Sample records for atacama cosmology telescope

  1. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Project: A Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; for the ACT Collaboration

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a project to map the microwave background radiation at arcminute angular resolution and high sensitivity in three frequency bands over substantial sky areas. Cosmological signals driving such an experiment are reviewed, and current progress in hardware construction is summarized. Complementary astronomical observations in other wavebands are also discussed.

  2. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: DATA CHARACTERIZATION AND MAPMAKING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duenner, Rolando; Aguirre, Paula; Barrientos, L. Felipe [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)] [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Hasselfield, Matthew; Amiri, Mandana; Battistelli, Elia S.; Burger, Bryce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Marriage, Tobias A.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Das, Sudeep [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Sievers, Jon; Appel, John William [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Addison, Graeme E.; Calabrese, Erminia [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Ade, Peter A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bond, J. Richard [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)] [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Brown, Ben [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Chervenak, Jay [Code 553/665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Code 553/665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); and others

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the data reduction and mapmaking pipeline used for the 2008 observing season of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The data presented here at 148 GHz represent 12% of the 90 TB collected by ACT from 2007 to 2010. In 2008 we observed for 136 days, producing a total of 1423 hr of data (11 TB for the 148 GHz band only), with a daily average of 10.5 hr of observation. From these, 1085 hr were devoted to an 850 deg{sup 2} stripe (11.2 hr by 9. Degree-Sign 1) centered on a declination of -52. Degree-Sign 7, while 175 hr were devoted to a 280 deg{sup 2} stripe (4.5 hr by 4. Degree-Sign 8) centered at the celestial equator. The remaining 163 hr correspond to calibration runs. We discuss sources of statistical and systematic noise, calibration, telescope pointing, and data selection. For the 148 GHz band, out of 1260 survey hours and 1024 detectors in the array, 816 hr and 593 effective detectors remain after data selection, yielding a 38% survey efficiency. The total sensitivity in 2008, determined from the noise level between 5 Hz and 20 Hz in the time-ordered data stream (TOD), is 32 {mu}K{radical}s in cosmic microwave background units. Atmospheric brightness fluctuations constitute the main contaminant in the data and dominate the detector noise covariance at low frequencies in the TOD. The maps were made by solving the least-squares problem using the Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient method, incorporating the details of the detector and noise correlations. Simulations, as well as cross-correlations with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe sky maps on large angular scales, reveal that our maps are unbiased at multipoles l > 300. This paper accompanies the public release of the 148 GHz southern stripe maps from 2008. The techniques described here will be applied to future maps and data releases.

  3. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: ACT-CL J0102-4915 'EL GORDO', A MASSIVE MERGING CLUSTER AT REDSHIFT 0.87

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menanteau, Felipe; Hughes, John P.; Baker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Sifon, Cristobal; Gonzalez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Felipe Barrientos, L. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Hilton, Matt [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Bond, John R.; Hajian, Amir; Nolta, Michael R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Das, Sudeep [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Marsden, Danica [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dunkley, Joanna [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kosowsky, Arthur [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Pittsburgh, 100 Allen Hall, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Marriage, Tobias A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Moodley, Kavilan [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Niemack, Michael D. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); and others

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis from new multi-wavelength observations of the exceptional galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915, likely the most massive, hottest, most X-ray luminous and brightest Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect cluster known at redshifts greater than 0.6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) collaboration discovered ACT-CL J0102-4915 as the most significant SZ decrement in a sky survey area of 755 deg{sup 2}. Our Very Large Telescope (VLT)/FORS2 spectra of 89 member galaxies yield a cluster redshift, z = 0.870, and velocity dispersion, {sigma}{sub gal} = 1321 {+-} 106 km s{sup -1}. Our Chandra observations reveal a hot and X-ray luminous system with an integrated temperature of T{sub X} = 14.5 {+-} 0.1 keV and 0.5-2.0 keV band luminosity of L{sub X} = (2.19 {+-} 0.11) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 45} h{sup -2}{sub 70} erg s{sup -1}. We obtain several statistically consistent cluster mass estimates; using empirical mass scaling relations with velocity dispersion, X-ray Y{sub X}, and integrated SZ distortion, we estimate a cluster mass of M{sub 200a} = (2.16 {+-} 0.32) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} h{sup -1}{sub 70} M{sub Sun }. We constrain the stellar content of the cluster to be less than 1% of the total mass, using Spitzer IRAC and optical imaging. The Chandra and VLT/FORS2 optical data also reveal that ACT-CL J0102-4915 is undergoing a major merger between components with a mass ratio of approximately 2 to 1. The X-ray data show significant temperature variations from a low of 6.6 {+-} 0.7 keV at the merging low-entropy, high-metallicity, cool core to a high of 22 {+-} 6 keV. We also see a wake in the X-ray surface brightness and deprojected gas density caused by the passage of one cluster through the other. Archival radio data at 843 MHz reveal diffuse radio emission that, if associated with the cluster, indicates the presence of an intense double radio relic, hosted by the highest redshift cluster yet. ACT-CL J0102-4915 is possibly a high-redshift analog of the famous Bullet cluster. Such a massive cluster at this redshift is rare, although consistent with the standard {Lambda}CDM cosmology in the lower part of its allowed mass range. Massive, high-redshift mergers like ACT-CL J0102-4915 are unlikely to be reproduced in the current generation of numerical N-body cosmological simulations.

  4. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: DYNAMICAL MASSES AND SCALING RELATIONS FOR A SAMPLE OF MASSIVE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTERS {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sifon, Cristobal; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Gonzalez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Duenner, Rolando [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Menanteau, Felipe; Hughes, John P.; Baker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Marriage, Tobias A.; Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Addison, Graeme E.; Dunkley, Joanna [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Das, Sudeep [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Devlin, Mark J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hilton, Matt [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first dynamical mass estimates and scaling relations for a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) selected galaxy clusters. The sample consists of 16 massive clusters detected with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) over a 455 deg{sup 2} area of the southern sky. Deep multi-object spectroscopic observations were taken to secure intermediate-resolution (R {approx} 700-800) spectra and redshifts for Almost-Equal-To 60 member galaxies on average per cluster. The dynamical masses M{sub 200c} of the clusters have been calculated using simulation-based scaling relations between velocity dispersion and mass. The sample has a median redshift z = 0.50 and a median mass M{sub 200c}{approx_equal}12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub sun} with a lower limit M{sub 200c}{approx_equal}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub sun}, consistent with the expectations for the ACT southern sky survey. These masses are compared to the ACT SZE properties of the sample, specifically, the match-filtered central SZE amplitude y{sub 0}-tilde, the central Compton parameter y{sub 0}, and the integrated Compton signal Y{sub 200c}, which we use to derive SZE-mass scaling relations. All SZE estimators correlate with dynamical mass with low intrinsic scatter ({approx}< 20%), in agreement with numerical simulations. We explore the effects of various systematic effects on these scaling relations, including the correlation between observables and the influence of dynamically disturbed clusters. Using the three-dimensional information available, we divide the sample into relaxed and disturbed clusters and find that {approx}50% of the clusters are disturbed. There are hints that disturbed systems might bias the scaling relations, but given the current sample sizes, these differences are not significant; further studies including more clusters are required to assess the impact of these clusters on the scaling relations.

  5. EFFECT OF MEASUREMENT ERRORS ON PREDICTED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SHEAR PEAK STATISTICS WITH LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bard, D.; Chang, C.; Kahn, S. M.; Gilmore, K.; Marshall, S. [KIPAC, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Kratochvil, J. M.; Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); May, M. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); AlSayyad, Y.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R. R.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Lorenz, S. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Haiman, Z.; Jernigan, J. G., E-mail: djbard@slac.stanford.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); and others

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of galaxy shape measurement errors on predicted cosmological constraints from the statistics of shear peak counts with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We use the LSST Image Simulator in combination with cosmological N-body simulations to model realistic shear maps for different cosmological models. We include both galaxy shape noise and, for the first time, measurement errors on galaxy shapes. We find that the measurement errors considered have relatively little impact on the constraining power of shear peak counts for LSST.

  6. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH-SELECTED CLUSTERS WITH X-RAY OBSERVATIONS IN THE FIRST 178 deg[superscript 2] OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersson, Karl

    We use measurements from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster survey in combination with X-ray measurements to constrain cosmological parameters. We present a statistical method that fits for the ...

  7. Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift 0.5: Cosmological Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Clocchiatti; B. Schmidt; A. Filippenko; P. Challis; A. Coil; R. Covarrubias; A. Diercks; P. Garnavich; L. Germany; R. Gilliland; C. Hogan; S. Jha; R. Kirshner; B. Leibundgut; D. Leonard; W. Li; T. Matheson; M. Phillips; J. Prieto; D. Reiss; A. Riess; R. Schommer; R. Smith; A. Soderberg; J. Spyromilio; C. Stubbs; N. Suntzeff; J. Tonry; P. Woudt; for the High Z SN Search Collaboration

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the Type Ia supernovae (SNe) 1999M, 1999N, 1999Q, 1999S, and 1999U, at redshift z~0.5. They were discovered in early 1999 with the 4.0~m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory by the High-z Supernova Search Team (HZT) and subsequently followed with many ground-based telescopes. SNe 1999Q and 1999U were also observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. We computed luminosity distances to the new SNe using two methods, and added them to the high-z Hubble diagram that the HZT has been constructing since 1995. The new distance moduli confirm the results of previous work. At z~0.5, luminosity distances are larger than those expected for an empty universe, implying that a ``Cosmological Constant,'' or another form of ``dark energy,'' has been increasing the expansion rate of the Universe during the last few billion years.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift 0.5: Cosmological Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clocchiatti, A; Filippenko, A V; Challis, P; Coil, A; Covarrubias, R; Diercks, A H; Garnavich, P M; Germany, L; Gilliland, R L; Hogan, C; Jha, S; Kirshner, R; Leibundgut, B; Leonard, D; Li, W; Matheson, T; Phillips, M; Prieto, J; Reiss, D; Riess, A; Schommer, R; Smith, R; Soderberg, A M; Spyromilio, J; Stubbs, C; Suntzeff, N; Tonry, J; Woudt, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the Type Ia supernovae (SNe) 1999M, 1999N, 1999Q, 1999S, and 1999U, at redshift z~0.5. They were discovered in early 1999 with the 4.0~m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory by the High-z Supernova Search Team (HZT) and subsequently followed with many ground-based telescopes. SNe 1999Q and 1999U were also observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. We computed luminosity distances to the new SNe using two methods, and added them to the high-z Hubble diagram that the HZT has been constructing since 1995. The new distance moduli confirm the results of previous work. At z~0.5, luminosity distances are larger than those expected for an empty universe, implying that a ``Cosmological Constant,'' or another form of ``dark energy,'' has been increasing the expansion rate of the Universe during the last few billion years.

  9. atacama telescope ccat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mounting and active positioning of primary mirror segments, high bandwidth secondary mirror segment motion control for chopping, a Calotte style dome of 50 meter diameter, a...

  10. VST telescope dynamic analisys and position control algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Schipani; D. Mancini

    2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The VST (VLT Survey Telescope) is a 2.6 m class Alt-Az telescope to be installed on Cerro Paranal in the Atacama desert, Northern Chile, in the European Southern Observatory (ESO) site. The VST is a wide-field imaging facility planned to supply databases for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) science and carry out stand-alone observations in the UV to I spectral range. So far no telescope has been dedicated entirely to surveys; the VST will be the first survey telescope to start the operation, as a powerful survey facility for the VLT observatory. This paper will focus on the axes motion control system. The dynamic model of the telescope will be analyzed, as well as the effect of the wind disturbance on the telescope performance. Some algorithms for the telescope position control will be briefly discussed.

  11. HEAVY DUST OBSCURATION OF z = 7 GALAXIES IN A COSMOLOGICAL HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Hubble Space Telescope observations with the Wide Field Camera 3/Infrared reveal that galaxies at z ? 7 have very blue ultraviolet (UV) colors, consistent with these systems being dominated by young stellar populations with moderate or little attenuation by dust. We investigate UV and optical properties of the high-z galaxies in the standard cold dark matter model using a high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. For this purpose, we perform panchromatic three-dimensional dust radiative transfer calculations on 198 galaxies of stellar mass 5 × 10{sup 8}-3 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ?} with three parameters: the dust-to-metal ratio, the extinction curve, and the fraction of directly escaped light from stars (f{sub esc}). Our stellar mass function is found to be in broad agreement with Gonzalez et al., independent of these parameters. We find that our heavily dust-attenuated galaxies (A{sub V} ? 1.8) can also reasonably match modest UV-optical colors, blue UV slopes, as well as UV luminosity functions, provided that a significant fraction (?10%) of light directly escapes from them. The observed UV slope and scatter are better explained with a Small-Magellanic-Cloud-type extinction curve, whereas a Milky-Way-type curve also predicts blue UV colors due to the 2175 Å bump. We expect that upcoming observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array will be able to test this heavily obscured model.

  12. Does Standard Cosmology Express Cosmological Principle Faithfully?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding-fang Zeng; Hai-jun Zhao

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1+1 dimensional case, Einstein equation cannot give us any information on the evolution of the universe because the Einstein tensor of the system is identically zero. We study such a 1+1 dimensional cosmology and find the metric of it according to cosmological principle and special relativity, but the results contradict the usual expression of cosmological principle of standard cosmology. So we doubt in 1+3 dimensional case, cosmological principle is expressed faithfully by standard cosmology.

  13. Iron control of past productivity in the coastal upwelling system off the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Iron control of past productivity in the coastal upwelling system off the Atacama Desert, Chile in the productivity of the upwelling system off presently arid northern Chile during the last 100,000 years. Changes in productivity are found to be in phase with the precessional cycle ($20,000 years) and with inputs of iron from

  14. Cosmological bootstrap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev; S. A. Timofeev

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A huge value of cosmological constant characteristic for the particle physics and the inflation of early Universe are inherently related to each other: one can construct a fine-tuned superpotential, which produces a flat potential of inflaton with a constant density of energy $V=\\Lambda^4$ after taking into account for leading effects due to the supergravity, so that an introduction of small quantum loop-corrections to parameters of this superpotential naturally results in the dynamical instability relaxing the primary cosmological constant by means of inflationary regime. The model phenomenologically agrees with observational data on the large scale structure of Universe at $\\Lambda~10^{16}$ GeV.

  15. Thirty Meter Telescope Detailed Science Case: 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skidmore, Warren; Fukugawa, Misato; Goswami, Aruna; Hao, Lei; Jewitt, David; Laughlin, Greg; Steidel, Charles; Hickson, Paul; Simard, Luc; Schöck, Matthias; Treu, Tommaso; Cohen, Judith; Anupama, G C; Dickinson, Mark; Harrison, Fiona; Kodama, Tadayuki; Lu, Jessica R; Macintosh, Bruce; Malkan, Matt; Mao, Shude; Narita, Norio; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tian, Feng; A'Hearn, Michael; Akiyama, Masayuki; Ali, Babar; Aoki, Wako; Bagchi, Manjari; Barth, Aaron; Bhalerao, Varun; Bradac, Marusa; Bullock, James; Burgasser, Adam J; Chapman, Scott; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Chiba, Masashi; Cooray, Asantha; Crossfield, Ian; Currie, Thayne; Das, Mousumi; Dewangan, G C; de Grijs, Richard; Do, Tuan; Dong, Subo; Evslin, Jarah; Fang, Taotao; Fang, Xuan; Fassnacht, Christopher; Fletcher, Leigh; Gaidos, Eric; Gal, Roy; Ghez, Andrea; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grady, Carol A; Greathouse, Thomas; Gogoi, Rupjyoti; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Ho, Luis; Hasan, Priya; Herczeg, Gregory J; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Imanishi, Masa; Inanmi, Hanae; Iye, Masanori; Kamath, U S; Kane, Stephen; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kirby, Vishal KasliwalEvan; Konopacky, Quinn M; Lepine, Sebastien; Li, Di; Li, Jianyang; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Michael C; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrigue; Lotz, Jennifer; Lubin, Philip; Macri, Lucas; Maeda, Keiichi; Marchis, Franck; Marois, Christian; Marscher, Alan; Martin, Crystal; Matsuo, Taro; Max, Claire; McConnachie, Alan; McGough, Stacy; Melis, Carl; Meyer, Leo; Mumma, Michael; Muto, Takayuki; Nagao, Tohru; Najita, Joan R; Navarro, Julio; Pierce, Michael; Prochaska, Jason X; Oguri, Masamune; Ojha, Devendra K; Okamoto, Yoshiko K; Orton, Glenn; Otarola, Angel; Ouchi, Masami; Packham, Chris; Padgett, Deborah L; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Pilachowsky, Catherine; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Primack, Joel; Puthiyaveettil, Shalima; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Reddy, Naveen; Rich, Michael; Richter, Matthew J; Schombert, James; Sen, Anjan Ananda; Shi, Jianrong; Sheth, Kartik; Srianand, R; Tan, Jonathan C; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tanner, Angelle; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tytler, David; U, Vivian; Wang, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yiping; Wilson, Gillian; Wright, Shelley; Wu, Chao; Wu, Xufeng; Xu, Renxin; Yamada, Toru; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Gongbo; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ),...

  16. High resolution telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Massie, Norbert A. (San Ramon, CA); Oster, Yale (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  17. SSALMON - The Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedemeyera, S; Brajsa, R; Barta, M; Hudson, H; Fleishman, G; Loukitcheva, M; Fleck, B; Kontar, E; De Pontieu, B; Tiwari, S; Kato, Y; Soler, R; Yagoubov, P; Black, J H; Antolin, P; Gunar, S; Labrosse, N; Benz, A O; Nindos, A; Steffen, M; Scullion, E; Doyle, J G; Zaqarashvili, T; Hanslmeier, A; Nakariakov, V M; Heinzel, P; Ayres, T; Karlicky, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network (SSALMON) was initiated in 2014 in connection with two ALMA development studies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new tool, which can also observe the Sun at high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. The international SSALMONetwork aims at coordinating the further development of solar observing modes for ALMA and at promoting scientific opportunities for solar physics with particular focus on numerical simulations, which can provide important constraints for the observing modes and can aid the interpretation of future observations. The radiation detected by ALMA originates mostly in the solar chromosphere - a complex and dynamic layer between the photosphere and corona, which plays an important role in the transport of energy and matter and the heating of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. Potential targets include active regions, prominences, quiet Sun regions, flares. Here, we give a...

  18. The supernova cosmology cookbook: Bayesian numerical recipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpenka, N V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and observational cosmology have enjoyed a number of significant successes over the last two decades. Cosmic microwave background measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck, together with large-scale structure and supernova (SN) searches, have put very tight constraints on cosmological parameters. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) played a central role in the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011. The last decade has seen an enormous increase in the amount of high quality SN observations, with SN catalogues now containing hundreds of objects. This number is expected to increase to thousands in the next few years, as data from next-generation missions, such as the Dark Energy Survey and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope become available. In order to exploit the vast amount of forthcoming high quality data, it is extremely important to develop robust and efficient statistical analysis methods to answer cosmological q...

  19. Designer Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce A. Bassett; David Parkinson; Robert C. Nichol

    2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We highlight the flexibility of the IPSO experiment-design framework by contrasting its application to CMB, weak lensing and redshift surveys. We illustrate the latter with a 10 parameter MCMC D-optimisation of a dark energy redshift survey. When averaged over a standard dark energy model space the resulting optimal survey typically has only one or two redshift bins, located at zoptimisation we show how the statistical power of such surveys is significantly enhanced. Experiment design is aided by the richness of the figure of merit landscape which means one can impose secondary optimisation criteria at little cost. For example, one may choose either to maximally test a single model (such as \\Lambda CDM) or to get the most general model-independent constraints possible (e.g. on a whole space of dark energy models). Such freedom points to a future where cosmological experiments become increasingly specialised and optimisation increasingly important.

  20. Throat Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harling, B v

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study throats in the early, hot universe. Throats are a common feature of the landscape of type IIB string theory. If a throat is heated during cosmological evolution, energy is subsequently transferred to other throats and to the standard model. We calculate the heat transfer rate and the decay rate of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states in a ten-dimensional model. For the calculation, we employ the dual description of the throats in terms of gauge theories. We discuss modifications of the decay rate which arise in flux compactifications and for Klebanov-Strassler throats and emphasize the role of tachyonic scalars in such throats in mediating decays of Kaluza-Klein modes. Our results are also applicable to the energy transfer from the heated standard model to throats. We determine the resulting energy density in throats at our epoch in dependence of their infrared scales and of the reheating temperature. The Kaluza-Klein modes in the throats decay to other sectors with a highly suppresse...

  1. Diagnosing space telescope misalignment and jitter using stellar images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaoming Ma; Gary Bernstein; Alan Weinstein; Michael Sholl

    2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge of the telescope's point spread function (PSF) is essential for the weak gravitational lensing measurements that hold great promise for cosmological constraints. For space telescopes, the PSF may vary with time due to thermal drifts in the telescope structure, and/or due to jitter in the spacecraft pointing (ground-based telescopes have additional sources of variation). We describe and simulate a procedure for using the images of the stars in each exposure to determine the misalignment and jitter parameters, and reconstruct the PSF at any point in that exposure's field of view. The simulation uses the design of the SNAP (http://snap.lbl.gov) telescope. Stellar-image data in a typical exposure determines secondary-mirror positions as precisely as $20 {\\rm nm}$. The PSF ellipticities and size, which are the quantities of interest for weak lensing are determined to $4.0 \\times 10^{-4}$ and $2.2 \\times 10^{-4}$ accuracies respectively in each exposure, sufficient to meet weak-lensing requirements. We show that, for the case of a space telescope, the PSF estimation errors scale inversely with the square root of the total number of photons collected from all the usable stars in the exposure.

  2. Cosmology with Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This review gives an update of the cosmological use of SNe Ia and the progress made in testing their properties from the local universe to high-z. The cosmological road from high-z supernovae down to Galactic SNe Ia is followed in search of the answer to standing questions on their nature and their validity as cosmological indicators.

  3. Perspectives on neutrino telescopes 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /Karlsruhe U., TTP

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remarks at the roundtable on plans for the future at the XIII International Workshop on Neutrino Telescopes.

  4. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrina, Chiara

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At about 40 km off the coast of Toulon (France), anchored at 2475 m deep in the Mediterranean Sea, there is ANTARES: the first undersea neutrino telescope and the only one currently operating. The detector consists of 885 photomultiplier tubes arranged into 12 strings of 450-metres high, with the aim to detect the Cherenkov light induced by the charged superluminal interaction products of neutrinos. Its main scientific target is the search for high-energy (TeV and beyond) neutrinos from cosmic accelerators, as predicted by hadronic interaction models, and the measurement of the cosmic neutrino diffuse flux, focusing in particular on events coming from below the horizon (up-going events) in order to significantly reduce the atmospheric muons background. Thanks to the development of a strategy for the identification of neutrinos coming from above the horizon (down-going events) the field of view of the telescope will be extended.

  5. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  6. Antares Reference Telescope System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Kaprelian, E.; Swann, T.; Parker, J.; Wolfe, P.; Woodfin, G.; Knight, D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antares is a 24-beam, 40-TW carbon-dioxide laser-fusion system currently nearing completion at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 24 beams will be focused onto a tiny target (typically 300 to 1000 ..mu..m in diameter) located approximately at the center of a 7.3-m-diameter by 9.3-m-long vacuum (10/sup -6/ torr) chamber. The design goal is to position the targets to within 10 ..mu..m of a selected nominal position, which may be anywhere within a fixed spherical region 1 cm in diameter. The Antares Reference Telescope System is intended to help achieve this goal for alignment and viewing of the various targets used in the laser system. The Antares Reference Telescope System consists of two similar electro-optical systems positioned in a near orthogonal manner in the target chamber area of the laser. Each of these consists of four subsystems: (1) a fixed 9X optical imaging subsystem which produces an image of the target at the vidicon; (2) a reticle projection subsystem which superimposes an image of the reticle pattern at the vidicon; (3) an adjustable front-lighting subsystem which illuminates the target; and (4) an adjustable back-lighting subsystem which also can be used to illuminate the target. The various optical, mechanical, and vidicon design considerations and trade-offs are discussed. The final system chosen (which is being built) and its current status are described in detail.

  7. Grid Integration of Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Breitling; T. Granzer; H. Enke

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic telescopes and grid technology have made significant progress in recent years. Both innovations offer important advantages over conventional technologies, particularly in combination with one another. Here, we introduce robotic telescopes used by the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam as ideal instruments for building a robotic telescope network. We also discuss the grid architecture and protocols facilitating the network integration that is being developed by the German AstroGrid-D project. Finally, we present three user interfaces employed for this purpose.

  8. High Energy Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. D. Hoffman

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

  9. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far-infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Leisawitz; Charles Baker; Amy Barger; Dominic Benford; Andrew Blain; Rob Boyle; Richard Broderick; Jason Budinoff; John Carpenter; Richard Caverly; Phil Chen; Steve Cooley; Christine Cottingham; Julie Crooke; Dave DiPietro; Mike DiPirro; Michael Femiano; Art Ferrer; Jacqueline Fischer; Jonathan P. Gardner; Lou Hallock; Kenny Harris; Kate Hartman; Martin Harwit; Lynne Hillenbrand; Tupper Hyde; Drew Jones; Jim Kellogg; Alan Kogut; Marc Kuchner; Bill Lawson; Javier Lecha; Maria Lecha; Amy Mainzer; Jim Mannion; Anthony Martino; Paul Mason; John Mather; Gibran McDonald; Rick Mills; Lee Mundy; Stan Ollendorf; Joe Pellicciotti; Dave Quinn; Kirk Rhee; Stephen Rinehart; Tim Sauerwine; Robert Silverberg; Terry Smith; Gordon Stacey; H. Philip Stahl; Johannes Staguhn; Steve Tompkins; June Tveekrem; Sheila Wall; Mark Wilson

    2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of a recently-completed pre-Formulation Phase study of SPIRIT, a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a spatial and spectral interferometer with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. SPIRIT will provide sub-arcsecond resolution images and spectra with resolution R = 3000 in a 1 arcmin field of view to accomplish three primary scientific objectives: (1) Learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks, and how they acquire their inhomogeneous composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. Observations with SPIRIT will be complementary to those of the James Webb Space Telescope and the ground-based Atacama Large Millimeter Array. All three observatories could be operational contemporaneously.

  10. The Infrared Cloud Monitor for the MAGNUM Robotic Telescope at Haleakala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Suganuma; Y. Kobayashi; N. Okada; Y. Yoshii; T. Minezaki; T. Aoki; K. Enya; H. Tomita; S. Koshida

    2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the most successful infrared cloud monitor for a robotic telescope. This system was originally developed for the MAGNUM 2-m telescope, which has been achieving unmanned and automated monitoring observation of active galactic nuclei at Haleakala on the Hawaiian island of Maui since 2001. Using a thermal imager and two aspherical mirrors, it at once sees almost the whole sky at a wavelength of $\\lambda\\sim 10\\mu{\\rm m}$. Its outdoor part is weather-proof and is totally maintenance-free. The images obtained every one or two minutes are analysed immediately into several ranks of weather condition, from which our automated observing system not only decides to open or close the dome, but also selects what types of observations should be done. The whole-sky data accumulated over four years show that 50$-$60 % of all nights are photometric, and about 75 % are observable with respect to cloud condition at Haleakala. Many copies of this system are now used all over the world such as Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Atacama in Chile, and Okayama and Kiso in Japan.

  11. Averaging Hypotheses in Newtonian Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Buchert

    1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Average properties of general inhomogeneous cosmological models are discussed in the Newtonian framework. It is shown under which circumstances the average flow reduces to a member of the standard Friedmann--Lema\\^\\i tre cosmologies. Possible choices of global boundary conditions of inhomogeneous cosmologies as well as consequences for the interpretation of cosmological parameters are put into perspective.

  12. M Theory and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks

    1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a series of lectures on M Theory for cosmologists. After summarizing some of the main properties of M Theory and its dualities I show how it can be used to address various fundamental and phenomenological issues in cosmology.

  13. Massive neutrinos and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Lesgourgues; Sergio Pastor

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present experimental results on neutrino flavour oscillations provide evidence for non-zero neutrino masses, but give no hint on their absolute mass scale, which is the target of beta decay and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Crucial complementary information on neutrino masses can be obtained from the analysis of data on cosmological observables, such as the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background or the distribution of large-scale structure. In this review we describe in detail how free-streaming massive neutrinos affect the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We summarize the current bounds on the sum of neutrino masses that can be derived from various combinations of cosmological data, including the most recent analysis by the WMAP team. We also discuss how future cosmological experiments are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses well into the sub-eV range.

  14. New Developments in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review is given of the present observational data in cosmology. A review of a new bimetric gravity theory with multiple light cones is presented. The physical consequences of this gravity theory for the early universe are analyzed.

  15. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  16. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  17. Cosmology models with ?_M-dependent cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Majernik

    2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the evolution of the scale factor in a cosmological model in which the cosmological constant is given by the scalar arisen by the contraction of the stress-energy tensor.

  18. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  19. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  20. Higgs boson cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian G. Moss

    2015-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson opens up a range of speculative cosmological scenarios, from the formation of structure in the early universe immediately after the big bang, to relics from the electroweak phase transition one nanosecond after the big bang, on to the end of the present-day universe through vacuum decay. Higgs physics is wide-ranging, and gives an impetus to go beyond the Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology to explore the physics of ultra-high energies and quantum gravity.

  1. Dimensionality and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Wu

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Kaluza-Klein model with a cosmological constant and a flux, the external spacetime and its dimension of the created universe from a $S^s \\times S^{n-s}$ seed instanton can be identified in quantum cosmology. One can also show that in the internal space the effective cosmological constant is most probably zero.

  2. Relativistic Fractal Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo B. Ribeiro

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews an approach for constructing a simple relativistic fractal cosmology whose main aim is to model the observed inhomogeneities of the distribution of galaxies by means of the Lemaitre-Tolman solution of Einstein's field equations for spherically symmetric dust in comoving coordinates. This model is based on earlier works developed by L. Pietronero and J.R. Wertz on Newtonian cosmology, whose main points are discussed. Observational relations in this spacetime are presented, together with a strategy for finding numerical solutions which approximate an averaged and smoothed out single fractal structure in the past light cone. Such fractal solutions are shown, with one of them being in agreement with some basic observational constraints, including the decay of the average density with the distance as a power law (the de Vaucouleurs' density power law) and the fractal dimension in the range 1 fractal model we find that all Friedmann models look inhomogeneous along the backward null cone, with a departure from the observable homogeneous region at relatively close ranges. It is also shown that with these same observational relations the Einstein-de Sitter model can have an interpretation where it has zero global density, a result consistent with the "zero global density postulate" advanced by Wertz for hierarchical cosmologies and conjectured by Pietronero for fractal cosmological models. The article ends with a brief discussion on the possible link between this model and nonlinear and chaotic dynamics.

  3. Neutrino Oscillations and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in cosmological plasma is considered. Neutrino oscillations in vacuum are usually described in plane wave approximation. In this formalism there is an ambiguity if one should assume $\\delta p =0$ and correspondingly $\\delta E\

  4. Cosmological Tests of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) is tested accurately within the local universe i.e., the Solar System, but this leaves open the possibility that it is not a good description at the largest scales in the Universe. The standard model of cosmology assumes GR as the theory to describe gravity on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. The standard model of cosmology is based on a huge extrapolation of our limited knowledge of gravity. This discovery of the late time acceleration of the Universe may require us to revise the theory of gravity and the standard model of cosmology based on GR. We will review recent ...

  5. Cosmological dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genly Leon; Carlos R. Fadragas

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this book are studied, from the perspective of the dynamical systems, several Universe models. In chapter 1 we give a bird's eye view on cosmology and cosmological problems. Chapter 2 is devoted to a brief review on some results and useful tools from the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. They provide the theoretical basis for the qualitative study of concrete cosmological models. Chapters 1 and 2 are a review of well-known results. Chapters 3, 4, 5 and 6 are devoted to our main results. In these chapters are extended and settled in a substantially different, more strict mathematical language, several results obtained by one of us in arXiv:0812.1013 [gr-qc]; arXiv:1009.0689 [gr-qc]; arXiv:0904.1577[gr-qc]; and arXiv:0909.3571 [hep-th]. In chapter 6, we provide a different approach to the subject discussed in astro-ph/0503478. Additionally, we perform a Poincar\\'e compactification process allowing to construct a global phase space containing all the cosmological information in both finite and infinite regions for all the models.

  6. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  7. Cosmology and the Bispectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; /Fermilab /CCPP, New York; Crocce, Martin; Pueblas, Sebastian; Scoccimarro, Roman; /CCPP, New York

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present spatial distribution of galaxies in the Universe is non-Gaussian, with 40% skewness in 50 h{sup -1} Mpc spheres, and remarkably little is known about the information encoded in it about cosmological parameters beyond the power spectrum. In this work they present an attempt to bridge this gap by studying the bispectrum, paying particular attention to a joint analysis with the power spectrum and their combination with CMB data. They address the covariance properties of the power spectrum and bispectrum including the effects of beat coupling that lead to interesting cross-correlations, and discuss how baryon acoustic oscillations break degeneracies. They show that the bispectrum has significant information on cosmological parameters well beyond its power in constraining galaxy bias, and when combined with the power spectrum is more complementary than combining power spectra of different samples of galaxies, since non-Gaussianity provides a somewhat different direction in parameter space. In the framework of flat cosmological models they show that most of the improvement of adding bispectrum information corresponds to parameters related to the amplitude and effective spectral index of perturbations, which can be improved by almost a factor of two. Moreover, they demonstrate that the expected statistical uncertainties in {sigma}s of a few percent are robust to relaxing the dark energy beyond a cosmological constant.

  8. Holography from quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rashki; S. Jalalzadeh

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of deformation quantization is applied to the closed Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmological model. We show that the phase space average for the surface of the apparent horizon is quantized in units of the Planck's surface, and that the total entropy of the universe is also quantized. Taking into account these two concepts, it is shown that 't Hooft conjecture on the cosmological holographic principle (CHP) in radiation and dust dominated quantum universes is satisfied as a manifestation of quantization. This suggests that the entire universe (not only inside the apparent horizon) can be seen as a two-dimensional information structure encoded on the apparent horizon.

  9. Supersymmetric quantum cosmological billiards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinschmidt, Axel; Koehn, Michael; Nicolai, Hermann [Physique Theorique et Mathematique and International Solvay Institutes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, ULB-CP231, BE-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, DE-14476 Golm (Germany)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    D=11 supergravity near a spacelike singularity admits a cosmological billiard description based on the hyperbolic Kac-Moody group E{sub 10}. The quantization of this system via the supersymmetry constraint is shown to lead to wave functions involving automorphic (Maass wave) forms under the modular group W{sup +}(E{sub 10}) congruent with PSL{sub 2}(O) with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the billiard domain. A general inequality for the Laplace eigenvalues of these automorphic forms implies that the wave function of the Universe is generically complex and always tends to zero when approaching the initial singularity. We discuss possible implications of this result for the question of singularity resolution in quantum cosmology and comment on the differences with other approaches.

