its growth as a function of cosmic epoch. We contrast the performance of the SKA in precision cosmology with that of other facilities which will, probably or possibly, be available on a similar timescale. We conclude that data from the SKA will yield transformational science as the direct result of four key features: (i) the immense cosmic volumes probed, exceeding future optical redshift surveys by more than an order of magnitude; (ii) well-controlled systematic effects such as the narrow `k-space window function' for Experiment I and the accurately-known `point-spread function' for Experiment II; (iii) the ability to measure with high precision large-scale modes in the clustering power spectra, for which nuisance effects such as non-linear structure growth, peculiar velocities and `galaxy bias' are minimised; and (iv) different degeneracies between key parameters to those which are inherent in the CMB.

  3. Cosmological Evidence for Modified Gravity (MOG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, J W

    2015-01-01

    Deviations from the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model motivate an interpretation of early universe cosmology using the Scalar-Tensor-Vector-Gravity (STVG) theory. A constraint analysis carried out by Valentino, Melchiorri and Silk, revealed deviations from the growth of structure predicted by General Relativity, and a lensing anomaly in the angular CMB power spectrum data with a $95\\%$ c.l. The modified gravity (MOG) theory resolves the lensing deviation from the standard model and provides an explanation of the CMB and structure growth data.

  4. Experimental Modeling of Cosmological Inflation with Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor I. Smolyaninov; Yu-Ju Hung; Ehren Hwang

    2012-07-23

    Recently we demonstrated that mapping of monochromatic extraordinary light distribution in a hyperbolic metamaterial along some spatial direction may model the flow of time and create an experimental toy model of the big bang. Here we extend this model to emulate cosmological inflation. This idea is illustrated in experiments performed with two-dimensional plasmonic hyperbolic metamaterials. Spatial dispersion which is always present in hyperbolic metamaterials results in scale-dependent (fractal) structure of the inflationary "metamaterial spacetime". This feature of our model replicates hypothesized fractal structure of the real observable universe.

  5. Cosmological Constraints on Isocurvature and Tensor Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Kawasaki; Toyokazu Sekiguchi

    2007-05-20

    We investigate cosmological constraints on primordial isocurvature and tensor perturbations, using recent observations of the cosmic microwave background and the large scale structure. We find that present observations are consistent with purely adiabatic initial conditions for the structure formation under any priors on correlations of isocurvature modes, and upper limits on the contribution of isocurvature and tensor perturbations are presented. We also apply the obtained constraints to some specific theoretical models, axion isocurvature perturbation models and curvaton models, and give some implications for theoretical models.

  6. Rastall Cosmology and the ?CDM Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos E. M. Batista; Mahamadou H. Daouda; Júlio C. Fabris; Oliver F. Piattella; Davi C. Rodrigues

    2012-03-13

    Rastall's theory is based on the non-conservation of the energy-momentum tensor. We show that, in this theory, if we introduce a two-fluid model, one component representing vacuum energy whereas the other pressureless matter (e.g. baryons plus cold dark matter), the cosmological scenario is the same as for the \\Lambda CDM model, both at background and linear perturbative levels, except for one aspect: now dark energy may cluster. We speculate that this can lead to a possibility of distinguishing the models at the non-linear perturbative level.

  7. Bubble Free Energy in Cosmological Phase Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ignatius

    1993-01-07

    Free energy as a function of temperature and the bubble radius is determined for spherical bubbles created in cosmological first order phase transitions. The phase transition is assumed to be driven by an order parameter (e.g. a Higgs field) with quartic potential. The definition of the bubble radius and the corresponding generalized, curvature-dependent surface tensions are discussed. In the free energy expansion in powers of the inverse radius, the coefficients of the curvature term and the constant term are also calculated.

  8. Dark Energy Studies: Challenges to Computational Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Annis; Francisco J. Castander; August E. Evrard; Joshua A. Frieman; Enrique Gaztanaga; Bhuvnesh Jain; Andrey V. Kravtsov; Ofer Lahav; Huan Lin; Joseph Mohr; Paul M. Ricker; Albert Stebbins; Risa H. Wechsler; David H. Weinberg; Jochen Weller

    2005-10-06

    The ability to test the nature of dark mass-energy components in the universe through large-scale structure studies hinges on accurate predictions of sky survey expectations within a given world model. Numerical simulations predict key survey signatures with varying degrees of confidence, limited mainly by the complex astrophysics of galaxy formation. As surveys grow in size and scale, systematic uncertainties in theoretical modeling can become dominant. Dark energy studies will challenge the computational cosmology community to critically assess current techniques, develop new approaches to maximize accuracy, and establish new tools and practices to efficiently employ globally networked computing resources.

  9. Dark Energy Studies: Challenges to Computational Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annis, J; Evrard, A E; Frieman, J A; Gaztañaga, E; Jain, B; Kravtsov, A V; Lahav, O; Lin, H; Mohr, J; Ricker, P M; Stebbins, A; Wechsler, R H; Weinberg, D H; Weller, J; Annis, James; Castander, Francisco J.; Evrard, August E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Lahav, Ofer; Lin, Huan; Mohr, Joseph; Ricker, Paul M.; Stebbins, Albert; Wechsler, Risa H.; Weinberg, David H.; Weller, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    The ability to test the nature of dark mass-energy components in the universe through large-scale structure studies hinges on accurate predictions of sky survey expectations within a given world model. Numerical simulations predict key survey signatures with varying degrees of confidence, limited mainly by the complex astrophysics of galaxy formation. As surveys grow in size and scale, systematic uncertainties in theoretical modeling can become dominant. Dark energy studies will challenge the computational cosmology community to critically assess current techniques, develop new approaches to maximize accuracy, and establish new tools and practices to efficiently employ globally networked computing resources.

  10. Dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Genly [Departamento de Matemática, Universidad Central de Las Villas, Santa Clara, CP 54830 (Cuba); Saridakis, Emmanuel N., E-mail: genly.leon@ucv.cl, E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu [Physics Division, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zografou Campus, Athens (Greece)

    2013-03-01

    We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology, incorporating also the requirements of ghost and instabilities absence. We find that there are not any new stable late-time solutions apart from those of standard quintessence. Furthermore, depending on the model parameters the Galileons may survive at late times or they may completely disappear by the dynamics, however the corresponding observables are always independent of the Galileon terms, determined only by the usual action terms. Thus, although the Galileons can play an important role at inflationary or at recent times, in the future, when the universe will asymptotically reach its stable state, they will not have any effect on its evolution.

  11. Modified Hamiltonian formalism for Regge Teitelboim Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinaki Patra; Md. Raju; Gargi Manna; Jyoti Prasad Saha

    2014-12-10

    The Ostrogradski approach for the Hamiltonian formalism of higher derivative theory is not satisfactory because of the reason that the Lagrangian cannot be viewed as a function on the tangent bundle to coordinate manifold. In this article, we have used an alternative approach which leads directly to the Lagrangian which, being a function on the tangent manifold, gives correct equation of motion; no new coordinate variables need to be added. This approach can be directly used to the singular (in Ostrogradski sense) Lagrangian. We have used this method for the Regge Teitelboim (RT) minisuperspace cosmological model. We have obtained the Hamiltonian of the dynamical equation of the scale factor of RT model.

  12. Cosmological Non-Constant Problem: Cosmological bounds on TeV-scale physics and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niayesh Afshordi; Elliot Nelson

    2015-07-04

    We study the influence of the fluctuations of a Lorentz invariant and conserved vacuum on cosmological metric perturbations, and show that they generically blow up in the IR. We compute this effect using the K\\"all\\'en-Lehmann spectral representation of stress correlators in generic quantum field theories, as well as the holographic bound on their entanglement entropy, both leading to an IR cut-off that scales as the fifth power of the highest UV scale (in Planck units). One may view this as analogous to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which is imposed on the phase space of gravitational theories by the Einstein constraint equations. The leading effect on cosmological observables come from anisotropic vacuum stresses which imply: i) any extension of the standard model of particle physics can only have masses (or resonances) $\\lesssim$ 35 TeV, and ii) perturbative quantum field theory or quantum gravity becomes strongly coupled beyond a cut-off scale of $\\Lambda\\lesssim1$ PeV. Such a low cut-off is independently motivated by the Higgs hierarchy problem. This result, which we dub the cosmological non-constant problem, can be viewed as an extension of the cosmological constant (CC) problem, demonstrating the non-trivial UV-IR coupling and (yet another) limitation of effective field theory in gravity. However, it is more severe than the old CC problem, as vacuum fluctuations cannot be tuned to cancel due to the positivity of spectral densities or entropy. We thus predict that future advances in cosmological observations and collider technology will sandwich from above and below, and eventually discover, new (non-perturbative) physics beyond the Standard Model within the TeV-PeV energy range.

  13. Integrating Seeing Measurements into the Operations of Solar Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    years, experimental solar physics has seen renewed efforts to design, build and operate the nextIntegrating Seeing Measurements into the Operations of Solar Telescopes C. Denker and A. P. Verdoni New Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research 323 Martin Luther King Blvd

  14. Status and First Results of the MAGIC Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cortina; for the MAGIC collaboration

    2004-07-22

    The 17 m MAGIC Cherenkov telescope for gamma ray astronomy between 30 and 300 GeV started operations in its final configuration in October 2003 and is currently well into its calibration phase. Here I report on its present status and its first gamma ray source detections.

  15. The high resolution silicon telescope of the INSULAB group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Lietti, Daniela; Vallazza, Erik

    This thesis has focused on the study of the performance of the high resolution tracking system (telescope) of the INSULAB group and on the implementation of a new data acquisition (DAQ) to comply with the high rate of the CERN North Area extracted beams. This system has allowed to increase the DAQ rate by a factor two with respect to the “standard” electronics. The INSULAB telescope is designed to test detectors ranging from calorimeters to more complex systems like in the case of the bent crystals studied by the COHERENT experiment. The telescope consists of four 300 $mu$m thick double side silicon strip detector modules with an area of 1.92$\times$1.92 cm$^{2}$ and 384 strips. The readout pitch is 50 $mu$m on both sides of the module but the junction side has an implant pitch of 25 $mu$m (and thus a floating strip) to improve the resolution. The telescope has been installed on the H4 beamline at the CERN SPS for the commissioning of the new readout system in June 2012. The results are analyzed in terms...

  16. Detecting Earth-impacting asteroids Pan-STARRS prototype telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veres, Peter

    Detecting Earth-impacting asteroids with the Pan-STARRS prototype telescope (Based on MS. Grav #12;10/14/2008 DPS, Ithaca, NY Granvik: Earth-impacting asteroids with PS1 Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Moving Object Processing System (MOPS) #12;10/14/2008 DPS, Ithaca, NY Granvik: Earth-impacting asteroids

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Supernova Remnant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the Supernova Remnant G8.7-0.1 We present a detailed analysis of the GeV gamma-ray emission toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G8.7-0.1 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on...

  18. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Low Resolution Spectrograph: mechanical design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Gary J.

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Low Resolution Spectrograph: mechanical design G. J. Hilla* , H. Nicklas constraints make the LRS a challenging instrument, built on a limited budget. The mechanical design of the mechanical design of the LRS. Fabrication, assembly and testing of the LRS will be completed by mid 1998

  19. The HobbyEberly Telescope Low Resolution Spectrograph: mechanical design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Gary J.

    The Hobby­Eberly Telescope Low Resolution Spectrograph: mechanical design G. J. Hill a* , H constraints make the LRS a challenging instrument, built on a limited budget. The mechanical design of the mechanical design of the LRS. Fabrication, assembly and testing of the LRS will be completed by mid 1998

  20. Parametric modeling and control of telescope wind-induced vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMynowski, Douglas G. - MacMynowski, Douglas G.

    -buffeting is presented. The model is being developed to support the design of next generation segmented-mirror optical: Parametric modeling, extremely large telescope, control, wind-buffeting 1. INTRODUCTION Various design the predictions of the former at one or more points in the design space. An initial parametric model of wind

  1. Laser guide star projection for large telescopes Erez N. Ribak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribak, Erez

    this projected pattern. Keywords: adaptive optics, laser guide stars 1. INTRODUCTION Telescopes of diameter will be corrected by active and adaptive optics, to remedy slow and fast variations of the optics beam diameter is set by the turbulence distorting the beam going up. Most systems use the light

  2. Performance of the MAGIC telescopes after the major upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitarek, Julian; Colin, Pierre; Mazin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    MAGIC is a system of two Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes located on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain. During summer 2011 and 2012 it underwent a major upgrade. The main subsystems upgraded were the MAGIC-I camera and its trigger system and the readout system of both telescopes. We use observations of the Crab Nebula taken at low and medium zenith angles to assess the key performance parameters of the MAGIC stereo system. For low zenith angle observations, the standard trigger threshold of the MAGIC telescopes is about 50 GeV. The integral sensitivity for point-like sources with Crab Nebula-like spectra above 220 GeV is (0.66 +/- 0.03)% of Crab Nebula flux in 50 h of observations. The angular resolution, defined as the sigma of a 2-dimensional Gaussian distribution, at energies of a few hundred GeV is below 0.07degree, while the energy resolution is around 16%. We investigate the effect of the systematic uncertainty on the data taken with the MAGIC telescopes after the upgrade. We estimate that th...

  3. The pier and building of the European Solar Telescope (EST) F.C.M. Bettonvil*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    The pier and building of the European Solar Telescope (EST) F.C.M. Bettonvil*a , R. Codinab , A surrounded by an open framework. Keywords: Telescope pier, building, solar telescope, CFD analysis, tower. ABSTRACT EST (European Solar Telescope) is a 4-m class solar telescope, which is currently

  4. Cosmology as Science: From Inflation to the Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Krass, Lawrence [Case Western Reserve

    2010-01-08

    Recent developments in cosmology bring to the forefront fundamental questions about our ability to falsify various fundamental assumptions about the universe.  I will discuss three issues that reflect different aspects of these questions:  (1) "Proving" Inflation (2) Anthropic "Explanations" (3) Cosmology of the far future.

  5. Testing No-Scale Supergravity with the Fermi Space Telescope LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2014-02-17

    We describe a methodology for testing No-Scale Supergravity by the LAT instrument onboard the Fermi Space Telescope via observation of gamma ray emissions from lightest supersymmetric (SUSY) neutralino annihilations. For our test vehicle we engage the framework of the supersymmetric grand unified model No-Scale Flipped $SU(5)$ with extra vector-like flippon multiplets derived from F-Theory, known as $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$. We show that through compression of the light stau and light bino neutralino mass difference, where internal bremsstrahlung (IB) photons give a dominant contribution, the photon yield from annihilation of SUSY dark matter can be elevated to a number of events potentially observable by the Fermi-LAT in the coming years. Likewise, the increased yield in No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$ may also have rendered the existing observation of a 133 GeV monochromatic gamma ray line visible, if additional data should exclude systematic or statistical explanations. The question of intensity aside, No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$ can indeed provide a natural weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) candidate with a mass in the correct range to yield $\\gamma \\gamma$ and $\\gamma Z$ emission lines at $m_{\\chi} \\sim 133$ GeV and $m_{\\chi} \\sim 145$ GeV, respectively. Additionally, we elucidate the emerging empirical connection between recent Planck satellite data and No-Scale Supergravity cosmological models which mimic the Starobinsky model of inflation. Together, these experiments furnish rich alternate avenues for testing No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$, and similarly structured models, the results of which may lend independent credence to observations made at the LHC.

  6. f(T,T) gravity and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Otalora, G.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N. E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension of f(T) gravity, allowing for a general coupling of the torsion scalar T with the trace of the matter energy-momentum tensor T. The resulting f(T,T) theory is a new modified gravity, since it is different from all the existing torsion or curvature based constructions. Applied to a cosmological framework, it leads to interesting phenomenology. In particular, one can obtain a unified description of the initial inflationary phase, the subsequent non-accelerating, matter-dominated expansion, and then the transition to a late-time accelerating phase. Additionally, the effective dark energy sector can be quintessence or phantom-like, or exhibit the phantom-divide crossing during the evolution. Moreover, in the far future the universe results either to a de Sitter exponential expansion, or to eternal power-law accelerated expansions. Finally, a detailed study of the scalar perturbations at the linear level reveals that f(T,T) cosmology can be free of ghosts and instabilities for a wide class of ansatzes and model parameters.