  10. Cosmological Insights from Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente

    1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    While low-z Type Ia supernovae are used to measure the present rate of expansion of the Universe, high-z Type Ia measure its variation due to the cosmic matter-energy content. Results from those determinations imply a low matter density Universe with a non-zero cosmological constant (vacuum-energy component). The expansion rate of the Universe accelerates, according to these determinations. The validity of the Type Ia supernova approach for this cosmological research is addressed. An account is given of additional prospects to further investigate through supernovae what the Universe is made of. Those attempts range from constraining the large scale dark matter distribution to further test and interpret the presence of a vacuum energy component.

  11. Quantum cosmology: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bojowald

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum cosmology, one applies quantum physics to the whole universe. While no unique version and no completely well-defined theory is available yet, the framework gives rise to interesting conceptual, mathematical and physical questions. This review presents quantum cosmology in a new picture that tries to incorporate the importance of inhomogeneity: De-emphasizing the traditional minisuperspace view, the dynamics is rather formulated in terms of the interplay of many interacting "microscopic" degrees of freedom that describe the space-time geometry. There is thus a close relationship with more-established systems in condensed-matter and particle physics even while the large set of space-time symmetries (general covariance) requires some adaptations and new developments. These extensions of standard methods are needed both at the fundamental level and at the stage of evaluating the theory by effective descriptions.

  12. Quantum cosmology: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum cosmology, one applies quantum physics to the whole universe. While no unique version and no completely well-defined theory is available yet, the framework gives rise to interesting conceptual, mathematical and physical questions. This review presents quantum cosmology in a new picture that tries to incorporate the importance of inhomogeneity: De-emphasizing the traditional minisuperspace view, the dynamics is rather formulated in terms of the interplay of many interacting "microscopic" degrees of freedom that describe the space-time geometry. There is thus a close relationship with more-established systems in condensed-matter and particle physics even while the large set of space-time symmetries (general covariance) requires some adaptations and new developments. These extensions of standard methods are needed both at the fundamental level and at the stage of evaluating the theory by effective descriptions.

  13. Weak Interaction and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine the connection among the themes: the cosmological constant, the weak interaction and the neutrino mass. Our main propose is to review and modify the ideas first proposed by Hayakawa [ Prog. Theor. Phys.Suppl.,532(1965).], in the light of the new-fashioned features of contemporary physics. Assuming the pressure of a Fermi gas of neutrinos should be balanced by its gravitational attraction, we evaluate the mass of the background neutrino and its number.The neutrino mass here evaluated is compatible with the known value for the cosmological constant (or dark energy).Taking in account the role played by the weak forces experimented by the neutrinos, we also determined a value for the electroweak mixing angle. For sake of comparison, an alternative evaluation of the neutrino mass is also done.

  14. Solar science with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array - A revolutionizing new view of our Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedemeyer, S; Brajsa, R; Barta, M; Hudson, H; Fleishman, G; Loukitcheva, M; Fleck, B; Kontar, E P; De Pontieu, B; Tiwari, S K; Kato, Y; Soler, R; Yagoubov, P; Black, J H; Antolin, P; Scullion, E; Gun'ar, S; Labrosse, N; Benz, A O; Ludwig, H -G; Hauschildt, P; Doyle, J G; Nakariakov, V M; Solanki, S K; White, S M; Ayres, T; Heinzel, P; Karlicky, M; Van Doorsselaere, T; Gary, D; Alissandrakis, C E; Nindos, A; van der Voort, L Rouppe; Shimojo, M; Zaqarashvili, T; Perez, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a new powerful tool for observing the Sun at high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. These capabilities can address a broad range of fundamental scientific questions in solar physics. The radiation observed by ALMA originates mostly from the chromosphere - a complex and dynamic region between the photosphere and corona, which plays a crucial role in the transport of energy and matter and, ultimately, the heating of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. Based on first solar test observations, strategies for regular solar campaigns are currently being developed. State-of-the-art numerical simulations of the solar atmosphere and modeling of instrumental effects can help constrain and optimize future observing modes for ALMA. Here we present a short technical description of ALMA and an overview of past efforts and future possibilities for solar observations at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths. In addition, selected numerical simulatio...

  15. Axion braneworld cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosimo Bambi; Masahiro Kawasaki; Federico R. Urban

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study axion cosmology in a 5D Universe, in the case of flat and warped extra dimension. The comparison between theoretical predictions and observations constrains the 5D axion decay constant and the 5D Planck mass, which has to be taken into account in building 5D axion models. The framework developed in this paper can be readily applied to other bulk fields in brane universes.

  16. Axion braneworld cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambi, Cosimo [IPMU, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro [IPMU, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); ICRR, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Urban, Federico R. [UBC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1 (Canada); KITPC, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study axion cosmology in a 5D universe, in the case of flat and warped extra dimensions. The comparison between theoretical predictions and observations constrains the 5D axion decay constant and the 5D Planck mass, which have to be taken into account in building 5D axion models. The framework developed in this paper can be readily applied to other bulk fields in brane universes.

  17. Cosmology of Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Burdyuzha; G. Vereshkov

    2007-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly the vacuum component of the Universe from the geometry point of view and from the point of view of the standard model of physics of elementary particles is discussed. Some arguments are given to the calculated value of the cosmological constant (Zeldovich approximation). A new component of space vacuum (the gravitational vacuum condensate) is involved the production of which has fixed time in our Universe. Also the phenomenon of vacuum selforganization must be included in physical consideration of the Universe evolution.

  18. Particle Physics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Pralavorio

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, both particle physics and cosmology are described by few parameter Standard Models, i.e. it is possible to deduce consequence of particle physics in cosmology and vice verse. The former is examined in this lecture, in light of the recent systematic exploration of the electroweak scale by the LHC experiments. The two main results of the first phase of the LHC, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle and the absence so far of new particles predicted by "natural" theories beyond the Standard Model (supersymmetry, extra-dimension and composite Higgs) are put in a historical context to enlighten their importance and then presented extensively. To be complete, a short review from the neutrino physics, which can not be probed at LHC, is also given. The ability of all these results to resolve the 3 fundamental questions of cosmology about the nature of dark energy and dark matter as well as the origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is discussed in each case.

  19. Quantum Vacuum Structure and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johann Rafelski; Lance Labun; Yaron Hadad; Pisin Chen

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Short review of riddles that lie at the intersection of quantum theory, particle physics and cosmology; dark energy as false vacuum; discussion of a possible detection experiment.

  20. Cosmological model with $?_M$-dependent cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Majernik

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea here is to set the cosmical constant $\\lambda$ proportional to the scalar of the stress-energy tensor of the ordinary matter. We investigate the evolution of the scale factor in a cosmological model in which the cosmological constant is proportional to the scalar of the stress-energy tensor.

  1. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, Roderick A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  2. MOND cosmology from holographic principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongsheng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the MOND cosmology which is uniquely corresponding to the original MOND in galaxies via holographic approach of gravity. It inherits the key merit of MOND, that is, it reduces the byronic matter and mysterious non-byronic dark matter (dark matter for short) in the standard cosmology into byronic matter only. For the first time we derive the critical parameter in MOND, i.e., the transition acceleration $a_c$ on cosmological scale. We thus solve the long-standing coincidence problem $a_c\\sim cH_{0}$. More interestingly, a term like age-graphic dark energy emerges naturally. In the frame of this MOND cosmology, we only need byronic matter to describe both dark matter and dark energy in standard cosmology.

  3. Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corasaniti, Pier Stefano [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8102, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Melchiorri, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica e Sezione INFN, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However prerecombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects, we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peak and dip multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast, the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis of the location of WMAP extrema to constrain, in combination with recent BAO data, a constant dark energy equation of state parameter w. For a flat universe we find a strong 2{sigma} upper limit w<-1.10, and including the Hubble Space Telescope prior, we obtain w<-1.14, which is only marginally consistent with limits derived from the Supernova Legacy Survey sample. On the other hand, we infer larger limits for nonflat cosmologies. From the full CMB likelihood analysis, we also estimate the values of the shift parameter R and the multipole l{sub a} of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies, to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should always be preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provides a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other data sets.

  4. Cosmology with decaying particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, M.S.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a cosmological model in which an unstable massive relic particle species (denoted by X) has an initial mass density relative to baryons ..beta../sup -1/ identically equal rho/sub X//rho/sub B/ >> 1, and then decays recently (redshift z less than or equal to 1000) into particles which are still relativistic today (denoted by R). We write down and solve the coupled equations for the cosmic scale factor a(t), the energy density in the various components (rho/sub X/, rho/sub R/, rho/sub B/), and the growth of linear density perturbations (delta rho/rho). The solutions form a one parameter (..beta..) family of solutions; physically ..beta../sup -1/ approx. = (..cap omega../sub R//..cap omega../sub NR/) x (1 + z/sub D/) = (ratio today of energy density of relativistic to nonrelativistic particles) x (1 + redshift of (decay)). We discuss the observational implications of such a cosmological model and compare our results to earlier results computed in the simultaneous decay approximation. In an appendix we briefly consider the case where one of the decay products of the X is massive and becomes nonrelativistic by the present epoch. 21 references.

  5. The Baikal Neutrino Telescope: Selected Physics Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Wischnewski; for the BAIKAL Collaboration

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on searches for exotic particles (relativistic magnetic monopoles and WIMPs) and for UHE neutrinos, obtained with the Baikal neutrino telescope NT200.

  6. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  7. SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Va'vra, J.

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC does not have a test beam for the HEP detector development at present. We have therefore created a cosmic ray telescope (CRT) facility, which is presently being used to test the FDIRC prototype. We have used it in the past to debug this prototype with the original SLAC electronics before going to the ESA test beam. Presently, it is used to test a new waveform digitizing electronics developed by the University of Hawaii, and we are also planning to incorporate the new Orsay TDC/ADC electronics. As a next step, we plan to put in a full size DIRC bar box with a new focusing optics, and test it together with a final SuberB electronics. The CRT is located in building 121 at SLAC. We anticipate more users to join in the future. This purpose of this note is to provide an introductory manual for newcomers.

  8. Recent Results from Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum Xmax are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20 degrees radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 sigma. The measured Xmax is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 10^18.2 eV - 10^19.2 eV.

  9. Cosmological perturbations on local systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory S. Adkins; Jordan McDonnell; Richard N. Fell

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of cosmological expansion on orbits--galactic, planetary, or atomic--subject to an inverse-square force law. We obtain the laws of motion for gravitational or electrical interactions from general relativity--in particular, we find the gravitational field of a mass distribution in an expanding universe by applying perturbation theory to the Robertson-Walker metric. Cosmological expansion induces an ($\\ddot a/a) \\vec r$ force where $a(t)$ is the cosmological scale factor. In a locally Newtonian framework, we show that the $(\\ddot a/a) \\vec r$ term represents the effect of a continuous distribution of cosmological material in Hubble flow, and that the total force on an object, due to the cosmological material plus the matter perturbation, can be represented as the negative gradient of a gravitational potential whose source is the material actually present. We also consider the effect on local dynamics of the cosmological constant. We calculate the perihelion precession of elliptical orbits due to the cosmological constant induced force, and work out a generalized virial relation applicable to gravitationally bound clusters.

  10. High energy neutrino telescopes as a probe of the neutrino mass mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kfir Blum; Anson Hook; Kohta Murase

    2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that measurements of the spectral shape and flavor ratios of high energy astrophysical neutrinos at neutrino telescopes can be sensitive to the details of the neutrino mass mechanism. We propose a simple model for Majorana neutrino mass generation that realizes the relevant parameter space, in which small explicit lepton number violation is mediated to the Standard Model through the interactions of a light scalar. IceCube, with about ten years of exposure time, could reveal the presence of anomalous neutrino self-interactions. Precision electroweak and lepton flavor laboratory experiments and a determination of the total neutrino mass from cosmology would provide consistency checks on the interpretation of a signal.

  11. Cosmological Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the imprint of new particles on the primordial cosmological fluctuations. New particles with masses comparable to the Hubble scale produce a distinctive signature on the non-gaussianities. This feature arises in the squeezed limit of the correlation functions of primordial fluctuations. It consists of particular power law, or oscillatory, behavior that contains information about the masses of new particles. There is an angular dependence that gives information about the spin. We also have a relative phase that crucially depends on the quantum mechanical nature of the fluctuations and can be viewed as arising from the interference between two processes. While some of these features were noted before in the context of specific inflationary scenarios, here we give a general description emphasizing the role of symmetries in determining the final result.

  12. The Mixmaster cosmological metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles W. Misner

    1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper begins with a short presentation of the Bianchi IX or ``Mixmaster'' cosmological model, and some ways of writing the Einstein equations for it. There is then an interlude describing how I came to a study of this model, and then a report of some mostly unpublished work from a Ph.\\ D. thesis of D. M. (Prakash) Chitre relating approximate solutions to geodesic flows on finite volume negative curvature Riemannian manifolds, for which he could quote results on ergodicity. A final section restates studies of a zero measure set of solutions which in first approximation appear to have only a finite number of Kasner epochs before reaching the singularity. One finds no plausible case for such behavior in better approximations.

  13. Protein folding and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz; C. L. Siguenza

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

  14. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, ?i?li, ?stanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  16. Cosmological moduli problem, supersymmetry breaking, and stability in postinflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, T.; Berkooz, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0849 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0849 (United States); Steinhardt, P.J. [Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We review scenarios that have been proposed to solve the cosmological problem caused by moduli in string theory, the postmodern Polonyi problem (PPP). In particular, we discuss the difficulties encountered by the apparently ``trivial`` solution of this problem, in which moduli masses are assumed to arise from nonperturbative, SUSY-preserving, dynamics at a scale higher than that of SUSY breaking. This suggests a powerful {ital cosmological} {ital vacuum} {ital selection} {ital principle} in superstring theory. However, we argue that if one eschews the possibility of cancellations between different exponentials of the inverse string coupling, the mechanism described above cannot stabilize the dilaton. Thus, even if supersymmetric dynamics gives mass to the other moduli in string theory, the dilaton mass must be generated by SUSY breaking, and dilaton domination of the energy density of the Universe cannot be avoided. We conclude that the only proposal for solving the PPP that works is the intermediate scale inflation scenario of Randall and Thomas. However, we point out that all extant models have ignored unavoidably large inhomogeneities in the cosmological moduli density at very early times, and speculate that the effects associated with nonlinear gravitational collapse of these inhomogeneities may serve as an efficient mechanism for converting moduli into ordinary matter. As an important by-product of this investigation we show that in a postinflationary universe minima of the effective potential with a negative cosmological constant are not stationary points of the classical equations of scalar field cosmology. Instead, such points lead to catastrophic gravitational collapse of that part of the Universe which is attracted to them. Thus postinflationary cosmology dynamically chooses non-negative values of the cosmological constant. This implies that supersymmetry {ital must} be broken in any sensible inflationary cosmology. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dravins, Dainis; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances, and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long...

  18. Design of a telescope pointing and tracking subsystem for the Big Bear Solar Observatory New Solar Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the design of the TPTS. Modern control systems for medium-sized telescopes are generally distributed systems Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory will use a distributed system to control the telescope, dome dome opening with the telescope optical axis. Keywords: NST, software, telescope, control system, solar

  19. MOND cosmology from entropic force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsheng Zhang; Xin-Zhou Li

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the MOND cosmology which is uniquely corresponding to the original MOND at galaxy scales via entropic gravity method. It inherits the key merit of MOND, that is, it reduces the baryonic matter and non-baryonic dark matter into baryonic matter only. For the first time we obtain the critical parameter in MOND, i.e., the transition acceleration $a_c$ at cosmological scale. We thus solve the long-standing coincidence problem $a_c\\sim cH_{0}$. More interestingly, a term like age-graphic dark energy emerges naturally. In the frame of this MOND cosmology, we only need baryonic matter to describe both dark matter and dark energy in standard cosmology.

  20. Rip Cosmology via Inhomogeneous Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Obukhov; A. V. Timoshkin; E. V Savushkin

    2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions for the appearance of the Little Rip, Pseudo Rip and Quasi Rip universes in the terms of the parameters in the equation of state of some dark fluid are investigated. Several examples of the Rip cosmologies are investigated.

  1. Thermodynamics in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Fang Li; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is very powerful to deal with the behavior of early universe. And the effective loop quantum cosmology gives a successful description of the universe in the semiclassical region. We consider the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe as a thermodynamical system and investigate the thermodynamics of LQC in the semiclassical region. The effective density and effective pressure in the modified Friedmann equation from LQC not only determine the evolution of the universe in LQC scenario but are actually also found to be the thermodynamic quantities. This result comes from the energy definition in cosmology (the Misner-Sharp gravitational energy) and is consistent with thermodynamic laws. We prove that within the framework of loop quantum cosmology, the elementary equation of equilibrium thermodynamics is still valid.

  2. Precision cosmology and the landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing the cosmological constant problem -- why is Lambda not huge? -- I outline the two basic approaches that had emerged by the late 1980s, and note that each made a clear prediction. Precision cosmological experiments now indicate that the cosmological constant is nonzero. This result strongly favors the environmental approach, in which vacuum energy can vary discretely among widely separated regions in the universe. The need to explain this variation from first principles constitutes an observational constraint on fundamental theory. I review arguments that string theory satisfies this constraint, as it contains a dense discretuum of metastable vacua. The enormous landscape of vacua calls for novel, statistical methods of deriving predictions, and it prompts us to reexamine our description of spacetime on the largest scales. I discuss the effects of cosmological dynamics, and I speculate that weighting vacua by their entropy production may allow for prior-free predictions that do not resort to explicitly anthropic arguments.

  3. Constraining fundamental physics from cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Simeon

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I use mathematical models and numerical simulations to constrain cosmological inflation, the seeds of structure, and the mass of the neutrino. I revisit arguments that simple models of inflation with a small red tilt in the scalar power spectrum...

  4. Bimetric gravity is cosmologically viable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akrami, Yashar; Könnig, Frank; Schmidt-May, Angnis; Solomon, Adam R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bimetric theory describes gravitational interactions in the presence of an extra spin-2 field. Previous work has suggested that its cosmological solutions are generically plagued by instabilities. We show that by taking the Planck mass for the second metric, $M_f$, to be small, these instabilities can be pushed back to unobservably early times. In this limit, the theory approaches general relativity with an effective cosmological constant which is, remarkably, determined by the spin-2 interaction scale. This provides a late-time expansion history which is extremely close to $\\Lambda$CDM, but with a technically-natural value for the cosmological constant. We find $M_f$ should be no larger than the electroweak scale in order for cosmological perturbations to be stable by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  5. ?CDM cosmology from matter only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman Telkamp

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a matter-only interpretation of {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, based on conservation of energy and assuming a Machian definition of inertia. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology can be linked to a Newtonian cosmic potential, subject to a propagating gravitational horizon. In a matter-only universe where total energy is conserved, Machian inertia related to the evolving potential may cause both deceleration and acceleration of recession.

  6. Axion cold dark matter in nonstandard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the parameter space of cold dark matter axions in two cosmological scenarios with nonstandard thermal histories before big bang nucleosynthesis: the low-temperature reheating (LTR) cosmology and the kination cosmology. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks during inflation, we find more allowed parameter space in the LTR cosmology than in the standard cosmology and less in the kination cosmology. On the contrary, if the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaks after inflation, the Peccei-Quinn scale is orders of magnitude higher than standard in the LTR cosmology and lower in the kination cosmology. We show that the axion velocity dispersion may be used to distinguish some of these nonstandard cosmologies. Thus, axion cold dark matter may be a good probe of the history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  7. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Leszczynska; Adam Balcerzak; Mariusz P. Dabrowski

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including $\\Lambda$-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ans\\"atze for the variability of constants: $c(a) = c_0 a^n$ and $G(a)=G_0 a^q$. We find that most of the varying $c$ and $G$ minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe "from nothing" ($a=0)$ to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor $a_t$ is large for growing $c$ models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing $c$ models. As for $G$ varying, the probability of tunneling is large for $G$ diminishing, while it is small for $G$ increasing. In general, both varying $c$ and $G$ change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  8. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  9. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  10. Lectures on Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Christodoulakis

    2001-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The problems encountered in trying to quantize the various cosmological models, are brought forward by means of a concrete example. The Automorphism groups are revealed as the key element through which G.C.T.'s can be used for a general treatment of these problems. At the classical level, the time dependent automorphisms lead to significant simplifications of the line element for the generic spatially homogeneous geometry, without loss of generality. At the quantum level, the ''frozen'' automorphisms entail an important reduction of the configuration space --spanned by the 6 components of the scale factor matrix-- on which the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, is to be based. In this spirit the canonical quantization of the most general minisuperspace actions --i.e. with all six scale factor as well as the lapse function and the shift vector present-- describing the vacuum type II, I geometries, is considered. The reduction to the corresponding physical degrees of freedom is achieved through the usage of the linear constraints as well as the quantum version of the entire set of all classical integrals of motion.

  11. Adaptive optic demonstrators for extremely large telescopes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Michael Aloysius

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of ground-based optical/infrared (IR) telescopes will have primary mirrors of up to 42 m. To take advantage of the large potential increase in angular resolution, adaptive optics will be essential to ...

  12. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Dobbs, Matt; Bissonnette, Eric; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An FPGA based digital signal processing (DSP) system for biasing and reading out multiplexed bolometric detectors for mm-wavelength telescopes is presented. This readout system is being deployed for balloon-borne and ground based cosmology experiments with the primary goal of measuring the signature of inflation with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The system consists of analog superconducting electronics running at 250 mK and 4 K, coupled to digital room temperature backend electronics described here. The digital electronics perform the real time functionality with DSP algorithms implemented in firmware. A soft embedded processor provides all of the slow housekeeping control and communications. Each board in the system synthesizes multi-frequency combs of 8 to 32 carriers in the MHz band to bias the detectors. After the carriers have been modulated with the sky-signal by the detectors, the same boards digitize the comb directly. The carriers are mixed down to base-band and low pass filtered. The signal bandwidth of 0.050Hz-100 Hz places extreme requirements on stability and requires powerful filtering techniques to recover the sky-signal from the MHz carriers.

  13. Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amanda R. Lopes; Alvaro Iribarrem; Marcelo B. Ribeiro; William R. Stoeger

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 light ratio and its GSMF data. Assuming ${\\mathcal{M}_{g_0}} \\approx 10^{11} \\mathcal{M}_\\odot$ as the local value of the average galactic mass, the LF approach results in $L_{B} \\propto (1+z)^{(2.40 \\pm 0.03)}$ and $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(1.1\\pm0.2)}$. However, using the GSMF results produces $\\mathcal{M}_g \\propto (1+z)^{(-0.58 \\pm 0.22)}$. We chose the latter result as it is less biased. We then obtained the theoretical quantities of interest, such as the differential number counts, to calculate the GCMF, which can be fitted by a Schechter function. The derived GCMF follows theoretical predictions in which the less massive objects form first, being followed later by more massive ones. In the range $0.5 < z < 2.0$ the GCMF has a strong variation that can be interpreted as a higher rate of galaxy mergers or as a strong evolution in the star formation history of these galaxies.

  14. Simulating Reionization in Numerical Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Sokasian; Tom Abel; Lars E. Hernquist

    2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of radiative transfer effects into cosmological hydrodynamical simulations is essential for understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) makes the transition from a neutral medium to one that is almost fully ionized. Here, we present an approximate numerical method designed to study in a statistical sense how a cosmological density field is ionized by a set of discrete point sources. A diffuse background radiation field is also computed self-consistently in our procedure. The method requires relatively few time steps and can be employed with simulations having high resolution. We describe the details of the algorithm and provide a description of how the method can be applied to the output from a pre-existing cosmological simulation to study the systematic reionization of a particular ionic species. As a first application, we compute the reionization of He II by quasars in the redshift range 3 to 6.

  15. Cosmological AMR MHD with Enzo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Hao [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present EnzoMHD, the extension of the cosmological code Enzoto include magnetic fields. We use the hyperbolic solver of Li et al. (2008) for the computation of interface fluxes. We use constrained transport methods of Balsara & Spicer (1999) and Gardiner & Stone (2005) to advance the induction equation, the reconstruction technique of Balsara (2001) to extend the Adaptive Mesh Refinement of Berger & Colella (1989) already used in Enzo, though formulated in a slightly different way for ease of implementation. This combination of methods preserves the divergence of the magnetic field to machine precision. We use operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We then present a series of cosmological and non cosmologjcal tests problems to demonstrate the quality of solution resulting from this combination of solvers.

  16. Cosmological dark energy effects from entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Capozziello; O. Luongo; S. Mancini

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The thorny issue of relating information theory to cosmology is here addressed by assuming a possible connection between quantum entanglement measures and observable universe. In particular, we propose a cosmological toy model, where the equation of state of the cosmological fluid, which drives the today observed cosmic acceleration, can be inferred from quantum entanglement between different cosmological epochs. In such a way the dynamical dark energy results as byproduct of quantum entanglement.

  17. Quasar Structure and Cosmological Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Elvis

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from quasars and AGNs is being invoked frequently in several cosmological settings. Currently, order of magnitude, or more, uncertainties in the structure of both the wind and the 'obscuring torus' make predictions highly uncertain. To make testable models of this 'cosmological feedback' it is essential to understand the detailed structure of AGNs sufficiently well to predict their properties for the whole quasar population, at all redshifts. Progress in both areas is rapid, and I describe the near-term prospects for reducing these uncertainties for 'slow' (non-relativistic) AGN winds and the obscuring torus.

  18. Noncommutative models in patch cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy) and INFN-Gruppo Collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy)

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider several classes of noncommutative inflationary models within an extended version of patch cosmological braneworlds, starting from a maximally invariant generalization of the action for scalar and tensor perturbations to a noncommutative brane embedded in a commutative bulk. Slow-roll expressions and consistency relations for the cosmological observables are provided, both in the UV and IR region of the spectrum; the inflaton field is assumed to be either an ordinary scalar field or a Born-Infeld tachyon. The effects of noncommutativity are then analyzed in a number of ways and energy regimes.

  19. Stringy Model of Cosmological Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Ya. Aref'eva

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A string field theory(SFT) nonlocal model of the cosmological dark energy providing w<-1 is briefly surveyed. We summarize recent developments and open problems, as well as point out some theoretical issues related with others applications of the SFT nonlocal models in cosmology, in particular, in inflation and cosmological singularity.

  20. Collecting Light with Telescopes How do telescopes help us learn about the universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    . Light Pollution #12;Star viewed with ground-based telescope 2. Turbulence causes twinkling blurs images pollution and turbulence. · Nothing short of going to space can solve problem of atmospheric absorption telescope. Very Large Array (VLA), New Mexico #12;Very Large Array (VLA), New Mexico #12;Very Long Baseline

  1. The Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mirror (M1) and its alignment with the secondary mirror (M2) will be actively controlled. HighThe Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory G. Yang*a, J of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd., Newark, NJ 07104; bBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore

  2. Electric Time in Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephon Alexander; Martin Bojowald; Antonino Marciano; David Simpson

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum cosmology is formulated with a realistic global internal time given by the electric vector potential. New possibilities for the quantum behavior of space-time are found, and the high-density regime is shown to be very sensitive to the specific form of state realized.

  3. Interpretation of the Cosmological Metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Cook; M. Shane Burns

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological Robertson-Walker metric of general relativity is often said to have the consequences that (1) the recessional velocity $v$ of a galaxy at proper distance $\\ell$ obeys the Hubble law $v=H\\ell$, and therefore galaxies at sufficiently great distance $\\ell$ are receding faster than the speed of light $c$; (2) faster than light recession does not violate special relativity theory because the latter is not applicable to the cosmological problem, and because ``space itself is receding'' faster than $c$ at great distance, and it is velocity relative to local space that is limited by $c$, not the velocity of distant objects relative to nearby ones; (3) we can see galaxies receding faster than the speed of light; and (4) the cosmological redshift is not a Doppler shift, but is due to a stretching of photon wavelength during propagation in an expanding universe. We present a particular Robertson-Walker metric (an empty universe metric) for which a coordinate transformation shows that none of these interpretation necessarily holds. The resulting paradoxes of interpretation lead to a deeper understanding of the meaning of the cosmological metric.

  4. Noncommutative Quantum Scalar Field Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz Barron, L. R.; Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Sabido, M. [Departamento de Fisica, DCI-Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, A.P. E-143, C.P. 37150, Guanajuato (Mexico); Yee, C. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we study noncommutative Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology coupled to a scalar field endowed with an exponential potential. The quantum scenario is analyzed in the Bohmian formalism of quantum trajectories to investigate the effects of noncommutativity in the evolution of the universe.

  5. Towards Noncommutative Supersymmetric Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabido, M.; Socorro, J. [Physics Department of the Division of Science and Engineering of the University of Guanajuato, Campus Leon P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Guzman, W. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work a construction of supersymmetric noncommutative cosmology is presented. We start with a ''noncommutative'' deformation of the minisuperspace variables, and by using the time reparametrization invariance of the noncommutative bosonic model we proceed to construct a super field description of the model.

  6. Mirror Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Förster, A; Baba, H; Bähr, J; Bonardi, A; Bonnoli, G; Brun, P; Canestrari, R; Chadwick, P; Chikawa, M; Carton, P -H; De Souza, V; Dipold, J; Doro, M; Durand, D; Dyrda, M; Giro, E; Glicenstein, J -F; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Hrabovski, M; Jeanney, C; Kagaya, M; Katagiri, H; Lessio, L; MANDAT, D; Mariotti, M; Medina, C; Micha?owski, J; Micolon, P; Nakajima, D; Niemiec, J; Nozato, A; Palatka, M; Pareschi, G; Pech, M; Peyaud, B; Pühlhofer, G; Rataj, M; Rodeghiero, G; Rojas, G; Rousselle, J; Sakonaka, R; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Schultz, C; Shu, S; Stinzing, F; Stodulski, M; Teshima, M; Travniczek, P; Van Eldik, C; Vassiliev, V; Wi?niewski, ?; Wörnlein, A; Yoshida, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a planned observatory for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy. It will consist of several tens of telescopes of different sizes, with a total mirror area of up to 10,000 square meters. Most mirrors of current installations are either polished glass mirrors or diamond-turned aluminium mirrors, both labour intensive technologies. For CTA, several new technologies for a fast and cost-efficient production of light-weight and reliable mirror substrates have been developed and industrial pre-production has started for most of them. In addition, new or improved aluminium-based and dielectric surface coatings have been developed to increase the reflectance over the lifetime of the mirrors compared to those of current Cherenkov telescope instruments.

  7. Telescopic nanotube device for hot nanolithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for maintaining a constant tip-surface distance for producing nanolithography patterns on a surface using a telescopic nanotube for hot nanolithography. An outer nanotube is attached to an AFM cantilever opposite a support end. An inner nanotube is telescopically disposed within the outer nanotube. The tip of the inner nanotube is heated to a sufficiently high temperature and brought in the vicinity of the surface. Heat is transmitted to the surface for thermal imprinting. Because the inner tube moves telescopically along the outer nanotube axis, a tip-surface distance is maintained constant due to the vdW force interaction, which in turn eliminates the need of an active feedback loop.

  8. Measuring Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivone F. M. Albuquerque; George F. Smoot

    2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino telescopes with large detection volumes can demonstrate that the current indications of neutrino oscillation are correct or if a better description can be achieved with non-standard alternatives. Observations of contained muons produced by atmospheric neutrinos can better constrain the allowed region for oscillations or determine the relevant parameters of non-standard models. We analyze the possibility of neutrino telescopes measuring atmospheric neutrino oscillations. We suggest adjustments to improve this potential. An addition of four densely-instrumented strings to the AMANDA II detector makes observations feasible. Such a configuration is competitive with current and proposed experiments.

  9. The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT): A Small Robotic Telescope for Large-Area Synoptic Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua Pepper; Richard W. Pogge; D. L. DePoy; J. L. Marshall; K. Z. Stanek; Amelia M. Stutz; Shawn Poindexter; Robert Siverd; Thomas P. O'Brien; Mark Trueblood; Patricia Trueblood

    2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a survey for planetary transits of bright stars. It consists of a small-aperture, wide-field automated telescope located at Winer Observatory near Sonoita, Arizona. The telescope surveys a set of 26 x 26 degree fields, together covering about 25% of the Northern sky, targeting stars in the range of 8

  10. Cosmological Analysis of Pilgrim Dark Energy in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawad, Abdul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposal of pilgrim dark energy is based on speculation that phantom-like dark energy (with strong enough resistive force) can prevent black hole formation in the universe. We explore this phenomenon in loop quantum cosmology framework by taking Hubble horizon as an infra-red cutoff in pilgrim dark energy. We evaluate the cosmological parameters such as Hubble, equation of state parameter, squared speed of sound and also cosmological planes like $\\omega_{\\vartheta}-\\omega'_{\\vartheta}$ and $r-s$ on the basis of pilgrim dark energy parameter ($u$) and interacting parameter ($d^2$). It is found that values of Hubble parameter lies in the range $74^{+0.005}_{-0.005}$. It is mentioned here that equation state parameter lies within the ranges $-1\\mp0.00005$ for $u=2, 1$ and $(-1.12,-1), (-5,-1)$ for $u=-1,-2$, respectively. Also, $\\omega_{\\vartheta}-\\omega'_{\\vartheta}$ planes provide $\\Lambda$CDM limit, freezing and thawing regions for all cases of $u$. It is also interesting to mention here that $\\omega_{\\va...

  11. Optical Technology Needs for Future Space Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Optical Technology Needs for Future Space Telescopes H. Philip Stahl, Ph.D. #12;Prelude systems. Synergistic integration of Earth observations & models. #12;Sun-Solar System Connection - investigate dark energy Structure and Evolution: Pathways to Life Program How Did we Get Here - follow

  12. The TACTIC atmospheric Cherenkov Imaging telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Koul; A. K. Tickoo; S. K. Kaul; S. R. Kaul; N. Kumar; K. K. Yadav; N. Bhatt; K. Venugopal; H. C. Goyal; M. Kothari; P. Chandra; R. C. Rannot; V. K. Dhar; M. K. Koul; R. K. Kaul; S. Kotwal; K. Chanchalani; S. Thoudam; N. Chouhan; M. Sharma; S. Bhattacharyya; S. Sahayanathan

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The TACTIC $\\gamma$-ray telescope, equipped with a light collector of area $\\sim$9.5m$^2$ and a medium resolution imaging camera of 349-pixels, has been in operation at Mt.Abu, India since 2001. This paper describes the main features of its various subsystems and its overall performance with regard to (a) tracking accuracy of its 2-axes drive system, (b) spot size of the light collector, (c) back-end signal processing electronics and topological trigger generation scheme, (d) data acquisition and control system and (e) relative and absolute gain calibration methodology. Using a trigger field of view of 11$\\times$11 pixels ($\\sim$ 3.4$^\\circ$$\\times3.4^\\circ$), the telescope records a cosmic ray event rate of $\\sim$2.5 Hz at a typical zenith angle of 15$^\\circ$. Monte Carlo simulation results are also presented in the paper for comparing the expected performance of the telescope with actual observational results. The consistent detection of a steady signal from the Crab Nebula above $\\sim$1.2 TeV energy, at a sensitivity level of $\\sim5.0\\sigma$ in $\\sim$25 h, alongwith excellent matching of its energy spectrum with that obtained by other groups, reassures that the performance of the TACTIC telescope is quite stable and reliable. Furthermore, encouraged by the detection of strong $\\gamma$-ray signals from Mrk 501 (during 1997 and 2006 observations) and Mrk 421 (during 2001 and 2005-2006 observations), we believe that there is considerable scope for the TACTIC telescope to monitor similar TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission activity from other active galactic nuclei on a long term basis.

  13. Gravitational Radiation From Cosmological Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; Andrew Mack; Tinatin Kahniashvili

    2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection of energy into the early Universe on a given characteristic length scale will result in turbulent motions of the primordial plasma. We calculate the stochastic background of gravitational radiation arising from a period of cosmological turbulence, using a simple model of isotropic Kolmogoroff turbulence produced in a cosmological phase transition. We also derive the gravitational radiation generated by magnetic fields arising from a dynamo operating during the period of turbulence. The resulting gravitational radiation background has a maximum amplitude comparable to the radiation background from the collision of bubbles in a first-order phase transition, but at a lower frequency, while the radiation from the induced magnetic fields is always subdominant to that from the turbulence itself. We briefly discuss the detectability of such a signal.

  14. The Schwarzschild Static Cosmological Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. H. Pereyra

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work describes an immersion in 5D of the interior Schwarzschild solution of the general relativity equations. The model theory is defined in the context of a flat 5D space time matter Minkowski model, using a Tolman like technique, which shows via Lorentz transformations that the solution is compatible with homogeneity and isotropy,thus obeying the cosmological principle. These properties permit one to consider the solution in terms of a cosmological model. In this model, the Universe may be treated as an idealized star with constant density and variable pressure, where each observer can be the center of the same. The observed redshift appears as a static gravitational effect which obeys the sufficiently verified and generally accepted square distance law. The Buchdahl stability theorem establishes a limit of distance observation with density dependence.

  15. Cosmology: a bird's eye view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan A. Coley; Sigbjorn Hervik; Woei Chet Lim

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this essay we discuss the difference in views of the Universe as seen by two different observers. While one of the observers follows a geodesic congruence defined by the geometry of the cosmological model, the other observer follows the fluid flow lines of a perfect fluid with a linear equation of state. We point out that the information these observers collect regarding the state of the Universe can be radically different; while one observes a non-inflating ever-expanding ever-lasting universe, the other observer can experience a dynamical behaviour reminiscent to that of quintessence or even that of a phantom cosmology leading to a 'big rip' singularity within finite time (but without the need for exotic forms of matter).

  16. Thermodynamics of decaying vacuum cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima, J.A. [Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)] [Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamic behavior of decaying vacuum cosmologies is investigated within a manifestly covariant formulation. Such a process corresponds to a continuous, irreversible energy flow from the vacuum component to the created matter constituents. It is shown that if the specific entropy per particle remains constant during the process, the equilibrium relations are preserved. In particular, if the vacuum decays into photons, the energy density {rho} and average number density of photons {ital n} scale with the temperature as {rho}{approximately}{ital T}{sup 4} and {ital n}{approximately}{ital T}{sup 3}. The temperature law is determined and a generalized Planckian-type form of the spectrum, which is preserved in the course of the evolution, is also proposed. Some consequences of these results for decaying vacuum FRW-type cosmologies as well as for models with {open_quote}{open_quote}adiabatic{close_quote}{close_quote} photon creation are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Cosmology, Thermodynamics and Matter Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; M. O. Calvao; I. Waga

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Several approaches to the matter creation problem in the context of cosmological models are summarily reviewed. A covariant formulation of the general relativistic imperfect simple fluid endowed with a process of matter creation is presented. By considering the standard big bang model, it is shown how the recent results of Prigogine et alii \\cite{1} can be recovered and, at the same time their limits of validity are explicited.

  18. Chameleon gravity on cosmological scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Farajollahi; A. Salehi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional approach to the chameleon mechanism, by assuming a static and spherically symmetric solutions in which matter density and chameleon field are given by $\\rho=\\rho(r)$ and $\\phi=\\phi(r)$, it has been shown that mass of chameleon field is matter density-dependent. In regions of high matter density such as earth, chameleon field is massive, in solar system it is low and in cosmological scales it is very low. In this article we revisit the mechanism in cosmological scales by assuming a redshift dependence of the matter density and chameleon field, i.e. $\\rho=\\rho(z)$, $\\phi=\\phi(z)$. To support our analysis, we best fit the model parameters with the observational data. The result shows that in cosmological scales, the mass of chameleon field increases with the redshift, i.e. more massive in higher redshifts. We also find that in both cases of power-law and exponential potential function, the current universe acceleration can be explained by the low mass chameleon field. In comparison with the high redshift observational data, we also find that the model with power-law potential function is in better agreement with the observational data.

  19. Multiverse Understanding of Cosmological Coincidences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Bousso; Lawrence J. Hall; Yasunori Nomura

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the timescales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  20. Multiverse understanding of cosmological coincidences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8162 (United States)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a deep cosmological mystery: although dependent on very different underlying physics, the time scales of structure formation, of galaxy cooling (both radiatively and against the CMB), and of vacuum domination do not differ by many orders of magnitude, but are all comparable to the present age of the universe. By scanning four landscape parameters simultaneously, we show that this quadruple coincidence is resolved. We assume only that the statistical distribution of parameter values in the multiverse grows towards certain catastrophic boundaries we identify, across which there are drastic regime changes. We find order-of-magnitude predictions for the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, the temperature at matter-radiation equality, the typical galaxy mass, and the age of the universe, in terms of the fine structure constant and the electron, proton and Planck masses. Our approach permits a systematic evaluation of measure proposals; with the causal patch measure, we find no runaway of the primordial density contrast and the cosmological constant to large values.

  1. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  2. The Berry phase in inflationary cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barun Kumar Pal; Supratik Pal; B. Basu

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive an analogue of the Berry phase associated with inflationary cosmological perturbations of quantum mechanical origin by obtaining the corresponding wavefunction. We have further shown that cosmological Berry phase can be completely envisioned through the observable parameters, viz. spectral indices. Finally, physical significance of this phase is discussed from the point of view of theoretical and observational aspects with some possible consequences of this quantity in inflationary cosmology.

  3. Cosmological Constant and Axions in String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory axions appear to be promising candidates for explaining cosmological constant via quintessence. In this paper, we study conditions on the string compactifications under which axion quintessence can happen. For sufficiently large number of axions, cosmological constant can be accounted for as the potential energy of axions that have not yet relaxed to their minima. In compactifications that incorporate unified models of particle physics, the height of the axion potential can naturally fall close to the observed value of cosmological constant.

  4. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trillion particle cosmological simulation completed A team of astrophysicists and computer scientists has created high-resolution cyber images of our cosmos. December 3, 2014...

  5. Vacuum Energy and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Melissinos

    2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a numerical relation between the cosmological constant and the vacuum energy arising from the Casimir effect in extra dimensions

  6. Variable cosmological term - geometry and physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Dymnikova

    2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the dynamics of a cosmological term in the spherically symmetric case by an r-dependent second rank symmetric tensor \\Lambda_{\\mu\

  7. Landscape predictions from cosmological vacuum selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael; Yang, Sheng

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In Bousso-Polchinski models with hundreds of fluxes, we compute the effects of cosmological dynamics on the probability distribution of landscape vacua. Starting from generic initial conditions, we find that most fluxes are dynamically driven into a different and much narrower range of values than expected from landscape statistics alone. Hence, cosmological evolution will access only a tiny fraction of the vacua with small cosmological constant. This leads to a host of sharp predictions. Unlike other approaches to eternal inflation, the holographic measure employed here does not lead to staggering, an excessive spread of probabilities that would doom the string landscape as a solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope characterized by using phase-retrieval algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fienup, James R.

    of the optical axis of a camera relay telescope relative to the main telescope. After we accounted for measured spherical aberration in the relay telescope,our estimate of the conicconstant of the primary mirror ofthe with the results of a blind test that was distributed to several groups. Section 4 describes some of the parameters

  9. AUTOMATIC GUIDING OF THE PRIMARY IMAGE OF SOLAR GREGORY TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and declination angles of the Sun. Gregory-type telescopes have an elliptical secondary mirror behind the primeAUTOMATIC GUIDING OF THE PRIMARY IMAGE OF SOLAR GREGORY TELESCOPES G. KÃ?VELER1, E. WIEHR2, D of solar Gregory telescopes is used for automatic guiding. This new system avoids temporal varying

  10. Large fully retractable telescope enclosures still closable in strong wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    built for the high-resolution solar telescopes DOT (Dutch Open Telescope) and GREGOR, both located be closed and opened with wind speeds of 20 m/s without any problems or restrictions. The DOT successfully of the air changes with the temperature. Objects near the telescope have the tendency to produce air bubbles

  11. The Automated Palomar 60-Inch Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenko, S B; Moon, D S; Harrison, F A; Kulkarni, S R; Henning, J R; Guzman, C D; Bonati, M; Smith, R M; Thicksten, R P; Doyle, M W; Petrie, H L; Gal-Yam, A; Soderberg, A M; Anagnostou, N L; Laity, A C; Fox, Derek B.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Harrison, Fiona A.; Henning, John R.; Bonati, Marco; Smith, Roger M.; Thicksten, Robert P.; Doyle, Michael W.; Petrie, Hal L.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Anagnostou, Nathaniel L.; Laity, Anastasia C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have converted the Palomar 60-inch telescope (P60) from a classical night assistant-operated telescope to a fully robotic facility. The automated system, which has been operational since September 2004, is designed for moderately fast (t <~ 3 minutes) and sustained (R <~ 23 mag) observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows and other transient events. Routine queue-scheduled observations can be interrupted in response to electronic notification of transient events. An automated pipeline reduces data in real-time, which is then stored on a searchable web-based archive for ease of distribution. We describe here the design requirements, hardware and software upgrades, and lessons learned from roboticization. We present an overview of the current system performance as well as plans for future upgrades.

  12. The Automated Palomar 60-Inch Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bradley Cenko; Derek B. Fox; Dae-Sik Moon; Fiona A. Harrison; S. R. Kulkarni; John R. Henning; C. Dani Guzman; Marco Bonati; Roger M. Smith; Robert P. Thicksten; Michael W. Doyle; Hal L. Petrie; Avishay Gal-Yam; Alicia M. Soderberg; Nathaniel L. Anagnostou; Anastasia C. Laity

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have converted the Palomar 60-inch telescope (P60) from a classical night assistant-operated telescope to a fully robotic facility. The automated system, which has been operational since September 2004, is designed for moderately fast (t <~ 3 minutes) and sustained (R <~ 23 mag) observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows and other transient events. Routine queue-scheduled observations can be interrupted in response to electronic notification of transient events. An automated pipeline reduces data in real-time, which is then stored on a searchable web-based archive for ease of distribution. We describe here the design requirements, hardware and software upgrades, and lessons learned from roboticization. We present an overview of the current system performance as well as plans for future upgrades.

  13. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  14. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  15. Axion Bounds from Precision Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffelt, G. G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Hamann, J.; Hannestad, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mirizzi, A. [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Wong, Y. Y. Y. [Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on their mass, axions produced in the early universe can leave different imprints in cosmic structures. If axions have masses in the eV-range, they contribute a hot dark matter fraction, allowing one to constrain m{sub a} in analogy to neutrinos. In the more favored scenario where axions play the role of cold dark matter and if reheating after inflation does not restore the Peccei-Quinn symmetry, the axion field provides isocurvature fluctuations that are severely constrained by precision cosmology. There remains a small sliver in parameter space where isocurvature fluctuations could still show up in future probes.

  16. Development of a mid-sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a ground-based observatory for very high-energy (10 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays, planned for operation starting in 2018. It will be an array of dozens of optical telescopes, known as Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs), of 8 m to 24 m diameter, deployed over an area of more than 1 square km, to detect flashes of Cherenkov light from showers initiated in the Earth's atmosphere by gamma rays. CTA will have improved angular resolution, a wider energy range, larger fields of view and an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over current ACT arrays such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Several institutions have proposed a research and development program to eventually contribute 36 medium-sized telescopes (9 m to 12 m diameter) to CTA to enhance and optimize its science performance. The program aims to construct a prototype of an innovative, Schwarzschild-Couder telescope (SCT) design that will allow much smaller and less expensive cameras and much larger fields of view than conventional Davies-Cotton designs, and will also include design and testing of camera electronics for the necessary advances in performance, reliability and cost. We report on the progress of the mid-sized SCT development program.

  17. THE NEED FOR A PARADIGM SHIFT IN OPTICAL ASTRONOMY: A SOLUTION GIVEN BY LIQUID MIRRORS AND EXAMPLES OF THEIR APPLICATIONS TO COSMOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. F. Borra

    1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    I argue that there is a crisis in optical Astronomy due to a paucity of telescopes and thus the need for a paradigm shift in telescope technology. Large increases in collecting areas and observing time/astronomer are only possible if we forgo the fully steerable multipurpose telescope with a glass primary mirror that has dominated astronomical research. Only by adopting entirely novel technologies that allow one to build large and inexpensive telescopes can we achieve truly large improvements. This may come at the expense of versatility and may entail changes in the observing strategies astronomers are now accustomed to. I build my case around a new technology, liquid mirrors, that although in its infancy has achieved credibility. I argue that forthcoming technological improvements will make Liquid Mirror Telescopes (LMTs) nearly as versatile as conventional telescopes. I address the issue of the fields accessible to LMTs equipped with novel optical correctors. Optical design work and exploratory laboratory work indicate that a single LMT should be able to access, with excellent images, subregions anywhere inside fields as large as 45 degrees. As a practical example of what an LMT can do with the present technology, I examine the expected performance of a 5-m liquid mirror telescope, presently under construction, dedicated to a cosmological survey. It is rather impressive, due to the fact that the instrument works full-time on a four-year survey: Spectrophotometry reaches B=24 with a signal to noise ratio of 10 within a 200\\AA bandpass for all objects within 300 square degrees and wide-band photometry reaches about B=27. I give three examples of cosmological projects that can be done with the data.

  18. Cosmological birefringence induced by neutrino current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Q. Geng; S. H. Ho; J. N. Ng

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We review our recent work on the cosmological birefringence. We propose a new type of effective interactions in terms of the $CPT$-even dimension-six Chern-Simons-like term to generate the cosmological birefringence. We use the neutrino number asymmetry to induce a non-zero rotation polarization angle in the data of the cosmic microwave background radiation polarization.

  19. No hair theorem for inhomogeneous cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, L.G.; Stein-Schabes, J.A.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under very general conditions any inhomogeneous cosmological model with a positive cosmological constant, that can be described in a synchronous reference system will tend asymptotically in time towards the de Sitter solution. This is shown to be relevant in the context of inflationary models as it makes inflation very weakly dependent on initial conditions. 8 refs.

  20. Vacuum Fluctuations and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi Qi

    2006-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypothesis is proposed that under the approximation that the quantum equations of motion reduce to the classical ones, the quantum vacuum also reduces to the classical vacuum--the empty space. The vacuum energy of QED is studied under this hypothesis. A possible solution to the cosmological constant problem is provided and a kind of parameterization of the cosmological "constant" is derived.

  1. Surface brightness in plasma-redshift cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Brynjolfsson

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 Lori M. Lubin and Allan Sandage, using big-bang cosmology for interpreting the data, found the surface brightness of galaxies to be inversely proportional to about the third power of (1+z), while the contemporary big-bang cosmology predicts that the surface brightness is inversely proportional to the fourth power of (1+z). In contrast, these surface brightness observations are in agreement with the predictions of the plasma-redshift cosmology. Lubin and Sandage (2001) and Barden et al. (2005), who surmised the big-bang expansion, interpreted the observations to indicate that the diameters of galaxies are inversely proportional to (1+z). In contrast, when assuming plasma-redshift cosmology, the diameters of galaxies are observed to be constant independent of redshift and any expansion. Lubin and Sandage (2001) and Barden et al. (2005), when using big-bang cosmology, observed the average absolute magnitude of galaxies to decrease with redshift; while in plasma redshift cosmology it is a constant. Lubin and Sandage and Barden et al. suggested that a coherent evolution could explain the discrepancy between the observed relations and those predicted in the big-bang cosmology. We have failed to find support for this explanation. We consider the observed relations between the redshift and the surface-brightness, the galaxy diameter, and the absolute magnitude to be robust confirmations of plasma-redshift cosmology.

  2. Analogue models for FRW cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Barcelo; Stefano Liberati; Matt Visser

    2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is by now well known that various condensed matter systems may be used to mimic many of the kinematic aspects of general relativity, and in particular of curved-spacetime quantum field theory. In this essay we will take a look at what would be needed to mimic a cosmological spacetime -- to be precise a spatially flat FRW cosmology -- in one of these analogue models. In order to do this one needs to build and control suitable time dependent systems. We discuss here two quite different ways to achieve this goal. One might rely on an explosion, physically mimicking the big bang by an outflow of whatever medium is being used to carry the excitations of the analogue model, but this idea appears to encounter dynamical problems in practice. More subtly, one can avoid the need for any actual physical motion (and avoid the dynamical problems) by instead adjusting the propagation speed of the excitations of the analogue model. We shall focus on this more promising route and discuss its practicality.

  3. Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1995-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical mechanical concepts and processes such as decoherence, correlation, and dissipation can prove to be of basic importance to understanding some fundamental issues of quantum cosmology and theoretical physics such as the choice of initial states, quantum to classical transition and the emergence of time. Here we summarize our effort in 1) constructing a unified theoretical framework using techniques in interacting quantum field theory such as influence functional and coarse-grained effective action to discuss the interplay of noise, fluctuation, dissipation and decoherence; and 2) illustrating how these concepts when applied to quantum cosmology can alter the conventional views on some basic issues. Two questions we address are 1) the validity of minisuperspace truncation, which is usually assumed without proof in most discussions, and 2) the relevance of specific initial conditions, which is the prevailing view of the past decade. We also mention how some current ideas in chaotic dynamics, dissipative collective dynamics and complexity can alter our view of the quantum nature of the universe.

  4. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatión, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  5. Review of the Solar Array Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Smith

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years the only experiments sensitive to astrophysical gamma rays with energies beyond the reach of EGRET but below that of the Cherenkov imaging telescopes have been the "solar tower" detectors. They use >2000 m2 mirror areas to sample the Cherenkov wavefront generated by <100 GeV gamma rays, obtaining Crab sensitivities of more than 6$\\sigma$ in one ON-source hour. I will review the history of the solar tower Cherenkov experiments from 1992 to the present and their key design features. I will describe some successful analysis strategies, then summarize the principal results obtained.

  6. Nonlinear relativistic corrections to cosmological distances, redshift and gravitational lensing magnification. I - Key results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obinna Umeh; Chris Clarkson; Roy Maartens

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of telescopes will usher in an era of precision cosmology, capable of determining the cosmological model to beyond the percent level. For this to be effective, the theoretical model must be understood to at least the same level of precision. A range of subtle relativistic effects remain to be explored theoretically, and offer the potential for probing general relativity in this new regime. We present the distance-redshift relation to second order in cosmological perturbation theory for a general dark energy model. This relation determines the magnification of sources at high precision, as well as redshift space distortions in the mildly non-linear regime. We identify a range of new lensing effects, including: double-integrated and nonlinear integrated Sach-Wolfe contributions, transverse Doppler effects, lensing from the induced vector mode and gravitational wave backgrounds, in addition to lensing from the second-order potential. Modifications to Doppler lensing from redshift-space distortions are identified. Finally, we find a new double-coupling between the density fluctuations integrated along the line of sight, and gradients in the density fluctuations coupled to transverse velocities along the line of sight. These can be large and thus offer important new probes of gravitational lensing and general relativity. This paper accompanies arXiv:1402.1933, where a comprehensive derivation is given.

  7. The potential for detecting gamma-ray burst afterglows from population III stars with the next generation of infrared telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macpherson, D. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Coward, D. M. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Zadnik, M. G., E-mail: damien.macpherson@icrar.org [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the detectability of a proposed population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from the collapse of Population III (Pop III) stars. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will be able to observe the late time infrared afterglows. We have developed a new method to calculate their detectability, which takes into account the fundamental initial mass function and formation rates of Pop III stars, from which we find the temporal variability of the afterglows and ultimately the length of time JWST and SPICA can detect them. In the range of plausible Pop III GRB parameters, the afterglows are always detectable by these instruments during the isotropic emission, for a minimum of 55 days and a maximum of 3.7 yr. The average number of detectable afterglows will be 2.96× 10{sup –5} per SPICA field of view (FOV) and 2.78× 10{sup –6} per JWST FOV. These are lower limits, using a pessimistic estimate of Pop III star formation. An optimal observing strategy with SPICA could identify a candidate orphan afterglow in ?1.3 yr, with a 90% probability of confirmation with further detailed observations. A beamed GRB will align with the FOV of the planned GRB detector Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope once every 9 yr. Pop III GRBs will be more easily detected by their isotropic emissions (i.e., orphan afterglows) rather than by their prompt emissions.

  8. Giant Magellan Telescope Site Testing Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas-Osip, Joanna E; Prieto, Gabriel; Phillips, Mark M; Johns, Matt

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cerro Las Campanas located at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) in Chile has been selected as the site for the Giant Magellan Telescope. We report results obtained since the commencement, in 2005, of a systematic site testing survey of potential GMT sites at LCO. Meteorological (cloud cover, temperature, pressure, wind, and humidity) and DIMM seeing data have been obtained at three potential sites, and are compared with identical data taken at the site of the twin Magellan 6.5m telescopes. In addition, measurements of the turbulence profile of the free-atmosphere above LCO have been collected with a MASS/DIMM. Furthermore, we consider photometric quality, light pollution, and precipitable water vapor (PWV). LCO, and Co. Las Campanas in particular, have dark skies, little or no risk of future light pollution, excellent seeing, moderate winds, PWV adequate for mid-IR astronomy during a reasonable fraction of the nights, and a high fraction of clear nights overall. Finally, Co. Las Campanas meets or exceeds all the...

  9. Cosmological Vacuum in Unified Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Pervushin; V. I Smirichinski

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The unification of the Einstein theory of gravity with a conformal invariant version of the standard model for electroweak interaction without the Higgs potential is considered. In this theory, a module of the Higgs field is absorbed by the scale factor component of metric so that the evolution of the Universe and the elementary particle masses have one and the same cosmological origin and the flat space limit corresponds to the $\\sigma$-model version of the standard model. The red shift formula and Hubble law are obtained under the assumption of homogeneous matter distribution. We show that the considered theory leads to a very small vacuum density of the Higgs field $\\rho_\\phi^{Cosmic}=10^{-34}\\rho_{cr}$ in contrast with the theory with the Higgs potential $\\rho_\\phi^{Higgs}=10^{54}\\rho_{cr}$.

  10. Accelerated expansion from cosmological holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Putten, Maurice H P M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that holographic cosmology implies an evolving Hubble radius $c^{-1}\\dot{R}_H = -1 + 3\\Omega_m$ in the presence of a dimensionless matter density $\\Omega_m$ scaled to the closure density $3H^2/8\\pi G$, where $c$ denotes the velocity of light and $H$ and $G$ denote the Hubble parameter and Newton's constant. It reveals a dynamical dark energy and a sixfold increase in gravitational attraction to matter on the scale of the Hubble acceleration. It reproduces the transition redshift $z_t\\simeq 0.4$ to the present epoch of accelerated expansion and is consistent with $(q_0,(dq/dz)_0)$ of the deceleration parameter $q(z)=q_0+(dq/dz)_0z$ observed in Type Ia supernovae.

  11. Isotropic cosmological singularities: other matter models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Tod

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotropic cosmological singularities are singularities which can be removed by rescaling the metric. In some cases already studied (gr-qc/9903008, gr-qc/9903009, gr-qc/9903018) existence and uniqueness of cosmological models with data at the singularity has been established. These were cosmologies with, as source, either perfect fluids with linear equations of state or massless, collisionless particles. In this article we consider how to extend these results to a variety of other matter models. These are scalar fields, massive collisionless matter, the Yang-Mills plasma of Choquet-Bruhat, or matter satisfying the Einstein-Boltzmann equation.

  12. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horatiu Nastase; Amanda Weltman

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why $\\Lambda$ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why $\\Lambda$ is comparable to the matter density now).

  13. Experimental signatures of cosmological neutrino condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mofazzal Azam; Jitesh R. Bhatt; Utpal Sarkar

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Superfluid condensation of neutrinos of cosmological origin at a low enough temperature can provide simple and elegant solution to the problems of neutrino oscillations and the accelerated expansion of the universe. It would give rise to a late time cosmological constant of small magnitude and also generate tiny Majorana masses for the neutrinos as observed from their flavor oscillations. We show that carefully prepared beta decay experiments in the laboratory would carry signatures of such a condensation, and thus, it would be possible to either establish or rule out neutrino condensation of cosmological scale in laboratory experiments.

  14. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  15. Towards the cosmological constant problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eun Kyung Park; Pyung Seong Kwon

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a new self-tuning mechanism to the well-known Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi (KKLT) model to address the cosmological constant problem. In this mechanism the cosmological constant $\\lambda$ contains a supersymmetry breaking term ${\\mathcal E}_{\\rm SB}$ besides the usual scalar potential ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ of the $N=1$ supergravity, which is distinguished from the usual theories where $\\lambda$ is directly identified with ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ alone. Also in this mechanism, whether $\\lambda$ vanishes or not is basically determined by the tensor structure of the scalar potential density, not by the zero or nonzero values of the scalar potential itself. As a result of this application we find that the natural scenario for the vanishing $\\lambda$ of the present universe is to take one of the AdS (rather than dS) vacua of KKLT as the background vacuum of our present universe. This AdS vacuum scenario does not suffer from the problematics of the dS vacua of KKLT. The background vacuum is stable both classically and quantum mechanically (no tunneling instabilities), and the value $\\lambda =0$ is also stable against quantum corrections because in this scenario the perturbative corrections of ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ and quantum fluctuations $\\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(NS)} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(R)}$ on the branes are all gauged away by an automatic cancelation between ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(NS)} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(R)}$ and ${\\mathcal E}_{\\rm SB}$.

  16. Status of the second phase of the MAGIC telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Goebel; for the MAGIC collaboration

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAGIC 17m diameter Cherenkov telescope will be upgraded with a second telescope with advanced photon detectors and ultra fast readout within the year 2007. The sensitivity of MAGIC-II, the two telescope system, will be improved by a factor of 2. In addition the energy threshold will be reduced and the energy and angular resolution will be improved. The design, status and expected performance of MAGIC-II is presented here.

  17. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Astier, Pierre; Carlberg, RaymondG.; Conley, Alex; Fabbro, Sebastien; Fouchez, Dominique; Neill, James D.; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift upto z {approx}0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy&Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNeII-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, across-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We apply this revised method to our dataset of high-redshift SNe II-P and find that the resulting Hubble diagram has a scatter of only 0.26 magnitudes, thus demonstrating the feasibility of measuring the expansion history, with present facilities, using a method independent of that based upon supernovae of Type Ia.

  18. A Calibration of a Microwave Telescope Christopher Herzog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Calibration of a Microwave Telescope Christopher Herzog February 27, 2004 1 Calculating the Polarization Change This calibration experiment relies on an ability to calculate what happens

  19. area space telescope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    telescope. Stellar-image data in a typical exposure determines secondary-mirror positions as precisely as 20 rm nm. The PSF ellipticities and size, which are...

  20. James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2014 DOE Project Management Workshop PM Lessons Applied - James Webb, Space Telescope More Documents & Publications NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 Storage Audit Report: IG-0540...

  1. area telescope measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Earth, Sun, the Earth's orbit, and even exceeding the distances to the stars given by Tycho Brahe. Thus Riccioli felt that telescopic observations were an effective argument...

  2. The Robotic Super-LOTIS Telescope: Results & Future Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Williams; P. A. Milne; H. S. Park; S. D. Barthelmy; D. H. Hartmann; A. Updike; K. Hurley

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide an overview of the robotic Super-LOTIS (Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System) telescope and present results from gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow observations using Super-LOTIS and other Steward Observatory telescopes. The 0.6-m Super-LOTIS telescope is a fully robotic system dedicated to the measurement of prompt and early time optical emission from GRBs. The system began routine operations from its Steward Observatory site atop Kitt Peak in April 2000 and currently operates every clear night. The telescope is instrumented with an optical CCD camera and a four position filter wheel. It is capable of observing Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) error boxes as early or earlier than the Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Super-LOTIS complements the UVOT observations by providing early R- and I-band imaging. We also use the suite of Steward Observatory telescopes including the 1.6-m Kuiper, the 2.3-m Bok, the 6.5-m MMT, and the 8.4-m Large Binocular Telescope to perform follow-up optical and near infrared observations of GRB afterglows. These follow-up observations have traditionally required human intervention but we are currently working to automate the 1.6-m Kuiper telescope to minimize its response time.

  3. amanda neutrino telescope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutrino flux, permanent and transient point source analyses, and indirect dark matter searches. A brief outlook on the IceCube neutrino telescope currently under...

  4. amanda neutrino telescopes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutrino flux, permanent and transient point source analyses, and indirect dark matter searches. A brief outlook on the IceCube neutrino telescope currently under...

  5. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Anne Green

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann Green

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.  

  6. Cosmology of modified (but second order) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomi S. Koivisto

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a brief review of modified gravity cosmologies. Generically extensions of gravity action involve higher derivative terms, which can result in ghosts and instabilities. There are three ways to circumvent this: Chern-Simons terms, first order variational principle and nonlocality. We consider recent cosmological applications of these three classes of modified gravity models, in particular to the dark energy problem. The viable parameter spaces can be very efficiently constrained by taking into account cosmological data from all epochs in addition to Solar system tests and stability considerations. We make some new remarks concerning so called algebraic scalar-tensor theories, biscalar reformulation of nonlocal actions involving the inverse d'Alembertian, and a possible covariant formulation holographic cosmology with nonperturbative gravity.

  7. Cosmology on the Beach: Kendrick Smith

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  8. Cosmology on the Beach - George Smoot

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  9. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Anne Green

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ann Green

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.  

  10. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Simon White

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  11. Cosmological Inflation and generation of Primordial Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souradeep, Tarun

    to high accuracy. The Inflationary universe, first proposed by Guth[1] is a modification of the hot big cosmology has become one of the cornerstones of modern cos- mology. Inflationary universe scenario

  12. Asymptotically Vanishing Cosmological Constant in the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hikaru Kawai; Takashi Okada

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of the cosmological constant in the context of the multiverse in Lorentzian spacetime, and show that the cosmological constant will vanish in the future. This sort of argument was started from Coleman in 1989, and he argued that the Euclidean wormholes make the multiverse partition a superposition of various values of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, which has a sharp peak at $\\Lambda=0$. However, the implication of the Euclidean analysis to our Lorentzian spacetime is unclear. With this motivation, we analyze the quantum state of the multiverse in Lorentzian spacetime by the WKB method, and calculate the density matrix of our universe by tracing out the other universes. Our result predicts vanishing cosmological constant. While Coleman obtained the enhancement at $\\Lambda=0$ through the action itself, in our Lorentzian analysis the similar enhancement arises from the front factor of $e^{iS}$ in the universe wave function, which is in the next leading order in the WKB approximation.

  13. Cosmological applications of weak gravitational flexion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Barnaby Thomas Peter

    Modern cosmology has reached an important juncture, at which the ability to make measurements of unprecedented accuracy has led to conclusions that are a fundamental challenge to natural science. The discovery that, in ...

  14. Cosmology and the S-matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Kachru, R. Kallosh, A. Linde and S. P. Trivedi: De sitter30] N. Kaloper and A. Linde: Cosmology vs. holography, hep-V. Hubeny, N. Kaloper, A. Linde, A. Mints, J. Polchinski, M.

  15. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: David Hughes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Hughes

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  16. Conformally Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a universe where, according to the standard cosmological models, some 97% of the total mass-energy is still "missing in action" it behooves us to spend at least a little effort critically assessing and exploring radical alternatives. Among possible, (dare we say plausible), nonstandard but superficially viable models, those spacetimes conformal to the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker class of cosmological models play a very special role --- these models have the unique and important property of permitting large non-perturbative geometric deviations from Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology without unacceptably distorting the cosmic microwave background. Performing a "cosmographic" analysis, (that is, temporarily setting aside the Einstein equations, since the question of whether or not the Einstein equations are valid on galactic and cosmological scales is essentially the same question as whether or not dark matter/dark energy actually exist), and using both supernova data and informat...

  17. Cosmology on the Beach - George Smoot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  18. Dark Energy and the New Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Turner

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A successor to the standard hot big-bang cosmology is emerging. It greatly extends the highly successful hot big-bang model. A key element of the New Standard Cosmology is dark energy, the causative agent for accelerated expansion. Dark energy is just possibly the most important problem in all of physics. The only laboratory up to the task of studying dark energy is the Universe itself.

  19. Dark spinors with torsion in cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Burnett, James [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve one of the open problems in Einstein-Cartan theory, namely, we find a natural matter source whose spin angular momentum tensor is compatible with the cosmological principle. We analyze the resulting evolution equations and find that an epoch of accelerated expansion is an attractor. The torsion field quickly decays in that period. Our results are interpreted in the context of the standard model of cosmology.

  20. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology from matter only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telkamp, Herman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a matter-only interpretation of {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, based on conservation of energy and assuming a Machian definition of inertia. {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology can be linked to a Newtonian cosmic potential, subject to a propagating gravitational horizon. In a matter-only universe where total energy is conserved, Machian inertia related to the evolving potential may cause both deceleration and acceleration of recession.

  1. Quantum Coherence Arguments for Cosmological Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindesay, James; /SLAC

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneity and correlations in the observed CMB are indicative of some form of cosmological coherence in early times. Quantum coherence in the early universe would be expected to give space-like phase coherence to any effects sourced to those times. If dark energy de-coherence is assumed to occur when the rate of expansion of the relevant cosmological scale parameter in the Friedmann-Lemaitre equations is no longer supra-luminal, a critical energy density is immediately defined. It is shown that the general class of dynamical models so defined necessarily requires a spatially flat cosmology in order to be consistent with observed structure formation. The basic assumption is that the dark energy density which is fixed during de-coherence is to be identified with the cosmological constant. It is shown for the entire class of models that the expected amplitude of fluctuations driven by the dark energy de-coherence process is of the order needed to evolve into the fluctuations observed in cosmic microwave background radiation and galactic clustering. The densities involved during de-coherence which correspond to the measured dark energy density turn out to be of the electroweak symmetry restoration scale. In an inflationary cosmology, this choice of the scale parameter in the FL equations directly relates the scale of dark energy decoherence to the De Sitter scales (associated with the positive cosmological constants) at both early and late times.