  7. On the nature of cosmological time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magain, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Time is a parameter playing a central role in our most fundamental modeling of natural laws. Relativity theory shows that the comparison of times measured by different clocks depends on their relative motions and on the strength of the gravitational field in which they are embedded. In standard cosmology, the time parameter is the one measured by fundamental clocks, i.e. clocks at rest with respect to the expanding space. This proper time is assumed to flow at a constant rate throughout the whole history of the Universe. We make the alternative hypothesis that the rate at which cosmological time flows depends on the dynamical state of the Universe. In thermodynamics, the arrow of time is strongly related to the second law, which states that the entropy of an isolated system will always increase with time or, at best, stay constant. Hence, we assume that time measured by fundamental clocks is proportional to the entropy of the region of the Universe that is causally connected to them. Under that simple assumpt...

  8. Homogeneous cosmology with aggressively expanding civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jay Olson

    2014-11-17

    In the context of a homogeneous universe, we note that the appearance of aggressively expanding advanced life is geometrically similar to the process of nucleation and bubble growth in a first-order cosmological phase transition. We exploit this similarity to describe the dynamics of life saturating the universe on a cosmic scale, adapting the phase transition model to incorporate probability distributions of expansion and resource consumption strategies. Through a series of numerical solutions covering several orders of magnitude in the input assumption parameters, the resulting cosmological model is used to address basic questions related to the intergalactic spreading of life, dealing with issues such as timescales, observability, competition between strategies, and first-mover advantage. Finally, we examine physical effects on the universe itself, such as reheating and the backreaction on the evolution of the scale factor, if such life is able to control and convert a significant fraction of the available pressureless matter into radiation. We conclude that the existence of life, if certain advanced technologies are practical, could have a significant influence on the future large-scale evolution of the universe.

  9. Cosmological effects of coupled dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophie C. F. Morris; Anne M. Green; Antonio Padilla; Ewan R. M. Tarrant

    2013-10-15

    Many models have been studied that contain more than one species of dark matter and some of these couple the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) to a light scalar field. In doing this we introduce additional long range forces, which in turn can significantly affect our estimates of cosmological parameters if not properly accounted for. It is, therefore, important to study these models and their resulting cosmological implications. We present a model in which a fraction of the total cold dark matter density is coupled to a scalar field. We study the background and perturbation evolution and calculate the resulting Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy spectra. The greater the fraction of dark matter coupled to the scalar field and the stronger the coupling strength, the greater the deviation of the background evolution from LCDM. Previous work, with a single coupled dark matter species, has found an upper limit on the coupling strength of order O(0.1). We find that with a coupling of this magnitude more than half the dark matter can be coupled to a scalar field without producing any significant deviations from LCDM.

  10. Small Scale Cosmological Perturbations: An Analytic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Hu; Naoshi Sugiyama

    1996-04-19

    Through analytic techniques verified by numerical calculations, we establish general relations between the matter and cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra and their dependence on cosmological parameters on small scales. Fluctuations in the CMB, baryons, cold dark matter (CDM), and neutrinos receive a boost at horizon crossing. Baryon drag on the photons causes alternating acoustic peak heights in the CMB and is uncovered in its bare form under the photon diffusion scale. Decoupling of the photons at last scattering and of the baryons at the end of the Compton drag epoch, freezes the diffusion-damped acoustic oscillations into the CMB and matter power spectra at different scales. We determine the dependence of the respective acoustic amplitudes and damping lengths on fundamental cosmological parameters. The baryonic oscillations, enhanced by the velocity overshoot effect, compete with CDM fluctuations in the present matter power spectrum. We present new exact analytic solutions for the cold dark matter fluctuations in the presence of a growth- inhibiting radiation {\\it and} baryon background. Combined with the acoustic contributions and baryonic infall into CDM potential wells, this provides a highly accurate analytic form of the small-scale transfer function in the general case.

  11. HYBRID COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH STREAM VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Thacker, Robert J. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2013-07-10

    In the early universe, substantial relative ''stream'' velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To assess the impact of these velocities on high-redshift structure formation, we carry out a suite of high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations, which use smoothed particle hydrodynamic data sets as initial conditions, converted using a new tool developed for this work. These simulations resolve structures with masses as small as a few 100 M{sub Sun }, and we focus on the 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} ''mini-halos'' in which the first stars formed. At z Almost-Equal-To 17, the presence of stream velocities has only a minor effect on the number density of halos below 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, but it greatly suppresses gas accretion onto all halos and the dark matter structures around them. Stream velocities lead to significantly lower halo gas fractions, especially for Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} objects, an effect that is likely to depend on the orientation of a halo's accretion lanes. This reduction in gas density leads to colder, more compact radial profiles, and it substantially delays the redshift of collapse of the largest halos, leading to delayed star formation and possibly delayed reionization. These many differences suggest that future simulations of early cosmological structure formation should include stream velocities to properly predict gas evolution, star formation, and the epoch of reionization.

  12. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, C C

    2015-01-01

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay $\\Delta\\tau$ of images, the velocity dispersion $\\sigma$ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, $\\Delta\\tau/\\sigma^2$. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between $\\Lambda$CDM universe and $R_h=ct$ universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the SLACS and LSD survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with $\\Delta\\tau$ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the $99.7\\%$ confidence level. Compar...

  13. Wide-Field InfrarRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets WFIRST-AFTA 2015 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spergel, D; Baltay, C; Bennett, D; Breckinridge, J; Donahue, M; Dressler, A; Gaudi, B S; Greene, T; Guyon, O; Hirata, C; Kalirai, J; Kasdin, N J; Macintosh, B; Moos, W; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Rauscher, B; Rhodes, J; Wang, Y; Weinberg, D; Benford, D; Hudson, M; Jeong, W -S; Mellier, Y; Traub, W; Yamada, T; Capak, P; Colbert, J; Masters, D; Penny, M; Savransky, D; Sterns, D; Zimmerman, N; Barry, R; Bartusek, L; Carpenter, K; Cheng, E; Content, D; Dekens, F; Demers, R; Grady, K; Jackson, C; Kuan, G; Kruk, J; Melton, M; Nemati, B; Parvin, B; Poberezhskiy, I; Peddie, C; Ruffa, J; Wallace, J K; Whipple, A; Wollack, E; Zhao, F

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the 2014 study by the Science Definition Team (SDT) of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission. It is a space observatory that will addresses the most compelling scientific problems in dark energy, exoplanets and general astrophysics using a 2.4m telescope with a wide-field infrared instrument and an optical coronagraph. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey recommended a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope as its top priority for a new large space mission. As conceived by the decadal survey, WFIRST would carry out a dark energy science program, a microlensing program to determine the demographics of exoplanets, and a general observing program utilizing its ultra wide field. In October 2012, NASA chartered a Science Definition Team (SDT) to produce, in collaboration with the WFIRST Study Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL, a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for an implementation of WFIRST using one of the 2.4-m, Hubble-quality telescope assemblies recently made availabl...

  14. The Zadko Telescope: the Australian Node of a Global Network of Fully Robotic Follow-up Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    imaging between the east coast of Australia and South Africa at similar latitude. The Zadko Telescope in frontier optical transient science projects. The so called `transient Universe'' consists of astronomical image processing pipeline produces calibrated FITS images to external users via a web-based interface

  15. Ion implantation for figure correction of high-resolution x-ray telescope mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalifoux, Brandon D

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating mirrors for future high-resolution, large-aperture x-ray telescopes continues to challenge the x-ray astronomy instrumentation community. Building a large-aperture telescope requires thin, lightweight mirrors; ...

  16. Integrated modeling to facilitate control architecture design for lightweight space telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohan, Lucy Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis it to examine the effects of utilizing control to better meet performance and systematic requirements of future space telescopes. New telescope systems are moving toward tighter optical performance ...

  17. Tradespace Investigation of a Telescope Architecture for Next-generation Space Astronomy and Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-12-19

    Humanity’s endeavor to further its scientific understanding of the celestial heavens has led to the creation and evolution of increasingly powerful and complex space telescopes. Space telescopes provide a view of the solar ...

  18. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

  19. An Efficient Work-Distribution Strategy for Gridding Radio-Telescope Data on GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romein, John W.

    other telescopes in the world together -- the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) [4]. The imager is a critical

  20. Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the drivers for building solar telescopes with large apertures. Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) make it possible to build solar telescopes in an open configuration and thus go beyond the conventional meterProgress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory C. Denkera, P. R

  1. EST: the European Solar Telescope D. Kiselman, M. Lofdahl & G. Scharmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löfdahl, Mats

    is to construct a new large-aperture solar telescope: the European Solar Telescope (EST). 3. EST design studyEST: the European Solar Telescope D. Kiselman, M. L¨ofdahl & G. Scharmer The Institute for Solar of solar magnetism is to measure the structure and dynamics of the magnetic field at the solar surface down

  2. Early Optical Follow-up Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts with the Robotic Liverpool Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomboc, Andreja

    Early Optical Follow-up Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts with the Robotic Liverpool Telescope A, Slovenia 3 ITC-IRST and INFN, Trento, via Sommarive, 18 38050 Povo (TN), Italy Abstract Robotic telescopes of robotic telescopes is the rapid reaction to Targets of Opportunity, including short and unpredictable

  3. EarlyTime Observations of GRBs afterglow with 2m Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomboc, Andreja

    Early­Time Observations of GRBs afterglow with 2­m Robotic Telescopes A. Melandri # , A. Gomboc time multi­wavelength light curves, obtained by space and ground­based robotic telescopes, have shown followup programme being conducted on a network of the world's three largest robotic telescopes that aims

  4. Cornelis Zwaan, open principle, and the future of high-resolution solar telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    ; (iii) the design consequences for the new generation of high-resolution solar telescopes. Keywords to the open tower design. In section 3 we consider the interaction between the wind and the telescope 15 m and upward when there is some wind. The conclusion from this experience was the open telescope

  5. Management of the Gemini 8M Telescopes Project R. Kurz, M. Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management of the Gemini 8­M Telescopes Project R. Kurz, M. Mountain Gemini Telescopes Project, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson AZ 85719 Gemini Preprint #7 #12; Management of the Gemini 8­M Telescopes, organizations in the partner countries, and industrial contractors. The project organization and management

  6. A Wide-Field Infrared Camera for the Palomar 200-inch Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    A Wide-Field Infrared Camera for the Palomar 200-inch Telescope J. C. Wilsona, S. S. Eikenberrya, C that provides the Palomar 200-inch telescope with such an imaging capability. WIRC features a field-of-view (FOV Camera (WIRC) at the Palomar 200-inch telescope. Mounted at prime focus to take advantage

  7. Cosmological model-independent Gamma-ray bursts calibration and its cosmological constraint to dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lixin, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2012-04-01

    As so far, the redshift of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can extend to z ? 8 which makes it as a complementary probe of dark energy to supernova Ia (SN Ia). However, the calibration of GRBs is still a big challenge when they are used to constrain cosmological models. Though, the absolute magnitude of GRBs is still unknown, the slopes of GRBs correlations can be used as a useful constraint to dark energy in a completely cosmological model independent way. In this paper, we follow Wang's model-independent distance measurement method and calculate their values by using 109 GRBs events via the so-called Amati relation. Then, we use the obtained model-independent distances to constrain ?CDM model as an example.

  8. Quantum cosmology with scalar fields: self-adjointness and cosmological scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Almeida; A. B. Batista; J. C. Fabris; P. R. L. V. Moniz

    2015-01-17

    We discuss the issue of unitarity in particular quantum cosmological models with scalar field. The time variable is recovered, in this context, by using the Schutz's formalism for a radiative fluid. Two cases are considered: a phantom scalar field and an ordinary scalar field. For the first case, it is shown that the evolution is unitary provided a convenient factor ordering and inner product measure are chosen; the same happens for the ordinary scalar field, except for some special cases for which the Hamiltonian is not self-adjoint but admits a self-adjoint extension. In all cases, even for those cases not exhibiting unitary evolution, the formal computation of the expectation value of the scale factor indicates a non-singular bounce. The importance of the unitary evolution in quantum cosmology is briefly discussed.

  9. Observation of GRBs by the MAGIC Telescope, Status and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bastieri; N. Galante; M. Garczarczyk; M. Gaug; F. Longo; S. Mizobuchi; V. Scapin

    2007-09-10

    Observation of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Very High Energy (VHE) domain will provide important information on the physical conditions in GRB outflows. The MAGIC telescope is the best suited Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) for these observations. Thanks to its fast repositioning time and low energy threshold, MAGIC is able to start quickly the follow-up observation, triggered by an alert from the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN), and observe the prompt emission and early afterglow phase from GRBs. In the last two years of operation several GRB follow-up observations were performed by MAGIC, however, until now without successful detection of VHE gamma rays above threshold energies >100 GeV. In this paper we revise the expectations for the GRB observations with MAGIC, based on the experience from the last years of operation.

  10. Registration of atmospheric neutrinos with the Baikal neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baikal Collaboration; V. A. Balkanov et al

    1999-03-23

    We present first neutrino induced events observed with a deep underwater neutrino telescope. Data from 70 days effective life time of the BAIKAL prototype telescope NT-96 have been analyzed with two different methods. With the standard track reconstruction method, 9 clear upward muon candidates have been identified, in good agreement with 8.7 events expected from Monte Carlo calculations for atmospheric neutrinos. The second analysis is tailored to muons coming from close to the opposite zenith. It yields 4 events, compared to 3.5 from Monte Carlo expectations. From this we derive a 90 % upper flux limit of 1.1 * 10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 for muons in excess of those expected from atmospheric neutrinos with zenith angle > 150 degrees and energy > 10GeV.

  11. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fan Yizhong, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

  12. SLAC All Access: Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Romani, Roger

    2014-06-24

    Three hundred and fifty miles overhead, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope silently glides through space. From this serene vantage point, the satellite's instruments watch the fiercest processes in the universe unfold. Pulsars spin up to 700 times a second, sweeping powerful beams of gamma-ray light through the cosmos. The hyperactive cores of distant galaxies spew bright jets of plasma. Far beyond, something mysterious explodes with unfathomable power, sending energy waves crashing through the universe. Stanford professor and KIPAC member Roger W. Romani talks about this orbiting telescope, the most advanced ever to view the sky in gamma rays, a form of light at the highest end of the energy spectrum that's created in the hottest regions of the universe.

  13. First images on the sky from a hyper telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Pedretti; A. Labeyrie; L. Arnold; N. Thureau; O. Lardiere; A. Boccaletti; P. Riaud

    2000-09-28

    We show star images obtained with a miniature ``densified pupil imaging interferometer'' also called a hyper-telescope. The formation of such images violates a ``golden rule of imaging interferometers'' which appeared to forbid the use of interferometric arrangements differing from a Fizeau interferometer. These produce useless images when the sub-apertures spacing is much wider than their size, owing to diffraction through the sub-apertures. The hyper-telescope arrangement solves these problems opening the way towards multi-kilometer imaging arrays in space. We experimentally obtain an intensity gain of 24 +- 3X when a densified-pupil interferometer is compared to an equivalent Fizeau-type interferometer and show images of the double star alpha Gem. The initial results presented confirm the possibility of directly obtaining high resolution and high dynamic range images in the recombined focal plane of a large interferometer if enough elements are used.

  14. The reflecting surface of the MAGIC-II Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bastieri; J. Arnold; C. Baixeras; O. Citterio; F. Dazzi; B. De Lotto; M. Doro; M. Ghigo; E. Giro; F. Goebel; R. Kosyra; E. Lorenz; M. Mariotti; R. Mirzoyan; R. Paoletti; G. Pareschi; D. Pascoli; A. Pepato; L. Peruzzo; A. Saggion; P. Sartori; A. Sillanpää

    2007-09-10

    The MAGIC Collaboration is building a second telescope, MAGIC II, improving the design of the current MAGIC Telescope. MAGIC II is being built at 85 m of distance from MAGIC I, and will also feature a huge reflecting surface of ~240 m$^2$ of area. One of the improvement is the design for the mirror of MAGIC II, that are lighter and larger, being square of 1 m of side and weighting around 15 kg. For the development and production of the new mirrors, two different techniques, both reliable and affordable in price, were selected: the diamond milling of aluminium surfaces and the cold slumping of thin glass panes. As tests for the second one are still ongoing, we present a description of the diamond milling technique, and its application and performance to the produced mirrors.