  2. Bulk viscous cosmology: statefinder and entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hu; Xin He Meng

    2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The statefinder diagnostic pair is adopted to differentiate viscous cosmology models and it is found that the trajectories of these viscous cosmology models on the statefinder pair $s-r$ plane are quite different from those of the corresponding non-viscous cases. Particularly for the quiessence model, the singular properties of state parameter $w=-1$ are obviously demonstrated on the statefinder diagnostic pair planes. We then discuss the entropy of the viscous / dissipative cosmology system which may be more practical to describe the present cosmic observations as the perfect fluid is just a global approximation to the complicated cosmic media in current universe evolution. When the bulk viscosity takes the form of $\\zeta=\\zeta_{1}\\dot{a}/a$($\\zeta_{1}$ is constant), the relationship between the entropy $S$ and the redshift $z$ is explicitly given out. We find that the entropy of the viscous cosmology is always increasing and consistent with the thermodynamics arrow of time for the universe evolution. With the parameter constraints from fitting to the 157 gold data of supernova observations, it is demonstrated that this viscous cosmology model is rather well consistent to the observational data at the lower redshifts, and together with the diagnostic statefinder pair analysis it is concluded that the viscous cosmic models tend to the favored $\\Lambda$CDM model in the later cosmic evolution, agreeable to lots of cosmological simulation results, especially to the fact of confidently observed current accelerating cosmic expansion.

  3. Recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope Veronique Van Elewycka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    annihilation, searches for exotic particles and the measurement of neutrino oscillations, are also reviewedRecent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope V´eronique Van Elewycka , on behalf Cit´e, France Abstract The ANTARES neutrino telescope is currently the largest operating water

  4. VERITAS The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekes, T C; Biller, S D; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; Dingus, B L; Fazio, G G; Fegan, D J; Finley, J; Fishman, G; Gaidos, J A; Gillanders, G H; Gorham, P W; Grindlay, J E; Hillas, A M; Huchra, J P; Kaaret, P E; Kertzman, M P; Kieda, D B; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Lang, M J; Marscher, A P; Matz, S; McKay, T; Müller, D; Ong, R; Purcell, W; Rose, J; Sembroski, G H; Seward, F D; Slane, P O; Swordy, S P; Tümer, T O; Ulmer, M P; Urban, M; Wilkes, B J

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A next generation atmospheric Cherenkov observatory is described based on the Whipple Observatory $\\gamma$-ray telescope. A total of nine such imaging telescopes will be deployed in an array that will permit the maximum versatility and give high sensitivity in the 50 GeV - 50 TeV band (with maximum sensitivity from 100 GeV to 10 TeV).

  5. Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fienup, James R.

    Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy with multi-aperture telescopes Samuel T. Thurman and James R Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 Abstract: Fourier spectroscopy can be performed with multi Society of America OCIS codes: (300.6300) Spectroscopy, Fourier transforms; (110.6770) Telescopes; (120

  6. VERITAS: Very LArge Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Weekes; C. Akerlof; S. Biller; A. C. Breslin; J. H. Buckley; D. A. Carter-Lewis; M. Catanese; M. F. Cawley; B. Dingus; G. G. Fazio; D. J. Fegan; J. Finley; G. Fishman; J. Gaidos; G. H. Gillanders; P. Gorham; J. E. Grindlay; A. M. Hillas; J. Huchra; P. Kaaret; M. Kertzman; D. Kieda; F. Krennrich; R. C. Lamb; M. J. Lang; A. P. Marscher; S. Matz; T. McKay; D. Muller; R. Ong; W. Purcell; J. Rose; G. Sembroski; F. D. Seward; P. Slane; S. Swordy; T. Tumer; M. Ulmer; M. Urban; B. J. Wilkes

    1997-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A next generation atmospheric Cherenkov observatory is described based on the Whipple Observatory $\\gamma$-ray telescope. A total of nine such imaging telescopes will be deployed in an array that will permit the maximum versatility and give high sensitivity in the 50 GeV - 50 TeV band (with maximum sensitivity from 100 GeV to 10 TeV).

  7. Integrating Seeing Measurements into the Operations of Solar Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrating Seeing Measurements into the Operations of Solar Telescopes C. Denker and A. P. Verdoni by the site survey for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) as one of the best sites for solar. The ATST site survey has collected more than two years of data linking seeing conditions to geographical

  8. Friction forces in cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico; Daniele Gregoris; Sauro Succi

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of test particles undergoing friction forces in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime. The interaction with the background fluid is modeled by introducing a Poynting-Robertson-like friction force in the equations of motion, leading to measurable (at least in principle) deviations of the particle trajectories from geodesic motion. The effect on the peculiar velocities of the particles is investigated for various equations of state of the background fluid and different standard cosmological models. The friction force is found to have major effects on particle motion in closed FRW universes, where it turns the time-asymptotic value (approaching the recollapse) of the peculiar particle velocity from ultra-relativistic (close to light speed) to a co-moving one, i.e., zero peculiar speed. On the other hand, for open or flat universes the effect of the friction is not so significant, because the time-asymptotic peculiar particle speed is largely non-relativistic also in the geodesic case.

  9. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  10. Cosmological consequences of string axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kain, Ben [Department of Physics, University of California and Theoretical Physics Group, Bldg. 50A5104, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion fluctuations generated during inflation lead to isocurvature and non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Following a previous analysis for the model independent string axion we consider the consequences of a measurement of these fluctuations for two additional string axions. We do so independent of any cosmological assumptions. The first axion has been shown to solve the strong CP problem for most compactifications of the heterotic string while the second axion, which does not solve the strong CP problem, obeys a mass formula which is independent of the axion scale. We find that if gravitational waves interpreted as arising from inflation are observed by the PLANCK polarimetry experiment with a Hubble constant during inflation of H{sub inf} > or approx. 10{sup 13} GeV the existence of the first axion is ruled out and the second axion cannot obey the scale independent mass formula. In an appendix we quantitatively justify the often held assumption that temperature corrections to the zero temperature QCD axion mass may be ignored for temperatures T < or approx. {lambda}{sub QCD}.

  11. Cosmological Consequences of String Axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kain, Ben

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion fluctuations generated during inflation lead to isocurvature and non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Following a previous analysis for the model independent string axion we consider the consequences of a measurement of these fluctuations for two additional string axions. We do so independent of any cosmological assumptions except for the axions being massless during inflation. The first axion has been shown to solve the strong CP problem for most compactifications of the heterotic string while the second axion, which does not solve the strong CP problem, obeys a mass formula which is independent of the axion scale. We find that if gravitational waves interpreted as arising from inflation are observed by the PLANCK polarimetry experiment with a Hubble constant during inflation of H{sub inf} {approx}> 10{sup 13} GeV the existence of the first axion is ruled out and the second axion cannot obey the scale independent mass formula. In an appendix we quantitatively justify the often held assumption that temperature corrections to the zero temperature QCD axion mass may be ignored for temperatures T {approx}< {Lambda}{sub QCD}.

  12. Quantum Vacuum Structure and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Hadad, Yaron; /Arizona U. /Munich U.; Chen, Pisin; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary physics faces three great riddles that lie at the intersection of quantum theory, particle physics and cosmology. They are: (1) The expansion of the universe is accelerating - an extra factor of two appears in the size; (2) Zero-point fluctuations do not gravitate - a matter of 120 orders of magnitude; and (3) The 'True' quantum vacuum state does not gravitate. The latter two are explicitly problems related to the interpretation and the physical role and relation of the quantum vacuum with and in general relativity. Their resolution may require a major advance in our formulation and understanding of a common unified approach to quantum physics and gravity. To achieve this goal we must develop an experimental basis and much of the discussion we present is devoted to this task. In the following, we examine the observations and the theory contributing to the current framework comprising these riddles. We consider an interpretation of the first riddle within the context of the universe's quantum vacuum state, and propose an experimental concept to probe the vacuum state of the universe.

  13. Spectral Energy Distribution of Radio Sources in Nearby Clusters of Galaxies: Implications for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen-Ting Lin; Bruce Partridge; J. C. Pober; Khadija El Bouchefry; Sarah Burke; Jonathan Klein; Joseph Coish; Kevin Huffenberger

    2009-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore the high frequency radio spectra of galaxies in clusters, we used NRAO's Very Large Array at four frequencies, 4.9-43 GHz, to observe 139 galaxies in low redshift (z22 GHz, implying a higher flux than would be expected from an extrapolation of the lower frequency flux measurements. Our results quantify the need for careful source subtraction in increasingly sensitive measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in clusters of galaxies (as currently being conducted by, for instance, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope groups).

  14. The Liverpool Telescope: Rapid follow-up observation of Targets of opportunity with a 2 m robotic telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gomboc; M. F. Bode; D. Carter; C. G. Mundell; A. M. Newsam; R. J. Smith; I. A. Steele

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liverpool Telescope, situated at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Canaries, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. It recently began observations. Among Liverpool Telescope's primary scientific goals is to monitor variable objects on all timescales from seconds to years. An additional benefit of its robotic operation is rapid reaction to unpredictable phenomena and their systematic follow up, simultaneous or coordinated with other facilities. The Target of Opportunity Programme of the Liverpool Telescope includes the prompt search for and observation of GRB and XRF counterparts. A special over-ride mode implemented for GRB/XRF follow-up enables observations commencing less than a minute after the alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. In particular, the moderate aperture and rapid automated response make the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to help solving the mystery of optically dark GRBs and for the investigation of currently unstudied short bursts and XRFs.

  15. Isotropic singularity in inhomogeneous brane cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; Y. He; W. C. Lim

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the asymptotic dynamical evolution of spatially inhomogeneous brane-world cosmological models close to the initial singularity. By introducing suitable scale-invariant dependent variables and a suitable gauge, we write the evolution equations of the spatially inhomogeneous $G_{2}$ brane cosmological models with one spatial degree of freedom as a system of autonomous first-order partial differential equations. We study the system numerically, and we find that there always exists an initial singularity, which is characterized by the fact that spatial derivatives are dynamically negligible. More importantly, from the numerical analysis we conclude that there is an initial isotropic singularity in all of these spatially inhomogeneous brane cosmologies for a range of parameter values which include the physically important cases of radiation and a scalar field source. The numerical results are supported by a qualitative dynamical analysis and a calculation of the past asymptotic decay rates. Although the analysis is local in nature, the numerics indicates that the singularity is isotropic for all relevant initial conditions. Therefore this analysis, and a preliminary investigation of general inhomogeneous ($G_0$) models, indicates that it is plausible that the initial singularity is isotropic in spatially inhomogeneous brane-world cosmological models and consequently that brane cosmology naturally gives rise to a set of initial data that provide the conditions for inflation to subsequently take place.

  16. Beyond the Cosmological Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin Joyce; Bhuvnesh Jain; Justin Khoury; Mark Trodden

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After a decade and a half of research motivated by the accelerating universe, theory and experiment have a reached a certain level of maturity. The development of theoretical models beyond \\Lambda, or smooth dark energy, often called modified gravity, has led to broader insights into a path forward, and a host of observational and experimental tests have been developed. In this review we present the current state of the field and describe a framework for anticipating developments in the next decade. We identify the guiding principles for rigorous and consistent modifications of the standard model, and discuss the prospects for empirical tests. We begin by reviewing attempts to consistently modify Einstein gravity in the infrared, focusing on the notion that additional degrees of freedom introduced by the modification must screen themselves from local tests of gravity. We categorize screening mechanisms into three broad classes: mechanisms which become active in regions of high Newtonian potential, those in which first derivatives become important, and those for which second derivatives are important. Examples of the first class, such as f(R) gravity, employ the familiar chameleon or symmetron mechanisms, whereas examples of the last class are galileon and massive gravity theories, employing the Vainshtein mechanism. In each case, we describe the theories as effective theories. We describe experimental tests, summarizing laboratory and solar system tests and describing in some detail astrophysical and cosmological tests. We discuss future tests which will be sensitive to different signatures of new physics in the gravitational sector. Parts that are more relevant to theorists vs. observers/experimentalists are clearly indicated, in the hope that this will serve as a useful reference for both audiences, as well as helping those interested in bridging the gap between them.

  17. Scrutinizing Exotic Cosmological Models Using ESSENCE Supernova Data Combined With Other Cosmological Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Tamara M.; Mortsell, E.; Sollerman, J.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Krisciunas, K.; Kirshner, R.P.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; Schmidt, B.P.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /Washington U.,

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first cosmological results from the ESSENCE supernova survey (Wood-Vasey et al. 2007) are extended to a wider range of cosmological models including dynamical dark energy and non-standard cosmological models. We fold in a greater number of external data sets such as the recent Higher-z release of high-redshift supernovae (Riess et al. 2007) as well as several complementary cosmological probes. Model comparison statistics such as the Bayesian and Akaike information criteria are applied to gauge the worth of models. These statistics favor models that give a good fit with fewer parameters. Based on this analysis, the preferred cosmological model is the flat cosmological constant model, where the expansion history of the universe can be adequately described with only one free parameter describing the energy content of the universe. Amongst the more exotic models that provide good fits to the data, we note a preference for models whose best-fit parameters reduce them to the cosmological constant model.

  18. SciTech Connect: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Authors: Harrison,...

  19. An Event Reconstruction Method for the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, T.; Ogio, S.; Yamazaki, K. [Graduate Schiool of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D.; Sagawa, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Tameda, Y. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hayashi, K.; Ishimori, R.; Kobayashi, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Tsunesada, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Honda, K.; Tomida, T. [Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Udo, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8686 (Japan)

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure arrival directions, energies and mass composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays with air fluorescence detector telescopes. The longitudinal profile of the cosmic ray induced extensive air shower cascade is imaged on focal plane of the telescope camera. Here, we show an event reconstruction method to obtain the primary information from data collected by the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detectors. In particular, we report on an ''Inverse Monte Carlo (IMC)'' method in which the reconstruction process searches for an optimum solution via repeated Monte Carlo simulations including characteristics of all detectors, atmospheric conditions, photon emission and scattering processes.

  20. Inflationary universe in loop quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Zhang; Yi Ling

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop quantum cosmology provides a nice solution of avoiding the big bang singularity through a big bounce mechanism in the high energy region. In loop quantum cosmology an inflationary universe is emergent after the big bounce, no matter what matter component is filled in the universe. A super-inflation phase without phantom matter will appear in a certain way in the initial stage after the bounce; then the universe will undergo a normal inflation stage. We discuss the condition of inflation in detail in this framework. Also, for slow-roll inflation, we expect the imprint from the effects of the loop quantum cosmology should be left in the primordial perturbation power spectrum. However, we show that this imprint is too weak to be observed.

  1. The Cosmological Constant in the Quantum Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Larsen; Yasunori Nomura; H. L. L. Roberts

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new framework for describing the multiverse has been proposed which is based on the principles of quantum mechanics. The framework allows for well-defined predictions, both regarding global properties of the universe and outcomes of particular experiments, according to a single probability formula. This provides complete unification of the eternally inflating multiverse and many worlds in quantum mechanics. In this paper we elucidate how cosmological parameters can be calculated in this framework, and study the probability distribution for the value of the cosmological constant. We consider both positive and negative values, and find that the observed value is consistent with the calculated distribution at an order of magnitude level. In particular, in contrast to the case of earlier measure proposals, our framework prefers a positive cosmological constant over a negative one. These results depend only moderately on how we model galaxy formation and life evolution therein.

  2. Brane f(R) gravity cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcerzak, Adam; DaPbrowski, Mariusz P. [Institute of Physics, University of Szczecin, Wielkopolska 15, 70-451 Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By the application of the generalized Israel junction conditions we derive cosmological equations for the fourth-order f(R) brane gravity and study their cosmological solutions. We show that there exists a nonstatic solution which describes a four-dimensional de Sitter (dS{sub 4}) brane embedded in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS{sub 5}) bulk for a vanishing Weyl tensor contribution. On the other hand, for the case of a nonvanishing Weyl tensor contribution, there exists a static brane solution only. We claim that in order to get some more general nonstatic f(R) brane configurations, one needs to admit a dynamical matter energy-momentum tensor in the bulk rather than just a bulk cosmological constant.

  3. Analysis of inflationary cosmological models in gauge theories of gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Minkevich; A. S. Garkun

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Inflationary homogeneous isotropic cosmological models filled by scalar fields and ultrarelativistic matter are examined in the framework of gauge theories of gravitation. By using quadratic scalar field potential numerical analysis of flat, open and closed models is curried out. Properties of cosmological models are investigated in dependence on indefinite parameter of cosmological equations and initial conditions at a bounce. Fulfilled analysis demonstrates regular character of all cosmological models.

  4. Quintom Cosmology: Theoretical implications and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Mohammad R. Setare; Jun-Qing Xia

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the paradigm of quintom cosmology. This scenario is motivated by the observational indications that the equation of state of dark energy across the cosmological constant boundary is mildly favored, although the data are still far from being conclusive. As a theoretical setup we introduce a no-go theorem existing in quintom cosmology, and based on it we discuss the conditions for the equation of state of dark energy realizing the quintom scenario. The simplest quintom model can be achieved by introducing two scalar fields with one being quintessence and the other phantom. Based on the double-field quintom model we perform a detailed analysis of dark energy perturbations and we discuss their effects on current observations. This type of scenarios usually suffer from a manifest problem due to the existence of a ghost degree of freedom, and thus we review various alternative realizations of the quintom paradigm. The developments in particle physics and string theory provide potential clues indicating that a quintom scenario may be obtained from scalar systems with higher derivative terms, as well as from non-scalar systems. Additionally, we construct a quintom realization in the framework of braneworld cosmology, where the cosmic acceleration and the phantom divide crossing result from the combined effects of the field evolution on the brane and the competition between four and five dimensional gravity. Finally, we study the outsets and fates of a universe in quintom cosmology. In a scenario with null energy condition violation one may obtain a bouncing solution at early times and therefore avoid the Big Bang singularity. Furthermore, if this occurs periodically, we obtain a realization of an oscillating universe. Lastly, we comment on several open issues in quintom cosmology and their connection to future investigations.

  5. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  6. Fischler-Susskind holographic cosmology revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Diaz; M. A. Per; Antonio Segui

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When Fischler and Susskind proposed a holographic prescription based on the Particle Horizon, they found that spatially closed cosmological models do not verify it due to the apparently unavoidable recontraction of the Particle Horizon area. In this article, after a short review of their original work, we expose graphically and analytically that spatially closed cosmological models can avoid this problem if they expand fast enough. It has been also shown that the Holographic Principle is saturated for a codimension one brane dominated Universe. The Fischler-Susskind prescription is used to obtain the maximum number of degrees of freedom per Planck volume at the Planck era compatible with the Holographic Principle.

  7. Thermodynamics of Ideal Gas in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying-Qiu Gu

    2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The equation of state and the state functions for the gravitational source are necessary conditions for solving cosmological model and stellar structure. The usual treatments are directly based on the laws of thermodynamics, and the physical meanings of some concepts are obscure. This letter show that, we can actually derive all explicit fundamental state functions for the ideal gas in the context of cosmology via rigorous dynamical and statistical calculation. These relations have clear physical meanings, and are valid in both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic cases. Some features of the equation of state are important for a stable structure of a star with huge mass.

  8. Cosmology as Science?: From Inflation to Eternity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade or two have represented the golden age of observational cosmology, producing a revolution in our picture of the Universe on its largest scales, and perhaps also its smallest ones. I will argue that these recent development bring to the forefront some vexing questions about whether various fundamental assumptions about the universe are in fact falsifiable. I will focus on 3 issues: (1) "Proving" Inflation, (2) Dark Energy and Anthropic Arguments, and (3) Cosmology of the far future.Interview with Lawrence M. Krauss

  9. Thermal relics in cosmology with bulk viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iorio; G. Lambiase

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss some consequences of cosmological models in which the primordial cosmic matter is described by a relativistic imperfect fluid. The latter takes into account the dissipative effects (bulk viscosity) arising from different cooling rates of the fluid components in the expanding Universe. We discuss, in particular, the effects of the bulk viscosity on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on the thermal relic abundance of particles, looking at recent results of PAMELA experiment. The latter has determined an anomalous excess of positron events, that cannot be explained by the conventional cosmology and particle physics.

  10. The Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It will be argued here that the cosmological constant problem exists because of the way the vacuum is defined in quantum field theory. It has been known for some time that for QFT to be gauge invariant certain terms--such as part of the vacuum polarization tensor--must be eliminated either explicitly or by some form of regularization followed by renormalization. It has recently been shown that lack of gauge invariance is a result of the way the vacuum is defined, and redefining the vacuum so that the theory is gauge invariant may also offer a solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  11. Domain wall cosmology and multiple accelerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, Korea 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Wonwoo; Nam, Siyoung; Park, Chanyong [CQUeST, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We classify the cosmological behaviors of the domain wall under junctions between two spacetimes in terms of various parameters: cosmological constants of bulk spacetime, a tension of a domain wall, and mass parameters of the black-hole-type metric. Especially, we consider the false-true vacuum-type junctions and the domain wall connecting between an inner AdS space and an outer AdS Reissner-Nordstroem black hole. We find that there exists a solution to the junction equations with multiple accelerations.

  12. Exact Classical Correspondence in Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moncy V. John

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a Friedmann model with appropriate matter/energy density such that the solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation exactly corresponds to the classical evolution. The well-known problems in quantum cosmology disappear in the resulting coasting evolution. The exact quantum-classical correspondence is demonstrated with the help of the de Broglie-Bohm and modified de Broglie-Bohm approaches to quantum mechanics. It is reassuring that such a solution leads to a robust model for the universe, which agrees well with cosmological expansion indicated by SNe Ia data.

  13. ACIS Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer: detector on Chandra ASCA Advanced Satellite for Astronomy and Cosmology: Xray telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ROSAT HRMA High Resolution Mirror Assembly: Chandra mirrors IPC Imaging Proportional Camera: detector

  14. ACIS Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer: detector on Chandra ASCA Advanced Satellite for Astronomy and Cosmology: X-ray telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ROSAT HRMA High Resolution Mirror Assembly: Chandra mirrors IPC Imaging Proportional Camera: detector

  15. atmospheric fluorescence telescopes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    become a powerful tool for accurate measurements of the energy and mass of ultra-high energy cosmic ray particles. Employing large area imaging telescopes with mirror areas of...

  16. A generation of astronomical telescopes, their users, and publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tele- scope in the Canary Islands, followed by 7 mirrors ofTelescopia Canarias in the Canary Islands. Table 3 attemptsKea, Hawaii, and the Canary Islands) have many telescopes

  17. Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 #12;#12;Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors Thomas Gray, David W. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 This work is based on the unaltered text

  18. area telescope catalog: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalog CERN Preprints Summary: We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on...

  19. area telescope view: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Core of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus A CERN Preprints Summary: We present gamma-ray observations with the LAT on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope of the nearby radio...

  20. Latest Results from the Cambridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, John

    autoguider sensors. 2. Imaging the disks of M giants and supergiants 2.1. Results from monolithic telescopes are representations of the disk plus hotspot(s) model that best fits the measurements. Contours are plotted from 5

  1. Robotic Telescopes and Networks: New Tools for Education and Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. R. Querci; M. Querci

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays many telescopes around the world are automated and some networks of robotic telescopes are active or planned as shown by the lists we draw up. Such equipment could be used for the training of students and for science in the Universities of Developing Countries and of New Astronomical Countries, by sending them observational data via Internet or through remotely controlled telescopes. It seems that it is time to open up for discussion with UN and ESA organizations and also with IAU, how to implement links between robotic telescopes and such Universities applying for collaborations. Many scientific fields could thus be accessible to them, for example on stellar variability, near-earth object follow-up, gamma-ray burst counterpart tracking, and so on.

  2. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwanke, U; Sulanke, K -H; Vorobiov, S; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E>20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger wi...

  3. Testing the Bimodal/Schizophrenic Neutrino Hypothesis in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Barry; Rabindra N. Mohapatra; Werner Rodejohann

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard assumption is that all three neutrino mass states are either Dirac or Majorana. However, it was recently suggested by Allaverdi, Dutta and one of the authors (R.N.M.) that mixed, or bimodal, flavor neutrino scenarios are conceivable and are consistent with all known observations (these were called "schizophrenic" in the ADM paper). In that case each individual mass eigenstate can be either Dirac or Majorana, so that the flavor eigenstates are "large" admixtures of both. An example of this "bimodal" situation is to consider one mass state as a Dirac particle (with a sterile partner), while the other two are of Majorana type. Since only Majorana particles contribute to neutrinoless double beta decay, the usual dependence of this observable on the neutrino mass is modified within this scenario. We study this in detail and, in particular, generalize the idea for all possible bimodal combinations. Inevitably, radiative corrections will induce a pseudo-Dirac nature to the Dirac states at the one-loop level, and the effects of the pseudo-Dirac mass splitting will show up in the flavor ratios of neutrinos from distant cosmological sources. Comparison of the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay as well as flavor ratios at neutrino telescopes, for different pseudo-Dirac cases and with their usual phenomenology, can distinguish the different bimodal possibilities.

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

    2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

  5. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  6. Neutrinos in physics, astrophysics, and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of neutrino anomalies in particle physics and of the role played by neutrinos in cosmology and astrophysics is presented. The main part of the talk is dedicated to the impact of neutrinos and in particular of neutrino oscillations on BBN and to a possible spatial variation of primordial abundances.

  7. A Critical Review of Classical Bouncing Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana Battefeld; Patrick Peter

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the proliferation of bouncing models in recent years, we gather and critically assess these proposals in a comprehensive review. The Planck data shows an unmistakably red, quasi scale-invariant, purely adiabatic primordial power spectrum and no primary non-Gaussianities. While these observations are consistent with inflationary predictions, bouncing cosmologies aspire to provide an alternative framework to explain them. Such models face many problems, both of the purely theoretical kind, such as the necessity of violating the NEC and instabilities, and at the cosmological application level, as exemplified by the possible presence of shear. We provide a pedagogical introduction to these problems and also assess the fitness of different proposals with respect to the data. For example, many models predict a slightly blue spectrum and must be fine-tuned to generate a red spectral index; as a side effect, large non-Gaussianities often result. We highlight several promising attempts to violate the NEC without introducing dangerous instabilities at the classical and/or quantum level. If primordial gravitational waves are observed, certain bouncing cosmologies, such as the cyclic scenario, are in trouble, while others remain valid. We conclude that, while most bouncing cosmologies are far from providing an alternative to the inflationary paradigm, a handful of interesting proposals have surfaced, which warrant further research. The constraints and lessons learned as laid out in this review might guide future research.

  8. COSMOLOGICAL LITHIUM PROBLEM: A DIFFERENT APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    LITHIUM 7Li sources BBN cosmic-ray interactions (ingredients: shock waves, magnetic field, chargedCOSMOLOGICAL LITHIUM PROBLEM: A DIFFERENT APPROACH Tijana Prodanovi, University of Novi Sad Tamara Observations - boxes 4He ­ OK D ­ right on! 7Li ­ problem! Factor of 3-4 discrepancy! LITHIUM PROBLEM

  9. Cosmology constrains gravitational four-fermion interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I.B.; Rudenko, A.S., E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su, E-mail: a.s.rudenko@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI). This interaction gets dominating on the Planck scale. If one confines to the regular, axial-axial part of this interaction, the results do not comply with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology for the spatial flat or closed Universe. In principle, the anomalous, vector-vector interaction could restore the agreement.

  10. Cosmology constrains gravitational four-fermion interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich; A. S. Rudenko

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI). This interaction gets dominating on the Planck scale. If one confines to the regular, axial-axial part of this interaction, the results do not comply with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology for the spatial flat or closed Universe. In principle, the anomalous, vector-vector interaction could restore the agreement.

  11. Closed inflationary universe models in Braneworld Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera; Joel Saavedra

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we study closed inflationary universe models proposed by Linde in a brane world cosmological context. In this scenario we determine and characterize the existence of a closed universe, in presence of one self-interacting scalar field with an inflationary stage. Our results are compared to those found in General Relativity.

  12. Warm inflationary model in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Ramon [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary universe model in loop quantum cosmology is studied. In general we discuss the condition of inflation in this framework. By using a chaotic potential, V({phi}){proportional_to}{phi}{sup 2}, we develop a model where the dissipation coefficient {Gamma}={Gamma}{sub 0}=constant. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model.

  13. Nonlocality as Evidence for a Multiverse Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank J. Tipler

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that observations of quantum nonlocality can be interpreted as purely local phenomena, provided one assumes that the cosmos is a multiverse. Conversely, the observation of quantum nonlocality can be interpreted as observation evidence for a multiverse cosmology, just as observation of the setting of the Sun can be interpreted as evidence for the Earth's rotation.

  14. Axion-dilaton cosmology and dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catena, Riccardo; Moeller, Jan, E-mail: catena@sissa.it, E-mail: janmoe@mail.desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Theory Group, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a class of flat FRW cosmological models based on D = 4 axion-dilaton gravity universally coupled to cosmological background fluids. In particular, we investigate the possibility of recurrent acceleration, which was recently shown to be generically realized in a wide class of axion-dilaton models, but in the absence of cosmological background fluids. We observe that, once we impose the existence of radiation- and matter-dominated earlier stages of cosmic evolution, the axion-dilaton dynamics is altered significantly with respect to the case of pure axion-dilaton gravity. Explicit computations are done considering a universal metric coupling between the dilaton and the matter fields. As a result we find that during the matter-dominated epoch the scalar fields remain either frozen, due to the large expansion rate, or enter a cosmological scaling regime. In both cases, oscillations of the effective equation of state around the acceleration boundary value are impossible. Models which enter an oscillatory stage in the low redshift regime, on the other hand, are disfavored by observations. We also comment on the viability of the axion-dilaton system as a candidate for dynamical dark energy. In a certain subclass of models, an intermediate scaling regime is succeeded by eternal acceleration. We also briefly discuss the issue of dependence on initial conditions.

  15. Axion-Dilaton Cosmology and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Catena; Jan Möller

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a class of flat FRW cosmological models based on D=4 axion-dilaton gravity universally coupled to cosmological background fluids. In particular, we investigate the possibility of recurrent acceleration, which was recently shown to be generically realized in a wide class of axion-dilaton models, but in absence of cosmological background fluids. We observe that, once we impose the existence of radiation -and matter- dominated earlier stages of cosmic evolution, the axion-dilaton dynamics is altered significantly with respect to the case of pure axion-dilaton gravity. During the matter dominated epoch the scalar fields remain either frozen, due to the large expansion rate, or enter a cosmological scaling regime. In both cases, oscillations of the effective equation of state around the acceleration boundary value are impossible. Models which enter an oscillatory stage in the low redshift regime, on the other hand, are disfavored by observations. We also comment on the viability of the axion-dilaton system as a candidate for dynamical dark energy. In a certain subclass of models, an intermediate scaling regime is succeeded by eternal acceleration. We also briefly discuss the issue of dependence on initial conditions.

  16. Vacuum Fluctuations Cannot Mimic a Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Klauber

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    When the vacuum fluctuation pressure is calculated directly from fundamental principles of quantum field theory, in the same manner as vacuum fluctuation energy density is commonly calculated, one finds it is not equal to the negative of the vacuum fluctuation energy density. Thus, vacuum fluctuations cannot manifest as a cosmological constant of any order.

  17. Cosmological model with movement in fifth dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Belayev

    2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented cosmological model is 3D brane world sheet moved in extra dimension with variable scale factor. Analysis of the geodesic motion of the test particle gives settle explanation of the Pioneer effect. It is found that for considered metric the solution of the semi-classical Einstein equations with various parameters conforms to isotropic expanded and anisotropic stationary universe.

  18. Fluctuation, Dissipation and Irreversibility in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    1993-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the appearance of time-asymmetric behavior in physical processes in cosmology and in the dynamics of the Universe itself. We begin with an analysis of the nature and origin of irreversibility in well-known physical processes such as dispersion, diffusion, dissipation and mixing, and make the distinction between processes whose irreversibility arises from the stipulation of special initial conditions, and those arising from the system's interaction with a coarse-grained environment. We then study the irreversibility associated with quantum fluctuations in cosmological processes like particle creation and the `birth of the Universe'. We suggest that the backreaction effect of such quantum processes can be understood as the manifestation of a fluctuation-dissipation relation relating fluctuations of quantum fields to dissipations in the dynamics of spacetime. For the same reason it is shown that dissipation is bound to appear in the dynamics of minisuperspace cosmologies. This provides a natural course for the emergence of a cosmological and thermodynamic arrow of time and suggests a meaningful definition of gravitational entropy. We conclude with a discussion on the criteria for the choice of coarse-grainings and the stability of persistent physical structures. Invited Talk given at the Conference on The Physical Origin of Time-Asymmetry Huelva, Spain, Oct. 1991, Proceedings eds. J. J. Halliwell, J. Perez-Mercader and W. H. Zurek, Cambridge University Press, 1993

  19. Surface Tension and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Samuel; Supurna Sinha

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The astronomically observed value of the cosmological constant is small but non-zero. This raises two questions together known as the cosmological constant problem a) why is lambda so nearly zero? b) why is lambda not EXACTLY zero? Sorkin has proposed that b) can be naturally explained as a one by square root N fluctuation by invoking discreteness of spacetime at the Planck scale due to quantum gravity. In this paper we shed light on these questions by developing an analogy between the cosmological constant and the surface tension of membranes. The ``cosmological constant problem'' has a natural analogue in the membrane context: the vanishingly small surface tension of fluid membranes provides an example where question a) above arises and is answered. We go on to find a direct analogue of Sorkin's proposal for answering question b) in the membrane context, where the discreteness of spacetime translates into the molecular structure of matter. We propose analogue experiments to probe a small and fluctuating surface tension in fluid membranes. A counterpart of dimensional reduction a la Kaluza-Klein and large extra dimensions also appears in the physics of fluid membranes.

  20. The kinematic component of the cosmological redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Chodorowski

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that the cosmological redshift is not a Doppler shift. However, Bunn & Hogg have recently pointed out that to settle properly this problem, one has to transport parallelly the velocity four-vector of a distant galaxy to the observer's position. Performing such a transport along the null geodesic of photons arriving from the galaxy, they found that the cosmological redshift is purely kinematic. Here we argue that one should rather transport the velocity four-vector along the geodesic connecting the points of intersection of the world-lines of the galaxy and the observer with the hypersurface of constant cosmic time. We find that the resulting relation between the transported velocity and the redshift of arriving photons is not given by a relativistic Doppler formula. Instead, for small redshifts it coincides with the well known non-relativistic decomposition of the redshift into a Doppler (kinematic) component and a gravitational one. We perform such a decomposition for arbitrary large redshifts and derive a formula for the kinematic component of the cosmological redshift, valid for any FLRW cosmology. In particular, in a universe with Omega_m = 0.24 and Omega_Lambda = 0.76, a quasar at a redshift 6, at the time of emission of photons reaching us today had the recession velocity v = 0.997c. This can be contrasted with v = 0.96c, had the redshift been entirely kinematic. Thus, for recession velocities of such high-redshift sources, the effect of deceleration of the early Universe clearly prevails over the effect of its relatively recent acceleration. Last but not least, we show that the so-called proper recession velocities of galaxies, commonly used in cosmology, are in fact radial components of the galaxies' four-velocity vectors. As such, they can indeed attain superluminal values, but should not be regarded as real velocities.

  1. Cosmology with a stiff matter era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe made of stiff matter, dust matter, and dark energy. A stiff matter era is present in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich (1972) where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. It also occurs in certain cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the energy density of the stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular. It starts from a state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the energy density of the stiff matter is negative (anti-stiff matter). This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction. In that case, the primordial universe is non-singular. It starts from a state in which the scale factor is finite and the energy density is equal to zero. For the sake of generality, we consider a cosmological constant of arbitrary sign. When the cosmological constant is positive, the universe asymptotically reaches a de Sitter phase where the scale factor increases exponentially rapidly. This can account for the accelerating expansion of the universe that we observe at present. When the cosmological constant is negative (anti-de Sitter), the evolution of the universe is cyclic. Therefore, depending on the sign of the energy density of the stiff matter and of the dark energy, we obtain singular and non-singular expanding or cyclic universes.

  2. Finite Future Cosmological Singularity Times and Maximum Predictability Times in a Nonlinear FRW-KG Scalar Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Max Wilson; Keith Andrew

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the relative time scales associated with finite future cosmological singularities, especially those classified as Big Rip cosmologies, and the maximum predictability time of a coupled FRW-KG scalar cosmology with chaotic regimes. Our approach is to show that by starting with a FRW-KG scalar cosmology with a potential that admits an analytical solution resulting in a finite time future singularity there exists a Lyapunov time scale that is earlier than the formation of the singularity. For this singularity both the cosmological scale parameter a(t) and the Hubble parameter H(t) become infinite at a finite future time, the Big Rip time. We compare this time scale to the predictability time scale for a chaotic FRW-KG scalar cosmology. We find that there are cases where the chaotic time scale is earlier than the Big Rip singularity calling for special care in interpreting and predicting the formation of the future cosmological singularity.

  3. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  4. EUNHA: a new cosmological hydro simulation code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shina, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S; Park, Changbom

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a parallel cosmological hydrodynamic simulation code designed for the study of formation and evolution of cosmological structures. The gravitational force is calculated using the TreePM method and the hydrodynamics is implemented based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The initial displacement and velocity of simulation particles are calculated according to second-order linear perturbation theory using the power spectra of dark matter and baryonic matter. The initial background temperature is given by Recfast and the temperature uctuations at the initial particle position are determined by the adiabatic model. We use a time-limiter scheme over the individual time steps to capture shock-fronts and to ease the time-step tension between the shock and preshock particles. We also include the astrophysical gas processes of radiative heating/cooling, star formation, metal enrichment, and supernova feedback. We have tested the code in several standard cases such as one-dimensional Riemann prob...

  5. Torsion, Scalar Field, Mass and FRW Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanta Mahato

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Einstein-Cartan space $U_4$, an axial vector torsion together with a scalar field connected to a local scale factor have been considered. By combining two particular terms from the SO(4,1) Pontryagin density and then modifying it in a SO(3,1) invariant way, we get a Lagrangian density with Lagrange multipliers. Then under FRW-cosmological background, where the scalar field is connected to the source of gravitation, the Euler-Lagrange equations ultimately give the constancy of the gravitational constant together with only three kinds of energy densities representing mass, radiation and cosmological constant. The gravitational constant has been found to be linked with the geometrical Nieh-Yan density.

  6. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  7. Nonsingular Decaying Vacuum Cosmology and Entropy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; S. Basilakos; Joan Solà

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamic behavior of a decaying vacuum cosmology describing the entire cosmological history evolving between two extreme (early and late time) de Sitter eras is investigated. The thermal evolution from the early de Sitter to the radiation phase is discussed in detail. The temperature evolution law and the increasing entropy function are analytically determined. The entropy of the effectively massless particles is initially zero but evolves continuously to the present day maximum value within the current Hubble radius, $S_0 \\sim 10^{88}$ in natural units. By using the Gibbons-Hawking temperature relation for the de Sitter spacetime, it is found that the ratio between the primeval and the late time vacuum energy densities is $\\rho_{vI}/\\rho_{v0} \\sim 10^{123}$, as required by some naive estimates from quantum field theory.

  8. MACHO Mass Determination Based on Space Telescope Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mareki Honma

    1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of lens mass determination for a caustic crossing microlensing event based on a space telescope observation. We demonstrate that the parallax due to the orbital motion of a space telescope causes a periodic fluctuation of the light curve, from which the lens distance can be derived. Since the proper motion of the lens relative to the source is also measurable for a caustic crossing event, one can find a full solution for microlensing properties of the event, including the lens mass. To determine the lens mass with sufficient accuracy, the light curve near the caustic crossing should be observed within uncertainty of $\\sim$ 1%. We argue that the Hubble Space Telescope observation of the caustic crossing supplied with ground-based observations of the full light curve will enable us to determine the mass of MACHOs, which is crucial for understanding the nature of MACHOs.

  9. Relay telescope for high power laser alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system includes an optical path having an intracavity relay telescope with a telescope focal point for imaging an output of the gain medium between an image location at or near the gain medium and an image location at or near an output coupler for the laser system. A kinematic mount is provided within a vacuum chamber, and adapted to secure beam baffles near the telescope focal point. An access port on the vacuum chamber is adapted for allowing insertion and removal of the beam baffles. A first baffle formed using an alignment pinhole aperture is used during alignment of the laser system. A second tapered baffle replaces the alignment aperture during operation and acts as a far-field baffle in which off angle beams strike the baffle a grazing angle of incidence, reducing fluence levels at the impact areas.

  10. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ahigh resolution(?future International Linear Collider providing test beam infrastructure to detector R&D groups. The telescope consists of six sensor planes with a pixel pitch of either 18.4 ?m or 10 ?mand canbe operated insidea solenoidal magnetic fieldofupto1.2T.Ageneral purpose cooling, positioning, data acquisition (DAQ) and offine data analysis tools are available for the users. The excellent resolution, readout rate andDAQintegration capabilities made the telescopea primary beam tests tool also for several CERN based experiments. In this report the performance of the final telescope is presented. The plans for an even more flexible telescope with three differentpixel technologies(ATLASPixel, Mimosa,Timepix) withinthenew European detector infrastructure project AIDA are presented.

  11. The Atmospheric Monitoring Strategy for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, M K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT) is unusual in astronomy as the atmosphere actually forms an intrinsic part of the detector system, with telescopes indirectly detecting very high energy particles by the generation and transport of Cherenkov photons deep within the atmosphere. This means that accurate measurement, characterisation and monitoring of the atmosphere is at the very heart of successfully operating an IACT system. The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next generation IACT observatory with an ambitious aim to improve the sensitivity of an order of magnitude over current facilities, along with corresponding improvements in angular and energy resolution and extended energy coverage, through an array of Large (23m), Medium (12m) and Small (4m) sized telescopes spread over an area of order ~km$^2$. Whole sky coverage will be achieved by operating at two sites: one in the northern hemisphere and one in the southern hemisphere. This proceedings will cover the characterisation of...

  12. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradbury, S M; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Criswell, S; Dingus, B L; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Grindlay, J; Hillas, A M; Harris, K; Hermann, G; Kaaret, P E; Kieda, D B; Knapp, J; Krennrich, F; Le Bohec, S; Lessard, R W; Lloyd-Evans, J; McKernan, B; Müller, D; Ong, R; Quenby, J J; Quinn, J; Rochester, G D; Rose, H J; Salamon, M B; Sembroski, G H; Sumner, T J; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview of the current status and scientific goals of VERITAS, a proposed hexagonal array of seven 10 m aperture imaging Cherenkov telescopes. The selected site is Montosa Canyon (1390 m a.s.l.) at the Whipple Observatory, Arizona. Each telescope, of 12 m focal length, will initially be equipped with a 499 element photomultiplier camera covering a 3.5 degree field of view. A central station will initiate the readout of 500 MHz FADCs upon receipt of multiple telescope triggers. The minimum detectable flux sensitivity will be 0.5% of the Crab Nebula flux at 200 GeV. Detailed simulations of the array's performance are presented elsewhere at this meeting. VERITAS will operate primarily as a gamma-ray observatory in the 50 GeV to 50 TeV range for the study of active galaxies, supernova remnants, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts.

  13. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bradbury; I. H. Bond; A. C. Breslin; J. H. Buckley; D. A. Carter-Lewis; M. Catanese; S. Criswell; B. L. Dingus; D. J. Fegan; J. P. Finley; J. Gaidos; J. Grindlay; A. M. Hillas; K. Harris; G. Hermann; P. Kaaret; D. Kieda; J. Knapp; F. Krennrich; S. LeBohec; R. W. Lessard; J. Lloyd-Evans; B. McKernan; D. Mueller; R. Ong; J. J. Quenby; J. Quinn; G. Rochester; H. J. Rose; M. Salamon; G. H. Sembroski; T. Sumner; S. Swordy; V. V. Vassiliev; T. C. Weekes

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview of the current status and scientific goals of VERITAS, a proposed hexagonal array of seven 10 m aperture imaging Cherenkov telescopes. The selected site is Montosa Canyon (1390 m a.s.l.) at the Whipple Observatory, Arizona. Each telescope, of 12 m focal length, will initially be equipped with a 499 element photomultiplier camera covering a 3.5 degree field of view. A central station will initiate the readout of 500 MHz FADCs upon receipt of multiple telescope triggers. The minimum detectable flux sensitivity will be 0.5% of the Crab Nebula flux at 200 GeV. Detailed simulations of the array's performance are presented elsewhere at this meeting. VERITAS will operate primarily as a gamma-ray observatory in the 50 GeV to 50 TeV range for the study of active galaxies, supernova remnants, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts.

  14. Indirect Dark Matter search with large neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermani, Paolo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter is one of the main goals of neutrino astronomy. At present, there are two big neutrino telescopes based on the Cherenkov technique in ice and water: IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the northern hemisphere. Both telescopes are performing an indirect search for Dark Matter by looking for a statistical excess of neutrinos coming from astrophysical massive objects. This excess could be an evidence of the possible annihilation of dark matter particles in the centre of these objects. In one of the most popular scenarios the Dark Matter is composed of WIMP particles. The analysis and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope for the indirect detection of Dark Matter fluxes from the Sun are here presented, as well as the latest IceCube published sensitivity results, for different Dark Matter models.

  15. The Construction of Sudden Cosmological Singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Barrow; S. Cotsakis; A. Tsokaros

    2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of the Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmological equations of general relativity have been found with finite-time singularities that are everywhere regular, have regular Hubble expansion rate, and obey the strong-energy conditions but possess pressure and acceleration singularities at finite time that are not associated with geodesic incompleteness. We show how these solutions with sudden singularities can be constructed using fractional series methods and find the limiting form of the equation of state on approach to the singularity.

  16. On Doppler tracking in cosmological spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Carrera; Domenico Giulini

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a rigorous derivation of the general-relativistic formula for the two-way Doppler tracking of a spacecraft in Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker and in McVittie spacetimes. The leading order corrections of the so-determined acceleration to the Newtonian acceleration are due to special-relativistic effects and cosmological expansion. The latter, although linear in the Hubble constant, is negligible in typical applications within the Solar System.

  17. Physical space and cosmology. I: Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeriy P. Polulyakh

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the physical space seems the most important subject in physics. A present paper proceeds from the assumption of physical reality of space contrary to the standard view of the space as a purely relational nonexistence - void. The space and its evolution are the primary sources of phenomena in Mega- and micro-worlds. Thus cosmology and particle physics have the same active agent - physical space.

  18. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Chao-Jun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  19. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  20. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Cluster Velocity Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman Bhattacharya; Arthur Kosowsky

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Future microwave sky surveys will have the sensitivity to detect the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from moving galaxy clusters, thus providing a direct measurement of their line-of-sight peculiar velocity. We show that cluster peculiar velocity statistics applied to foreseeable surveys will put significant constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters. We consider three statistical quantities that can be constructed from a cluster peculiar velocity catalog: the probability density function, the mean pairwise streaming velocity, and the pairwise velocity dispersion. These quantities are applied to an envisioned data set which measures line-of-sight cluster velocities with normal errors of 100 km/s for all clusters with masses larger than $10^{14}$ solar masses over a sky area of up to 5000 square degrees. A simple Fisher matrix analysis of this survey shows that the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the dark energy equation of state can be constrained to better than 10 percent, and the Hubble constant and the primordial power spectrum index can be constrained to a few percent, independent of any other cosmological observations. We also find that the current constraint on the power spectrum normalization can be improved by more than a factor of two using data from a 400 square degree survey and WMAP third-year priors. We also show how the constraints on cosmological parameters changes if cluster velocities are measured with normal errors of 300 km/s.

  1. Robust model comparison disfavors power law cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Daniel L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late-time power law expansion has been proposed as an alternative to the standard cosmological model and shown to be consistent with some low-redshift data. We test power law expansion against the standard flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology using goodness-of-fit and model comparison criteria. We consider Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data from two current compilations (Union2.1 and JLA) along with a current set of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements that includes the high-redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest measurements from BOSS quasars. We find that neither power law expansion nor $\\Lambda$CDM is strongly preferred over the other when the SN Ia and BAO data are analyzed separately but that power law expansion is strongly disfavored by the combination. We treat the $R_\\text{h} = ct$ cosmology (a constant rate of expansion) separately and find that it is conclusively disfavored by all combinations of data that include SN Ia observations and a poor overall fit when systematic errors in the SN Ia measurements are ig...

  2. Photon Consumption in Minihalos during Cosmological Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltan Haiman; Tom Abel; Piero Madau

    2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    At the earliest epochs of structure formation in cold dark matter (CDM) cosmologies, the smallest nonlinear objects are the numerous small halos that condense with virial temperatures below 10,000 K. Such ``minihalos'' are not yet resolved in large-scale three-dimensional cosmological simulations. Here we employ a semi-analytic method, combined with three-dimensional simulations of individual minihalos, to examine their importance during cosmological reionization. We show that, depending on when reionization takes place, they potentially play an important role as sinks of ionizing radiation. If reionization occurs at sufficiently high redshifts (z_r > 20), the intergalactic medium is heated to 10,000 K and most minihalos never form. On the other hand, if z_r 10 percent) of all baryons have already collapsed into minihalos, and are subsequently removed from the halos by photoevaporation as the ionizing background flux builds up. We show that this process can require a significant budget of ionizing photons; exceeding the production by a straightforward extrapolation back in time of known quasar and galaxy populations by a factor of up to 10 and 3, respectively.

  3. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catena, Riccardo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Notari, Alessio, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  4. Cosmological models in the nonsymmetric Kaluza-Klein Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Kalinowski

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a dynamics of Higgs' field in the framework of cosmological models involving the scalar field from Nonsymmetric Kaluza-Klein (Jordan-Thiry) Theory. The field plays here a role of a quintessence field. We consider phase transition in cosmological models of the second and of the first order due to evolution of Higgs' field. We developed inflationary models including calculation of an amount of inflation. We match some cosmological models, calculating a Hubble parameter and an age of the Universe.

  5. A Cosmology Calculator for the World Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward L. Wright

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmology calculator that computes times and distances as a function of redshift for user-defined cosmological parameters is available on the World Wide Web. This note gives the formulae used by the cosmology calculator and discusses some of its implementation. A version of the calculator that allows one to specify the equation of state parameter w and w' and neutrino masses, and a version for converting the light travel times usually given in the popular press into redshifts are also available.

  6. Cosmology and the noncommutative approach to the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi [Institute of Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, State College, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States); Department of Physics, King's College, University of London, Strand WC2R 2LS, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study cosmological consequences of the noncommutative approach to the standard model of particle physics. Neglecting the nonminimal coupling of the Higgs field to the curvature, noncommutative corrections to Einstein's equations are present only for inhomogeneous and anisotropic space-times. Considering the nonminimal coupling however, corrections are obtained even for background cosmologies. Links with dilatonic gravity as well as chameleon cosmology are briefly discussed, and potential experimental consequences are mentioned.

  7. A new multidimensional AMR Hydro+Gravity Cosmological code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicent Quilis

    2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new cosmological multidimensional hydrodynamic and N-body code based on an Adaptive Mesh Refinement scheme is described and tested. The hydro part is based on modern high-resolution shock-capturing techniques, whereas N-body approach is based on the Particle Mesh method. The code has been specifically designed for cosmological applications. Tests including shocks, strong gradients, and gravity have been considered. A cosmological test based on Santa Barbara cluster is also presented. The usefulness of the code is discussed. In particular, this powerful tool is expected to be appropriate to describe the evolution of the hot gas component located inside asymmetric cosmological structures.

  8. accelerating frw cosmology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parametres. Taymaz Ghaneh; Farhad Darabi; Hossein Motavalli 2012-12-05 14 Dark energy FRW cosmology - dynamical system reconstruction CERN Preprints Summary: We...

  9. Gamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    detection reported Flare activity reported via ATel Gamma Ray Bursts reported via GCN Giant MC imageGamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope RESCEU Symposium on Astroparticle Physics) Measure the photon direction Identification of the gamma-ray shower 36 planes of Si strip detectors (228 m

  10. SCIENCE: JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE (JWST) Budget Authority Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Prior FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 BTC Total FY 2013 President's Budget TELESCOPE (JWST) Formulation Development Operations JWST-2 FY 2013 BUDGET Budget Authority Actual Estimate (in $ millions) Prior FY 2011 FY 2012 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 BTC Total FY 2013 President

  11. Collecting Light with Telescopes Two Fundamentally Different Spectral Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    ;Observing problems due to Earth's atmosphere 1. Light Pollution #12;Star viewed with ground-based telescope. · Location/technology can help overcome light pollution and turbulence. · Nothing short of going to space can Mexico #12;Very Large Array (VLA), New Mexico #12;Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) #12;Large Binocular

  12. Detecting Exoplanets by Gravitational Microlensing using a Small Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Christie

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational microlensing is a new technique that allows low-mass exoplanets to be detected at large distances of ~7kpc. This paper briefly outlines the principles of the method and describes the observational techniques. It shows that small (e.g. 0.35m) telescopes with a CCD camera can make unexpectedly useful observations of these events.

  13. New Astronomy Reviews 42 (1998) 485488 The Dutch Open Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    obstructions around it. The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) is a 15-m high For protection against the sometimes very. No warm air bubbles are forced upwards floor will be made for protection against moisture against Muchachos Observatory (ORM) The primary mirror of the DOT was tested inter- is an excellent site for testing

  14. Origami Sunshield Concepts for Space Telescopes and Sergio Pellegrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    booms. This whole structure needs to be shrouded in a sunshield to maintain thermal stability high envelope when it is folded. The envelope available for the packaged sunshield is defined envelope, limited by 5 m diameter fairing on the outside and by the telescope on the inside. This paper

  15. Indirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    significant high energy neutrino fluxes. Indirect search for Dark Matter looking at such neutrino fluxes for the Cherenkov light induced by high energy muons during their travel in the sea water throughout the detectorIndirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope V. Bertin1 on behalf

  16. VISUALIZATION AND ANALYTICS Galileo Galilei's improvements to early telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    -sized machines and generate vast amounts of output data. Managing and under- standing such data is widely the Copernican heliocentric model of the solar system: that it is the Sun, rather than the Earth, which is the center of the solar sys- tem. Thus, the telescope became the first device to make the unseeable seeable

  17. Testing No-Scale Supergravity with the Fermi Space Telescope LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a methodology for testing No-Scale Supergravity by the LAT instrument onboard the Fermi Space Telescope via observation of gamma ray emissions from lightest supersymmetric (SUSY) neutralino annihilations. For our test vehicle we engage the framework of the supersymmetric grand unified model No-Scale Flipped $SU(5)$ with extra vector-like flippon multiplets derived from F-Theory, known as $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$. We show that through compression of the light stau and light bino neutralino mass difference, where internal bremsstrahlung (IB) photons give a dominant contribution, the photon yield from annihilation of SUSY dark matter can be elevated to a number of events potentially observable by the Fermi-LAT in the coming years. Likewise, the increased yield in No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$ may also have rendered the existing observation of a 133 GeV monochromatic gamma ray line visible, if additional data should exclude systematic or statistical explanations. The question of intensity aside, No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$ can indeed provide a natural weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) candidate with a mass in the correct range to yield $\\gamma \\gamma$ and $\\gamma Z$ emission lines at $m_{\\chi} \\sim 133$ GeV and $m_{\\chi} \\sim 145$ GeV, respectively. Additionally, we elucidate the emerging empirical connection between recent Planck satellite data and No-Scale Supergravity cosmological models which mimic the Starobinsky model of inflation. Together, these experiments furnish rich alternate avenues for testing No-Scale $\\cal{F}$-$SU(5)$, and similarly structured models, the results of which may lend independent credence to observations made at the LHC.

  18. Robust Cosmological Bounds on Neutrinos and their Combination with Oscillation Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Michele Maltoni; Jordi Salvado

    2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a global analysis of cosmological observables in generalized cosmologies which depart from $\\Lambda$CDM models by allowing non-vanishing curvature $\\Omega_k\

  19. Wide-Field InfrarRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets WFIRST-AFTA 2015 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spergel, D; Baltay, C; Bennett, D; Breckinridge, J; Donahue, M; Dressler, A; Gaudi, B S; Greene, T; Guyon, O; Hirata, C; Kalirai, J; Kasdin, N J; Macintosh, B; Moos, W; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Rauscher, B; Rhodes, J; Wang, Y; Weinberg, D; Benford, D; Hudson, M; Jeong, W -S; Mellier, Y; Traub, W; Yamada, T; Capak, P; Colbert, J; Masters, D; Penny, M; Savransky, D; Sterns, D; Zimmerman, N; Barry, R; Bartusek, L; Carpenter, K; Cheng, E; Content, D; Dekens, F; Demers, R; Grady, K; Jackson, C; Kuan, G; Kruk, J; Melton, M; Nemati, B; Parvin, B; Poberezhskiy, I; Peddie, C; Ruffa, J; Wallace, J K; Whipple, A; Wollack, E; Zhao, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 2014 study by the Science Definition Team (SDT) of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission. It is a space observatory that will addresses the most compelling scientific problems in dark energy, exoplanets and general astrophysics using a 2.4m telescope with a wide-field infrared instrument and an optical coronagraph. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey recommended a Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope as its top priority for a new large space mission. As conceived by the decadal survey, WFIRST would carry out a dark energy science program, a microlensing program to determine the demographics of exoplanets, and a general observing program utilizing its ultra wide field. In October 2012, NASA chartered a Science Definition Team (SDT) to produce, in collaboration with the WFIRST Study Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL, a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for an implementation of WFIRST using one of the 2.4-m, Hubble-quality telescope assemblies recently made availabl...

  20. Tradespace Investigation of a Telescope Architecture for Next-generation Space Astronomy and Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Humanity’s endeavor to further its scientific understanding of the celestial heavens has led to the creation and evolution of increasingly powerful and complex space telescopes. Space telescopes provide a view of the solar ...

  1. Integrated modeling to facilitate control architecture design for lightweight space telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohan, Lucy Elizabeth

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis it to examine the effects of utilizing control to better meet performance and systematic requirements of future space telescopes. New telescope systems are moving toward tighter optical performance ...

  2. Ion implantation for figure correction of high-resolution x-ray telescope mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalifoux, Brandon D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabricating mirrors for future high-resolution, large-aperture x-ray telescopes continues to challenge the x-ray astronomy instrumentation community. Building a large-aperture telescope requires thin, lightweight mirrors; ...

  3. Ultrahigh precision cosmology from gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, Curt [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the Big Bang Observer (BBO), a proposed space-based gravitational-wave (GW) detector, would provide ultraprecise measurements of cosmological parameters. By detecting {approx}3x10{sup 5} compact-star binaries, and utilizing them as standard sirens, BBO would determine the Hubble constant to {approx}0.1%, and the dark-energy parameters w{sub 0} and w{sub a} to {approx}0.01 and {approx}0.1, respectively. BBO's dark-energy figure-of-merit would be approximately an order of magnitude better than all other proposed, dedicated dark-energy missions. To date, BBO has been designed with the primary goal of searching for gravitational waves from inflation, down to the level {omega}{sub GW}{approx}10{sup -17}; this requirement determines BBO's frequency band (deci-Hz) and its sensitivity requirement (strain measured to {approx}10{sup -24}). To observe an inflationary GW background, BBO would first have to detect and subtract out {approx}3x10{sup 5} merging compact-star binaries, out to a redshift z{approx}5. It is precisely this carefully measured foreground which would enable high-precision cosmology. BBO would determine the luminosity distance to each binary to {approx} percent accuracy. In addition, BBO's angular resolution would be sufficient to uniquely identify the host galaxy for the majority of binaries; a coordinated optical/infrared observing campaign could obtain the redshifts. Combining the GW-derived distances and the electromagnetically-derived redshifts for such a large sample of objects, out to such high redshift, naturally leads to extraordinarily tight constraints on cosmological parameters. We emphasize that such 'standard siren' measurements of cosmology avoid many of the systematic errors associated with other techniques: GWs offer a physics-based, absolute measurement of distance. In addition, we show that BBO would also serve as an exceptionally powerful gravitational-lensing mission, and we briefly discuss other astronomical uses of BBO, including providing an early warning system for all short/hard gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Tunneling decay rate in quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mithani, Audrey T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In canonical quantum cosmology, the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence. However, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. In this paper, we apply this approach to an oscillating universe model recently introduced by Graham et al. By extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock", we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe.

  5. Tunneling decay rate in quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audrey T. Mithani; Alexander Vilenkin

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In canonical quantum cosmology, the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence. However, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. In this paper, we apply this approach to an oscillating universe model recently introduced by Graham et al. By extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock", we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe.

  6. Quantum string cosmology in the phase space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruben Cordero; Erik Diaz; Hugo Garcia-Compean; Francisco J. Turrubiates

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation quantization is applied to quantize gravitational systems coupled with matter. This quantization procedure is performed explicitly for quantum cosmology of these systems in a flat minisuper(phase)space. The procedure is employed in a quantum string minisuperspace corresponding to an axion-dilaton system in an isotropic FRW Universe. The Wheeler-DeWitt-Moyal equation is obtained and its corresponding Wigner function is given analytically in terms of Meijer's functions. Finally, this Wigner functions is used to extract physical information of the system.

  7. Cosmological Evolution of Pilgrim Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; M. Zubair

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study pilgrim dark energy model by taking IR cut-offs as particle and event horizons as well as conformal age of the universe. We derive evolution equations for fractional energy density and equation of state parameters for pilgrim dark energy. The phantom cosmic evolution is established in these scenarios which is well supported by the cosmological parameters such as deceleration parameter, statefinder parameters and phase space of $\\omega_\\vartheta$ and $\\omega'_\\vartheta$. We conclude that the consistent value of parameter $\\mu$ is $\\mu<0$ in accordance with the current Planck and WMAP$9$ results.

  8. Cosmological Evolution of Pilgrim Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study pilgrim dark energy model by taking IR cut-offs as particle and event horizons as well as conformal age of the universe. We derive evolution equations for fractional energy density and equation of state parameters for pilgrim dark energy. The phantom cosmic evolution is established in these scenarios which is well supported by the cosmological parameters such as deceleration parameter, statefinder parameters and phase space of $\\omega_\\vartheta$ and $\\omega'_\\vartheta$. We conclude that the consistent value of parameter $\\mu$ is $\\mu<0$ in accordance with the current Planck and WMAP$9$ results.

  9. Modified Hamiltonian formalism for Regge Teitelboim Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinaki Patra; Md. Raju; Gargi Manna; Jyoti Prasad Saha

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ostrogradski approach for the Hamiltonian formalism of higher derivative theory is not satisfactory because of the reason that the Lagrangian cannot be viewed as a function on the tangent bundle to coordinate manifold. In this article, we have used an alternative approach which leads directly to the Lagrangian which, being a function on the tangent manifold, gives correct equation of motion; no new coordinate variables need to be added. This approach can be directly used to the singular (in Ostrogradski sense) Lagrangian. We have used this method for the Regge Teitelboim (RT) minisuperspace cosmological model. We have obtained the Hamiltonian of the dynamical equation of the scale factor of RT model.

  10. Time-Varying Fine-Structure Constant Requires Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. W. Kuhne

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Webb et al. presented preliminary evidence for a time-varying fine-structure constant. We show Teller's formula for this variation to be ruled out within the Einstein-de Sitter universe, however, it is compatible with cosmologies which require a large cosmological constant.

  11. Cosmology as Science: From Inflation to the Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lawrence Krauss

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in cosmology bring to the forefront fundamental questions about our ability to falsify various fundamental assumptions about the universe.  I will discuss three issues that reflect different aspects of these questions:  (1) "Proving" Inflation (2) Anthropic "Explanations" (3) Cosmology of the far future.

  12. Inflationary Cosmology: Is Our Universe Part of a Multiverse?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Guth

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, Guth explains the inflationary theory and reviews the features that make it scientifically plausible. In addition, he discusses the biggest mystery in cosmology: Why is the value of the cosmological constant, sometimes called the "anti-gravity" effect, so remarkably small compared to theoretical expectations?

  13. Is there evidence for additional neutrino species from cosmology?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Verde, Licia, E-mail: stephen.feeney.09@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and ICC, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that recent cosmological and flavor-oscillation data favor the existence of additional neutrino species beyond the three predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. We apply Bayesian model selection to determine whether there is indeed any evidence from current cosmological datasets for the standard cosmological model to be extended to include additional neutrino flavors. The datasets employed include cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing power spectra, and measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale and the Hubble constant. We also consider other extensions to the standard neutrino model, such as massive neutrinos, and possible degeneracies with other cosmological parameters. The Bayesian evidence indicates that current cosmological data do not require any non-standard neutrino properties.

  14. Large open telescope: size-upscaling from DOT to LOT Robert H. Hammerschlaga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    Large open telescope: size-upscaling from DOT to LOT Robert H. Hammerschlaga , Aswin P. L. Jägersb, telescope drives 1. INTRODUCTION The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on the Canary island La Palma consists temperature homogeneous. No warm air bubbles are forced upwards against the closed wall of a tower and no heat

  15. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, C C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay $\\Delta\\tau$ of images, the velocity dispersion $\\sigma$ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, $\\Delta\\tau/\\sigma^2$. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between $\\Lambda$CDM universe and $R_h=ct$ universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the SLACS and LSD survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with $\\Delta\\tau$ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the $99.7\\%$ confidence level. Compar...

  16. Cosmology calculations almost without general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Friedmann equation is derived for a Newtonian universe. Changing mass density to energy density gives exactly the Friedmann equation of general relativity. Accounting for work done by pressure then yields the two Einstein equations that govern the expansion of the universe. Descriptions and explanations of radiation pressure and vacuum pressure are added to complete a basic kit of cosmology tools. It provides a basis for teaching cosmology to undergraduates in a way that quickly equips them to do basic calculations. This is demonstrated with calculations involving: characteristics of the expansion for densities dominated by radiation, matter, or vacuum; the closeness of the density to the critical density; how much vacuum energy compared to matter energy is needed to make the expansion accelerate; and how little is needed to make it stop. Travel time and luninosity distance are calculated in terms of the redshift and the densities of matter and vacuum energy, using a scaled Friedmann equation with the constant in the curvature term determined by matching with the present values of the Hubble parameter and energy density. General relativity is needed only for the luminosity distance, to describe how the curvature of space, determined by the energy density, can change the intensity of light by changing the area of the sphere to which the light has spread. Thirty-one problems are included.

  17. Conserved Currents in Supersymmetric Quantum Cosmology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Moniz

    1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate whether conserved currents can be sensibly defined in supersymmetric minisuperspaces. Our analysis deals with k=1 FRW and Bianchi class--A models. Supermatter in the form of scalar supermultiplets is included in the former. Moreover, we restrict ourselves to the first-order differential equations derived from the Lorentz and supersymmetry constraints. The ``square-root'' structure of N=1 supergravity was our motivation to contemplate this interesting research. We show that conserved currents cannot be adequately established except for some very simple scenarios. Otherwise, conservation equations may only be obtained from Wheeler-DeWitt--like equations, which are derived from the supersymmetric algebra of constraints. Two appendices are included. In appendix A we describe some interesting features of quantum FRW cosmologies with complex scalar fields when supersymmetry is present. In particular, we explain how the Hartle-Hawking state can now be satisfactorily identified. In appendix B we initiate a discussion about the retrieval of classical properties from supersymmetric quantum cosmologies.

  18. Non-Singular Cosmology in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-singular cosmology is derived in modified gravity (MOG) with a varying gravitational coupling strength $G(t)=G_N\\xi(t)$. Assuming that the curvature $k$, the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and $\\rho$ vanish at $t=0$, we obtain a non-singular universe with a negative pressure, $p_G < 0$. Quantum fluctuations at $t\\sim 0$ produce creation of pairs of particles from the vacuum explaining the origin of matter. The universe expands for $t\\to \\infty$ according to the standard radiation and matter dominated solutions. The arrow of time reverses at $t=0$ always pointing in the direction of increasing entropy ${\\cal S}$ and the entropy is at a minimum value at $t=0$, solving the conundrum of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The Hubble radius $H^{-1}(t)$ is infinite at $t=0$ removing the curvature and particle horizons. The negative pressure $p_G$ generated by the scalar field $\\xi$ at $t\\sim 0$ can produce quantum spontaneous creation of particles explaining the origin of matter and radiation.

  19. Probing Cosmological Isotropy With Type IA Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengaly, C A P; Alcaniz, J S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the validity of the Cosmological Principle by mapping the cosmological parameters $H_0$ and $q_0$ through the celestial sphere. In our analysis, performed in a low-redshift regime to follow a model-independent approach, we use two compilations of type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), namely the Union2.1 and the JLA datasets. Firstly, we show that the angular distributions for both SNe Ia datasets are statistically anisotropic at high confidence level ($p$-value $<$ 0.0001), in particular the JLA sample. Then we find that the cosmic expansion and acceleration are mainly of dipolar type, with maximal anisotropic expansion [acceleration] pointing towards $(l,b) \\simeq (326^{\\circ},12^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (174^{\\circ},27^{\\circ})$], and $(l,b) \\simeq (58^{\\circ},-60^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (225^{\\circ},51^{\\circ})$] for the Union2.1 and JLA data, respectively. Secondly, we use a geometrical method to test the hypothesis that the non-uniformly distributed SNe Ia events could introduce anisotropic imp...