  15. Field Fractal Cosmological Model As an Example of Practical Cosmology Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Baryshev

    2015-03-11

    The idea of the global gravitational effect as the source of cosmological redshift was considered by de Sitter (1916, 1917), Eddington (1923), Tolman (1929) and Bondi (1947). Also Hubble (1929) called the discovered distance-redshift relation as "De Sitter effect". For homogeneous matter distribution cosmological gravitational redshift is proportional to square of distance: z_grav ~ r^2. However for a fractal matter distribution having the fractal dimension D=2 the global gravitational redshift is the linear function of distance: z_grav ~ r, which gives possibility for interpretation of the Hubble law without the space expansion. Here the field gravity fractal cosmological model (FGF) is presented, which based on two initial principles. The first assumption is that the Feynman's field gravity approach describes the gravitational interaction, which delivers a natural basis for the conceptual unity of all fundamental physical interactions within the framework of the relativistic and quantum fields in Minkowski space. The second hypothesis is that the spatial distribution of gravitating matter is a fractal at all scales up to the Hubble radius. The fractal dimension of matter distribution is assumed to be D = 2, which implies that the global gravitational redshift is the explanation of the observed linear Hubble law. In the frame of the FGF all three phenomena - the cosmic background radiation, the fractal large scale structure, and the Hubble law, - could be the consequence of a unique large scale structure evolution process of the initially homogeneous ordinary matter without nonbaryonic matter and dark energy.

  16. The Raychaudhuri equation in homogeneous cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albareti, F.D.; Cembranos, J.A.R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A. E-mail: cembra@fis.ucm.es E-mail: dobado@fis.ucm.es

    2014-03-01

    In this work we address the issue of studying the conditions required to guarantee the Focusing Theorem for both null and timelike geodesic congruences by using the Raychaudhuri equation. In particular we study the case of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker as well as more general Bianchi Type I spacetimes. The fulfillment of the Focusing Theorem is mandatory in small scales since it accounts for the attractive character of gravity. However, the Focusing Theorem is not satisfied at cosmological scales due to the measured negative deceleration parameter. The study of the conditions needed for congruences convergence is not only relevant at the fundamental level but also to derive the viability conditions to be imposed on extended theories of gravity describing the different expansion regimes of the universe. We illustrate this idea for f(R) gravity theories.

  17. Cool Core Clusters from Cosmological Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasia, E; Murante, G; Planelles, S; Beck, A M; Biffi, V; Ragone-Figueroa, C; Granato, G L; Steinborn, L K; Dolag, K

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters, aimed at comparing predictions with observational data on the diversity between cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our simulations include the effects of stellar and AGN feedback and are based on an improved version of the Smoothed-Particle-Hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, which ameliorates gas mixing and better captures gas-dynamical instabilities by including a suitable artificial thermal diffusion. In this Letter, we focus our analysis on the entropy profiles, our primary diagnostic to classify the degree of cool-coreness of clusters, and on the iron profiles. In keeping with observations, our simulated clusters display a variety of behaviors in entropy profiles: they range from steadily decreasing profiles at small radii, characteristic of cool-core systems, to nearly flat core isentropic profiles, characteristic of non cool-core systems. Using observational criteria to distinguish between the two classes of...

  18. The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

  19. AGN feedback using AMR cosmological simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Yohan; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Feedback processes are thought to solve some of the long-standing issues of the numerical modelling of galaxy formation: over-cooling, low angular momentum, massive blue galaxies, extra-galactic enrichment, etc. The accretion of gas onto super-massive black holes in the centre of massive galaxies can release tremendous amounts of energy to the surrounding medium. We show, with cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, how the growth of black holes is regulated by the feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei using a new dual jet/heating mechanism. We discuss how this large amount of feedback is able to modify the cold baryon content of galaxies, and perturb the properties of the hot plasma in their vicinity.

  20. Cosmological HII Bubble Growth During Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Min-Su; Cen, Renyue

    2007-01-01

    We present general properties of ionized hydrogen (HII) bubbles and their growth based on a state-of-the-art large-scale (100 Mpc/h) cosmological radiative transfer simulation. The simulation resolves all halos with atomic cooling at the relevant redshifts and simultaneously performs radiative transfer and dynamical evolution of structure formation. Our major conclusions include: (1) for significant HII bubbles, the number distribution is peaked at a volume of ~ 0.6 Mpc^3/h^3 at all redshifts. But, at z 10 even the largest HII bubbles have a balanced ionizing photon contribution from Pop II and Pop III stars, while at z Pop II stars start to dominate the overall ionizing photon production for large bubbles, although Pop III stars continue to make a non-negligible contribution. (6) The relationship between halo number density and bubble size is complicated but a strong correlation is found between halo number density and bubble size for for large bubbles.

  1. Cosmological and Astrophysical Constraints on Tensor Unparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Lewis

    2007-10-23

    We calculate cosmological and astrophysical bounds on the couplings between standard model fields and tensor unparticles. The present day density of tensor unparticles from neutrino-neutrino and photon-photon annihilation is calculated. Also, the supernovae volume energy loss rates from electron-positron and photon-photon annihilation to tensor unparticles are calculated. The constraints from matter density and supernovae volume energy loss rates from photon-photon annihilation are on the same order of magnitude, while the bounds from supernovae volume energy loss rates from electron-positron annihilation are an order of magnitude lower. We find the couplings between standard model fields and tensor unparticles are at least an order of magnitude lower than those used for previous studies of tensor unparticle collider phenomenology.

  2. Probing quintessence potential with future cosmological surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Ichiki, Kiyotomo [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the origin of particles and the universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Takahashi, Tomo [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masahide, E-mail: yoshitaka@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: ichiki@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp, E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Quintessence, a scalar field model, has been proposed to account for the acceleration of the Universe at present. We discuss how accurately quintessence models are discriminated by future cosmological surveys, which include experiments of CMB, galaxy clustering, weak lensing, and the type Ia SNe surveys, by making use of the conventional parameterized dark energy models. We can see clear differences between the thawing and the freezing quintessence models at more than 1? (2?) confidence level as long as the present equation of state for quintessence is away from -1 as w{sub X}?>?0.95(?0.90). However, it is found to be difficult to probe the effective mass squared for the potential in thawing models, whose signs are different between the quadratic and the cosine-type potentials. This fact may require us to invent a new estimator to distinguish quintessence models beyond the thawing and the freezing ones.

  3. Liouville theory beyond the cosmological horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoffrey Compère; Laura Donnay; Pierre-Henry Lambert; Waldemar Schulgin

    2015-04-29

    The dS/CFT correspondence postulates the existence of a Euclidean CFT dual to a suitable gravity theory with Dirichlet boundary conditions asymptotic to de Sitter spacetime. A semi-classical model of such a correspondence consists of Einstein gravity with positive cosmological constant and without matter which is dual to Euclidean Liouville theory defined at the future conformal boundary. Here we show that Euclidean Liouville theory is also dual to Einstein gravity with Dirichlet boundary conditions on a fixed timelike slice in the static patch. Intriguingly, the spacetime interpretation of Euclidean Liouville time is the physical time of the static observer. As a prerequisite of this correspondence, we show that the asymptotic symmetry algebra which consists of two copies of the Virasoro algebra extends everywhere into the bulk.

  4. Hybrid Quantum Gowdy Cosmology: Combining Loop and Fock Quantizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercedes Martin-Benito; Luis J. Garay; Guillermo A. Mena Marugan

    2008-08-27

    We quantize an inhomogeneous cosmological model using techniques that include polymeric quantization. More explicitly, we construct well defined operators to represent the constraints and find the physical Hilbert space formed by their solutions, which reproduces the conventional Fock quantization for the inhomogeneities. The initial singularity is resolved in this inhomogeneous model in an extremely simple way and without imposing special boundary conditions, thus ensuring the robustness and generality of this resolution. Furthermore this quantization constitutes a well founded step towards the extraction of physical results and consequences from loop quantum cosmology, given the central role of the inhomogeneities in modern cosmology.

  5. Hamilton-Jacobi method for Domain Walls and Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostas Skenderis; Paul K. Townsend

    2006-12-07

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of adS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relationship to Hamilton-Jacobi theory and compute the wave-function of a 3-dimensional closed universe evolving towards de Sitter spacetime.

  6. Evolving extrinsic curvature and the cosmological constant problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraao J. S. Capistrano; Luiz A. Cabral

    2015-12-09

    The concept of smooth deformation of Riemannian manifolds associated with the extrinsic curvature is explained and applied to the FLRW cosmology. We show that such deformation can be derived from Einstein-Hilbert-like dynamical principle producing an observable effect in the sense of Noether. As a result, we notice on how the extrinsic curvature compensates both quantitative and qualitative difference between the cosmological constant $ \\Lambda$ and the vacuum energy $\\rho_{vac}$ obtaining the observed upper bound for the cosmological constant problem at electroweak scale. The topological characteristics of the extrinsic curvature are discussed showing that the produced extrinsic scalar curvature is an evolving dynamical quantity.

  7. The cosmology dependence of weak lensing cluster counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Marian; Robert E. Smith; Gary M. Bernstein

    2009-06-30

    We present the main results of a numerical study of weak lensing cluster counting. We examine the scaling with cosmology of the projected-density-peak mass function. Our main conclusion is that the projected-peak and the three-dimensional mass functions scale with cosmology in an astonishingly close way. This means that, despite being derived from a two-dimensional field, the weak lensing cluster abundance can be used to constrain cosmology in the same way as the three-dimensional mass function probed by other types of surveys.

  8. Laser metrology for coherent multi-telescope arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shao, M.; Massie, N.A.

    1993-05-04

    In multi-telescope arrays that comprise multiple telescopes, a beam-combining module, and flat mirrors for directing light beams from the multiple telescopes to the beam combining module, a laser metrology system is used for monitoring various pathlengths along a beam path where deviations are likely. Some pathlengths are defined simply by a pair of retroreflectors or reflectors at both ends. Lengths between pairs of retroreflectors are measured and monitored by laser interferometers. One critical pathlength deviation is related to the displacement of the flat mirror. A reference frame is set up relative to the beam-combining module to form and define the coordinate system within which the positions of the flat mirrors are measured and monitored. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of retroreflectors along the optical axis of the beam-combining module defines a reference frame. A triangle is formed by the reference frame as the base and another retroreflector at the flat mirror as the vertex. The triangle is used to monitor the position of the flat mirror. A beam's pathlength is dynamically corrected in response to the monitored deviations.

  9. Laser metrology for coherent multi-telescope arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shao, Michael (Pasadena, CA); Massie, Norbert A. (San Ramon, CA)

    1993-01-01

    In multi-telescope arrays that comprise multiple telescopes, a beam-combining module, and flat mirrors for directing light beams from the multiple telescopes to the beam combining module, a laser metrology system is used for monitoring various pathlengths along a beam path where deviations are likely. Some pathlengths are defined simply by a pair of retroreflectors or reflectors at both ends. Lengths between pairs of retroreflectors are measured and monitored by laser interferometers. One critical pathlength deviation is related to the displacement of the flat mirror. A reference frame is set up relative to the beam-combining module to form and define the coordinate system within which the positions of the flat mirrors are measured and monitored. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of retroreflectors along the optical axis of the beam-combining module defines a reference frame. A triangle is formed by the reference frame as the base and another retroreflector at the flat mirror as the vertex. The triangle is used to monitor the position of the flat mirror. A beam's pathlength is dynamically corrected in response to the monitored deviations.

  10. SETI reloaded, Next Generation Radio Telescopes, Transients and Cognitive Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) using radio telescopes is an area of research that is now more than 50 years old. Thus far, both targeted and wide-area surveys have yet to detect artificial signals from intelligent civilisations. In this paper, I argue that the incidence of co-existing intelligent and communicating civilisations is probably small in the Milky Way. While this makes successful SETI searches a very difficult pursuit indeed, the huge impact of even a single detection requires us to continue the search. A substantial increase in the overall performance of radio telescopes (and in particular future wide-field instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array, SKA), provide renewed optimism in the field. Evidence for this is already to be seen in the success of SETI researchers in acquiring observations on some of the world's most sensitive radio telescope facilities via open, peer-reviewed processes. The increasing interest in the dynamic radio sky, and our ability to detect new a...

  11. The Instrument Response Function Format for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John E

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a future ground-based observatory (with two locations, in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres) that will be used in the study of the very-high-energy gamma-ray sky. CTA observations will be proposed by external users or initiated by the observatory, with the resulting measurements being processed by the CTA observatory and the reduced data made accessible to the corresponding proposer. Instrument Response Functions (IRFs) will also be provided to convert the quantities measured by the array(s) into relevant science products (i.e. spectra, sky maps, light curves). As the response of the telescopes depend on many correlated observational and physical quantities (e.g. gamma-ray arrival direction, energy, telescope orientation, background light, weather conditions etc.) the CTA IRFs could grow into increasingly larger and larger file sizes, which can become unwieldy or impractical for use in specific observation cases. To this end, a customized IRF format (complying with t...

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  13. INFN Camera demonstrator for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array is a world-wide project for a new generation of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes of the Imaging class with the aim of exploring the highest energy region of the electromagnetic spectrum. With two planned arrays, one for each hemisphere, it will guarantee a good sky coverage in the energy range from a few tens of GeV to hundreds of TeV, with improved angular resolution and a sensitivity in the TeV energy region better by one order of magnitude than the currently operating arrays. In order to cover this wide energy range, three different telescope types are envisaged, with different mirror sizes and focal plane features. In particular, for the highest energies a possible design is a dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical scheme, with a compact focal plane. A silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based camera is being proposed as a solution to match the dimensions of the pixel (angular size of ~ 0.17 degrees). INFN is developing a camera demonstrator made by 9 Photo Sensor Modules (PSMs...

  14. Statistical anisotropy and cosmological quantum relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Valentini

    2015-10-08

    We show that cosmological quantum relaxation predicts an anisotropic primordial power spectrum with a specific dependence on wavenumber k. We explore some of the consequences for precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Quantum relaxation is a feature of the de Broglie-Bohm pilot-wave formulation of quantum theory, which allows the existence of more general physical states that violate the Born probability rule. Recent work has shown that relaxation to the Born rule is suppressed for long-wavelength field modes on expanding space, resulting in a large-scale power deficit with a characteristic inverse-tangent dependence on k. Because the quantum relaxation dynamics is independent of the direction of the wave vector for the relaxing field mode, in the limit of weak anisotropy we are able to derive an expression for the anisotropic power spectrum that is determined by the power deficit function. As a result, the off-diagonal terms in the CMB covariance matrix are also determined by the power deficit. We show that the lowest-order l-(l+1) inter-multipole correlations have a characteristic scaling with multipole moment l. Our derived spectrum also predicts a residual statistical anisotropy at small scales, with an approximate consistency relation between the scaling of the l-(l+1) correlations and the scaling of the angular power spectrum at high l. We also predict a relationship between the l-(l+1) correlations at large and small scales. Cosmological quantum relaxation appears to provide a single physical mechanism that predicts both a large-scale power deficit and a range of statistical anisotropies, together with potentially testable relationships between them.

  15. Sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array to the detection of axion-like particles at high gamma-ray opacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Manuel; Conrad, Jan E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se

    2014-12-01

    Extensions of the Standard Model of particles commonly predict the existence of axion(-like) particles (ALPs) that could be detected through their coupling to photons in external magnetic fields. This coupling could lead to modifications of ?-ray spectra from extragalactic sources. Above a certain energy, the ?-ray flux should be exponentially damped due to the interaction with photons of background radiations fields. ALPs, on the other hand, propagate unimpeded over cosmological distances and a reconversion into ?-rays could lead to an additional component in the spectra. Here, we present the sensitivity of the proposed Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to detect this spectral hardening. Using the full instrumental response functions of CTA, a combined likelihood analysis of four ?-ray sources shows that a significant detection of the ALP signal is possible for couplings g{sub a?} ? 2 × 10{sup ?11} GeV{sup ?1} and ALP masses m{sub a} ?< 100 neV. We discuss the dependency of these values on different model assumptions and magnetic-field scenarios and identify the best observation strategy to search for an ALP induced boost of the ?-ray flux.

  16. A NEW COSMOLOGICAL DISTANCE MEASURE USING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franca, Fabio La; Bianchi, Stefano; Branchini, Enzo; Matt, Giorgio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146, Roma (Italy); Ponti, Gabriele, E-mail: lafranca@fis.uniroma3.it [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-05-20

    We report the discovery of a luminosity distance estimator using active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We combine the correlation between the X-ray variability amplitude and the black hole (BH) mass with the single-epoch spectra BH mass estimates which depend on the AGN luminosity and the line width emitted by the broad-line region. We demonstrate that significant correlations do exist that allow one to predict the AGN (optical or X-ray) luminosity as a function of the AGN X-ray variability and either the H? or the Pa? line widths. In the best case, when the Pa? is used, the relationship has an intrinsic dispersion of ?0.6 dex. Although intrinsically more disperse than supernovae Ia, this relation constitutes an alternative distance indicator potentially able to probe, in an independent way, the expansion history of the universe. With respect to this, we show that the new mission concept Athena should be able to measure the X-ray variability of hundreds of AGNs and then constrain the distance modulus with uncertainties of 0.1 mag up to z ? 0.6. We also discuss how our estimator has the prospect of becoming a cosmological probe even more sensitive than the current supernovae Ia samples by using a new dedicated wide-field X-ray telescope able to measure the variability of thousands of AGNs.