  20. Homogeneous cosmology with aggressively expanding civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jay Olson

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of a homogeneous universe, we note that the appearance of aggressively expanding advanced life is geometrically similar to the process of nucleation and bubble growth in a first-order cosmological phase transition. We exploit this similarity to describe the dynamics of life saturating the universe on a cosmic scale, adapting the phase transition model to incorporate probability distributions of expansion and resource consumption strategies. Through a series of numerical solutions covering several orders of magnitude in the input assumption parameters, the resulting cosmological model is used to address basic questions related to the intergalactic spreading of life, dealing with issues such as timescales, observability, competition between strategies, and first-mover advantage. Finally, we examine physical effects on the universe itself, such as reheating and the backreaction on the evolution of the scale factor, if such life is able to control and convert a significant fraction of the available pressureless matter into radiation. We conclude that the existence of life, if certain advanced technologies are practical, could have a significant influence on the future large-scale evolution of the universe.

  1. The Problem of the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ElectroMagnetic Quantum Gravity (EMQG) is applied to the problem of the Cosmological Constant. EMQG is a quantum gravity theory (ref. 1) in which the virtual particles of the quantum vacuum play a very important role in all gravitational interactions, and also in accelerated motion. According to EMQG theory (and quantum field theory in general), empty space is populated by vast numbers of virtual particles, consisting of virtual fermion and virtual anti-fermion particles, which posses mass, and also virtual boson particles of all the various force particle species. Therefore the problem of the cosmological constant is essentially equivalent to a determination of the mass contributed by all the virtual particles of the vacuum to the overall curvature and dynamics of the entire universe. Our original analysis was based on the assumption of perfect symmetry in the creation and destruction of virtual fermion and virtual anti-fermion particle pairs in the quantum vacuum, which is in accordance with the existing la...

  2. On the nature of cosmological time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magain, Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time is a parameter playing a central role in our most fundamental modeling of natural laws. Relativity theory shows that the comparison of times measured by different clocks depends on their relative motions and on the strength of the gravitational field in which they are embedded. In standard cosmology, the time parameter is the one measured by fundamental clocks, i.e. clocks at rest with respect to the expanding space. This proper time is assumed to flow at a constant rate throughout the whole history of the Universe. We make the alternative hypothesis that the rate at which cosmological time flows depends on the dynamical state of the Universe. In thermodynamics, the arrow of time is strongly related to the second law, which states that the entropy of an isolated system will always increase with time or, at best, stay constant. Hence, we assume that time measured by fundamental clocks is proportional to the entropy of the region of the Universe that is causally connected to them. Under that simple assumpt...

  3. The Standard Cosmological Model and CMB Anisotropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Bartlett

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a course on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in the standard cosmological model, designed for beginning graduate students and advanced undergraduates. ``Standard cosmological model'' in this context means a Universe dominated by some form of cold dark matter (CDM) with adiabatic perturbations generated at some initial epoch, e.g., Inflation, and left to evolve under gravity alone (which distinguishes it from defect models). The course is primarily theoretical and concerned with the physics of CMB anisotropies in this context and their relation to structure formation. Brief presentations of the uniform Big Bang model and of the observed large--scale structure of the Universe are given. The bulk of the course then focuses on the evolution of small perturbations to the uniform model and on the generation of temperature anisotropies in the CMB. The theoretical development is performed in the (pseudo--)Newtonian gauge because it aids intuitive understanding by providing a quick reference to classical (Newtonian) concepts. The fundamental goal of the course is not to arrive at a highly exact nor exhaustive calculation of the anisotropies, but rather to a good understanding of the basic physics that goes into such calculations.

  4. PhD Studies in Neutrinos in Cosmology Institute for Computational Cosmology and Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    and Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology Neutrino physics has brought a new perspective physics and cosmology and will focus on the impact of neutrinos on large scale structures in the Universe, Supersymmetry, Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology etc. followed by the research project in Neutrinos

  5. High-Energy Cosmology: gamma rays and neutrinos from beyond the galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Our knowledge of the high-energy universe is undergoing a period of rapid change as new astronomical detectors of high-energy radiation start to operate at their design sensitivities. Now is a boomtime for high-energy astrophysics, with new discoveries from Swift and HESS, results from MAGIC and VERITAS starting to be reported, the upcoming launches of the gamma-ray space telescopes GLAST and AGILE, and anticipated data releases from IceCube and Auger. A formalism for calculating statistical properties of cosmological gamma-ray sources is presented. Application is made to model calculations of the statistical distributions of gamma-ray and neutrino emission from (i) beamed sources, specifically, long-duration GRBs, blazars, and extagalactic microquasars, and (ii) unbeamed sources, including normal galaxies, starburst galaxies and clusters. Expressions for the integrated intensities of faint beamed and unbeamed high-energy radiation sources are also derived. A toy model for the background intensity of radiation from dark-matter annihilation taking place in the early universe is constructed. Estimates for the gamma-ray fluxes of local group galaxies, starburst, and infrared luminous galaxies are briefly reviewed. Because the brightest extragalactic gamma-ray sources are flaring sources, and these are the best targets for sources of PeV -- EeV neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic rays, rapidly slewing all-sky telescopes like MAGIC and an all-sky gamma-ray observatory beyond Milagro will be crucial for optimal science return in the multi-messenger age.

  6. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fan Yizhong, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

  7. Registration of atmospheric neutrinos with the Baikal neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baikal Collaboration; V. A. Balkanov et al

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first neutrino induced events observed with a deep underwater neutrino telescope. Data from 70 days effective life time of the BAIKAL prototype telescope NT-96 have been analyzed with two different methods. With the standard track reconstruction method, 9 clear upward muon candidates have been identified, in good agreement with 8.7 events expected from Monte Carlo calculations for atmospheric neutrinos. The second analysis is tailored to muons coming from close to the opposite zenith. It yields 4 events, compared to 3.5 from Monte Carlo expectations. From this we derive a 90 % upper flux limit of 1.1 * 10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 for muons in excess of those expected from atmospheric neutrinos with zenith angle > 150 degrees and energy > 10GeV.

  8. Minimal Stereoscopic Analysis for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. LeBohec; C. Duke; P. Jordan

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The trajectory of a primary gamma-ray detected with an array of at least four atmospheric Cherenkov imaging telescopes can be reconstructed from the shower image centroid positions and geometrical considerations independent of the primary energy. Using only the image centroid positions some cosmic-ray discrimination is also possible. This minimal approach opens the possibility of pushing the analysis threshold to lower values, close to the hardware threshold.

  9. The data acquisition system for the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, J A; Ameli, F; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Aslanides, E; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Barbarito, E; Basa, S; Battaglieri, M; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Beltramelli, J; Bertin, V; Bigi, A; Billault, M; Blaes, R; De Botton, N R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bradbury, S M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Burgio, G F; Busto, J; Cafagna, F; Caillat, L; Calzas, A; Capone, A; Caponetto, L; Carmona, E; Carr, J; Cartwright, S L; Castel, D; Castorina, E; Cavasinni, V; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Charvis, P; Chauchot, P; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Colnard, C; Compere, C; Coniglione, R; Cottini, N; Coyle, P; Cuneo, S; Cussatlegras, A S; Damy, G; Van Dantzig, R; De Marzo, C; Dekeyser, I; Delagnes, E; Denans, D; Deschamps, A; Dessages-Ardellier, F; Destelle, J J; Dinkespieler, B; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Drogou, J F; Druillole, F; Durand, D; Ernenwein, J P; Escoffier, S; Falchini, E; Favard, S; Feinstein, F; Ferry, S; Festy, D; Fiorello, C; Flaminio, V; Galeotti, S; Gallone, J M; Giacomelli, G; Girard, N; Gojak, C; Goret, P; Graf, K; Hallewell, G D; Harakeh, M N; Hartmann, B; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Hossl, J; Hoffman, C; Hogenbirk, J; Hubbard, John R; Jaquet, M; Jaspers, M; De Jong, M; Jouvenot, F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karkar, S; Katz, U; Keller, P; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Korolkova, E V; Kouchner, A; Kretschmer, W; Kruijer, A; Kuch, S; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lachartre, D; Lafoux, H; Lagier, P; Lahmann, R; Lamanna, G; Lamare, P; Languillat, J C; Laschinsky, H; Le Guen, Y; Le Provost, H; Le Van-Suu, A; Legou, T; Lim, G; Lo Nigro, L; Lo Presti, D; Löhner, H; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Louis, F; Lucarelli, F; Lyashuk, V; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Masullo, R; Mazéas, F; Mazure, A; McMillan, J E; Megna, R; Melissas, M; Migneco, E; Milovanovic, A; Mongelli, M; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Musumeci, M; Naumann, C; Naumann-Godo, M; Niess, V; Olivetto, C; Ostasch, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Payre, P; Peek, H; Petta, C; Piattelli, P; Pineau, J P; Poinsignon, J; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Randazzo, N; Van Randwijk, J; Real, D; Van Rens, B; Rethore, F; Rewiersma, P A M; Riccobene, G; Rigaud, V; Ripani, M; Roca, V; Roda, C; Rolin, J F; Romita, M; Rose, H J; Rostovtsev, A; Roux, J; Ruppi, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Salomon, K; Sapienza, P; Schmitt, F; Schuller, J P; Shanidze, R; Sokalski, I A; Spona, T; Spurio, M; van der Steenhoven, G; Stolarczyk, T; Streeb, K; Stubert, D; Sulak, L; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tao, C; Terreni, G; Thompson, L F; Valdy, P; Valente, V; Vallage, B; Venekamp, G; Verlaat, B; Vernin, P; De Vita, R; De Vries, G; Van Wijk, R F; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; Wobbe, G; De Wolf, E; Yao, A F; Zaborov, D; Zaccone, Henri; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan; Zúñiga, J; al, et

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope is being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It consists of a large three-dimensional array of photo-multiplier tubes. The data acquisition system of the detector takes care of the digitisation of the photo-multiplier tube signals, data transport, data filtering, and data storage. The detector is operated using a control program interfaced with all elements. The design and the implementation of the data acquisition system are described.

  10. Joel R. Primack Distinguished Professor of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Proposal 2001; Chair, NASA Cosmology panel on LTSA and ADP 2001; Cosmology Panel, Hubble Space Telescope

  11. Laser metrology for coherent multi-telescope arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shao, M.; Massie, N.A.

    1993-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In multi-telescope arrays that comprise multiple telescopes, a beam-combining module, and flat mirrors for directing light beams from the multiple telescopes to the beam combining module, a laser metrology system is used for monitoring various pathlengths along a beam path where deviations are likely. Some pathlengths are defined simply by a pair of retroreflectors or reflectors at both ends. Lengths between pairs of retroreflectors are measured and monitored by laser interferometers. One critical pathlength deviation is related to the displacement of the flat mirror. A reference frame is set up relative to the beam-combining module to form and define the coordinate system within which the positions of the flat mirrors are measured and monitored. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of retroreflectors along the optical axis of the beam-combining module defines a reference frame. A triangle is formed by the reference frame as the base and another retroreflector at the flat mirror as the vertex. The triangle is used to monitor the position of the flat mirror. A beam's pathlength is dynamically corrected in response to the monitored deviations.

  12. Cosmological model-independent Gamma-ray bursts calibration and its cosmological constraint to dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lixin, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As so far, the redshift of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can extend to z ? 8 which makes it as a complementary probe of dark energy to supernova Ia (SN Ia). However, the calibration of GRBs is still a big challenge when they are used to constrain cosmological models. Though, the absolute magnitude of GRBs is still unknown, the slopes of GRBs correlations can be used as a useful constraint to dark energy in a completely cosmological model independent way. In this paper, we follow Wang's model-independent distance measurement method and calculate their values by using 109 GRBs events via the so-called Amati relation. Then, we use the obtained model-independent distances to constrain ?CDM model as an example.

  13. Dynamics of interacting dark energy model in Einstein and Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Songbai Chen; Bin Wang; Jiliang Jing

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is coupled to dark matter in the universe described by Einstein cosmology and Loop Quantum Cosmology. We introduce a new general form of dark sector coupling, which presents us a more complicated dynamical phase space. Differences in the phase space in obtaining the accelerated scaling attractor in Einstein cosmology and Loop Quantum Cosmology are disclosed.

  14. Field Fractal Cosmological Model As an Example of Practical Cosmology Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Baryshev

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of the global gravitational effect as the source of cosmological redshift was considered by de Sitter (1916, 1917), Eddington (1923), Tolman (1929) and Bondi (1947), also Hubble (1929) called the discovered distance-redshift relation as "De Sitter effect". For homogeneous matter distribution cosmological gravitational redshift is proportional to square of distance: z_grav ~ r^2. However for a fractal matter distribution having the fractal dimension D=2 the global gravitational redshift is the linear function of distance: z_grav ~ r, which gives possibility for interpretation of the Hubble law without the space expansion. Here the field gravity fractal cosmological model (FGF) is presented, which based on two initial principles. The first assumption is that the field gravity theory describes the gravitational interaction within the conceptual unity of all fundamental physical interactions. The second hypothesis is that the spatial distribution of matter is a fractal at all scales up to the Hubble radius. The fractal dimension of matter distribution is assumed to be D = 2, which implies that the global gravitational redshift is the explanation of the observed linear Hubble law. In the frame of the FGF all three phenomena - the cosmic background radiation, the fractal large scale structure, and the Hubble law, -could be consequences of a unique evolution process of the initially homogeneous cold gas. Within field gravity fractal framework a new qualitative picture of the structure and evolution of the Universe has emerged, with some quantitative results that may be tested by current and forthcoming observations.

  15. Degeneracy and Discreteness in Cosmological Model Fitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teng, Huan-Yu; Hu, Huan-Chen; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the degeneracy and discreteness problems in the standard cosmological model ({\\Lambda}CDM). We use the Observational Hubble Data (OHD) and the type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) data to study this issue. In order to describe the discreteness in fitting of data, we define a factor G to test the influence from each single data point and analyze the goodness of G. Our results indicate that a higher absolute value of G shows a better capability of distinguishing models, which means the parameters are restricted into smaller confidence intervals with a larger figure of merit evaluation. Consequently, we claim that the factor G is an effective way in model differentiation when using different models to fit the observational data.

  16. On the geometry of cosmological model building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erhard Scholz

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This article analyzes the present anomalies of cosmology from the point of view of integrable Weyl geometry. It uses P.A.M. Dirac's proposal for a weak extension of general relativity, with some small adaptations. Simple models with interesting geometrical and physical properties, not belonging to the Friedmann-Lema\\^{\\i}tre class, are studied in this frame. Those with positive spatial curvature (Einstein-Weyl universes) go well together with observed mass density $\\Omega_m$, CMB, supernovae Ia data, and quasar frequencies. They suggest a physical role for an equilibrium state of the Maxwell field proposed by I.E. Segal in the 1980s (Segal background) and for a time invariant balancing condition of vacuum energy density. The latter leads to a surprising agreement with the BF-theoretical calculation proposed by C. Castro (2002).

  17. Some Cosmological Consequences of Weyl Invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Álvarez, Enrique; Herrero-Valea, Mario

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Weyl invariant cosmological models are examined in the framework of dilaton gravity. It will be shown that When the FRW ansatz for the spacetime metric is assumed, the Ward identity for conformal invariance guarantees that the gravitational equations hold whenever the matter EM do so. It follows that any scale factor can solve the theory provided a non-trivial profile for a dilaton field. In particular, accelerated expansion is a natural solution to the full set of equations. When two or more scalar fields are coupled to gravity in a Weyl invariant way there is an antigravity phase in which the effective Newton constant is negative. This phase is separated from the atractive gravity phase by a strong coupling barrier. Nevertheles, and perhaps contradicting na\\"ive beliefs, the antigravity phase does not imply accelerated expansion, although it is compatible with it.

  18. Replication regulates volume weighting in quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartle, James [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Hertog, Thomas [APC, UMR 7164 (CNRS, Universite Paris 7), 10 rue A.Domon et L.Duquet, 75205 Paris (France) and Intl Solvay Institutes, Boulevard du Triomphe, ULB-C.P. 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilities for observations in cosmology are conditioned both on the Universe's quantum state and on local data specifying the observational situation. We show the quantum state defines a measure for prediction through such conditional probabilities that is well-behaved for spatially large or infinite universes when the probabilities that our data are replicated are taken into account. In histories where our data are rare volume weighting connects top-down probabilities conditioned on both the data and the quantum state to the bottom-up probabilities conditioned on the quantum state alone. We apply these principles to a calculation of the number of inflationary e-folds in a homogeneous, isotropic minisuperspace model with a single scalar field moving in a quadratic potential. We find that volume weighting is justified and the top-down probabilities favor a large number of e-folds, hereby predicting the curvature of our Universe at the present time to be approximately zero.

  19. AGN feedback using AMR cosmological simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Yohan; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback processes are thought to solve some of the long-standing issues of the numerical modelling of galaxy formation: over-cooling, low angular momentum, massive blue galaxies, extra-galactic enrichment, etc. The accretion of gas onto super-massive black holes in the centre of massive galaxies can release tremendous amounts of energy to the surrounding medium. We show, with cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, how the growth of black holes is regulated by the feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei using a new dual jet/heating mechanism. We discuss how this large amount of feedback is able to modify the cold baryon content of galaxies, and perturb the properties of the hot plasma in their vicinity.

  20. Radion Physics, Stability and Cosmological issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Lorenzana, Abdel [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N. Apdo. Post. 14-740, 07000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Santos, Eli [Centro de Estudios en Fisica y Matematicas Basicas y Aplicadas, UNACH, 4a Oriente Norte 1428, C.P. 29000 Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP. 58040 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Moduli fields are a known ingredient of models that involve extra compact dimensions, as the Kaluza-Klein theories, String theory, and models with compact extra dimensions. They are scalar fields that emerge when the configuration of the compact space is perturbed. The radion is a particular example of this type of fields, which is associated to the variations of the total volume of compact space. Radions usually couple to all other fields, affecting the definition of coupling constants and gravity strength. They also modify gravitational potentials in a way that may be tested in table top experiments. Usually, these fields are run away modes which manifest the difficulties to stabilize the shape of the compact manifold of extra space. This is feature that can be a threat for cosmology on the early Universe. Here we provide a brief discussion of these general aspects of the radion physics.

  1. Cosmological Signatures of Anisotropic Spatial Curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Thiago S; Carneiro, Saulo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If one is willing to give up the cherished hypothesis of spatial isotropy, many interesting cosmological models can be developed beyond the simple anisotropically expanding scenarios. One interesting possibility is presented by shear-free models in which the anisotropy emerges at the level of the curvature of the homogeneous spatial sections, whereas the expansion is dictated by a single scale factor. We show that such models represent viable alternatives to describe the large-scale structure of the inflationary universe, leading to a kinematically equivalent Sachs-Wolfe effect. Through the definition of a complete set of spatial eigenfunctions we compute the two-point correlation function of scalar perturbations in these models. In addition, we show how such scenarios would modify the spectrum of the CMB assuming that the observations take place in a small patch of a universe with anisotropic curvature.

  2. Cosmological Perturbations in an Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karim A. Malik

    2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After introducing gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory we give an improved set of governing equations for multiple fluids including energy transfer. Having defined adiabatic and entropic perturbations we derive the ``conservation law'' for the curvature perturbation on large scales using only the energy conservation equation. We then investigate the dynamics of assisted inflation. By choosing an appropriate rotation in field space we can write down explicitly the potential for the weighted mean field along the scaling solution and for fields orthogonal to it. This allows us to present analytic solutions describing homogeneous and inhomogeneous perturbations about the attractor solution without resorting to slow-roll approximations. Finally we analyze the simplest model of preheating analytically, and show that in linear perturbation theory the effect of preheating on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation on large scales is negligible. We end with some concluding remarks, possible extensions and an outlook to future work.

  3. Cosmological Axion Problem in Chaotic Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kasuya; M. Kawasaki; T. Yanagida

    1997-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate two cosmological axion problems (isocurvature fluctuations and domain-wall formation) in chaotic inflationary universe. It is believed that these problems are solved if potential for the Peccei-Quinn scalar field is very flat. However, we find that too many domain walls are produced through parametric resonance decay of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field. Only the axion model with N=1(N: QCD anomaly factor) is consistent with observations. We also point out that the flat potential is naturally obtained in a supersymmetric extension of the Peccei-Quinn model. If Peccei-Quinn breaking scale $F_a$ is about 10^{12} GeV, this model predicts anisotropies of cosmic microwave background radiation due to the axion isocurvature fluctuations which may be detectable in future observations.

  4. Liouville theory beyond the cosmological horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoffrey Compère; Laura Donnay; Pierre-Henry Lambert; Waldemar Schulgin

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The dS/CFT correspondence postulates the existence of a Euclidean CFT dual to a suitable gravity theory with Dirichlet boundary conditions asymptotic to de Sitter spacetime. A semi-classical model of such a correspondence consists of Einstein gravity with positive cosmological constant and without matter which is dual to Euclidean Liouville theory defined at the future conformal boundary. Here we show that Euclidean Liouville theory is also dual to Einstein gravity with Dirichlet boundary conditions on a fixed timelike slice in the static patch. Intriguingly, the spacetime interpretation of Euclidean Liouville time is the physical time of the static observer. As a prerequisite of this correspondence, we show that the asymptotic symmetry algebra which consists of two copies of the Virasoro algebra extends everywhere into the bulk.

  5. Cosmological perturbations and noncommutative tachyon inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Daojun; Li Xinzhou [Shanghai United Center for Astrophysics (SUCA), Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China) and Division of Astrophysics, E-institute of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for studying the rolling tachyon and noncommutative inflation comes from string theory. In the tachyon inflation scenario, metric perturbations are created by tachyon field fluctuations during inflation. We drive the exact mode equation for scalar perturbations of the metric and investigate the cosmological perturbations in the commutative and noncommutative inflationary spacetime driven by the tachyon field which have a Born-Infeld Lagrangian. Although at lowest order the predictions of tachyon inflation are no different than those from standard slow-roll inflation, due to the modified inflationary dynamics there exists modifications to the power spectra of fluctuations generated during inflation. In the noncommutative tachyon inflation scenario, the stringy noncommutativity of spacetime results in corrections to the primordial power spectrum that lead to a spectral index that is greater than 1 on large scales and less than 1 on small scales as the first-year results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe indicate.

  6. On the energy of homogeneous cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James M. Nester; Lau Loi So; T. Vargas

    2008-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy for the homogeneous cosmological models is presented. More specifically, using an appropriate natural prescription, we find the energy within any region with any gravitational source for a large class of gravity theories--namely those with a tetrad description--for all 9 Bianchi types. Our energy is given by the value of the Hamiltonian with homogeneous boundary conditions; this value vanishes for all regions in all Bianchi class A models, and it does not vanish for any class B model. This is so not only for Einstein's general relativity but, moreover, for the whole 3-parameter class of tetrad-teleparallel theories. For the physically favored one parameter subclass, which includes the teleparallel equivalent of Einstein's theory as an important special case, the energy for all class B models is, contrary to expectation, negative.

  7. Testing Cosmology with Cosmic Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pier Stefano Corasaniti; Alessandro Melchiorri

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    WMAP observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the CMB temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However pre-recombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peaks and dips multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with the respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a MCMC likelihood analysis to constrain in combination with recent BAO data a constant dark energy equation w. For a flat universe we find at 95% upper limit w<-1.10, and including the HST prior w<-1.14, which are only marginally consistent with limits derived from the supernova SNLS sample. Larger limits are obtained for non-flat cosmologies. From the full CMB likelihood analysis we also estimate the values of the shift parameter R and the multipole l_a of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should be always preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provide a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other datasets.

  8. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norbert, M.A.; Yale, O.

    1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 15 figs.

  9. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norbert, Massie A. (San Ramon, CA); Yale, Oster (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  10. Cosmology on the Beach - Carlos Frenk: Lecture 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carlos Frenk

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  11. Cosmology on the Beach - Carlos Frenk, Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carlos Frenk

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  12. A new type of second order cosmological lagrangians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Tretyakov

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a possible connection between Galileon gravity and teleparallel gravity. We also propose a new type of second order cosmological lagrangian and study a some of its properties.

  13. Cosmology on the Beach - Carlos Frenk, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carlos Frenk

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  14. Cosmology on the Beach - Eric Linder: Lecture 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Linder

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  15. Cosmology on the Beach - Chung-Pei Ma: Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chung-Pei Ma

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009

  16. Cosmology on the Beach: Eric Linder, lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Linder

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  17. Cosmology on the Beach - Simon White, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  18. Cosmology on the Beach - Wayne Hu: Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  19. Cosmology on the Beach - Chung-Pei Ma, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chung-Pei Ma

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  20. Cosmology on the Beach - Eric Linder, Lecture 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Linder

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.  

  1. Simulating large cosmology surveys with calibrated halo models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynn, Stuart

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I present a novel method for constructing large scale mock galaxy and halo catalogues and apply this model to a number of important topics in modern cosmology. Traditionally such mocks are created through ...

  2. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del; Minning, Paul; Salgado, Patricio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepcion (Chile); Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum {lambda}-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  3. Dark energy in some integrable and nonintegrable FRW cosmological models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuralay Esmakhanova; Nurgissa Myrzakulov; Gulgasyl Nugmanova; Yerlan Myrzakulov; Leonid Chechin; Ratbay Myrzakulov

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest challenges in cosmology today is to determine the nature of dark energy, the sourse of the observed present acceleration of the Universe. Besides the vacuum energy, various dark energy models have been suggested. The Friedmann - Robertson - Walker (FRW) spacetime plays an important role in modern cosmology. In particular, the most popular models of dark energy work in the FRW spacetime. In this work, a new class of integrable FRW cosmological models is presented. These models induced by the well-known Painlev$\\acute{e}$ equations. Some nonintegrable FRW models are also considered. These last models are constructed with the help of Pinney, Schr$\\ddot{o}$dinger and hypergeometric equations. Scalar field description and two-dimensional generalizations of some cosmological models are presented. Finally some integrable and nonintegrable $F(R)$ and $F(G)$ gravity models are constructed.

  4. axion cosmology revisited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (arXiv) Summary: In axion quintessence, the cosmological era with an energy contrast in dark energy 0.1 < OmegaDE < 0.9 may represent a significant fraction of the universe's...

  5. accelerated cosmological lattice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theory that predicts a late-time accelerated attractor with a constant dark matter to dark energy ratio can be said to solve the Coincidence Problem. Such cosmologies are...

  6. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Chung-Pei Ma

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chung-Pei Ma

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  7. Extreme multiplex spectroscopy at wide-field 4-m telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Content; Tom Shanks

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the design and science case for a spectrograph for the prime focus of classical 4-m wide-field telescopes that can deliver at least 4000 MOS slits over a 1 degree field. This extreme multiplex capability means that 25000 galaxy redshifts can be measured in a single night, opening up the possibilities for large galaxy redshift surveys out to z~0.7 and beyond for the purpose of measuring the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and for many other science goals. The design features four cloned spectrographs and exploits the exclusive possibility of tiling the focal plane of wide-field 4-m telescopes with CCDs for multi-object spectroscopic purposes. In ~200 night projects, such spectrographs have the potential to make galaxy redshift surveys of ~6 million galaxies over a wide redshift range and thus may provide a low-cost alternative to other survey routes such as WFMOS and SKA. Two of these extreme multiplex spectrographs are currently being designed for the AAT (NG1dF) and Calar Alto (XMS) 4-m class telescopes. NG2dF, a larger version for the AAT 2 degree field, would have 12 clones and at least 12000 slits. The clones use a transparent design including a grism in which all optics are smaller than the clone square subfield so that the clones can be tightly packed with little gaps between the contiguous fields. Only low cost glasses are used; the variations in chromatic aberrations between bands are compensated by changing one or two of the lenses adjacent to the grism. The total weight and length is smaller with a few clones than a unique spectrograph which makes it feasible to place the spectrograph at the prime focus.

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation radiation telescope Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Physics 3 MPI Kernphysik, Heidelberg Humboldt Univ. Berlin Summary: Gamma ray bursts Cosmology Diffuse extragalactic radiation fields via cutoff in AGN spectra and...

  9. Power Spectra to 1% Accuracy between Dynamical Dark Energy Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew J. Francis; Geraint F. Lewis; Eric V. Linder

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For dynamical dark energy cosmologies we carry out a series of N-body gravitational simulations, achieving percent level accuracy in the relative mass power spectra at any redshift. Such accuracy in the power spectrum is necessary for next generation cosmological mass probes. Our matching procedure reproduces the CMB distance to last scattering and delivers subpercent level power spectra at z=0 and z~3. We discuss the physical implications for probing dark energy with surveys of large scale structure.

  10. Anisotropic Bianchi types VIII and IX locally rotationally symmetric cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assad, M.J.D.; Soares, I.D.

    1983-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a class of exact cosmological solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations, which are anisotropic and spatially homogeneous of Bianchi types VIII and IX, and class IIIb in the Stewart-Ellis classification of locally rotationally symmetric models. If we take the electromagnetic field equal to zero, a class of Bianchi types VIII/IX spatially homogeneous anisotropic cosmological solutions with perfect fluid is obtained.

  11. How secret interactions can reconcile sterile neutrinos with cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannestad, Steen; Tram, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments have shown hints of the existence of additional sterile neutrinos in the eV mass range. However, such neutrinos seem incompatible with cosmology because they have too large an impact on cosmic structure formation. Here we show that new interactions in the sterile neutrino sector can prevent their production in the early Universe and reconcile short baseline oscillation experiments with cosmology.

  12. Iso-spectral potential and inflationary quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Garcia; W. Guzman; M. Sabido; J. Socorro

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the factorization approach of quantum mechanics, we obtain a family of isospectral scalar potentials for power law inflationary cosmology. The construction is based on a scattering Wheeler-DeWitt solution. These iso-spectrals have new features, they give a mechanism to end inflation, as well as the possibility to have new inflationary epochs. The procedure can be extended to other cosmological models.

  13. Future singularities and teleparallelism in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamba, Kazuharu [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Haro, Jaume de [Departament de Matemàtica Aplicada I, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Odintsov, Sergei D., E-mail: bamba@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: jaime.haro@upc.edu, E-mail: odintsov@ieec.uab.es [Dept. Gen. and Theor. Phys. and Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate how holonomy corrections in loop quantum cosmology (LQC) prevent the Big Rip singularity by introducing a quadratic modification in terms of the energy density ? in the Friedmann equation in the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) space-time in a consistent and useful way. In addition, we investigate whether other kind of singularities like Type II,III and IV singularities survive or are avoided in LQC when the universe is filled by a barotropic fluid with the state equation P = ???f(?), where P is the pressure and f(?) a function of ?. It is shown that the Little Rip cosmology does not happen in LQC. Nevertheless, the occurrence of the Pseudo-Rip cosmology, in which the phantom universe approaches the de Sitter one asymptotically, is established, and the corresponding example is presented. It is interesting that the disintegration of bound structures in the Pseudo-Rip cosmology in LQC always takes more time than that in Einstein cosmology. Our investigation on future singularities is generalized to that in modified teleparallel gravity, where LQC and Brane Cosmology in the Randall-Sundrum scenario are the best examples. It is remarkable that F(T) gravity may lead to all the kinds of future singularities including Little Rip.

  14. Status of the technologies for the production of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pareschi, G; Baba, H; Bähr, J; Bonardi, A; Bonnoli, G; Brun, P; Canestrari, R; Chadwick, P; Chikawa, M; Carton, P -H; de Souza, V; Dipold, J; Doro, M; Durand, D; Dyrda, M; Förster, A; Garczarczyk, M; Giro, E; Glicenstein, J -F; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Hrabovski, M; Jeanney, C; Kagaya, M; Katagiri, H; Lessio, L; Mandat, D; Mariotti, M; Medina, C; Micha?owski, J; Micolon, P; Nakajima, D; Niemiec, J; Nozato, A; Palatka, M; Pech, M; Peyaud, B; Pühlhofer, G; Rataj, M; Rodeghiero, G; Rojas, G; Rousselle, J; Sakonaka, R; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Schultz, C; Shu, S; Stinzing, F; Stodulski, M; Teshima, M; Travniczek, P; van Eldik, C; Vassiliev, V; Wi?niewski, ?; Wörnlein, A; Yoshida, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation very high-energy gamma-ray observatory, with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than current instruments. CTA will comprise several tens of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) operated in array-mode and divided into three size classes: large, medium and small telescopes. The total reflective surface could be up to 10,000 m2 requiring unprecedented technological efforts. The properties of the reflector directly influence the telescope performance and thus constitute a fundamental ingredient to improve and maintain the sensitivity. The R&D status of lightweight, reliable and cost-effective mirror facets for the CTA telescope reflectors for the different classes of telescopes is reviewed in this paper.

  15. 4MOST - 4-metre Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Jong, Roelof S; Chiappini, Cristina; Depagne, Éric; Haynes, Roger; Johl, Diane; Schnurr, Olivier; Schwope, Axel; Walcher, Jakob; Dionies, Frank; Haynes, Dionne; Kelz, Andreas; Kitaura, Francisco S; Lamer, Georg; Minchev, Ivan; Müller, Volker; Nuza, Sebastián E; Olaya, Jean-Christophe; Piffl, Tilmann; Popow, Emil; Steinmetz, Matthias; Ural, U?ur; Williams, Mary; Winkler, Roland; Wisotzki, Lutz; Ansorgb, Wolfgang R; Banerji, Manda; Solares, Eduardo Gonzalez; Irwin, Mike; Kennicutt, Robert C; King, David; McMahon, Richard; Koposov, Sergey; Parry, Ian R; Walton, Nicholas A; Finger, Gert; Iwert, Olaf; Krumpe, Mirko; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Vincenzo, Mainieri; Amans, Jean-Philippe; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Cohen, Mathieu; Francois, Patrick; Jagourel, Pascal; Mignot, Shan B; Royer, Frédéric; Sartoretti, Paola; Bender, Ralf; Grupp, Frank; Hess, Hans-Joachim; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Muschielok, Bernard; Böhringer, Hans; Boller, Thomas; Bongiorno, Angela; Brusa, Marcella; Dwelly, Tom; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Salvato, Mara; Pragt, Johannes H; Navarro, Ramón; Gerlofsma, Gerrit; Roelfsema, Ronald; Dalton, Gavin B; Middleton, Kevin F; Tosh, Ian A; Boeche, Corrado; Caffau, Elisabetta; Christlieb, Norbert; Grebel, Eva K; Hansen, Camilla; Koch, Andreas; Ludwig, Hans-G; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Sbordone, Luca; Seifert, Walter; Thimm, Guido; Trifonov, Trifon; Helmi, Amina; Trager, Scott C; Feltzing, Sofia; Korn, Andreas; Boland, Wilfried

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 4MOST consortium is currently halfway through a Conceptual Design study for ESO with the aim to develop a wide-field (>3 square degree, goal >5 square degree), high-multiplex (>1500 fibres, goal 3000 fibres) spectroscopic survey facility for an ESO 4m-class telescope (VISTA). 4MOST will run permanently on the telescope to perform a 5 year public survey yielding more than 20 million spectra at resolution R~5000 ({\\lambda}=390-1000 nm) and more than 2 million spectra at R~20,000 (395-456.5 nm & 587-673 nm). The 4MOST design is especially intended to complement three key all-sky, space-based observatories of prime European interest: Gaia, eROSITA and Euclid. Initial design and performance estimates for the wide-field corrector concepts are presented. We consider two fibre positioner concepts, a well-known Phi-Theta system and a new R-Theta concept with a large patrol area. The spectrographs are fixed configuration two-arm spectrographs, with dedicated spectrographs for the high- and low-resolution. A ful...

  16. Sites in Argentina for the Cherenkov Telescope Array Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allekotte, Ingo; Etchegoyen, Alberto; García, Beatriz; Mancilla, Alexis; Maya, Javier; Ravignani, Diego; Rovero, Adrián

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Project will consist of two arrays of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to study high-energy gamma radiation in the range of a few tens of GeV to beyond 100 TeV. To achieve full-sky coverage, the construction of one array in each terrestrial hemisphere is considered. Suitable candidate sites are being explored and characterized. The candidate sites in the Southern Hemisphere include two locations in Argentina, one in San Antonio de los Cobres (Salta Province, Lat. 24:02:42 S, Long. 66:14:06 W, at 3600 m.a.s.l) and another one in El Leoncito (San Juan Province, Lat. 31:41:49 S, Long. 69:16:21 W, at 2600 m.a.s.l). Here we describe the two sites and the instrumentation that has been deployed to characterize them. We summarize the geographic, atmospheric and climatic data that have been collected for both of them.

  17. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves in Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Biesiada, Marek [Department of Astrophysics and Cosmology, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zhu, Zong-Hong, E-mail: aleksandra.piorkowska@us.edu.pl, E-mail: marek.biesiada@us.edu.pl, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational wave experiments have entered a new stage which gets us closer to the opening a new observational window on the Universe. In particular, the Einstein Telescope (ET) is designed to have a fantastic sensitivity that will provide with tens or hundreds of thousand NS-NS inspiral events per year up to the redshift z = 2. Some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral NS-NS events in the Einstein telescope. Being conservative we consider the lens population of elliptical galaxies. It turns out that depending on the local insipral rate ET should detect from one per decade detection in the pessimistic case to a tens of detections per year for the most optimistic case. The detection of gravitationally lensed source in gravitational wave detectors would be an invaluable source of information concerning cosmography, complementary to standard ones (like supernovae or BAO) independent of the local cosmic distance ladder calibrations.

  18. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  19. Six years of GRB follow up with MITSuME Okayama Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Nagayama, Shogo; Toda, Hiroyuki [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Ohta, Kouji [Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kita-shirakawa, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MITSuME Okayama Telescope is an autonomous telescope with a diameter of 50 cm dedicated primarily to follow-up {gamma}-ray bursts. The telescope has successfully been in operation since 2004. We have made 131 observations of {gamma}-ray bursts and submitted 47 reports to GCN circulars. In this article, we present an overview of the instrumentation and scientific results obtained so far.

  20. Observational constraints on Visser's cosmological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves, M. E. S.; Araujo, J. C. N. de; Miranda, O. D.; Wuensche, C. A. [INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais - Divisao de Astrofisica, Av.dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010 SP (Brazil); Carvalho, F. C. [INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais - Divisao de Astrofisica, Av.dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010 SP (Brazil); UERN - Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Mossoro, 59610-210, RN (Brazil); Santos, E. M. [UFRJ - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 21945-970, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories of gravity for which gravitons can be treated as massive particles have presently been studied as realistic modifications of general relativity, and can be tested with cosmological observations. In this work, we study the ability of a recently proposed theory with massive gravitons, the so-called Visser theory, to explain the measurements of luminosity distance from the Union2 compilation, the most recent Type-Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) data set, adopting the current ratio of the total density of nonrelativistic matter to the critical density ({Omega}{sub m}) as a free parameter. We also combine the SNe Ia data with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. We find that, for the allowed interval of values for {Omega}{sub m}, a model based on Visser's theory can produce an accelerated expansion period without any dark energy component, but the combined analysis (SNe Ia+BAO+CMB) shows that the model is disfavored when compared with the {Lambda}CDM model.

  1. Finite Cosmology and a CMB Cold Spot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, R.J.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Bjorken, J.D.; /SLAC; Overduin, J.M.; /Stanford U., HEPL

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard cosmological model posits a spatially flat universe of infinite extent. However, no observation, even in principle, could verify that the matter extends to infinity. In this work we model the universe as a finite spherical ball of dust and dark energy, and obtain a lower limit estimate of its mass and present size: the mass is at least 5 x 10{sup 23}M{sub {circle_dot}} and the present radius is at least 50 Gly. If we are not too far from the dust-ball edge we might expect to see a cold spot in the cosmic microwave background, and there might be suppression of the low multipoles in the angular power spectrum. Thus the model may be testable, at least in principle. We also obtain and discuss the geometry exterior to the dust ball; it is Schwarzschild-de Sitter with a naked singularity, and provides an interesting picture of cosmogenesis. Finally we briefly sketch how radiation and inflation eras may be incorporated into the model.

  2. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Evan; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One intriguing BSM particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong CP problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the universe. This particle is a pNGB of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry breaking scale, $f_a$, whose value is roughly greater than $10^{9}$ GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, $m_a$, is roughly less than $10^4\\ \\mu \\text{eV}$). The density of axions in the universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early-universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the QCD free energy with respect to the CP-violating phase, $\\theta$. However, this quantity is generically non-perturbative and previous calculations have only employed ins...

  3. K-mouflage Cosmology: the Background Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Brax; Patrick Valageas

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the cosmology of K-mouflage theories at the background level. We show that the effects of the scalar field are suppressed at high matter density in the early Universe and only play a role in the late time Universe where the deviations of the Hubble rate from its $\\Lambda$-CDM counterpart can be of the order five percent for redshifts $1 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 5$. Similarly, we find that the equation of state can cross the phantom divide in the recent past and even diverge when the effective scalar energy density goes negative and subdominant compared to matter, preserving the positivity of the squared Hubble rate. These features are present in models for which Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is not affected. We analyze the fate of K-mouflage when the nonlinear kinetic terms give rise to ghosts, particle excitations with negative energy. In this case, we find that the K-mouflage theories can only be considered as an effective description of the Universe at low energy below $1$ keV. In the safe ghost-free models, we find that the equation of state always diverges in the past and changes significantly by a few percent since $z\\lesssim 1$.

  4. FRW Cosmologies with Adiabatic Matter Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; A. S. M. Germano; L. R. W. Abramo

    1995-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Some properties of cosmological models with matter creation are investigated in the framework of the Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) line element. For adiabatic matter creation, as developed by Prigogine and coworkers, we derive a simple expression relating the particle number density $n$ and energy density $\\rho$ which holds regardless of the matter creation rate. The conditions to generate inflation are discussed and by considering the natural phenomenological matter creation rate $\\psi =3 \\beta nH$, where $\\beta$ is a pure number of the order of unity and $H$ is the Hubble parameter, a minimally modified hot big-bang model is proposed. The dynamic properties of such models can be deduced from the standard ones simply by replacing the adiabatic index $\\gamma$ of the equation of state by an effective parameter $\\gamma_{*} = \\gamma (1 - \\beta)$. The thermodynamic behavior is determined and it is also shown that ages large enough to agree with observations are obtained even given the high values of $H$ suggested by recent measurements.

  5. Cosmological simulations with disformally coupled symmetron fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Hagala; C. Llinares; D. F. Mota

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We use N-body simulations to study the matter distribution in disformal gravity. The disformal model studied here is a conformally coupled symmetron field with an additional exponential disformal term. We conduct cosmological simulations with the aim to find the impact of the new disformal terms in the matter power spectrum, halo mass function and radial profile of the scalar field. This is done by calculating the disformal geodesic equation and the equation of motion for the scalar field, then implementing them into the N-body code ISIS, which is a modified gravity version of the code RAMSES. The presence of a conformal symmetron field increases both the power spectrum and mass function compared to standard gravity on small scales. Our main result is that the newly added disformal terms tend to counteract this effects and can make the evolution slightly closer to standard gravity. We finally show that the disformal terms give rise to oscillations of the scalar field in the centre of the dark matter haloes.

  6. Pseudo-Dirac Neutrinos, a Challenge for Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John F. Beacom; Nicole F. Bell; Dan Hooper; John G. Learned; Sandip Pakvasa; Thomas J. Weiler

    2004-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos may be pseudo-Dirac states, such that each generation is actually composed of two maximally-mixed Majorana neutrinos separated by a tiny mass difference. The usual active neutrino oscillation phenomenology would be unaltered if the pseudo-Dirac splittings are $\\delta m^2 \\alt 10^{-12}$ eV$^2$; in addition, neutrinoless double beta decay would be highly suppressed. However, it may be possible to distinguish pseudo-Dirac from Dirac neutrinos using high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. By measuring flavor ratios as a function of $L/E$, mass-squared differences down to $\\delta m^2 \\sim 10^{-18}$ eV$^2$ can be reached. We comment on the possibility of probing cosmological parameters with neutrinos.

  7. Methods for point source analysis in high energy neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jim Braun; Jon Dumm; Francesco De Palma; Chad Finley; Albrecht Karle; Teresa Montaruli

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.

  8. High precision astrometry with a diffractive pupil telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyon, Olivier; Milster, Thomas D; Eisner, Josh A; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J; Ammons, Stephen M; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan; Pitman, Joe; Woodruff, Robert A; Belikov, Ruslan; 10.1088/0067-0049/200/2/11

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrometric detection and mass determination of Earth-mass exoplanets requires sub-microarcsec accuracy, which is theoretically possible with an imaging space telescope using field stars as an astrometric reference. The measurement must however overcome astrometric distortions which are much larger than the photon noise limit. To address this issue, we propose to generate faint stellar diffraction spikes using a two-dimensional grid of regularly spaced small dark spots added to the surface of the primary mirror (PM). Accurate astrometric motion of the host star is obtained by comparing the position of the spikes to the background field stars. The spikes do not contribute to scattered light in the central part of the field and therefore allow unperturbed coronagraphic observation of the star's immediate surrounding. Because the diffraction spikes are created on the PM and imaged on the same focal plane detector as the background stars, astrometric distortions affect equally the diffraction spikes and the backg...

  9. PROSPECTS FOR GRB SCIENCE WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Band, D. L. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Stockholm Observatory, Albanova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Battelino, M. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bissaldi, E. [Max-Planck Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bogaert, G. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Bonnell, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chiang, J.; Do Couto e Silva, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Cohen-Tanugi, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Astroparticules, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Cutini, S. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); De Palma, F. [Dipt. di Fisica 'M. Merlin' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dingus, B. L. [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fishman, G. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)], E-mail: nicola.omodei@pi.infn.it (and others)

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi mission will reveal the rich spectral and temporal gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena in the >100 MeV band. The synergy with Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors will link these observations to those in the well explored 10-1000 keV range; the addition of the >100 MeV band observations will resolve theoretical uncertainties about burst emission in both the prompt and afterglow phases. Trigger algorithms will be applied to the LAT data both onboard the spacecraft and on the ground. The sensitivity of these triggers will differ because of the available computing resources onboard and on the ground. Here we present the LAT's burst detection methodologies and the instrument's GRB capabilities.

  10. The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) for the Spitzer Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Fazio; the IRAC team

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) is one of three focal plane instruments in the Spitzer Space Telescope. IRAC is a four-channel camera that obtains simultaneous broad-band images at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns. Two nearly adjacent 5.2x5.2 arcmin fields of view in the focal plane are viewed by the four channels in pairs (3.6 and 5.8 microns; 4.5 and 8 microns). All four detector arrays in the camera are 256x256 pixels in size, with the two shorter wavelength channels using InSb and the two longer wavelength channels using Si:As IBC detectors. IRAC is a powerful survey instrument because of its high sensitivity, large field of view, and four-color imaging. This paper summarizes the in-flight scientific, technical, and operational performance of IRAC.

  11. Anisotropic Homogeneous Cosmologies in the Post-Newtonian Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamath Rainsford

    2000-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we explore how far the post-Newtonian theory goes in overcoming the difficulties associated with anisotropic homogeneous cosmologies in the Newtonian approximation. It will be shown that, unlike in the Newtonian case, the cosmological equations of the post-Newtonian approximation are much more in the spirit of general relativity with regard to the nine Bianchi types and issues of singularities. The situations of vanishing rotation and vanishing shear are treated separately. The homogeneous Bianchi I model is considered as an example of a rotation-free cosmology with anisotropy. It is found in the Newtonian approximation that there are arbitrary functions that need to be given for all time if the initial value problem is to be well-posed, while in the post-Newtonian case there is no such need. For the general case of a perfect fluid only the post-Newtonian theory can satisfactorily describe the effects of pressure. This is in accordance with findings in an earlier paper where the post-Newtonian approximation was applied to homogeneous cosmologies. For a shear-free anisotropic homogeneous cosmology the Newtonian theory of Heckmann and Sch\\"ucking is explored. Comparisons with its relativistic and post-Newtonian counterparts are made. In the Newtonian theory solutions exist to which there are no analogues in general relativity. The post-Newtonian approximation may provide a way out.

  12. On a New 4-Vector Cosmological Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The original Dirac Equation is modified in the simplest imaginable and most trivial manner to include a universal 4-Vector Cosmological Field term in the space and time dimensions. This cosmological field leads to a modified Dirac Equation capable of explaining why the Universe appears to be made up chiefly of matter. It is seen that this 4-Vector Cosmological Field is actually a particle field and this particle field can possibly be identified with the darkmatter and darkenergy field. Further, this 4-Vector Cosmological Field is seen to give spacetime the desired quantum mechanical properties of randomness. Furthermore, it is seen that in the emergent Universe, the position coordinates of a particle in space -- contrary to the widely accepted belief that the position of a particle in space has no physical significance, we see that that opposite is true - namely that the position of a particle has physical significance. We further note that the 4-Vector Cosmological Field modification to the Dirac Equation leads us to a vacuum model redolent but different from that of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). This new vacuum model is without virtual particles but darkparticles. We dare to make the suggestion that these darkparticles may possibly explain the current mystery of what really is darkmatter and darkenergy.

  13. Crystal diffraction lens telescope for focusing nuclear gamma rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Ballmoos, P. von; Naya, J.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G. [Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France); Faiz, M. [KFUPM, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Physics Dept.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystal diffraction lens was constructed at Argonne National Laboratory for use as a telescope to focus nuclear gamma rays. It consisted of 600 single crystals of germanium arranged in 8 concentric rings. The mounted angle of each crystal was adjusted to intercept and diffract the incoming gamma rays with an accuracy of a few arc sec. The performance of the lens was tested in two ways. In one case, the gamma rays were focused on a single medium size germanium detector. In the second case, the gamma rays were focused on the central germanium detector of a 3 x 3 matrix of small germanium detectors. The efficiency, image concentration and image quality, and shape were measured. The tests performed with the 3 x 3 matrix detector system were particularly interesting. The wanted radiation was concentrated in the central detector. The 8 other detectors were used to detect the Compton scattered radiation, and their energy was summed with coincident events in the central detector. This resulted in a detector with the efficiency of a large detector (all 9 elements) and the background of a small detector (only the central element). The use of the 3 x 3 detector matrix makes it possible to tell if the source is off axis and, if so, to tell in which direction. The crystal lens acts very much like a simple convex lens for visible light. Thus if the source is off to the left then the image will focus off to the right illuminating the detector on the right side: telling one in which direction to point the telescope. Possible applications of this type of crystal lens to balloon and satellite experiments will be discussed.

  14. HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRY WITH A DIFFRACTIVE PUPIL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guyon, Olivier; Eisner, Josh A.; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bendek, Eduardo A.; Milster, Thomas D. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mark Ammons, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physics Division L-210, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Pitman, Joe [Exploration Sciences, P.O. Box 24, Pine, CO 80470 (United States); Woodruff, Robert A. [2081 Evergreen Avenue, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); Belikov, Ruslan, E-mail: guyon@naoj.org [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrometric detection and mass determination of Earth-mass exoplanets require sub-{mu}as accuracy, which is theoretically possible with an imaging space telescope using field stars as an astrometric reference. The measurement must, however, overcome astrometric distortions, which are much larger than the photon noise limit. To address this issue, we propose to generate faint stellar diffraction spikes using a two-dimensional grid of regularly spaced small dark spots added to the surface of the primary mirror (PM). Accurate astrometric motion of the host star is obtained by comparing the position of the spikes to the background field stars. The spikes do not contribute to scattered light in the central part of the field and therefore allow unperturbed coronagraphic observation of the star's immediate surroundings. Because the diffraction spikes are created on the PM and imaged on the same focal plane detector as the background stars, astrometric distortions affect equally the diffraction spikes and the background stars and are therefore calibrated. We describe the technique, detail how the data collected by the wide-field camera are used to derive astrometric motion, and identify the main sources of astrometric error using numerical simulations and analytical derivations. We find that the 1.4 m diameter telescope, 0.3 deg{sup 2} field we adopt as a baseline design achieves 0.2 {mu}as single measurement astrometric accuracy. The diffractive pupil concept thus enables sub-{mu}as astrometry without relying on the accurate pointing, external metrology, or high-stability hardware required with previously proposed high-precision astrometry concepts.

  15. From theoretical promise to observational reality : calibration, foreground subtraction, and signal extraction in hydrogen cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Adrian Chi-Yan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the hyperfine 21 cm transition to map out the distribution of neutral hydrogen at high redshifts, hydrogen cosmology has the potential to place exquisite constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters, as well ...

  16. Freshman Seminar on New Cosmology MAE 87 8-10 am in EBUII 479

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    the standard NASA-and (dark energy) CDM (cold dark matter) HC (hierarchical clustering) cosmological model-gravitational-dynamics HGD emerges. According to HGD cosmology, life begins soon after the big bang in hot water oceans

  17. The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 The Control System of the MAGIC telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    will be commissioned during this year. The control system of the telescope is distributed over a number of functional on the Central Control and Camera Control systems. 1. Introduction MAGIC[1] is a new generation Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) allocated at the IAC site in the Canary island of La Palma. The aim of the tele

  18. Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project Myung K. Cho Optical Sciences Center in the University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 and Gemini Telescopes Project P. O. Box 26732 Tucson, AZ 85726­6732 Gemini Preprint #9 #12; Active optics performance study of the primary

  19. Point-spread function stability of the SNAP telescope M.J. Sholl1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    the SNAP telescope and detector images, and identified the effects of secondary mirror misalignment, the effects of seasonal variations in solar flux, transients introduced when pointing the body-fixed Ka, with predicted daily changes well within WL limts. Keywords: three-mirror telescopes, space astronomy, dark

  20. THE PREFLIGHT PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING TELESCOPE EIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Dere; J. D. Moses; J. -p. Delaboudinière; J. Brunaud; C. Carabetian; J. -f. Hochedez; X. Y. Song; R. C. Catura; F. Clette

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. This paper presents the preflight photometric calibration of the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The EIT consists of a Ritchey–Chrétien telescope with multilayer coatings applied to four quadrants of the primary and secondary mirrors, several filters and a backside-thinned CCD detector. The quadrants of the EIT

  1. Hubble Space Telescope FOS Optical and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Bow Shock HH 47A 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartigan, Patrick

    Hubble Space Telescope FOS Optical and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Bow Shock HH 47A 1 Patrick Telescope of the HH 47A bow shock and Mach disk that cover the entire spectral range between 2220 Å¡ that the Fe II line broadening must exceed that expected from thermal motions. Excitation of ultraviolet Fe II

  2. The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey: The Multi-Telescope Robotic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Lehner; C. -Y. Wen; J. -H. Wang; S. L. Marshall; M. E. Schwamb; Z. -W. Zhang; F. B. Bianco; J. Giammarco; R. Porrata; C. Alcock; T. Axelrod; Y. -I. Byun; W. P. Chen; K. H. Cook; R. Dave; S. -K. King; T. Lee; H. -C. Lin; S. -Y. Wang

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) operates four fully automatic telescopes to search for occultations of stars by Kuiper Belt Objects. It is a versatile facility that is also useful for the study of initial optical GRB afterglows. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS multi-telescope system, control software, and high-speed imaging.

  3. In-orbit performance of the XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes: images and spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the three X-ray telescopes on-board of XMM-Newton is evaluated addressing imaging characteristics and effective collecting area. The agreement with ground calibration data is excellent. The analysis of images and spectra of cosmic X-ray sources, emphazising supernova and supernova remnants, prooves that the telescopes are even better than originally required.

  4. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of ...

  5. Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    /m2 Diameter: 6.5 m (1.3 m segments) Shape control: active (7 DOF) Actuators: cryogenic stepper motors SSL3 26 January 2010 Background · Trend toward large aperture space telescopes ­ Higher resolving: 2.4 m Shape control: passive Actuators: none Previous generation: Hubble Space Telescope (HST) [1

  6. March 18, 2010 James Webb Space Telescope Studies of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirianni, Marco

    March 18, 2010 James Webb Space Telescope Studies of Dark Energy Jonathan P. Gardner (NASA. Introduction The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has contributed significantly to studies of dark energy) was due to dark energy rather than observational or astrophysical effects such as systematic errors

  7. Dark Energy Cosmology with the Alternative Cosmic Microwave Background Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Wei

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, in a series of works by Liu and Li (L&L), they claimed that there exists a timing asynchrony of $-25.6\\,$ms between the spacecraft attitude and radiometer output timestamps in the original raw WMAP time-ordered data (TOD). L&L reprocessed the WMAP data while the aforementioned timing asynchrony has been corrected, and they obtained an alternative CMB map in which the quadrupole dropped to nearly zero. In the present work, we try to see the implications to dark energy cosmology if L&L are right. While L&L claimed that there is a bug in the WMAP pipeline which leads to significantly different cosmological parameters, an interesting question naturally arises, namely, how robust is the current dark energy cosmology with respect to systematic errors and bugs? So, in this work, we adopt the alternative CMB data of L&L as a strawman to study the robustness of dark energy predictions.

  8. Revisiting the cosmological bias due to local gravitational redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhiqi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent article by Wojtak {\\it et al} (arXiv:1504.00178) pointed out that the local gravitational redshift, despite its smallness ($\\sim 10^{-5}$), can have a noticeable ($\\sim 1\\%$) systematic effect on our cosmological parameter measurements. The authors studied a few extended cosmological models (non-flat $\\Lambda$CDM, $w$CDM, and $w_0$-$w_a$CDM) with a mock supernova dataset. We repeat this calculation and find that the $\\sim 1\\%$ biases are due to strong degeneracy between cosmological parameters. When Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data are added to break the degeneracy, the biases due to local gravitational redshift are negligible ($\\lesssim 0.1 \\sigma$).

  9. Perturbative stability of SFT-based cosmological models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galli, Federico; Koshelev, Alexey S., E-mail: fgalli@tena4.vub.ac.be, E-mail: alexey.koshelev@vub.ac.be [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the appearance of multiple scalar fields in linearized SFT based cosmological models with a single non-local scalar field. Some of these local fields are canonical real scalar fields and some are complex fields with unusual coupling. These systems only admit numerical or approximate analysis. We introduce a modified potential for multiple scalar fields that makes the system exactly solvable in the cosmological context of Friedmann equations and at the same time preserves the asymptotic behavior expected from SFT. The main part of the paper consists of the analysis of inhomogeneous cosmological perturbations in this system. We show numerically that perturbations corresponding to the new type of complex fields always vanish. As an example of application of this model we consider an explicit construction of the phantom divide crossing and prove the perturbative stability of this process at the linear order. The issue of ghosts and ways to resolve it are briefly discussed.

  10. Structure of Cosmological CP Violation via Neutrino Seesaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; Duane A. Dicus; Hong-Jian He; Tianjun Li

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological matter-antimatter asymmetry can originate from CP-violating interactions of seesaw Majorana neutrinos via leptogenesis in the thermal phase of the early universe. Having the cosmological CP-phase for leptogenesis requires at least two right-handed Majorana neutrinos. Using only the low energy neutrino observables we quantitatively reconstruct a minimal neutrino seesaw. We establish a general criterion for minimal seesaw schemes in which the cosmological CP-phase is {\\it completely} reconstructed from the low energy CP-phases measured by neutrino oscillation and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. We reveal and analyze two distinct classes of such minimal schemes that are shown to be highly predictive. Extension of our reconstruction formalism to a three-heavy-neutrino seesaw is discussed.

  11. Thermodynamics of de Sitter Black Holes: Thermal Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Sekiwa

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the thermodynamic properties associated with the black hole event horizon and the cosmological horizon for black hole solutions in asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes. We examine thermodynamics of these horizons on the basis of the conserved charges according to Teitelboim's method. In particular, we have succeeded in deriving the generalized Smarr formula among thermodynamical quantities in a simple and natural way. We then show that cosmological constant must decrease when one takes into account the quantum effect. These observations have been obtained if and only if cosmological constant plays the role of a thermodynamical state variable. We also touch upon the relation between inflation of our universe and a phase transition of black holes.

  12. An improved cosmological bound on the thermal axion mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Melchiorri; Olga Mena; Anze Slosar

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Relic thermal axions could play the role of an extra hot dark matter component in cosmological structure formation theories. By combining the most recent observational data we improve previous cosmological bounds on the axion mass m_a in the so-called hadronic axion window. We obtain a limit on the axion mass m_a axion mass. If neutrino masses belong to an inverted hierarchy scheme, for example, the above constraint is improved to m_a < 0.38eV at the 95% c.l. (m_a < 0.67eV at the 99% c.l.). Future data from experiments as CAST will provide a direct test of the cosmological bound.

  13. On the robustness of cosmological axion mass limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present cosmological bounds on the thermal axion mass in an extended cosmological scenario in which the primordial power spectrum of scalar perturbations differs from the usual power-law shape predicted by the simplest inflationary models. The power spectrum is instead modeled by means of a "piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial" (PCHIP). When using Cosmic Microwave Background measurements combined with other cosmological data sets, the thermal axion mass constraints are degraded only slightly. The addition of the measurements of $\\sigma_8$ and $\\Omega_m$ from the 2013 Planck cluster catalogue on galaxy number counts relaxes the bounds on the thermal axion mass, mildly favouring a $\\sim 1$~eV axion mass, regardless of the model adopted for the primordial power spectrum.

  14. Cosmological bounds on sub-MeV mass axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadamuro, Davide; Raffelt, Georg; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Hannestad, Steen, E-mail: cadamuro@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk, E-mail: raffelt@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: redondo@mppmu.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Axions with mass m{sub a} ?> 0.7 eV are excluded by cosmological precision data because they provide too much hot dark matter. While for m{sub a} ?> 20 eV the a ? 2? lifetime drops below the age of the universe, we show that the cosmological exclusion range can be extended to 0.7eV ?< m{sub a} ?< 300 keV, primarily by the cosmic deuterium abundance: axion decays would strongly modify the baryon-to-photon ratio at BBN relative to the one at CMB decoupling. Additional arguments include neutrino dilution relative to photons by axion decays and spectral CMB distortions. Our new cosmological constraints complement stellar-evolution and laboratory bounds.

  15. Supercooling and phase coexistence in cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megevand, Ariel; Sanchez, Alejandro D. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Dean Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological phase transitions are predicted by particle physics models, and have a variety of important cosmological consequences, which depend strongly on the dynamics of the transition. In this work we investigate in detail the general features of the development of a first-order phase transition. We find thermodynamical constraints on some quantities that determine the dynamics, namely, the latent heat, the radiation energy density, and the false-vacuum energy density. Using a simple model with a Higgs field, we study numerically the amount and duration of supercooling and the subsequent reheating and phase coexistence. We analyze the dependence of the dynamics on the different parameters of the model, namely, the energy scale, the number of degrees of freedom, and the couplings of the scalar field with bosons and fermions. We also inspect the implications for the cosmological outcomes of the phase transition.

  16. Dark Energy Dipole in f(R T) Cosmological Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salehi, Amin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent astronomical observations show that the universe may be anisotropic on large scales. The Union2 SnIa data hint that the universe has a preferred direction. If such a cosmological privileged axis indeed exists, one has to consider an anisotropic expanding Universe, instead of the isotropic cosmological model. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the cosmic dipoles in f(R; T) Cosmological Model. the maximum anisotropic deviation direction is (l, b) = (137,23) or equivalently (l, b) = (317,-23). Our numerical results show that, using Union2 data, the anisotropic f(R, T) model provides a significantly better fit than the isotropic f(R, T), CPL, and {\\Lambda}CDM models.

  17. On higher derivative gravity, c-theorems and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aninda Sinha

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider higher derivative gravity lagrangians in 3 and 4 dimensions, which admit simple c-theorems, including upto six derivative curvature invariants. Following a suggestion by Myers, these lagrangians are restricted such that the fluctuations around (anti) de Sitter spaces have second order linearized equations of motion. We study c-theorems both in the context of AdS/CFT and cosmology. In the context of cosmology, the monotonic function is the entropy defined on the apparent horizon through Wald's formula. Exact black hole solutions which are asymptotically (anti) de Sitter are presented. An interesting lower bound for entropy is found in de Sitter space. Some aspects of cosmology in both D=3 and D=4 are discussed.

  18. The MAGIC Telescope Project for Gamma Astronomy above 10 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Magnussen

    1998-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to construct a 17 m diameter imaging air Cherenkov telescope, called the MAGIC Telescope, is described. The aim of the project is to close the observation gap in the gamma-ray sky extending from 10 GeV as the highest energy measurable by space-borne experiments to 300 GeV, the lowest energy measurable by the current generation of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. The MAGIC Telescope will incorporate several new features in order to reach the very low energy threshold. At the same time the new technology will yield an improvement in sensitivity in the energy region where current Cherenkov telescopes are measuring by about an order of magnitude.

  19. Theoretical Research in Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Y Jack; Dolan, Louise; Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Frampton, Paul

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The research was in the area of Theoretical Physics: Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

  20. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN 1999em

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Type IIP Supernovae as Cosmological Probes: A SEAM Distanceintrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmologicalstars: atmospheres — supernovae: 1999em Distances from

  1. Implementing the DC Mode in Cosmological Simulations with Supercomoving Variables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Rudd, Douglas H.

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    As emphasized by previous studies, proper treatment of the density fluctuation on the fundamental scale of a cosmological simulation volume - the 'DC mode' - is critical for accurate modeling of spatial correlations on scales ~> 10% of simulation box size. We provide further illustration of the effects of the DC mode on the abundance of halos in small boxes and show that it is straightforward to incorporate this mode in cosmological codes that use the 'supercomoving' variables. The equations governing evolution of dark matter and baryons recast with these variables are particularly simple and include the expansion factor, and hence the effect of the DC mode, explicitly only in the Poisson equation.

  2. Precision Cosmology and the Density of Baryons in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kaplinghat; M. S. Turner

    2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Big-bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements give independent, accurate measurements of the baryon density and can test the framework of the standard cosmology. Early CMB data are consistent with the longstanding conclusion from BBN that baryons constitute a small fraction of matter in the Universe, but may indicate a slightly higher value for the baryon density. We clarify precisely what the two methods determine, and point out that differing values for the baryon density can indicate either an inconsistency or physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. We discuss other signatures of the new physics in CMB anisotropy.

  3. Mathematical problems in higher order gravity and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cotsakis

    1997-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the issue of motivating the analysis of higher order gravity theories and their cosmologies and introduce a rule which states that these theories may be considered as a vehicle for testing whether certain properties may be of relevance to quantum theory. We discuss the physicality issue arising as a consequence of the conformal transformation theorem, the question of formulating a consistent first order formalism of such theories and also the isotropization problem for a class of generalized cosmologies. We point out that this field may have an important role to play in clarifying issues arising also in general relativity.

  4. Nonlocal String Tachyon as a Model for Cosmological Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aref'eva, Irina Ya. [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkin st. 8, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many different phenomenological models describing the cosmological dark energy and accelerating Universe by choosing adjustable functions. In this paper we consider a specific model of scalar tachyon field which is derived from the NSR string field theory and study its cosmological applications. We find that in the effective field theory approximation the equation of state parameter w < -1, i.e. one has a phantom Universe. It is shown that due to nonlocal effects there is no quantum instability that the usual phantom models suffer from. Moreover due to a flip effect of the potential the Universe does not enter to a future singularity.

  5. A note on string size evolution in phantom cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soon-Tae Hong

    2015-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze evolution of string size in higher-dimensional cosmology with phantom field. Assuming that the Universe possesses the phantom field defined in a ten-dimensional spacetime, we predict string size which is claimed to be that of photon in nature at present. The Universe size increases as in the standard inflationary Universe model while the photon size decreases drastically at the early stage of the string evolution after the Big Bang. Moreover, the photon spin in the phantom Universe is analyzed in the framework of the stringy cosmology.

  6. Density perturbations in braneworld cosmology and primordial black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bugaev, Edgar; Klimai, Peter [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study, by numerical methods, the time evolution of scalar perturbations in radiation era of Randall-Sundrum braneworld cosmology. Our results confirm an existence of the enhancement of perturbation amplitudes (near horizon crossing), discovered recently. We suggest the approximate solution of equations of the perturbation theory in the high-energy regime, which predicts that the enhancement factor is asymptotically constant, as a function of scale. We discuss the application of this result for the problem of primordial black hole production in braneworld cosmology.

  7. Attracted to de Sitter: cosmology of the linear Horndeski models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin-Moruno, Prado; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Horndeski cosmological models, with a minisuperspace Lagrangian linear in the field derivative, that are able to screen any vacuum energy and material content leading to a spatially flat de Sitter vacuum fixed by the theory itself. Furthermore, we investigate particular models with a cosmic evolution independent of the material content and use them to understand the general characteristics of this framework. We also consider more realistic models, which we denote the "term-by-term" and "tripod" models, focusing attention on cases in which the critical point is indeed an attractor solution and the cosmological history is of particular interest.

  8. Attracted to de Sitter: cosmology of the linear Horndeski models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prado Martin-Moruno; Nelson J. Nunes; Francisco S. N. Lobo

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Horndeski cosmological models, with a minisuperspace Lagrangian linear in the field derivative, that are able to screen any vacuum energy and material content leading to a spatially flat de Sitter vacuum fixed by the theory itself. Furthermore, we investigate particular models with a cosmic evolution independent of the material content and use them to understand the general characteristics of this framework. We also consider more realistic models, which we denote the "term-by-term" and "tripod" models, focusing attention on cases in which the critical point is indeed an attractor solution and the cosmological history is of particular interest.

  9. Cosmological Neutrino Mass Detection: The Best Probe of Neutrino Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States)

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence, on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi)massless particles as in Majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way out to explain a discrepancy < or approx. 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and lab data.