  17. Cosmological dark matter annihilations into gamma-rays - a closer look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piero Ullio; Lars Bergstrom; Joakim Edsjo; Cedric Lacey

    2002-07-04

    We investigate the prospects of detecting weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter by measuring the contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray radiation induced, in any dark matter halo and at all redshifts, by WIMP pair annihilations into high-energy photons. We perform a detailed analysis of the distinctive spectral features of this signal, recently proposed in a short letter by three of the authors, with emphasis on the signature due to monochromatic gamma-ray yields: the combined effect of cosmological redshift and absorption along the line of sight produces sharp bumps, peaked at the rest frame energy of the lines and asymmetrically smeared to lower energies. The level of the flux depends both on the particle physics scenario for WIMP dark matter and on the question of how dark matter clusters. Uncertainties introduced by the latter are thoroughly discussed implementing a realistic model inspired by results of the state-of-the-art N-body simulations and semi-analytic modeling in the cold dark matter structure formation theory. We also address the question of the potential gamma-ray background originating from blazars, presenting a novel calculation. Comparing the signal with the background, we find that there are viable configurations, in the combined parameter space defined by the particle physics setup and the structure formation scenario, for which the WIMP induced extragalactic gamma-ray signal will be detectable in the new generation of gamma-ray telescopes such as GLAST.

  18. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN1999em

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-06-01

    Because of their intrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmological probes. We describe the spectral-fitting expanding atmosphere method (SEAM) for obtaining distances to Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) and present a distance to SN 1999em for which a Cepheid distance exists. Our models give results consistent with the Cepheid distance, even though we have not attempted to tune the underlying hydrodynamical model but have simply chosen the best fits. This is in contradistinction to the expanding photosphere method (EPM), which yields a distance to SN 1999em that is 50 percent smaller than the Cepheid distance. We emphasize the differences between the SEAM and the EPM. We show that the dilution factors used in the EPM analysis were systematically too small at later epochs. We also show that the EPM blackbody assumption is suspect. Since SNe IIP are visible to redshifts as high as z {approx}< 6, with the James Webb Space Telescope, the SEAM may be a valuable probe of the early universe.

  19. Cosmology on the Beach - Eric Linder: Lecture 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Linder

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  20. Cosmology on the Beach - Wayne Hu: Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  1. Cosmology on the Beach - Eric Linder, Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Linder

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.  

  2. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Chung-Pei Ma

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chung-Pei Ma

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  3. Cosmology on the Beach - Chung-Pei Ma: Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chung-Pei Ma

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009

  4. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauricio Cataldo; Sergio del Campo; Paul Minning; Patricio Salgado

    2008-12-23

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recolapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum $\\Lambda$-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  5. COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETERS FROM SUPERNOVAE ASSOCIATED WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xue; Hjorth, Jens; Wojtak, Rados?aw, E-mail: lixue@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-11-20

    We report estimates of the cosmological parameters ? {sub m} and ?{sub ?} obtained using supernovae (SNe) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts up to 0.606. Eight high-fidelity GRB-SNe with well-sampled light curves across the peak are used. We correct their peak magnitudes for a luminosity-decline rate relation to turn them into accurate standard candles with dispersion ? = 0.18 mag. We also estimate the peculiar velocity of the low-redshift host galaxy of SN 1998bw using constrained cosmological simulations. In a flat universe, the resulting Hubble diagram leads to best-fit cosmological parameters of (?{sub m},?{sub ?})=(0.58{sub ?0.25}{sup +0.22},0.42{sub ?0.22}{sup +0.25}). This exploratory study suggests that GRB-SNe can potentially be used as standardizable candles to high redshifts to measure distances in the universe and constrain cosmological parameters.

  6. Cosmology on the Beach - Carlos Frenk: Lecture 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carlos Frenk

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  7. Cosmology on the Beach - Carlos Frenk, Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carlos Frenk

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  8. Cosmology on the Beach - Carlos Frenk, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carlos Frenk

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  9. Cosmology on the Beach - Simon White, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  10. Cosmology on the Beach: Eric Linder, lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Linder

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  11. Cosmology on the Beach - Chung-Pei Ma, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chung-Pei Ma

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  12. Primordial Graviton Production in a Class of Running Vacuum Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Tamayo; J. A. S. Lima; D. F. A. Bessada

    2015-08-05

    The problem of cosmological production of (massless) gravitons is discussed in the framework of an expanding, spatially homogeneous and isotropic FRW type Universe with decaying vacuum energy density ($\\Lambda \\equiv \\Lambda(H(t))$) described by general relativity theory. The gravitational wave equation is established and its modified time-dependent part has analytically been solved for different epochs in the case of a flat geometry. Unlike the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology (no interacting vacuum), we show that massless gravitons can be produced during the radiation era. However, for all values of the free parameter, the high frequency modes are damped out even faster than in the standard cosmology both in the radiation and matter-vacuum dominated epoch. The formation of the stochastic background of gravitons and the remnant power spectrum generated at different cosmological eras are also explicitly evaluated.

  13. Exact Solutions for Cosmological Perturbations with Collisionless Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz

    1994-07-11

    All regular and singular cosmological perturbations in a radiation dominated Einstein-de Sitter Universe with collisionless particles can be found by a generalized power series ansatz. Talk given at "Birth of the Universe and Fundamental Physics", May 1994 (Rome).

  14. Power Spectra to 1% Accuracy between Dynamical Dark Energy Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew J. Francis; Geraint F. Lewis; Eric V. Linder

    2007-04-03

    For dynamical dark energy cosmologies we carry out a series of N-body gravitational simulations, achieving percent level accuracy in the relative mass power spectra at any redshift. Such accuracy in the power spectrum is necessary for next generation cosmological mass probes. Our matching procedure reproduces the CMB distance to last scattering and delivers subpercent level power spectra at z=0 and z~3. We discuss the physical implications for probing dark energy with surveys of large scale structure.

  15. Separable sequences in Bianchi I loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartin, Daniel; Khanna, Gaurav [Naval Academy Preparatory School, 197 Elliot Street, Newport, Rhode Island 02841 (United States); Physics Department, University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02747 (United States)

    2005-10-15

    In this paper, we discuss the properties of one-parameter sequences that arise when solving the Hamiltonian constraint in Bianchi I loop quantum cosmology using a separation of variables method. In particular, we focus on finding an expression for the sequence for all real values of the parameter, and discuss the preclassicality of this function. We find that the behavior of these preclassical sequences imply time asymmetry on either side of the classical singularity in Bianchi I cosmology.

  16. Visualizing Cosmological Concepts Using the Analog of a Hot Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusofi, E

    2010-01-01

    We have used the expansion process of hot milk, which has similarities with the cosmic expansion, to facilitate easier and better visualization and teaching of cosmological concepts. Observations of the milk are used to illustrate phenomena related to the Planck era, the standard hot big bang model, cosmic inflation, problems with the formation of structure, and other subjects. This innovative and easily implemented demonstration can enhance the learning of cosmological concepts.

  17. Interpretations of Quantum Theory in the Light of Modern Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Castagnino; Sebastian Fortin; Roberto Laura; Daniel Sudarsky

    2014-12-24

    The difficult issues related to the interpretation of quantum mechanics and, in particular, the "measurement problem" are revisited using as motivation the process of generation of structure from quantum fluctuations in inflationary cosmology. The unessential mathematical complexity of the particular problem is bypassed, facilitating the discussion of the conceptual issues, by considering, within the paradigm set up by the cosmological problem, another problem where symmetry serves as a focal point: a simplified version of Mott's problem.

  18. Accelerating universe in two-dimensional noncommutative dilaton cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wontae Kim; Myung Seok Yoon

    2006-12-01

    We show that the phase transition from the decelerating universe to the accelerating universe, which is of relevance to the cosmological coincidence problem, is possible in the semiclassically quantized two-dimensional dilaton gravity by taking into account the noncommutative field variables during the finite time. Initially, the quantum-mechanically induced energy from the noncommutativity among the fields makes the early universe decelerate and subsequently the universe is accelerating because the dilaton driven cosmology becomes dominant later.

  19. Jerk, snap, and the cosmological equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2004-03-31

    Taylor expanding the cosmological equation of state around the current epoch is the simplest model one can consider that does not make any a priori restrictions on the nature of the cosmological fluid. Most popular cosmological models attempt to be ``predictive'', in the sense that once somea priori equation of state is chosen the Friedmann equations are used to determine the evolution of the FRW scale factor a(t). In contrast, a retrodictive approach might usefully take observational dataconcerning the scale factor, and use the Friedmann equations to infer an observed cosmological equation of state. In particular, the value and derivatives of the scale factor determined at the current epoch place constraints on the value and derivatives of the cosmological equation of state at the current epoch. Determining the first three Taylor coefficients of the equation of state at the current epoch requires a measurement of the deceleration, jerk, and snap -- the second, third, and fourth derivatives of the scale factor with respect to time. Higher-order Taylor coefficients in the equation of state are related to higher-order time derivatives of the scale factor. Since the jerk and snap are rather difficult to measure, being related to the third and fourth terms in the Taylor series expansion of the Hubble law, it becomes clear why direct observational constraints on the cosmological equation of state are so relatively weak; and are likely to remain weak for the foreseeable future.

  20. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norbert, M.A.; Yale, O.

    1992-04-28

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 15 figs.

  1. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norbert, Massie A. (San Ramon, CA); Yale, Oster (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  2. Extreme multiplex spectroscopy at wide-field 4-m telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Content; Tom Shanks

    2008-08-18

    We describe the design and science case for a spectrograph for the prime focus of classical 4-m wide-field telescopes that can deliver at least 4000 MOS slits over a 1 degree field. This extreme multiplex capability means that 25000 galaxy redshifts can be measured in a single night, opening up the possibilities for large galaxy redshift surveys out to z~0.7 and beyond for the purpose of measuring the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and for many other science goals. The design features four cloned spectrographs and exploits the exclusive possibility of tiling the focal plane of wide-field 4-m telescopes with CCDs for multi-object spectroscopic purposes. In ~200 night projects, such spectrographs have the potential to make galaxy redshift surveys of ~6 million galaxies over a wide redshift range and thus may provide a low-cost alternative to other survey routes such as WFMOS and SKA. Two of these extreme multiplex spectrographs are currently being designed for the AAT (NG1dF) and Calar Alto (XMS) 4-m class telescopes. NG2dF, a larger version for the AAT 2 degree field, would have 12 clones and at least 12000 slits. The clones use a transparent design including a grism in which all optics are smaller than the clone square subfield so that the clones can be tightly packed with little gaps between the contiguous fields. Only low cost glasses are used; the variations in chromatic aberrations between bands are compensated by changing one or two of the lenses adjacent to the grism. The total weight and length is smaller with a few clones than a unique spectrograph which makes it feasible to place the spectrograph at the prime focus.

  3. An Optical Reflector for the CANGAROO-II Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawachi, A; Dazeley, S A; Edwards, P G; Gunji, S; Hara, S; Hara, T; Jinbo, J; Kifune, T; Kubo, H; Matsubara, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Mori, M; Moriya, M; Muraishi, H; Muraki, Y; Naito, T; Nishijima, K; Patterson, J R; Roberts, M D; Rowell, G P; Sako, T; Sakurazawa, K; Sato, Y; Susukita, R; Tamura, T; Tanimori, T; Yanagita, S; Yoshida, T; Yoshikoshi, T; Yuki, A; Kawachi, Akiko

    1999-01-01

    We have been successful in developing light and durable mirrors made of CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) laminates for the reflector of the new CANGAROO-II 7 m telescope. The reflector has a parabolic shape (F/1.1) with a 30 m^2 effective area which consists of 60 small spherical mirrors of CFRP laminates. The orientation of each mirror can be remotely adjusted by stepping motors. After the first adjustment work, the reflector offers a point image of about $0.^\\circ 14$ (FWHM) on the optic axis.

  4. An Optical Reflector for the CANGAROO-II Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiko Kawachi; J. Kushida; S. A. Dazeley; S. A. Dazeley; P. G. Edwards; S. Gunji; S. Hara; T. Hara; J. Jinbo; T. Kifune; H. Kubo; Y. Matsubara; Y. Mizumoto; M. Mori; M. Moriya; H. Muraishi; Y. Muraki; T. Naito; K. Nishijima; J. R. Patterson; M. D. Roberts; G. P. Rowell; T. Sako; K. Sakurazawa; Y. Sato; R. Susukita; T. Tamura; T. Tanimori; S. Yanagita; T. Yoshida; T. Yoshikoshi; A. Yuki

    1999-06-04

    We have been successful in developing light and durable mirrors made of CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) laminates for the reflector of the new CANGAROO-II 7 m telescope. The reflector has a parabolic shape (F/1.1) with a 30 m^2 effective area which consists of 60 small spherical mirrors of CFRP laminates. The orientation of each mirror can be remotely adjusted by stepping motors. After the first adjustment work, the reflector offers a point image of about $0.^\\circ 14$ (FWHM) on the optic axis.

  5. Edge Detection, Cosmic Strings and the South Pole Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Stewart; Robert Brandenberger

    2009-01-07

    We develop a method of constraining the cosmic string tension $G\\mu$ which uses the Canny edge detection algorithm as a means of searching CMB temperature maps for the signature of the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the potential of this method using high resolution, simulated CMB temperature maps. By modeling the future output from the South Pole Telescope project (including anticipated instrumental noise), we find that cosmic strings with $G\\mu > 5.5\\times10^{-8}$ could be detected.

  6. Stochastic semiclassical equations for weakly inhomogeneous cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Campos; Enric Verdaguer

    1995-11-28

    Semiclassical Einstein-Langevin equations for arbitrary small metric perturbations conformally coupled to a massless quantum scalar field in a spatially flat cosmological background are derived. Use is made of the fact that for this problem the in-in or closed time path effective action is simply related to the Feynman and Vernon influence functional which describes the effect of the ``environment'', the quantum field which is coarse grained here, on the ``system'', the gravitational field which is the field of interest. This leads to identify the dissipation and noise kernels in the in-in effective action, and to derive a fluctuation-dissipation relation. A tensorial Gaussian stochastic source which couples to the Weyl tensor of the spacetime metric is seen to modify the usual semiclassical equations which can be viewed now as mean field equations. As a simple application we derive the correlation functions of the stochastic metric fluctuations produced in a flat spacetime with small metric perturbations due to the quantum fluctuations of the matter field coupled to these perturbations.

  7. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@aquila.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w{sub eff} has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w{sub eff} from -1. Taking into account current limits on w{sub eff} and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w{sub eff} form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory.

  8. Cosmological constraints on extended Galileon models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, Antonio De; Tsujikawa, Shinji E-mail: shinji@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    The extended Galileon models possess tracker solutions with de Sitter attractors along which the dark energy equation of state is constant during the matter-dominated epoch, i.e. w{sub DE} = ?1?s, where s is a positive constant. Even with this phantom equation of state there are viable parameter spaces in which the ghosts and Laplacian instabilities are absent. Using the observational data of the supernovae type Ia, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and baryon acoustic oscillations, we place constraints on the tracker solutions at the background level and find that the parameter s is constrained to be s = 0.034{sub ?0.034}{sup +0.327} (95 % CL) in the flat Universe. In order to break the degeneracy between the models we also study the evolution of cosmological density perturbations relevant to the large-scale structure (LSS) and the Integrated-Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in CMB. We show that, depending on the model parameters, the LSS and the ISW effect is either positively or negatively correlated. It is then possible to constrain viable parameter spaces further from the observational data of the ISW-LSS cross-correlation as well as from the matter power spectrum.

  9. The Background Field Approximation in (quantum) cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Parentani

    1998-03-12

    We analyze the Hamilton-Jacobi action of gravity and matter in the limit where gravity is treated at the background field approximation. The motivation is to clarify when and how the solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation lead to the Schr\\"odinger equation in a given background. To this end, we determine when and how the total action, solution of the constraint equations of General Relativity, leads to the HJ action for matter in a given background. This is achieved by comparing two neighboring solutions differing slightly in their matter energy content. To first order in the change of the 3-geometries, the change of the gravitational action equals the integral of the matter energy evaluated in the background geometry. Higher order terms are governed by the ``susceptibility'' of the geometry. These classical properties also apply to quantum cosmology since the conditions which legitimize the use of WKB gravitational waves are concomitant with those governing the validity of the background field approximation.

  10. Finite Cosmology and a CMB Cold Spot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, R.J.; Bjorken, J.D.; Overduin, J.M.; /Stanford U., HEPL

    2006-03-20

    The standard cosmological model posits a spatially flat universe of infinite extent. However, no observation, even in principle, could verify that the matter extends to infinity. In this work we model the universe as a finite spherical ball of dust and dark energy, and obtain a lower limit estimate of its mass and present size: the mass is at least 5 x 10{sup 23}M{sub {circle_dot}} and the present radius is at least 50 Gly. If we are not too far from the dust-ball edge we might expect to see a cold spot in the cosmic microwave background, and there might be suppression of the low multipoles in the angular power spectrum. Thus the model may be testable, at least in principle. We also obtain and discuss the geometry exterior to the dust ball; it is Schwarzschild-de Sitter with a naked singularity, and provides an interesting picture of cosmogenesis. Finally we briefly sketch how radiation and inflation eras may be incorporated into the model.

  11. Fast cosmological parameter estimation using neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Auld; M. Bridges; M. P. Hobson; S. F. Gull

    2007-09-17

    We present a method for accelerating the calculation of CMB power spectra, matter power spectra and likelihood functions for use in cosmological parameter estimation. The algorithm, called CosmoNet, is based on training a multilayer perceptron neural network and shares all the advantages of the recently released Pico algorithm of Fendt & Wandelt, but has several additional benefits in terms of simplicity, computational speed, memory requirements and ease of training. We demonstrate the capabilities of CosmoNet by computing CMB power spectra over a box in the parameter space of flat \\Lambda CDM models containing the 3\\sigma WMAP1 confidence region. We also use CosmoNet to compute the WMAP3 likelihood for flat \\Lambda CDM models and show that marginalised posteriors on parameters derived are very similar to those obtained using CAMB and the WMAP3 code. We find that the average error in the power spectra is typically 2-3% of cosmic variance, and that CosmoNet is \\sim 7 \\times 10^4 faster than CAMB (for flat models) and \\sim 6 \\times 10^6 times faster than the official WMAP3 likelihood code. CosmoNet and an interface to CosmoMC are publically available at www.mrao.cam.ac.uk/software/cosmonet.

  12. Cosmological simulations with disformally coupled symmetron fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Hagala; C. Llinares; D. F. Mota

    2015-10-29

    We investigate statistical properties of the distribution of matter at redshift zero in disformal gravity by using N-body simulations. The disformal model studied here consists of a conformally coupled symmetron field with an additional exponential disformal term. We conduct cosmological simulations to discover the impact of the new disformal terms in the matter power spectrum, halo mass function, and radial profile of the scalar field. We calculated the disformal geodesic equation and the equation of motion for the scalar field. We then implemented these equations into the N-body code ISIS, which is a modified gravity version of the code RAMSES. The presence of a conformal symmetron field increases both the power spectrum and mass function compared to standard gravity on small scales. Our main finding is that the newly added disformal terms tend to counteract these effects and can make the evolution slightly closer to standard gravity. We finally show that the disformal terms give rise to oscillations of the scalar field in the centre of the dark matter haloes.

  13. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a ?(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  14. Cosmological simulations with disformally coupled symmetron fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Hagala; C. Llinares; D. F. Mota

    2015-04-27

    We use N-body simulations to study the matter distribution in disformal gravity. The disformal model studied here is a conformally coupled symmetron field with an additional exponential disformal term. We conduct cosmological simulations with the aim to find the impact of the new disformal terms in the matter power spectrum, halo mass function and radial profile of the scalar field. This is done by calculating the disformal geodesic equation and the equation of motion for the scalar field, then implementing them into the N-body code ISIS, which is a modified gravity version of the code RAMSES. The presence of a conformal symmetron field increases both the power spectrum and mass function compared to standard gravity on small scales. Our main result is that the newly added disformal terms tend to counteract this effects and can make the evolution slightly closer to standard gravity. We finally show that the disformal terms give rise to oscillations of the scalar field in the centre of the dark matter haloes.

  15. Workflow management for a cosmology collaboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loken, Stewart C.; McParland, Charles

    2001-07-20

    The Nearby Supernova Factory Project will provide a unique opportunity to bring together simulation and observation to address crucial problems in particle and nuclear physics. Its goal is to significantly enhance our understanding of the nuclear processes in supernovae and to improve our ability to use both Type Ia and Type II supernovae as reference light sources (standard candles) in precision measurements of cosmological parameters. Over the past several years, astronomers and astrophysicists have been conducting in-depth sky searches with the goal of identifying supernovae in their earliest evolutionary stages and, during the 4 to 8 weeks of their most ''explosive'' activity, measure their changing magnitude and spectra. The search program currently under development at LBNL is an earth-based observation program utilizing observational instruments at Haleakala and Mauna Kea, Hawaii and Mt. Palomar, California. This new program provides a demanding testbed for the integration of computational, data management and collaboratory technologies. A critical element of this effort is the use of emerging workflow management tools to permit collaborating scientists to manage data processing and storage and to integrate advanced supernova simulation into the real-time control of the experiments. This paper describes the workflow management framework for the project, discusses security and resource allocation requirements and reviews emerging tools to support this important aspect of collaborative work.

  16. Cosmological perturbations across an S-brane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Robert H. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Kounnas, Costas [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Partouche, Hervé [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau cedex (France); Patil, Subodh P. [Theory Division, PH-TH Case C01600, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Toumbas, Nicolaos, E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: kounnas@lpt.ens.fr, E-mail: herve.partouche@cpht.polytechnique.fr, E-mail: subodh.patil@cern.ch, E-mail: nick@ucy.ac.cy [Department of Physics, University of Cyprus, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

    2014-03-01

    Space-filling S-branes can mediate a transition between a contracting and an expanding universe in the Einstein frame. Following up on previous work that uncovered such bouncing solutions in the context of weakly coupled thermal configurations of a certain class of type II superstrings, we set up here the formalism in which we can study the evolution of metric fluctuations across such an S-brane. Our work shows that the specific nature of the S-brane, which is sourced by non-trivial massless thermal string states and appears when the universe reaches a maximal critical temperature, allows for a scale invariant spectrum of curvature fluctuations to manifest at late times via a stringy realization of the matter bounce scenario. The finite energy density at the transition from contraction to expansion provides calculational control over the propagation of the curvature perturbations through the bounce, furnishing a working proof of concept that such a stringy universe can result in viable late time cosmology.

  17. Cosmological perturbations through a simple bounce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura E. Allen; David Wands

    2004-07-20

    We present a detailed study of a simple scalar field model that yields non-singular cosmological solutions. We study both the qualitative dynamics of the homogeneous and isotropic background and the evolution of inhomogeneous linear perturbations. We calculate the spectrum of perturbations generated on super-Hubble scales during the collapse phase from initial vacuum fluctuations on small scales and then evolve these numerically through the bounce. We show there is a gauge in which perturbations remain well-defined and small throughout the bounce, even though perturbations in other commonly used gauges become large or ill-defined. We show that the comoving curvature perturbation calculated during the collapse phase provides a good estimate of the resulting large scale adiabatic perturbation in the expanding phase while the Bardeen metric potential is dominated by what becomes a decaying mode after the bounce. We show that a power-law collapse phase with scale factor proportional to $(-t)^{2/3}$ can yield a scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations in the expanding phase, but the amplitude of tensor perturbations places important constraints on the allowed initial conditions.

  18. Sites in Argentina for the Cherenkov Telescope Array Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allekotte, Ingo; Etchegoyen, Alberto; García, Beatriz; Mancilla, Alexis; Maya, Javier; Ravignani, Diego; Rovero, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Project will consist of two arrays of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to study high-energy gamma radiation in the range of a few tens of GeV to beyond 100 TeV. To achieve full-sky coverage, the construction of one array in each terrestrial hemisphere is considered. Suitable candidate sites are being explored and characterized. The candidate sites in the Southern Hemisphere include two locations in Argentina, one in San Antonio de los Cobres (Salta Province, Lat. 24:02:42 S, Long. 66:14:06 W, at 3600 m.a.s.l) and another one in El Leoncito (San Juan Province, Lat. 31:41:49 S, Long. 69:16:21 W, at 2600 m.a.s.l). Here we describe the two sites and the instrumentation that has been deployed to characterize them. We summarize the geographic, atmospheric and climatic data that have been collected for both of them.

  19. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves in Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Biesiada, Marek [Department of Astrophysics and Cosmology, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zhu, Zong-Hong, E-mail: aleksandra.piorkowska@us.edu.pl, E-mail: marek.biesiada@us.edu.pl, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Gravitational wave experiments have entered a new stage which gets us closer to the opening a new observational window on the Universe. In particular, the Einstein Telescope (ET) is designed to have a fantastic sensitivity that will provide with tens or hundreds of thousand NS-NS inspiral events per year up to the redshift z = 2. Some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral NS-NS events in the Einstein telescope. Being conservative we consider the lens population of elliptical galaxies. It turns out that depending on the local insipral rate ET should detect from one per decade detection in the pessimistic case to a tens of detections per year for the most optimistic case. The detection of gravitationally lensed source in gravitational wave detectors would be an invaluable source of information concerning cosmography, complementary to standard ones (like supernovae or BAO) independent of the local cosmic distance ladder calibrations.

  20. The On-Site Analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; De Cesare, Giovanni; De Rosa, Adriano; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Borkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Colomé, Pep; Reyes, Raquel de los; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Gotz, Diego; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Inoue, Susumu; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Flour, Thierry Le; Lindemann, Rico; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Markoff, Sera; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Oya, Igor; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rosen, Simon; Ribo, Marc; Tacchini, Alessandro; Schüssler, Fabian; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Wegner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in part...

  1. Deployable telescope having a thin-film mirror and metering structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumel, Leslie J. (Cedar Crest, NM); Martin, Jeffrey W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-24

    A deployable thin-film mirror telescope comprises a base structure and a metering structure. The base structure houses a thin-film mirror, which can be rolled for stowage and unrolled for deployment. The metering structure is coupled to the base structure and can be folded for stowage and unfolded for deployment. In the deployed state, the unrolled thin-film mirror forms a primary minor for the telescope and the unfolded metering structure positions a secondary minor for the telescope.

  2. Efficient Cosmological Parameter Estimation from Microwave Background Anisotropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; Milos Milosavljevic; Raul Jimenez

    2002-06-02

    We revisit the issue of cosmological parameter estimation in light of current and upcoming high-precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background power spectrum. Physical quantities which determine the power spectrum are reviewed, and their connection to familiar cosmological parameters is explicated. We present a set of physical parameters, analytic functions of the usual cosmological parameters, upon which the microwave background power spectrum depends linearly (or with some other simple dependence) over a wide range of parameter values. With such a set of parameters, microwave background power spectra can be estimated with high accuracy and negligible computational effort, vastly increasing the efficiency of cosmological parameter error determination. The techniques presented here allow calculation of microwave background power spectra $10^5$ times faster than comparably accurate direct codes (after precomputing a handful of power spectra). We discuss various issues of parameter estimation, including parameter degeneracies, numerical precision, mapping between physical and cosmological parameters, and systematic errors, and illustrate these considerations with an idealized model of the MAP experiment.

  3. Observation of solar flares through the ART-P telescope side shield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lutovinov; M. Pavlinsky; S. Grebenev

    2001-06-13

    Some preliminary results of observations of six solar flares though the ART-P telescop side shield in 1990-1992 are presented.

  4. Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with the BICEP Telescope at the South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Yuki David

    2010-01-01

    South Pole Dark Sector and LC-130 . . . . . . .2.2 South Pole site . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bicep Telescope at the South Pole by Yuki David Takahashi A

  5. Sub-mm Galaxies in Cosmological Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Fardal; Neal Katz; David H. Weinberg; Romeel Davé; Lars Hernquist

    2001-07-16

    We study the predicted sub-mm emission from massive galaxies in a Lambda-CDM universe, using hydrodynamic cosmological simulations. Assuming that most of the emission from newly formed stars is absorbed and reradiated in the rest-frame far-IR, we calculate the number of galaxies that would be detected in sub-mm surveys conducted with SCUBA. The predicted number counts are strongly dependent on the assumed dust temperature and emissivity law. With plausible choices for SED parameters (e.g., T=35 K, beta=1.0), the simulation predictions reproduce the observed number counts above ~ 1 mJy. The sources have a broad redshift distribution with median z ~ 2, in reasonable agreement with observational constraints. However, the predicted count distribution may be too steep at the faint end, and the fraction of low redshift objects may be larger than observed. In this physical model of the sub-mm galaxy population, the objects detected in existing surveys consist mainly of massive galaxies (several M_*) forming stars fairly steadily over timescales ~ 10^8-10^9 years, at moderate rates ~100 Msun/yr. The typical descendants of these sub-mm sources are even more massive galaxies, with old stellar populations, found primarily in dense environments. While the resolution of our simulations is not sufficient to determine galaxy morphologies, these properties support the proposed identification of sub-mm sources with massive ellipticals in the process of formation. The most robust and distinctive prediction of this model, stemming directly from the long timescale and correspondingly moderate rate of star formation, is that the far-IR SEDs of SCUBA sources have a relative high 850 micron luminosity for a given bolometric luminosity. [Abridged

  6. The Semiclassical Einstein Equation on Cosmological Spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Siemssen

    2015-03-06

    The subject of this thesis is the coupling of quantum fields to a classical gravitational background in a semiclassical fashion. It contains a thorough introduction into quantum field theory on curved spacetime with a focus on the stress-energy tensor and the semiclassical Einstein equation. Basic notions of differential geometry, topology, functional and microlocal analysis, causality and general relativity will be summarised, and the algebraic approach to QFT on curved spacetime will be reviewed. Apart from these foundations, the original research of the author and his collaborators will be presented: Together with Fewster, the author studied the up and down structure of permutations using their decomposition into so-called atomic permutations. The relevance of these results to this thesis is their application in the calculation of the moments of quadratic quantum fields. In a work with Pinamonti, the author showed the local and global existence of solutions to the semiclassical Einstein equation in flat cosmological spacetimes coupled to a scalar field by solving simultaneously for the quantum state and the Hubble function in an integral-functional equation. The theorem is proved with a fixed-point theorem using the continuous functional differentiability and boundedness of the integral kernel of the integral-functional equation. In another work with Pinamonti the author proposed an extension of the semiclassical Einstein equations which couples the moments of a stochastic Einstein tensor to the moments of the quantum stress-energy tensor. In a toy model of a Newtonianly perturbed exponentially expanding spacetime it is shown that the quantum fluctuations of the stress-energy tensor induce an almost scale-invariant power spectrum for the perturbation potential and that non-Gaussianties arise naturally.

  7. Pseudo-Dirac Neutrinos, a Challenge for Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John F. Beacom; Nicole F. Bell; Dan Hooper; John G. Learned; Sandip Pakvasa; Thomas J. Weiler

    2004-01-05

    Neutrinos may be pseudo-Dirac states, such that each generation is actually composed of two maximally-mixed Majorana neutrinos separated by a tiny mass difference. The usual active neutrino oscillation phenomenology would be unaltered if the pseudo-Dirac splittings are $\\delta m^2 \\alt 10^{-12}$ eV$^2$; in addition, neutrinoless double beta decay would be highly suppressed. However, it may be possible to distinguish pseudo-Dirac from Dirac neutrinos using high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. By measuring flavor ratios as a function of $L/E$, mass-squared differences down to $\\delta m^2 \\sim 10^{-18}$ eV$^2$ can be reached. We comment on the possibility of probing cosmological parameters with neutrinos.

  8. Development of the photomultiplier tube readout system for the first Large-Sized Telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masuda, Shu; Barrio, Juan Abel; Bigas, Oscar Blanch; Delgado, Carlos; Coromina, Lluís Freixas; Gunji, Shuichi; Hadasch, Daniela; Hatanaka, Kenichiro; Ikeno, Masahiro; Laguna, Jose Maria Illa; Inome, Yusuke; Ishio, Kazuma; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Martínez, Gustavo; Mazin, Daniel; Nakajima, Daisuke; Nakamori, Takeshi; Ohoka, Hideyuki; Paoletti, Riccardo; Ritt, Stefan; Rugliancich, Andrea; Saito, Takayuki; Sulanke, Karl-Heinz; Takeda, Junki; Tanaka, Manobu; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Tejedor, Luis Ángel; Teshima, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Tokonatsu

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation ground-based very high energy gamma-ray observatory. The Large-Sized Telescope (LST) of CTA targets 20 GeV -- 1 TeV gamma rays and has 1855 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) installed in the focal plane camera. With the 23 m mirror dish, the night sky background (NSB) rate amounts to several hundreds MHz per pixel. In order to record clean images of gamma-ray showers with minimal NSB contamination, a fast sampling of the signal waveform is required so that the signal integration time can be as short as the Cherenkov light flash duration (a few ns). We have developed a readout board which samples waveforms of seven PMTs per board at a GHz rate. Since a GHz FADC has a high power consumption, leading to large heat dissipation, we adopted the analog memory ASIC "DRS4". The sampler has 1024 capacitors per channel and can sample the waveform at a GHz rate. Four channels of a chip are cascaded to obtain deeper sampling depth with 4096 capacitors. After a trigger ...

  9. Design of a prototype device to calibrate the Large Size Telescope camera of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iori, M; De Persio, F; Chatterjee, A; Ferrarotto, F; Nagesh, B K; Saha, L; Singh, B B

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array is a project that aims to exploring the highest energy region of electromagnetic spectrum. Two arrays, one for each hemisphere, will cover the full sky in a range from few tens of GeV to hundreds of TeV improving the sensitivity and angular resolution of the present operating arrays. A prototype of the Large Size Telescope (LST) for the study of gamma ray astronomy above some tens of GeV will be installed at the Canary Island of La Palma in 2016. The LST camera, made by an array of photomultipliers (PMTs), requires an accurate and systematic calibration over a wide dynamic range. In this contribution, we present an optical calibration system made by a 355 nm wavelength laser with 400 ps pulse width, 1 muJ output energy, up to 4k Hz repetition rate and a set of neutral density filters to obtain a wide range of photon intensities, up to 1000 photoelectrons/PMT, to be sent to the camera plane 28 m away. The number of photons after the diffuser of the calibration box, located in the ...

  10. From theoretical promise to observational reality : calibration, foreground subtraction, and signal extraction in hydrogen cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Adrian Chi-Yan

    2012-01-01

    By using the hyperfine 21 cm transition to map out the distribution of neutral hydrogen at high redshifts, hydrogen cosmology has the potential to place exquisite constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters, as well ...

  11. Cosmological Applications of Algebraic Quantum Field Theory in Curved Spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Thomas-Paul

    2015-01-01

    This monograph provides a largely self--contained and broadly accessible exposition of two cosmological applications of algebraic quantum field theory (QFT) in curved spacetime: a fundamental analysis of the cosmological evolution according to the Standard Model of Cosmology and a fundamental study of the perturbations in Inflation. The two central sections of the book dealing with these applications are preceded by sections containing a pedagogical introduction to the subject as well as introductory material on the construction of linear QFTs on general curved spacetimes with and without gauge symmetry in the algebraic approach, physically meaningful quantum states on general curved spacetimes, and the backreaction of quantum fields in curved spacetimes via the semiclassical Einstein equation. The target reader should have a basic understanding of General Relativity and QFT on Minkowski spacetime, but does not need to have a background in QFT on curved spacetimes or the algebraic approach to QFT. In particul...

  12. Structure of Cosmological CP Violation via Neutrino Seesaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; Duane A. Dicus; Hong-Jian He; Tianjun Li

    2003-12-16

    The cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry can originate from CP-violating interactions of seesaw Majorana neutrinos via leptogenesis in the thermal phase of the early universe. Having the cosmological CP-phase for leptogenesis requires at least two right-handed Majorana neutrinos. Using only the low energy neutrino observables we quantitatively reconstruct a minimal neutrino seesaw. We establish a general criterion for minimal seesaw schemes in which the cosmological CP-phase is {\\it completely} reconstructed from the low energy CP-phases measured by neutrino oscillation and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. We reveal and analyze two distinct classes of such minimal schemes that are shown to be highly predictive. Extension of our reconstruction formalism to a three-heavy-neutrino seesaw is discussed.

  13. Dark Energy Cosmology with the Alternative Cosmic Microwave Background Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Wei

    2011-04-19

    Recently, in a series of works by Liu and Li (L&L), they claimed that there exists a timing asynchrony of $-25.6\\,$ms between the spacecraft attitude and radiometer output timestamps in the original raw WMAP time-ordered data (TOD). L&L reprocessed the WMAP data while the aforementioned timing asynchrony has been corrected, and they obtained an alternative CMB map in which the quadrupole dropped to nearly zero. In the present work, we try to see the implications to dark energy cosmology if L&L are right. While L&L claimed that there is a bug in the WMAP pipeline which leads to significantly different cosmological parameters, an interesting question naturally arises, namely, how robust is the current dark energy cosmology with respect to systematic errors and bugs? So, in this work, we adopt the alternative CMB data of L&L as a strawman to study the robustness of dark energy predictions.

  14. Hybrid Quantum Cosmology: Combining Loop and Fock Quantizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillermo A. Mena Marugan; Mercedes Martin-Benito

    2009-07-22

    As a necessary step towards the extraction of realistic results from Loop Quantum Cosmology, we analyze the physical consequences of including inhomogeneities. We consider in detail the quantization of a gravitational model in vacuo which possesses local degrees of freedom, namely, the linearly polarized Gowdy cosmologies with the spatial topology of a three-torus. We carry out a hybrid quantization which combines loop and Fock techniques. We discuss the main aspects and results of this hybrid quantization, which include the resolution of the cosmological singularity, the polymeric quantization of the internal time, a rigorous definition of the quantum constraints and the construction of their solutions, the Hilbert structure of the physical states, and the recovery of a conventional Fock quantization for the inhomogeneities.

  15. Thermodynamics of de Sitter Black Holes: Thermal Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Sekiwa

    2006-04-10

    We study the thermodynamic properties associated with the black hole event horizon and the cosmological horizon for black hole solutions in asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes. We examine thermodynamics of these horizons on the basis of the conserved charges according to Teitelboim's method. In particular, we have succeeded in deriving the generalized Smarr formula among thermodynamical quantities in a simple and natural way. We then show that cosmological constant must decrease when one takes into account the quantum effect. These observations have been obtained if and only if cosmological constant plays the role of a thermodynamical state variable. We also touch upon the relation between inflation of our universe and a phase transition of black holes.

  16. Future asymptotics of tilted Bianchi type II cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigbjorn Hervik; Woei Chet Lim; Patrik Sandin; Claes Uggla

    2010-04-21

    In this paper we study the future asymptotics of spatially homogeneous Bianchi type II cosmologies with a tilted perfect fluid with a linear equation of state. By means of Hamiltonian methods we first find a monotone function for a special tilted case, which subsequently allows us to construct a new set of monotone functions for the general tilted type II cosmologies. In the context of a new partially gauge invariant dynamical system, this then leads to a proof for a theorem that for the first time gives a complete description of the future asymptotic states of the general tilted Bianchi type II models. The generality of our arguments suggests how one can produce monotone functions that are useful for determining the asymptotics of other tilted perfect fluid cosmologies, as well as for other sources.

  17. Abundance of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Brane World Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoernisa Iminniyaz

    2015-05-14

    Relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter particles in brane world cosmological scenario is investigated in this article. Hubble expansion rate is enhanced in brane world cosmology and it affects the relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter particles. We analyze how the relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter is changed in this model. We show that in such kind of nonstandard cosmological scenario, indirect detection of asymmetric Dark Matter is possible if the cross section is small enough which let the anti--particle abundance kept in the same amount with the particle. We show the indirect detection signal like Fermi--LAT constraints can be used to such model only when the cross section and the 5 dimensional Planck mass scale are in appropriate values.

  18. Does Quantum Cosmology Predict a Constant Dilatonic Field?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Alvarenga; A. B. Batista; J. C. Fabris

    2004-04-07

    Quantum cosmology may permit to determine the initial conditions of the Universe. In particular, it may select a specific model between many possible classical models. In this work, we study a quantum cosmological model based on the string effective action coupled to matter. The Schutz's formalism is employed in the description of the fluid. A radiation fluid is considered. In this way, a time coordinate may be identified and the Wheeler-DeWitt equation reduces in the minisuperspace to a Schr\\"odinger-like equation. It is shown that, under some quite natural assumptions, the expectation values indicate a null axionic field and a constant dilatonic field. At the same time the scale factor exhibits a bounce revealing a singularity-free cosmological model. In some cases, the mininum value of the scale factor can be related to the value of gravitational coupling.

  19. Impact of the local void on the cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Bo, E-mail: yubo@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, I discuss the effects of a local void on the cosmological parameters. It is found that, if the supernova distance is absolutely calibrated, then the bias of all the cosmological parameters is always important, while if the supernova distance is relatively calibrated, the largest effects will appear in the dark energy equation of state. For a local void of size ? 100 Mpc, the bias effects mainly manifest in the low redshift range. Therefore, the piecewise dark energy equation of state, especially the one in the range of lowest redshift, will be more strongly affected than the constant equation of state. In order to reduce this bias in constraining the cosmological parameters, one could require the distance of all the adopted supernovas be greater than 1.2 ? 1.5 times of the radius of the local void. In this case, the residual bias can be safely ignored.

  20. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN 1999em

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    Type IIP Supernovae as Cosmological Probes: A SEAM Distanceintrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmologicalstars: atmospheres — supernovae: 1999em Distances from

  1. On some physical aspects of isotropic cosmology in Riemann-Cartan spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minkevich, A.V.; Garkun, A.S.; Kudin, V.I., E-mail: minkav@bsu.by, E-mail: awm@matman.uwm.edu.pl, E-mail: garkun@bsu.by, E-mail: kudzin_w@tut.by [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-03-01

    Isotropic cosmology built in the framework of the Poincaré gauge theory of gravity based on sufficiently general expression of gravitational Lagrangian is considered. The derivation of cosmological equations and equations for torsion functions in the case of the most general homogeneous isotropic models is given. Physical aspects of isotropic cosmology connected with possible solution of dark energy problem and problem of cosmological singularity are discussed.

  2. Theoretical Research in Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Y Jack; Dolan, Louise; Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Frampton, Paul

    2013-07-29

    The research was in the area of Theoretical Physics: Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

  3. Photometric Calibration of the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, T S; Page, M J; Landsman, W; Holland, S T; Roming, P; Kuin, N P M; Brown, P J; Gronwall, C; Hunsberger, S; Koch, S; Mason, K O; Schady, P; Berk, D Vanden; Blustin, A J; Boyd, P; Broos, P; Carter, M; Chester, M M; Cucchiara, A; Hancock, B; Huckle, H; Immler, S; Ivanushkina, M; Kennedy, T; Marshall, F; Morgan, A; Pandey, S; de Pasquale, M; Smith, P J; Still, M

    2007-01-01

    We present the photometric calibration of the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) which includes: optimum photometric and background apertures, effective area curves, colour transformations, conversion factors for count rates to flux, and the photometric zero points (which are accurate to better than 4 per cent) for each of the seven UVOT broadband filters. The calibration was performed with observations of standard stars and standard star fields that represent a wide range of spectral star types. The calibration results include the position dependent uniformity, and instrument response over the 1600-8000A operational range. Because the UVOT is a photon counting instrument, we also discuss the effect of coincidence loss on the calibration results. We provide practical guidelines for using the calibration in UVOT data analysis. The results presented here supersede previous calibration results.

  4. Paper II: Calibration of the Swift ultraviolet/optical telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breeveld, A A; Hoversten, E A; Koch, S; Landsman, W; Marshall, F E; Page, M J; Poole, T S; Roming, P; Smith, P J; Still, M; Yershov, V; Blustin, A J; Brown, P J; Gronwall, C; Holland, S T; Kuin, N P M; McGowan, K; Rosen, S; Boyd, P; Broos, P; Carter, M; Chester, M M; Hancock, B; Huckle, H; Immler, S; Ivanushkina, M; Kennedy, T; Mason, K O; Morgan, A N; Oates, S; de Pasquale, M; Schady, P; Siegel, M; Berk, D Vanden

    2010-01-01

    The Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) is one of three instruments onboard the Swift observatory. The photometric calibration has been published, and this paper follows up with details on other aspects of the calibration including a measurement of the point spread function with an assessment of the orbital variation and the effect on photometry. A correction for large scale variations in sensitivity over the field of view is described, as well as a model of the coincidence loss which is used to assess the coincidence correction in extended regions. We have provided a correction for the detector distortion and measured the resulting internal astrometric accuracy of the UVOT, also giving the absolute accuracy with respect to the International Celestial Reference System. We have compiled statistics on the background count rates, and discuss the sources of the background, including instrumental scattered light. In each case we describe any impact on UVOT measurements, whether any correction is applied in the st...

  5. Photometric Calibration of the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Poole; A. A. Breeveld; M. J. Page; W. Landsman; S. T. Holland; P. Roming; N. P. M. Kuin; P. J. Brown; C. Gronwall; S. Hunsberger; S. Koch; K. O. Mason; P. Schady; D. Vanden Berk; A. J. Blustin; P. Boyd; P. Broos; M. Carter; M. M. Chester; A. Cucchiara; B. Hancock; H. Huckle; S. Immler; M. Ivanushkina; T. Kennedy; F. Marshall; A. Morgan; S. Pandey; M. de Pasquale; P. J. Smith; M. Still

    2007-11-09

    We present the photometric calibration of the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) which includes: optimum photometric and background apertures, effective area curves, colour transformations, conversion factors for count rates to flux, and the photometric zero points (which are accurate to better than 4 per cent) for each of the seven UVOT broadband filters. The calibration was performed with observations of standard stars and standard star fields that represent a wide range of spectral star types. The calibration results include the position dependent uniformity, and instrument response over the 1600-8000A operational range. Because the UVOT is a photon counting instrument, we also discuss the effect of coincidence loss on the calibration results. We provide practical guidelines for using the calibration in UVOT data analysis. The results presented here supersede previous calibration results.

  6. Data model issues in the Cherenkov Telescope Array project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras, J L; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bregeon, J; Bulgarelli, A; de Cesare, G; Reyes, R de los; Fioretti, V; Kosack, K; Lavalley, C; Lyard, E; Marx, R; Rico, J; Sanguillot, M; Servillat, M; Walter, R; Ward, J E

    2015-01-01

    The planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future ground-based Very-High-Energy (VHE) gamma-ray observatory, will be the largest project of its kind. It aims to provide an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to currently operating VHE experiments and open access to guest observers. These features, together with the thirty years lifetime planned for the installation, impose severe constraints on the data model currently being developed for the project. In this contribution we analyze the challenges faced by the CTA data model development and present the requirements imposed to face them. While the full data model is still not completed we show the organization of the work, status of the design, and an overview of the prototyping efforts carried out so far. We also show examples of specific aspects of the data model currently under development.

  7. Data compression for the First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahnen, M L; Bergmann, M; Biland, A; Bretz, T; Buß, J; Dorner, D; Einecke, S; Freiwald, J; Hempfling, C; Hildebrand, D; Hughes, G; Lustermann, W; Lyard, E; Mannheim, K; Meier, K; Mueller, S; Neise, D; Neronov, A; Overkemping, A -K; Paravac, A; Pauss, F; Rhode, W; Steinbring, T; Temme, F; Thaele, J; Toscano, S; Vogler, P; Walter, R; Wilbert, A

    2015-01-01

    The First Geiger-mode Avalanche photodiode (G-APD) Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) has been operating on the Canary island of La Palma since October 2011. Operations were automated so that the system can be operated remotely. Manual interaction is required only when the observation schedule is modified due to weather conditions or in case of unexpected events such as a mechanical failure. Automatic operations enabled high data taking efficiency, which resulted in up to two terabytes of FITS files being recorded nightly and transferred from La Palma to the FACT archive at ISDC in Switzerland. Since long term storage of hundreds of terabytes of observations data is costly, data compression is mandatory. This paper discusses the design choices that were made to increase the compression ratio and speed of writing of the data with respect to existing compression algorithms. Following a more detailed motivation, the FACT compression algorithm along with the associated I/O layer is discussed. Eventually, the performances...

  8. Methods for point source analysis in high energy neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jim Braun; Jon Dumm; Francesco De Palma; Chad Finley; Albrecht Karle; Teresa Montaruli

    2008-01-10

    Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.

  9. Crystal diffraction lens telescope for focusing nuclear gamma rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Ballmoos, P. von; Naya, J.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G. [Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France); Faiz, M. [KFUPM, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Physics Dept.

    1996-08-01

    A crystal diffraction lens was constructed at Argonne National Laboratory for use as a telescope to focus nuclear gamma rays. It consisted of 600 single crystals of germanium arranged in 8 concentric rings. The mounted angle of each crystal was adjusted to intercept and diffract the incoming gamma rays with an accuracy of a few arc sec. The performance of the lens was tested in two ways. In one case, the gamma rays were focused on a single medium size germanium detector. In the second case, the gamma rays were focused on the central germanium detector of a 3 x 3 matrix of small germanium detectors. The efficiency, image concentration and image quality, and shape were measured. The tests performed with the 3 x 3 matrix detector system were particularly interesting. The wanted radiation was concentrated in the central detector. The 8 other detectors were used to detect the Compton scattered radiation, and their energy was summed with coincident events in the central detector. This resulted in a detector with the efficiency of a large detector (all 9 elements) and the background of a small detector (only the central element). The use of the 3 x 3 detector matrix makes it possible to tell if the source is off axis and, if so, to tell in which direction. The crystal lens acts very much like a simple convex lens for visible light. Thus if the source is off to the left then the image will focus off to the right illuminating the detector on the right side: telling one in which direction to point the telescope. Possible applications of this type of crystal lens to balloon and satellite experiments will be discussed.

  10. Anisotropic Cosmological Model with Variable G and Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Tripathy; D. Behera; T. R. Routray

    2015-01-12

    Anisotropic Bianchi-III cosmological model is investigated with variable gravitational and cosmological constants in the framework of Einstein's general relativity. The shear scalar is considered to be proportional to the expansion scalar. The dynamics of the anisotropic universe with variable G and Lambda are discussed. Without assuming any specific forms for Lambda and the metric potentials, we have tried to extract the time variation of G and Lambda from the anisotropic model. The extracted G and Lambda are in conformity with the present day observation. Basing upon the observational limits, the behaviour and range of the effective equation of state parameter are discussed.

  11. Precision Cosmology and the Density of Baryons in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kaplinghat; M. S. Turner

    2000-11-14

    Big-bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements give independent, accurate measurements of the baryon density and can test the framework of the standard cosmology. Early CMB data are consistent with the longstanding conclusion from BBN that baryons constitute a small fraction of matter in the Universe, but may indicate a slightly higher value for the baryon density. We clarify precisely what the two methods determine, and point out that differing values for the baryon density can indicate either an inconsistency or physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. We discuss other signatures of the new physics in CMB anisotropy.

  12. Path Integral of Bianchi I models in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Liu; Fei Huang; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2013-02-01

    A path integral formulation of the Bianchi I models containing a massless scalar field in loop quantum cosmology is constructed. Following the strategy used in the homogenous and isotropic case, the calculation is extended to the simplest non-isotropic models according to the $\\bar{\\mu}$ and $\\bar{\\mu}^{\\prime}$ scheme. It is proved from the path integral angle that the quantum dynamic lacks the full invariance with respect to fiducial cell scaling in the $\\bar{\\mu}$ scheme, but it does not in the $\\bar{\\mu}^{\\prime}$ scheme. The investigation affirms the equivalence of the canonical approach and the path integral approach in loop quantum cosmology.

  13. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  14. Anisotropic cosmology and inflation from tilted Bianchi IX model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the tilted Bianchi IX cosmological models are explored allowing energy flux in the source fluid. The equation of state and the tilt angle of the fluid are the two free parameters and the shear, the vorticity and the curvature of the spacetime span a three-dimensional phase space that contains seven fixed points. One of them is an attractor that inflates the universe anisotropically, thus providing a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture. Also, an example of a realistic though fine-tuned cosmology is presented wherein the rotation can grow significant towards the present epoch but the shear stays within the observational bounds.

  15. Anisotropic cosmology and inflation from tilted Bianchi IX model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Sundell; Tomi Koivisto

    2015-06-15

    The dynamics of the tilted Bianchi IX cosmological models are explored allowing energy flux in the source fluid. The equation of state and the tilt angle of the fluid are the two free parameters and the shear, the vorticity and the curvature of the spacetime span a three-dimensional phase space that contains seven fixed points. One of them is an attractor that inflates the universe anisotropically, thus providing a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture. Also, an example of a realistic though fine-tuned cosmology is presented wherein the rotation can grow significant towards the present epoch but the shear stays within the observational bounds.

  16. A note on string size evolution in phantom cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soon-Tae Hong

    2015-04-05

    We analyze evolution of string size in higher-dimensional cosmology with phantom field. Assuming that the Universe possesses the phantom field defined in a ten-dimensional spacetime, we predict string size which is claimed to be that of photon in nature at present. The Universe size increases as in the standard inflationary Universe model while the photon size decreases drastically at the early stage of the string evolution after the Big Bang. Moreover, the photon spin in the phantom Universe is analyzed in the framework of the stringy cosmology.

  17. Early universe cosmology and tests of fundamental physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreas Albrecht, Joshua A. Frieman and Mark Trodden

    2002-03-04

    This is the report of the Working Group on Early Universe Cosmology and tests of Fundamental Physics, group P4.8 of the of the Snowmass 2001 conference. Here we summarize the impressive array of advances that have taken place in this field, and identify opportunities for even greater progress in the future. Topics include Dark Energy, Cosmic Acceleration, Inflation, Phase Transitions, Baryogenesis, and String/M-theory Cosmology. The introductory section gives an executive summary with six key open questions on which we can expect to make significant progress.

  18. Implementing the DC Mode in Cosmological Simulations with Supercomoving Variables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Kravtsov, Andrey V; Rudd, Douglas H

    2011-06-02

    As emphasized by previous studies, proper treatment of the density fluctuation on the fundamental scale of a cosmological simulation volume - the 'DC mode' - is critical for accurate modeling of spatial correlations on scales ~> 10% of simulation box size. We provide further illustration of the effects of the DC mode on the abundance of halos in small boxes and show that it is straightforward to incorporate this mode in cosmological codes that use the 'supercomoving' variables. The equations governing evolution of dark matter and baryons recast with these variables are particularly simple and include the expansion factor, andmore »hence the effect of the DC mode, explicitly only in the Poisson equation.« less

  19. Cosmological fluctuations of a random field and radiation fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Campus de Fuentenueva, Universidad de Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Berera, Arjun [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Moss, Ian G. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastlle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Ramos, Rudnei O., E-mail: mbg@ugr.es, E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk, E-mail: ian.moss@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: rudnei@uerj.br [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20550-013 Brazil (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    A generalization of the random fluid hydrodynamic fluctuation theory due to Landau and Lifshitz is applied to describe cosmological fluctuations in systems with radiation and scalar fields. The viscous pressures, parametrized in terms of the bulk and shear viscosity coefficients, and the respective random fluctuations in the radiation fluid are combined with the stochastic and dissipative scalar evolution equation. This results in a complete set of equations describing the perturbations in both scalar and radiation fluids. These derived equations are then studied, as an example, in the context of warm inflation. Similar treatments can be done for other cosmological early universe scenarios involving thermal or statistical fluctuations.

  20. Attracted to de Sitter: cosmology of the linear Horndeski models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prado Martin-Moruno; Nelson J. Nunes; Francisco S. N. Lobo

    2015-05-06

    We consider Horndeski cosmological models, with a minisuperspace Lagrangian linear in the field derivative, that are able to screen any vacuum energy and material content leading to a spatially flat de Sitter vacuum fixed by the theory itself. Furthermore, we investigate particular models with a cosmic evolution independent of the material content and use them to understand the general characteristics of this framework. We also consider more realistic models, which we denote the "term-by-term" and "tripod" models, focusing attention on cases in which the critical point is indeed an attractor solution and the cosmological history is of particular interest.

  1. Modified Dispersion Relations from Closed Strings in Toroidal Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar Bastero-Gil; Paul H. Frampton; Laura Mersini

    2002-02-13

    A long-standing problem of theoretical physics is the exceptionally small value of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda \\sim 10^{-120}$ measured in natural Planckian units. Here we derive this tiny number from a toroidal string cosmology based on closed strings. In this picture the dark energy arises from the correlation between momentum and winding modes that for short distances has an exponential fall-off with increasing values of the momenta.The freeze-out by the expansion of the background universe for these transplanckian modes may be interpreted as a frozen condensate of the closed-string modes in the three non-compactified spatial dimensions.

  2. The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For large-diameter solar telescopes operating at the theoretical diffraction limit, one of the main designThe Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory Angelo P. Verdonia and Carsten Denkera aNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, 323 Martin

  3. Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project Myung K. Cho Optical Sciences Center in the University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 and Gemini Telescopes Project P. O. Box 26732 Tucson, AZ 85726­6732 Gemini Preprint #9 #12; Active optics performance study of the primary

  4. Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope Observations of Nova Circini 1995 and Nova Aquilae 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope Observations of Nova Circini 1995 and Nova Aquilae 1995 Bradford W 1995 and Nova Aql 1995 with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope during the Astro­2 space shuttle mission in 1995 March. The spectra cover the wavelength range from 820 š A to 1840 š A with a spectral resolution

  5. End-to-end absolute energy calibration of atmospheric fluorescence telescopes by an electron linear accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    End-to-end absolute energy calibration of atmospheric fluorescence telescopes by an electron linear of fluorescence telescopes by using air showers induced by electron beams from a linear accelerator, which and constructing a compact linear accelerator with a maximum electron energy of 40 MeV and an intensity of 6.4 m

  6. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of ...

  7. In-orbit performance of the XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes: images and spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2001-09-21

    The performance of the three X-ray telescopes on-board of XMM-Newton is evaluated addressing imaging characteristics and effective collecting area. The agreement with ground calibration data is excellent. The analysis of images and spectra of cosmic X-ray sources, emphazising supernova and supernova remnants, prooves that the telescopes are even better than originally required.

  8. The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey: The Multi-Telescope Robotic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Lehner; C. -Y. Wen; J. -H. Wang; S. L. Marshall; M. E. Schwamb; Z. -W. Zhang; F. B. Bianco; J. Giammarco; R. Porrata; C. Alcock; T. Axelrod; Y. -I. Byun; W. P. Chen; K. H. Cook; R. Dave; S. -K. King; T. Lee; H. -C. Lin; S. -Y. Wang

    2009-03-16

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) operates four fully automatic telescopes to search for occultations of stars by Kuiper Belt Objects. It is a versatile facility that is also useful for the study of initial optical GRB afterglows. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS multi-telescope system, control software, and high-speed imaging.

  9. Wind tunnel testing of a generic telescope enclosure Tait S. Pottebaum*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMynowski, Douglas G. - MacMynowski, Douglas G.

    -buffeting, wind tunnel, DPIV 1. INTRODUCTION Various design studies are currently underway for the next generation that CFD can be used with confidence in future design work. Keywords: Extremely-Large-Telescopes, Wind with confidence in future design work. For an 80m diameter telescope dome in a 12m/s external wind (roughly the 85

  10. Multilayer coating facility for the HEFT hard X-ray telescope Carsten P. Jensena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Christensena , Hubert Chenb , Erik B. W.Smitta , Eric Zieglerc a Danish Space Research Institute (Denmark); b) for the production coating of depth graded multilayers on the thermally slumped glass segments which form the basis, Hard X-ray telescope 1. INTRODUCTION The High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT) is a balloon borne

  11. IL NUOVO CIMENTO Vol. ?, N. ? ? The Liverpool Telescope Automatic Pipeline for Realtime GRB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomboc, Andreja

    IL NUOVO CIMENTO Vol. ?, N. ? ? The Liverpool Telescope Automatic Pipeline for Real­time GRB pipeline. PACS 95.55.Cs -- Ground­based ultraviolet, optical and infrared telescopes. PACS 95.75.Mn of the system is the subsequent pipelined data reduction, analysis and automatic identification of possible GRB

  12. CMS Pixel Telescope Addition to T-980 Bent Crystal Collimation Experiment at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, Ryan; Johnson, Todd; Kwan, Simon; Lundberg, Carl; Still, Dean; Prosser, Alan; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Zagel, Jim; Zvodaya, Viktoriya

    2012-01-01

    An enhancement to the T-980 bent crystal collimation experiment at the Tevatron has been completed. The enhancement was the installation of a pixel telescope inside the vacuum-sealed beam pipe of the Tevatron. The telescope is comprised of six CMS PSI46 pixel plaquettes, arranged as three stations of horizontal and vertical planes, with the CAPTAN system for data acquisition and control. The purpose of the pixel telescope is to measure beam profiles produced by bent crystals under various conditions. The telescope electronics inside the beam pipe initially were not adequately shielded from the image current of the passing beams. A new shielding approach was devised and installed, which resolved the problem. The noise issues encountered and the mitigating techniques are presented herein, as well as some preliminary results from the telescope.

  13. CMS Pixel Telescope Addition to T-980 Bent Crystal Collimation Experiment at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, Ryan; Annala, Jerry; Johnson, Todd; Kwan, Simon; Lundberg, Carl; Still, Dean; Prosser, Alan; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Zagel, Jim; Zvodaya, Viktoriya; /Fermilab

    2011-09-14

    An enhancement to the T-980 bent crystal collimation experiment at the Tevatron has been completed. The enhancement was the installation of a pixel telescope inside the vacuum-sealed beam pipe of the Tevatron. The telescope is comprised of six CMS PSI46 pixel plaquettes, arranged as three stations of horizontal and vertical planes, with the CAPTAN system for data acquisition and control. The purpose of the pixel telescope is to measure beam profiles produced by bent crystals under various conditions. The telescope electronics inside the beam pipe initially were not adequately shielded from the image current of the passing beams. A new shielding approach was devised and installed, which resolved the problem. The noise issues encountered and the mitigating techniques are presented herein, as well as some preliminary results from the telescope.

  14. The MAGIC Telescope Project for Gamma Astronomy above 10 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Magnussen

    1998-05-14

    A project to construct a 17 m diameter imaging air Cherenkov telescope, called the MAGIC Telescope, is described. The aim of the project is to close the observation gap in the gamma-ray sky extending from 10 GeV as the highest energy measurable by space-borne experiments to 300 GeV, the lowest energy measurable by the current generation of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. The MAGIC Telescope will incorporate several new features in order to reach the very low energy threshold. At the same time the new technology will yield an improvement in sensitivity in the energy region where current Cherenkov telescopes are measuring by about an order of magnitude.

  15. The impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petri, Andrea [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); May, Morgan [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kratochvil, Jan M. [Univ. of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2?10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ?100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.

  16. Impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2014-12-30

    We research, residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biasesmore »from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2 ? 10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ? 100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.« less

  17. Impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2014-12-30

    We research, residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2 ? 10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ? 100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.

  18. Non-minimal derivative coupling gravity in cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumjudpai, Burin

    2015-01-01

    We give a brief review of the non-minimal derivative coupling (NMDC) scalar field theory in which there is non-minimal coupling between the scalar field derivative term and the Einstein tensor. We assume that the expansion is of power-law type or super-acceleration type for small redshift. The Lagrangian includes the NMDC term, a free kinetic term, a cosmological constant term and a barotropic matter term. For a value of the coupling constant that is compatible with inflation, we use the combined WMAP9 (WMAP9+eCMB+BAO+ $H_0$) dataset, the PLANCK+WP dataset, and the PLANCK $TT,TE,EE$+lowP+Lensing+ext datasets to find the value of the cosmological constant in the model. Modeling the expansion with power-law gives a negative cosmological constants while the phantom power-law (super-acceleration) expansion gives positive cosmological constant with large error bar. The value obtained is of the same order as in the $\\Lambda$CDM model, since at late times the NMDC effect is tiny due to small curvature.

  19. Disformal theories of gravity: from the solar system to cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2014-12-01

    This paper is concerned with theories of gravity that contain a scalar coupled both conformally and disformally to matter through the metric. By systematically deriving the non-relativistic limit, it is shown that no new non-linear screening mechanisms are present beyond the Vainshtein mechanism and chameleon-like screening. If one includes the cosmological expansion of the universe, disformal effects that are usually taken to be absent can be present in the solar system. When the conformal factor is absent, fifth-forces can be screened on all scales when the cosmological field is slowly-rolling. We investigate the cosmology of these models and use local tests of gravity to place new constraints on the disformal coupling and find M ?> O(eV), which is not competitive with laboratory tests. Finally, we discuss the future prospects for testing these theories and the implications for other theories of modified gravity. In particular, the Vainshtein radius of solar system objects can be altered from the static prediction when cosmological time-derivatives are non-negligible.

  20. Bimetric gravity doubly coupled to matter: theory and cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Mota, David F.; Sandstad, Marit E-mail: t.s.koivisto@astro.uio.no E-mail: marit.sandstad@astro.uio.no

    2013-10-01

    A ghost-free theory of gravity with two dynamical metrics both coupled to matter is shown to be consistent and viable. Its cosmological implications are studied, and the models, in particular in the context of partially massless gravity, are found to explain the cosmic acceleration without resorting to dark energy.

  1. Identifying cosmological perturbations in group field theory condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffen Gielen

    2015-08-03

    One proposal for deriving effective cosmological models from theories of quantum gravity is to view the former as a mean-field (hydrodynamic) description of the latter, which describes a universe formed by a 'condensate' of quanta of geometry. This idea has been successfully applied within the setting of group field theory (GFT), a quantum field theory of 'atoms of space' which can form such a condensate. We further clarify the interpretation of this mean-field approximation, and show how it can be used to obtain a semiclassical description of the GFT, in which the mean field encodes a classical statistical distribution of geometric data. In this sense, GFT condensates are quantum homogeneous geometries that also contain statistical information about cosmological inhomogeneities. We show in the isotropic case how this information can be extracted from geometric GFT observables and mapped to quantities of observational interest. Basic uncertainty relations of (non-commutative) Fourier transforms imply that this statistical description can only be compatible with the observed near-homogeneity of the Universe if the typical length scale associated to the distribution is much larger than the fundamental 'Planck' scale. As an example of effective cosmological equations derived from the GFT dynamics, we then use a simple approximation in one class of GFT models to derive the 'improved dynamics' prescription of holonomy corrections in loop quantum cosmology.

  2. The Age-Redshift Relation for Standard Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Thomas; R. Kantowski

    2000-08-10

    We present compact, analytic expressions for the age-redshift relation $\\tau(z)$ for standard Friedmann-Lema\\^ \\itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology. The new expressions are given in terms of incomplete Legendre elliptic integrals and evaluate much faster than by direct numerical integration.

  3. Growth of matter perturbations in clustered holographic dark energy cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrabi, Ahmad; Malekjani, Mohammad; Davari, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the growth of matter fluctuations in holographic dark energy cosmologies. First we use an overall statistical analysis involving the latest observational data in order to place constraints on the cosmological parameters. Then we test the range of validity of the holographic dark energy models at the perturbation level and its variants from the concordance $\\Lambda$ cosmology. Specifically, we provide a new analytical approach in order to derive, for the first time, the growth index of matter perturbations. Considering a homogeneous holographic dark energy we find that the growth index is $\\gamma \\approx \\frac{4}{7}$ which is somewhat larger ($\\sim 4.8\\%$) than that of the usual $\\Lambda$ cosmology, $\\gamma^{(\\Lambda)}\\approx \\frac{6}{11}$. Finally, if we allow clustering in the holographic dark energy models then the asymptotic value of the growth index is given in terms of the effective sound speed $c_{\\rm e}$, namely $\\gamma \\approx \\frac{3(1-c_{\\rm e})}{7}$.

  4. Dangerous Angular KK/Glueball Relics in String Theory Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Dufaux; L. Kofman; M. Peloso

    2008-07-07

    The presence of Kaluza-Klein particles in the universe is a potential manifestation of string theory cosmology. In general, they can be present in the high temperature bath of the early universe. In particular examples, string theory inflation often ends with brane-antibrane annihilation followed by the energy cascading through massive closed string loops to KK modes which then decay into lighter standard model particles. However, massive KK modes in the early universe may become dangerous cosmological relics if the inner manifold contains warped throat(s) with approximate isometries. In the complimentary picture, in the AdS/CFT dual gauge theory with extra symmetries, massive glueballs of various spins become the dangerous cosmological relics. The decay of these angular KK modes/glueballs, located around the tip of the throat, is caused by isometry breaking which results from gluing the throat to the compact CY manifold. We address the problem of these angular KK particles/glueballs, studying their interactions and decay channels, from the theory side, and the resulting cosmological constraints on the warped compactification parameters, from the phenomenology side. The abundance and decay time of the long-lived non-relativistic angular KK modes depend strongly on the parameters of the warped geometry, so that observational constraints rule out a significant fraction of the parameter space. In particular, the coupling of the angular KK particles can be weaker than gravitational.

  5. Evolution Operators for Linearly Polarized Two-Killing Cosmological Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Fernando Barbero G.; Daniel Gómez Vergel; Eduardo J. S. Villaseñor

    2006-06-15

    We give a general procedure to obtain non perturbative evolution operators in closed form for quantized linearly polarized two Killing vector reductions of general relativity with a cosmological interpretation. We study the representation of these operators in Fock spaces and discuss in detail the conditions leading to unitary evolutions.

  6. Mergers and star formation in SPH cosmological simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricia B. Tissera

    1999-11-02

    The star formation rate history of galactic objects in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are analyzed in relation to their merger histories. The findings suggest that massive mergers produce more efficient starbursts and that, depending on the internal structure of the objects, double starbursts could also occur.

  7. Cosmological Evolution of Statistical System of Scalar Charged Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignat'ev, Yurii; Mikhailov, Mikhail; Ignatyev, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    In the paper we consider the macroscopic model of plasma of scalar charged particles, obtained by means of the statistical averaging of the microscopic equations of particle dynamics in a scalar field. On the basis of kinetic equations, obtained from averaging, and their strict integral consequences, a self-consistent set of equations is formulated which describes the self-gravitating plasma of scalar charged particles. It was obtained the corresponding closed cosmological model which also was numerically simulated for the case of one-component degenerated Fermi gas and two-component Boltzmann system. It was shown that results depend weakly on the choice of a statistical model. Two specific features of cosmological evolution of a statistical system of scalar charged particles were obtained with respect to cosmological evolution of the minimal interaction models: appearance of giant bursts of invariant cosmological acceleration $\\Omega$ at the time interval $8\\cdot10^3\\div2\\cdot10^4 t_{Pl}$ and strong heating ...

  8. Nvidia CUDA and AMD Stream (for Cosmology): Experiences So Far

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratton, Steven

    2008-11-11

    … Some support Received a mini-grant from the Foundation Questions Institute to look at GPGPU with CUDA for cosmology and provide a resources page; the latter at: http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~stg20/gpgpu/index.html htttp://www.fqxi.org I bought… 2x Nvidia...

  9. Troubles with quantum anisotropic cosmological models: loss of unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Alvarenga; A. B. Batista; J. C. Fabris; S. V. B. Goncalves

    2004-02-25

    The anisotropic Bianchi I cosmological model coupled with perfect fluid is quantized in the minisuperspace. The perfect fluid is described by using the Schutz formalism which allows to attribute dynamical degrees of freedom to matter. It is shown that the resulting model is non-unitary. This breaks the equivalence between the many-worlds and dBB interpretations of quantum mechanics.

  10. Cosmological electromagnetic fields due to gravitational wave perturbations Mattias Marklund*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunsby, Peter

    show that this coupling leads to an initial pulse of electromagnetic waves whose width and amplitude to produce a pulse of gravitationally induced electromagnetic waves. In particular, because of the differentCosmological electromagnetic fields due to gravitational wave perturbations Mattias Marklund

  11. Deuterium Nucleosynthesis in AGN: Is D Cosmological? D. A. Lubowicha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Tom

    Deuterium Nucleosynthesis in AGN: Is D Cosmological? D. A. Lubowicha , N. Kunob , H. Robertsc , T or cosmic-ray luminosity > 1042 erg/s. If jet-cloud nucleosynthesis produces significant amounts of D on the temperature and baryonic density during the epoch of nucleosynthesis (first 1000 seconds). Thus any

  12. Alternative cosmology fits supernovae redshifts with no dark energyy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis J. M. Farley

    2009-03-17

    Supernovae and radio galaxy redshift data are fitted in an alternative cosmology. The galaxies are assumed to recede with unchanging velocities in a static Robertson-Walker metric with a(t) = 1. An exact fit is obtained with no adjustable parameters. There is no indication that the recession velocities are changing with time, so no call for "dark energy".

  13. The matter bounce scenario in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward, E-mail: wilson-ewing@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS UMR 7332, CPT, 13288 Marseille (France)

    2013-03-01

    In the matter bounce scenario, a dust-dominated contracting space-time generates scale-invariant perturbations that, assuming a nonsingular bouncing cosmology, propagate to the expanding branch and set appropriate initial conditions for the radiation-dominated era. Since this scenario depends on the presence of a bounce, it seems appropriate to consider it in the context of loop quantum cosmology where a bouncing universe naturally arises. For a pressureless collapsing universe in loop quantum cosmology, the predicted power spectrum of the scalar perturbations after the bounce is scale-invariant and the tensor to scalar ratio is negligibly small. A slight red tilt can be given to the scale-invariance of the scalar perturbations by a scalar field whose equation of state is P = ???, where ? is a small positive number. Then, the power spectrum for tensor perturbations is also almost scale-invariant with the same red tilt as the scalar perturbations, and the tensor to scalar ratio is expected to be r ? 9 × 10{sup ?4}. Finally, for the predicted amplitude of the scalar perturbations to agree with observations, the critical density in loop quantum cosmology must be of the order ?{sub c} ? 10{sup ?9}?{sub Pl}.

  14. Cosmological milestones and gravastars - topics in general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celine Cattoen

    2006-06-05

    In this thesis, we consider two different problems relevant to general relativity. Over the last few years, opinions on physically relevant singularities occurring in FRW cosmologies have considerably changed. We present an extensive catalogue of such cosmological milestones using generalized power series both at the kinematical and dynamical level. We define the notion of "scale factor singularity" and explore its relation to polynomial and differential curvature singularities. We also extract dynamical information using the Friedmann equations and derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of cosmological milestones such as big bangs, big crunches, big rips, sudden singularities and extremality events. Specifically, we provide a complete characterization of cosmological milestones for which the dominant energy condition is satisfied. The second problem looks at one of the very small number of serious alternatives to the usual concept of an astrophysical black hole, that is, the gravastar model developed by Mazur and Mottola. By considering a generalized class of similar models with continuous pressure (no infinitesimally thin shells) and negative central pressure, we demonstrate that gravastars cannot be perfect fluid spheres: anisotropic pressures are unavoidable. We provide bounds on the necessary anisotropic pressure and show that these transverse stresses that support a gravastar permit a higher compactness than is given by the Buchdahl-Bondi bound for perfect fluid stars. We also comment on the qualitative features of the equation of state that such gravastar-like objects without any horizon must have.

  15. Receive Transmit Telescope Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies for the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft and verify these technologies with the experimental test for Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft Jae Jun Kim* , Tim Sands , and Brij N. Agrawal Naval Postgraduate School Relay Mirror Spacecraft. In this paper, development of the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft experimental

  16. Characterizing the best cosmic telescopes with the millennium simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, K. Decker; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.; Angulo, Raul E.

    2014-04-10

    Certain configurations of massive structures projected along the line of sight (LOS) maximize the number of detections of gravitationally lensed z ? 10 galaxies. We characterize such LOSs with the étendue ?{sub ?}, the area in the source plane magnified over some threshold ?. We use the Millennium I and Millennium XXL cosmological simulations to determine the frequency of high ?{sub ?} beams on the sky, their properties, and efficient selection criteria. We define the best beams as having ?{sub ?>3} > 2000 arcsec{sup 2}, for a z ? 10 source plane, and predict 477 ± 21 such beams on the sky. The total mass in the beam and ?{sub ?>3} are strongly correlated. After controlling for total mass, we find a significant residual correlation between ?{sub ?>3} and the number of cluster-scale halos (>10{sup 14} M {sub ?} h {sup –1}) in the beam. Beams with ?{sub ?>3} > 2000 arcsec{sup 2}, which should be best at lensing z ? 10 galaxies, are 10 times more likely to contain multiple cluster-scale halos than a single cluster-scale halo. Beams containing an A1689-like massive cluster halo often have additional structures along the LOS, including at least one additional cluster-scale (M {sub 200} > 10{sup 14} M {sub ?} h {sup –1}) halo 28% of the time. Selecting beams with multiple, massive structures will lead to enhanced detection of the most distant and intrinsically faint galaxies.

  17. De-contamination of cosmological 21-cm maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liron Gleser; Adi Nusser; Andrew J. Benson

    2008-10-27

    We present a method for extracting the expected cosmological 21-cm signal from the epoch of reionization, taking into account contaminating radiations and random instrumental noise. The method is based on the maximum a-posteriori probability (MAP) formalism and employs the coherence of the contaminating radiation along the line-of-sight and the three-dimensional correlations of the cosmological signal. We test the method using a detailed and comprehensive modeling of the cosmological 21-cm signal and the contaminating radiation. The signal is obtained using a high resolution N-body simulation where the gas is assumed to trace the dark matter and is reionized by stellar radiation computed from semi-analytic galaxy formation recipes. We model contaminations to the cosmological signal from synchrotron and free-free galactic foregrounds and extragalactic sources including active galactic nuclei, radio haloes and relics, synchrotron and free-free emission from star forming galaxies, and free-free emission from dark matter haloes and the intergalactic medium. We provide tests of the reconstruction method for several rms values of instrumental noise from $\\sigma_{N}=1$ to 250 mK. For low instrumental noise, the recovered signal, along individual lines-of-sight, fits the true cosmological signal with a mean rms difference of $d_{rms}\\approx 1.7\\pm 0.6$ for $\\sigma_{N}=1$ mK, and $d_{rms}\\approx 4.2\\pm 0.4$ for $\\sigma_{N}=5$ mK. The one-dimensional power spectrum is nicely reconstructed for all values of $\\sigma_{N}$ considered here, while the reconstruction of the two-dimensional power spectrum and the Minkowski functionals is good only for noise levels of the order of few mK.

  18. Emergent Universe With Exotic Matter In Loop Quantum Cosmology, DGP Brane World and Kaluza-Klein Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabir Rudra

    2012-11-09

    In this work we have investigated the emergent scenario of the universe described by Loop quantum cosmology model, DGP brane model and Kaluza-Klein cosmology. Scalar field along with barotropic fluid as normal matter is considered as the matter content of the universe. In Loop quantum cosmology it is found that the emergent scenario is realized with the imposition of some conditions on the value of the density of normal matter in case of normal and phantom scalar field. This is a surprising result indeed considering the fact that scalar field is the dominating matter component. In case of Tachyonic field, emergent scenario is realized with some constraints on the value of $\\rho_{1}$ for both normal and phantom tachyon. In case of DGP brane-world realization of an emergent scenario is possible almost unconditionally for normal and phantom fields. Plots and table have been generated to testify this fact. In case of tachyonic field emergent scenario is realized with some constraints on $\\dot{H}$. In Kaluza-Klein cosmology emergent scenario is possible only for a closed universe in case of normal and phantom scalar field. For a tachyonic field realization of emergent universe is possible for all models(closed, open and flat).

  19. Investigation of Umbral Dots with the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaifan, Ji; Song, Feng; Yunfei, Yang; Hui, Deng; Feng, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Umbral dots (UDs) are small isolated brightening observed in sunspot umbrae. They are convective phenomena existing inside umbrae. UDs are usually divided into central UDs (CUDs) and peripheral UDs (PUDs) with respect to their positions inside an umbra. Our purpose is to investigate UD properties and analyze their relationships, and further to find whether or not the properties depend on the umbral magnetic field variation. For the purpose, we selected the high-resolution TiO images of four active regions (ARs) obtained under the best seeing conditions with the \\emph{New Vacuum Solar Telescope} (NVST) in Fuxian Solar Observatory of Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, China. The four ARs (NOAA 11598, 11801, 12158, and 12178) include six sunspots. A total of 1220 CUDs were extracted from six sunspots, and 603 PUDs from three sunspots. Meanwhile, the radial component of the magnetic field of the sunspots obtained with the \\emph{Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} onboard the \\emph{Solar Dynamics Observatory} was used...

  20. THE INFRARED TELESCOPE FACILITY (IRTF) SPECTRAL LIBRARY: COOL STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, John T.; Cushing, Michael C.; Vacca, William D. E-mail: michael.cushing@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    We present a 0.8-5 {mu}m spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R {identical_to} {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured and preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.