  10. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  11. Distributions of Fourier modes of cosmological density fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Z.; Bardeen, J.M. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the probability distributions of Fourier modes of cosmological density fields using the central limit theorem is it applies to weighted integrals of random fields. It is shown that if the cosmological principle holds in a certain sense, i.e., the Universe approaches homogeneity and isotropy sufficiently rapidly on very large scales, the one-point distribution of each Fourier mode of the density field is Gaussian whether or not the density field itself is Gaussian. Therefore, one-point distributions of the power spectrum obtained from observational data or from simulations are not a good test of whether the density field is Gaussian.

  12. Searches for Astrophysical and Cosmological Axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asztalos, S J; Rosenberg, L J; van Bibber, K; Sikivie, P; Zioutas, K

    2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The axion remains, after nearly 30 years, the most compelling and elegant solution to the strong-CP problem, i.e. why this symmetry is protected in QCD in spite of CP violation elsewhere. The axion is expected to be extremely light, and possess extraordinarily feeble couplings to matter and radiation. Because of its small couplings, the axion has defied experimental confirmation and is unlikely to be discovered in conventional laboratory experiments (i.e. production-detection). Nevertheless, a sufficiently light axion would have been produced abundantly in the Big Bang and is an excellent candidate for the dark matter of the Universe. Through the axion's two-photon coupling, implying axion-photon mixing in an external electromagnetic field, galactic halo axions may be feasibly detected by their resonant conversion to RF photons in a microwave cavity permeated by magnetic field with current technology. Over the past decade experiments have already set interesting limits in mass and coupling; upgrades in progress to photon detection schemes at or below the standard quantum limit will soon enable definitive searches. Similarly, axions produced in the solar burning core might be detectable by their conversion to x-rays in a magnetic helioscope. Indeed current published limits already equal the best bounds on axion-photon coupling inferred from the concordance of stellar evolution models and observations, from horizontal branch stars. Significant improvements in both the mass range and sensitivity of the axion helioscope technique will be forthcoming in the next few years. This report will first summarize the theoretical background of the axion, and laboratory, astrophysical and cosmological limits on its mass and couplings. Cavity microwave searches for cosmic axions will then be reviewed, focusing on the current large-scale experiments (ADMX in the US; CARRACK in Japan), and their enabling technologies (HFET and SQUID amplifiers; Rydberg-atom single-quantum detection). Last, the searches for solar axions will be discussed, with particular attention to the CAST experiment at CERN. The conclusion provides a basis for cautious optimism that a definitive verdict on the axion, or at least its role as a dark matter component, could be expected within a decade.

  13. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Berkowitz; Michael I. Buchoff; Enrico Rinaldi

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One intriguing BSM particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong CP problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the universe. This particle is a pNGB of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry breaking scale, $f_a$, whose value is roughly greater than $10^{9}$ GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, $m_a$, is roughly less than $10^4\\ \\mu \\text{eV}$). The density of axions in the universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early-universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the QCD free energy with respect to the CP-violating phase, $\\theta$. However, this quantity is generically non-perturbative and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small $\\theta$ from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the universe. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-$\\theta$ cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound $m_a \\geq (14.6\\pm0.1) \\ \\mu \\text{eV}$ when PQ-breaking occurs after inflation.

  14. Receive Transmit Telescope Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies for the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft and verify these technologies with the experimental test for Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft Jae Jun Kim* , Tim Sands , and Brij N. Agrawal Naval Postgraduate School Relay Mirror Spacecraft. In this paper, development of the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft experimental

  15. The impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petri, Andrea [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); May, Morgan [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kratochvil, Jan M. [Univ. of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2?10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ?100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.

  16. The impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Andrea [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); May, Morgan [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kratochvil, Jan M. [Univ. of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from the PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2?10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ?100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.

  17. The impact of spurious shear on cosmological parameter estimates from weak lensing observables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltan; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual errors in shear measurements, after corrections for instrument systematics and atmospheric effects, can impact cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing observations. Here we combine convergence maps from our suite of ray-tracing simulations with random realizations of spurious shear. This allows us to quantify the errors and biases of the triplet (?m,w,?8) derived from the power spectrum (PS), as well as from three different sets of non-Gaussian statistics of the lensing convergence field: Minkowski functionals (MFs), low-order moments (LMs), and peak counts (PKs). Our main results are as follows: (i) We find an order of magnitude smaller biases from themore »PS than in previous work. (ii) The PS and LM yield biases much smaller than the morphological statistics (MF, PK). (iii) For strictly Gaussian spurious shear with integrated amplitude as low as its current estimate of ?sys2?10-7, biases from the PS and LM would be unimportant even for a survey with the statistical power of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. However, we find that for surveys larger than ?100 deg2, non-Gaussianity in the noise (not included in our analysis) will likely be important and must be quantified to assess the biases. (iv) The morphological statistics (MF, PK) introduce important biases even for Gaussian noise, which must be corrected in large surveys. The biases are in different directions in (?m,w,?8) parameter space, allowing self-calibration by combining multiple statistics. Our results warrant follow-up studies with more extensive lensing simulations and more accurate spurious shear estimates.« less

  18. A study of the performance parameters of the High Altitude Gamma Ray (HAGAR) telescope system at Ladakh in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    results of Monte Carlo simulations for the High Altitude Gamma Ray (HAGAR) telescope array which detects High Altitude GAmma Ray (HAGAR) telescope system is designed to detect very high energy gamma rays fromA study of the performance parameters of the High Altitude Gamma Ray (HAGAR) telescope system

  19. Wide-eld CCD imager for the 6.5m MMT telescope Brian McLeod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from six 1.8-m mirrors to a single f 1.25 6.5-m mirror. The new telescope will have several secondary of the Multiple Mirror Telescope fromsix 1.8mmirrors to a single 6.5mmirror willsigni cantly increase its and searches for objects in the outer solar system. Keywords: CCDs, imaging, astronomy, telescopes, cameras 1

  20. Cosmological parameter estimation and Bayesian model comparison using VSA data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anze Slosar; Pedro Carreira; Kieran Cleary; Rod D. Davies; Richard J. Davis; Clive Dickinson; Ricardo Genova-Santos; Keith Grainge; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Yaser A. Hafez; Michael P. Hobson; Michael E. Jones; Rudiger Kneissl; Katy Lancaster; Anthony Lasenby; J. P. Leahy; Klaus Maisinger; Phil J. Marshall; Guy G. Pooley; Rafael Rebolo; Jose Alberto Rubino-Martin; Ben Rusholme; Richard D. E. Saunders; Richard Savage; Paul F. Scott; Pedro J. Sosa Molina; Angela C. Taylor; David Titterington; Elizabeth Waldram; Robert A. Watson; Althea Wilkinson

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the basic comological parameters using the first observations by the Very Small Array (VSA) in its extended configuration, together with existing cosmic microwave background data and other cosmological observations. We estimate cosmological parameters for four different models of increasing complexity. In each case, careful consideration is given to implied priors and the Bayesian evidence is calculated in order to perform model selection. We find that the data are most convincingly explained by a simple flat Lambda-CDM cosmology without tensor modes. In this case, combining just the VSA and COBE data sets yields the 68 per cent confidence intervals Omega_b h^2=0.034 (+0.007, -0.007), Omega_dm h^2 = 0.18 (+0.06, -0.04), h=0.72 (+0.15,-0.13), n_s=1.07 (+0.06,-0.06) and sigma_8=1.17 (+0.25, -0.20). The most general model considered includes spatial curvature, tensor modes, massive neutrinos and a parameterised equation of state for the dark energy. In this case, by combining all recent cosmological data, we find, in particular, 95 percent limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio R < 0.63 and on the fraction of massive neutrinos f_nu < 0.11; we also obtain the 68 per cent confidence interval w=-1.06 (+0.20, -0.25) on the equation of state of dark energy.

  1. Analyzing and Visualizing Cosmological Simulations with ParaView

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodring, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Heitmann, Katrin [ORNL; Ahrens, James P [ORNL; Fasel, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hsu, Chung-Hsing [ORNL; Habib, Salman [ORNL; Pope, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of large cosmological sky surveys - ushering in the era of precision cosmology - has been accompanied by ever larger cosmological simulations. The analysis of these simulations, which currently encompass tens of billions of particles and up to a trillion particles in the near future, is often as daunting as carrying out the simulations in the first place. Therefore, the development of very efficient analysis tools combining qualitative and quantitative capabilities is a matter of some urgency. In this paper, we introduce new analysis features implemented within ParaView, a fully parallel, open-source visualization toolkit, to analyze large N-body simulations. A major aspect of ParaView is that it can live and operate on the same machines and utilize the same parallel power as the simulation codes themselves. In addition, data movement is in a serious bottleneck now and will become even more of an issue in the future; an interactive visualization and analysis tool that can handle data in situ is fast becoming essential. The new features in ParaView include particle readers and a very efficient halo finder that identifies friends-of-friends halos and determines common halo properties, including spherical overdensity properties. In combination with many other functionalities already existing within ParaView, such as histogram routines or interfaces to programming languages like Python, this enhanced version enables fast, interactive, and convenient analyses of large cosmological simulations. In addition, development paths are available for future extensions.

  2. Dangerous Angular KK/Glueball Relics in String Theory Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Dufaux; L. Kofman; M. Peloso

    2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of Kaluza-Klein particles in the universe is a potential manifestation of string theory cosmology. In general, they can be present in the high temperature bath of the early universe. In particular examples, string theory inflation often ends with brane-antibrane annihilation followed by the energy cascading through massive closed string loops to KK modes which then decay into lighter standard model particles. However, massive KK modes in the early universe may become dangerous cosmological relics if the inner manifold contains warped throat(s) with approximate isometries. In the complimentary picture, in the AdS/CFT dual gauge theory with extra symmetries, massive glueballs of various spins become the dangerous cosmological relics. The decay of these angular KK modes/glueballs, located around the tip of the throat, is caused by isometry breaking which results from gluing the throat to the compact CY manifold. We address the problem of these angular KK particles/glueballs, studying their interactions and decay channels, from the theory side, and the resulting cosmological constraints on the warped compactification parameters, from the phenomenology side. The abundance and decay time of the long-lived non-relativistic angular KK modes depend strongly on the parameters of the warped geometry, so that observational constraints rule out a significant fraction of the parameter space. In particular, the coupling of the angular KK particles can be weaker than gravitational.

  3. Cosmological status of Lagrangian theory of density perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Strokov

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that hydrodynamical and field approaches in theory of cosmological scalar perturbations are equivalent for a single medium. We also give relations between notations introduced by V. Lukash, J. Bardeen, J. Bardeen et al. and G. Chibisov and V. Mukhanov.

  4. Scaling attractors for quintessence in flat universe with cosmological term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    For evolution of flat universe, we classify late time and future attractors with scaling behavior of scalar field quintessence in the case of potential, which, at definite values of its parameters and initial data, corresponds to exact scaling in the presence of cosmological constant.

  5. Universal neutrino mass hierarchy and cosmological baryon number asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing Zhizhong [CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918 (4), Beijing 100039 (China)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conjecture that three light Majorana neutrinos and their right-handed counterparts may have a universal geometric mass hierarchy. Incorporating this phenomenological conjecture with the Fritzsch texture of lepton mass matrices in a simple seesaw mechanism, we show that it is possible to simultaneously account for current neutrino oscillation data and the cosmological baryon number asymmetry via leptogenesis.

  6. Testing Cosmological Models with Type Ic Super Luminous Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of type Ic Super Luminous Supernovae (SLSN Ic) to examine the cosmological expansion introduces a new standard ruler with which to test theoretical models. The sample suitable for this kind of work now includes 11 SLSNe Ic, which have thus far been used solely in tests involving $\\Lambda$CDM. In this paper, we broaden the base of support for this new, important cosmic probe by using these observations to carry out a one-on-one comparison between the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ and $\\Lambda$CDM cosmologies. We individually optimize the parameters in each cosmological model by minimizing the $\\chi^{2}$ statistic. We also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on these current SLSN Ic measurements to estimate how large the sample would have to be in order to rule out either model at a $\\sim 99.7\\%$ confidence level. The currently available sample indicates a likelihood of $\\sim$$70-80\\%$ that the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is the correct cosmology versus $\\sim$$20-30\\%$ for the standard model. These results are suggest...

  7. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /CCAPP; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Evrard, August E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; Hansen, Sarah M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Hao, Jia; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Northwestern U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Sheldon, Erin S.; /Brookhaven; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  8. Disformal Theories of Gravity: From the Solar System to Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Sakstein

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with theories of gravity that contain a scalar coupled both conformally and disformally to matter through the metric. By systematically deriving the non-relativistic limit, it is shown that no new non-linear screening mechanisms are present beyond the Vainshtein mechanism and chameleon-like screening. If one includes the cosmological expansion of the universe, disformal effects that are usually taken to be absent can be present in the solar system. When the conformal factor is absent, fifth-forces can be screened on all scales when the cosmological field is slowly-rolling. We investigate the cosmology of these models and use local tests of gravity to place new constraints on the disformal coupling and find $\\mathcal{M}>\\mathcal{O}(\\textrm{eV})$, which is not competitive with laboratory tests. Finally, we discuss the future prospects for testing these theories and the implications for other theories of modified gravity. In particular, the Vainshtein radius of solar system objects can be altered from the static prediction when cosmological time-derivatives are non-negligible.

  9. The Age-Redshift Relation for Standard Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Thomas; R. Kantowski

    2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present compact, analytic expressions for the age-redshift relation $\\tau(z)$ for standard Friedmann-Lema\\^ \\itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology. The new expressions are given in terms of incomplete Legendre elliptic integrals and evaluate much faster than by direct numerical integration.

  10. Cosmological evolutions of $F(R)$ nonlinear massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Jun Wu

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently a new extended nonlinear massive gravity model has been proposed which includes the $F(R)$ modifications to dRGT model.We follow the $F(R)$ nonlinear massive gravity and study its implications on cosmological evolutions. We derive the critical points of the cosmic system and study the corresponding kinetics by performing the phase-plane analysis.

  11. Evolution Operators for Linearly Polarized Two-Killing Cosmological Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Fernando Barbero G.; Daniel Gómez Vergel; Eduardo J. S. Villaseñor

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a general procedure to obtain non perturbative evolution operators in closed form for quantized linearly polarized two Killing vector reductions of general relativity with a cosmological interpretation. We study the representation of these operators in Fock spaces and discuss in detail the conditions leading to unitary evolutions.

  12. Cosmological electromagnetic fields due to gravitational wave perturbations Mattias Marklund*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunsby, Peter

    show that this coupling leads to an initial pulse of electromagnetic waves whose width and amplitude to produce a pulse of gravitationally induced electromagnetic waves. In particular, because of the differentCosmological electromagnetic fields due to gravitational wave perturbations Mattias Marklund

  13. Decaying $?$ cosmologies and statistical properties of gravitational lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. F. Bloomfield Torres; I. Waga

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the statistical properties of gravitational lenses for models in which a cosmological term decreases with time as $\\Lambda \\propto a^{-m}$, where $a$ is the scale factor and $m$ is a parameter ($0 \\leq m }{\\sim}2$ have high likelihood to reproduce the observed lens statistics in the HST snapshot survey.

  14. Dark energy and dark matter from cosmological observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen Hannestad

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of our knowledge about the dark matter and dark energy is reviewed. Bounds on the content of cold and hot dark matter from cosmological observations are discussed in some detail. I also review current bounds on the physical properties of dark energy, mainly its equation of state and effective speed of sound.

  15. CAPUT DARK ENERGY TOPICS, 2013 1. The Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    CAPUT DARK ENERGY TOPICS, 2013 1 #12;1. The Cosmological Constant - The acceleration as curvature term in the Einstein field equation and not a form of dark energy. Provide a critical discussion., Rovelli C., 2010 Is dark energy really a mystery ? Nature, 466, 321 (July 2010) - Padmanabhan T., 2003

  16. Kaluza-Klein Cosmology With Modified Holographic Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Farida Khanum

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the compact Kaluza-Klein cosmology in which modified holographic dark energy is interacting with dark matter. Using this scenario, we evaluate equation of state parameter as well as equation of evolution of the modified holographic dark energy. Further, it is shown that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds without any constraint.

  17. Dark Energy: The Cosmological Challenge of the T. Padmanabhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Dark Energy: The Cosmological Challenge of the Millennium T. Padmanabhan IUCAA, Pune Observational. It is made of a very exotic species called dark energy which exerts negative pressure. This is more esoteric per cent dark 1 #12;energy. The key direct evidence, however, came in late ninetees from the analysis

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Novae in M49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Ferrarese; Patrick Cote; Andres Jordan

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for novae in M49 (NGC 4472) has been undertaken with the Hubble Space Telescope. A 55-day observing campaign in F555W (19 epochs) and F814W (five epochs) has led to the discovery of nine novae. We find that M49 may be under-abundant in slow, faint novae relative to the Milky Way and M31. Instead, the decline rates of the M49 novae are remarkably similar to those of novae in the LMC. This fact argues against a simple classification of novae in "bulge" and "disk" sub-classes. We examine the Maximum-Magnitude versus Rate of Decline (MMRD) relation for novae in M49, finding only marginal agreement with the Galactic and M31 MMRD relations. A recalibration of the Buscombe-de Vaucouleurs relation gives an absolute magnitude 15 days past maximum of M_{V,15} = -6.36+/-0.19, which is substantially brighter than previous calibrations based on Galactic novae. Monte Carlo simulations yield a global nova rate for M49 of 100{+35}{-30} per year, and a luminosity-specific nova rate in the range \

  19. Active optics and coronography with the Hubble Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malbet, F; Yu, J; Fabien Malbet; Michael Shao; Jeffrey Yu

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of planet and proto-planetary disk detection, achieving high angular resolution and high dynamic range is a necessity. Coronography coupled with adaptive optics on Hubble Space Telescope is a way to get both good spatial resolution and high dynamic range. However, because of the residual figure errors on the primary and on the secondary, HST has a scattered light level that prevents it from detecting extra-solar planets. Our simulations show that by using an active mirror (400-1000 actuators) in the optical path of HST with adaptive optics, we can correct the mirror errors and decrease the scattering level by a factor 10.sup(2) (from 10.sup(-4) to 10.sup(-6) fainter than the star). Furthermore, by controlling the spatial frequencies of the active mirror with a {\\em dark hole\\/} algorithm we can decrease the scattering level in image zones where planet detection is likely. Using this technique, we have succeeded in decreasing the scattering level to 3 x 10.sup(-8) of the star intensity within 1 ar...

  20. Active Optics and Coronography with the Hubble Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabien Malbet; Michael Shao; Jeffrey Yu

    1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of planet and proto-planetary disk detection, achieving high angular resolution and high dynamic range is a necessity. Coronography coupled with adaptive optics on Hubble Space Telescope is a way to get both good spatial resolution and high dynamic range. However, because of the residual figure errors on the primary and on the secondary, HST has a scattered light level that prevents it from detecting extra-solar planets. Our simulations show that by using an active mirror (400-1000 actuators) in the optical path of HST with adaptive optics, we can correct the mirror errors and decrease the scattering level by a factor $10^{2}$ (from $10^{-4}$ to $10^{-6}$ fainter than the star). Furthermore, by controlling the spatial frequencies of the active mirror with a {\\em dark hole\\/} algorithm we can decrease the scattering level in image zones where planet detection is likely. Using this technique, we have succeeded in decreasing the scattering level to $3\\times 10^{-8}$ of the star intensity within 1 arcsec from the central star. This will allow the detection of a Jupiter-like planet $10^{-9}$ times dimmer than the central star located 10 pc away in 1 hour of integration time with a signal-to-noise ratio of 5. This paper describes the method used to determine the actuator strokes applied to a deformable mirror to achieve planet detection and the design of a coronograph which implements this novel technique.

  1. WorldWide Telescope in Research and Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Alyssa; Muench, August; Pepe, Alberto; Udomprasert, Patricia; Wong, Curtis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The WorldWide Telescope computer program, released to researchers and the public as a free resource in 2008 by Microsoft Research, has changed the way the ever-growing Universe of online astronomical data is viewed and understood. The WWT program can be thought of as a scriptable, interactive, richly visual browser of the multi-wavelength Sky as we see it from Earth, and of the Universe as we would travel within it. In its web API format, WWT is being used as a service to display professional research data. In its desktop format, WWT works in concert (thanks to SAMP and other IVOA standards) with more traditional research applications such as ds9, Aladin and TOPCAT. The WWT Ambassadors Program (founded in 2009) recruits and trains astrophysically-literate volunteers (including retirees) who use WWT as a teaching tool in online, classroom, and informal educational settings. Early quantitative studies of WWTA indicate that student experiences with WWT enhance science learning dramatically. Thanks to the wealth ...

  2. Curvature Wavefront Sensing for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin, Bo; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from 4 curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1mm on either side of focus. In this paper we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intra- and extra-focal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LS...

  3. Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petroff, E; Barr, E D; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J; Edwards, P G; Stevens, J; Brem, C; Jameson, A; Burke-Spolaor, S; Johnston, S; Bhat, N D R; Chandra, P; Kudale, S; Bhandari, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Perytons" are millisecond-duration transients of terrestrial origin, whose frequency-swept emission mimics the dispersion of an astrophysical pulse that has propagated through tenuous cold plasma. In fact, their similarity to FRB 010724 had previously cast a shadow over the interpretation of "fast radio bursts," which otherwise appear to be of extragalactic origin. Until now, the physical origin of the dispersion-mimicking perytons had remained a mystery. We have identified strong out-of-band emission at 2.3--2.5 GHz associated with several peryton events. Subsequent tests revealed that a peryton can be generated at 1.4 GHz when a microwave oven door is opened prematurely and the telescope is at an appropriate relative angle. Radio emission escaping from microwave ovens during the magnetron shut-down phase neatly explain all of the observed properties of the peryton signals. Now that the peryton source has been identified, we furthermore demonstrate that the microwaves on site could not have caused FRB 01072...

  4. Origin of Matter from Vacuum in Conformal Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Blaschke; V. Pervushin; D. Proskurin; S. Vinitsky; A. Gusev

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the hypothesis that the matter content of the universe can be a product of the decay of primordial vector bosons. The effect of the intensive cosmological creation of these primordial vector $W, ~Z $ bosons from the vacuum is studied in the framework of General Relativity and the Standard Model where the relative standard of measurement identifying conformal quantities with the measurable ones is accepted. The relative standard leads to the conformal cosmology with the z-history of masses with the constant temperature, instead of the conventional z-history of the temperature with constant masses in inflationary cosmology. In conformal cosmology both the latest supernova data and primordial nucleosynthesis are compatible with a stiff equation of state associated with one of the possible states of the infrared gravitation field. The distribution function of the created bosons in the lowest order of perturbation theory exposes a cosmological singularity as a consequence of the theorem about the absence of the massless limit of massive vector fields in quantum theory. This singularity can be removed by taking into account the collision processes leading to a thermalization of the created particles. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature T=(M_W^2H_0)^{1/3} ~ 2.7 K occurs as an integral of motion for the universe in the stiff state. We show that this temperature can be attained by the CMB radiation being the final product of the decay of primordial bosons. The effect of anomalous nonconservation of baryon number due to the polarization of the Dirac sea vacuum by these primordial bosons is considered.

  5. De-contamination of cosmological 21-cm maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liron Gleser; Adi Nusser; Andrew J. Benson

    2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for extracting the expected cosmological 21-cm signal from the epoch of reionization, taking into account contaminating radiations and random instrumental noise. The method is based on the maximum a-posteriori probability (MAP) formalism and employs the coherence of the contaminating radiation along the line-of-sight and the three-dimensional correlations of the cosmological signal. We test the method using a detailed and comprehensive modeling of the cosmological 21-cm signal and the contaminating radiation. The signal is obtained using a high resolution N-body simulation where the gas is assumed to trace the dark matter and is reionized by stellar radiation computed from semi-analytic galaxy formation recipes. We model contaminations to the cosmological signal from synchrotron and free-free galactic foregrounds and extragalactic sources including active galactic nuclei, radio haloes and relics, synchrotron and free-free emission from star forming galaxies, and free-free emission from dark matter haloes and the intergalactic medium. We provide tests of the reconstruction method for several rms values of instrumental noise from $\\sigma_{N}=1$ to 250 mK. For low instrumental noise, the recovered signal, along individual lines-of-sight, fits the true cosmological signal with a mean rms difference of $d_{rms}\\approx 1.7\\pm 0.6$ for $\\sigma_{N}=1$ mK, and $d_{rms}\\approx 4.2\\pm 0.4$ for $\\sigma_{N}=5$ mK. The one-dimensional power spectrum is nicely reconstructed for all values of $\\sigma_{N}$ considered here, while the reconstruction of the two-dimensional power spectrum and the Minkowski functionals is good only for noise levels of the order of few mK.

  6. Cosmology of hybrid metric-Palatini f(X)-gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Capozziello; Tiberiu Harko; Tomi S. Koivisto; Francisco S. N. Lobo; Gonzalo J. Olmo

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of modified theories of gravity, consisting of the superposition of the metric Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian with an $f(\\cal R)$ term constructed \\`{a} la Palatini was proposed recently. The dynamically equivalent scalar-tensor representation of the model was also formulated, and it was shown that even if the scalar field is very light, the theory passes the Solar System observational constraints. Therefore the model predicts the existence of a long-range scalar field, modifying the cosmological and galactic dynamics. An explicit model that passes the local tests and leads to cosmic acceleration was also obtained. In the present work, it is shown that the theory can be also formulated in terms of the quantity $X\\equiv \\kappa^2 T+R$, where T and R are the traces of the stress-energy and Ricci tensors, respectively. The variable X represents the deviation with respect to the field equation trace of general relativity. The cosmological applications of this hybrid metric-Palatini gravitational theory are also explored, and cosmological solutions coming from the scalar-tensor representation of f(X)-gravity are presented. Criteria to obtain cosmic acceleration are discussed and the field equations are analyzed as a dynamical system. Several classes of dynamical cosmological solutions, depending on the functional form of the effective scalar field potential, describing both accelerating and decelerating Universes are explicitly obtained. Furthermore, the cosmological perturbation equations are derived and applied to uncover the nature of the propagating scalar degree of freedom and the signatures these models predict in the large-scale structure.

  7. Degravitation, inflation and the cosmological constant as an afterglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patil, Subodh P., E-mail: subodh@physik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we adopt the phenomenological approach of taking the degravitation paradigm seriously as a consistent modification of gravity in the IR, and investigate its consequences for various cosmological situations. We motivate degravitation - where Netwon's constant is promoted to a scale dependent filter function - as arising from either a small (resonant) mass for the graviton, or as an effect in semi-classical gravity. After addressing how the Bianchi identities are to be satisfied in such a set up, we turn our attention towards the cosmological consequences of degravitation. By considering the example filter function corresponding to a resonantly massive graviton (with a filter scale larger than the present horizon scale), we show that slow roll inflation, hybrid inflation and old inflation remain quantitatively unchanged. We also find that the degravitation mechanism inherits a memory of past energy densities in the present epoch in such a way that is likely significant for present cosmological evolution. For example, if the universe underwent inflation in the past due to it having tunneled out of some false vacuum, we find that degravitation implies a remnant 'afterglow' cosmological constant, whose scale immediately afterwards is parametrically suppressed by the filter scale (L) in Planck units {Lambda} {approx} l{sup 2}{sub pl}/L{sup 2}. We discuss circumstances through which this scenario reasonably yields the presently observed value for {Lambda} {approx} O(10{sup -120}). We also find that in a universe still currently trapped in some false vacuum state, resonance graviton models of degravitation only degravitate initially Planck or GUT scale energy densities down to the presently observed value over timescales comparable to the filter scale. We argue that different functional forms for the filter function will yield similar conclusions. In this way, we argue that although the degravitation models we study have the potential to explain why the cosmological constant is not large in addition to why it is not zero, it does not satisfactorily address the co-incidence problem without additional tuning.

  8. Cosmological constraints from the Hubble parameter on f(R) cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, F C; Alcaniz, J S [Observatorio Nacional, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)] [Observatorio Nacional, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Santos, E M [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)] [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Santos, J, E-mail: fabiocc@das.inpe.br, E-mail: emoura@cbpf.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br, E-mail: janilo@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil)] [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modified f(R) gravity in the Palatini approach has been recently applied in cosmology as a realistic alternative to dark energy. In this regard, a number of authors have searched for observational constraints on several f(R) gravity functional forms using mainly data from type Ia supernovae, cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and large scale structure. In this paper, considering a homogeneous and isotropic flat universe, we use determinations of the Hubble function H(z), which are based on a differential age method, to place bounds on the free parameters of the f(R) = R-{beta}/R{sup n} functional form. We also combine the H(z) data with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillations and CMB measurements, obtaining ranges of values for n and {beta} in agreement with other independent analyses. We find that, for some intervals of n and {beta}, models based on f(R) = R-{beta}/R{sup n} gravity in the Palatini approach, unlike the metric formalism, can produce a sequence of radiation-dominated, matter-dominated, and accelerating periods without the need for dark energy.

  9. DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING IN NGC 6397: STELLAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyl, J. S.; Richer, H.; Woodley, K. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Anderson, J.; Dotter, A.; Kalirai, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Fahlman, G.; Stetson, P. [Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, National Research Council, Victoria, BC (Canada); Hurley, J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Rich, R. M. [Division of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Shara, M.; Zurek, D. [American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-epoch observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope provide a unique and comprehensive probe of stellar dynamics within NGC 6397. We are able to confront analytic models of the globular cluster with the observed stellar proper motions. The measured proper motions probe well along the main sequence from 0.8 to below 0.1 M{sub Sun} as well as white dwarfs younger than 1 Gyr. The observed field lies just beyond the half-light radius where standard models of globular cluster dynamics (e.g., based on a lowered Maxwellian phase-space distribution) make very robust predictions for the stellar proper motions as a function of mass. The observed proper motions show no evidence for anisotropy in the velocity distribution; furthermore, the observations agree in detail with a straightforward model of the stellar distribution function. We do not find any evidence that the young white dwarfs have received a natal kick in contradiction with earlier results. Using the observed proper motions of the main-sequence stars, we obtain a kinematic estimate of the distance to NGC 6397 of 2.2{sup +0.5}{sub -0.7} kpc and a mass of the cluster of 1.1 {+-} 0.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} at the photometric distance of 2.53 kpc. One of the main-sequence stars appears to travel on a trajectory that will escape the cluster, yielding an estimate of the evaporation timescale, over which the number of stars in the cluster decreases by a factor of e, of about 3 Gyr. The proper motions of the youngest white dwarfs appear to resemble those of the most massive main-sequence stars, providing the first direct constraint on the relaxation time of the stars in a globular cluster of greater than or about 0.7 Gyr.

  10. Green Bank Telescope Studies of Giant Pulses from Millisecond Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. S. Knight; M. Bailes; R. N. Manchester; S. M. Ord; B. A. Jacoby

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a search for giant pulses from four millisecond pulsars using the 100m Green Bank Telescope. Coherently dedispersed time-series from PSR J0218+4232 were found to contain giant pulses of very short intrinsic duration whose energies follow power-law statistics. The giant pulses are in phase with the two minima of the radio integrated pulse profile but are phase aligned with the peaks of the X-ray profile. Historically, individual pulses more than 10-20 times the mean pulse energy have been deemed to be ``giant pulses''. As only 4 of the 155 pulses had energies greater than 10 times the mean pulse-energy, we argue the emission mechanism responsible for giant pulses should instead be defined through: (a) intrinsic timescales of microsecond or nanosecond duration; (b) power-law energy statistics; and (c) emission occurring in narrow phase-windows coincident with the phase windows of non-thermal X-ray emission. Four short-duration pulses with giant-pulse characteristics were also observed from PSR B1957+20. As the inferred magnetic fields at the light cylinders of the millisecond pulsars that emit giant pulses are all very high, this parameter has previously been considered to be an indicator of giant pulse emissivity. However, the frequency of giant pulse emission from PSR~B1957+20 is significantly lower than for other millisecond pulsars that have similar magnetic fields at their light cylinders. This suggests that the inferred magnetic field at the light cylinder is a poor indicator of the rate of emission of giant pulses.

  11. Ground calibrations of Nuclear Compton Telescope Jeng-Lun Chiu*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    occurred to result in major payload damage with no balloon flight, where a subsequent one with the same Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, edited by Monique Arnaud, Stephen S. Murray

  12. Minimizing actuator-induced residual error in active space telescope primary mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Matthew William, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heritage space telescope mirror technology-i.e. large, monolithic glass primary mirrors-has reached an upper limit on allowable aperture diameter given launch vehicle volume and mass constraints. The next generation of ...

  13. Design and Optimization of Lightweight Space Telescope Andrzej M. Stewart and David W. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Miller May 2007 SSL # 9-07 #12;#12;Design and Optimization of Lightweight Space Telescope Structures, for seeing enough promise in me to bring me into the SSL, for always ensuring that I had a source of funding

  14. Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Smith, David W. Miller September 2010 SSL #12-10 #12;#12;Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors Matthew W. Smith, David W. Miller September 2010 SSL #12

  15. Image Collection Optimization in the Design and Operation of Lightweight, Low Areal-Density Space Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telescopes by Josef Roach Bogosian Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in partial by Josef Roach Bogosian Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics on May 23, 2008

  16. Thin optic surface analysis for high resolution X-ray telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akilian, Mireille

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The art of glass developed throughout the years has covered artifacts ranging from crude ornaments to high precision optics used in flat panel displays, hard disk drives, and x-ray telescopes. Methods for manufacturing ...

  17. Early Optical Follow-up Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts with the Robotic Liverpool Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomboc, Andreja

    , Slovenia 3 ITC-IRST and INFN, Trento, via Sommarive, 18 38050 Povo (TN), Italy Abstract Robotic telescopes emission is crucial since it holds important information a- bout the origin and environment of GRBs. To

  18. EVIDENCE FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA DIVERSITY FROM ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewin, Walter H. G.

    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This ...

  19. A Continuous Homologation of Esters: An Efficient Telescoped Reduction–Olefination Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Damien

    A continuous protocol for the two-carbon homologation of esters to ?,?-unsaturated esters is described. This multireactor homologation telescopes an ester reduction, phosphonate deprotonation, and Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons ...

  20. The Gemini 8m Telescopes C.M. Mountain, F.C. Gillett, J. Oschmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ranging in ranging in distance from within our own Solar System to within 10% of the observable horizon and its instrumentation can be encapsulated in the formula: S a Telescope Diameter . h 1/2 1. N Delivered

  1. ISIS polarimetry for ING support astronomers Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ISIS polarimetry for ING support astronomers Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes Pablo Rodr 0.1 Document history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 ISIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Setting up ISIS for spectropolarimetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1

  2. Search for Sub-eV Mass Solar Axions by the CERN Axion Solar Telescope with {sup 3}He Buffer Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arik, M.; Cetin, S. A.; Ezer, C.; Yildiz, S. C. [Dogus University, Istanbul (Turkey); Aune, S.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Giomataris, I.; Papaevangelou, T. [IRFU, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barth, K.; Borghi, S.; Davenport, M.; Elias, N.; Haug, F.; Laurent, J. M.; Niinikoski, T.; Silva, P. S.; Stewart, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Belov, A.; Gninenko, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Braeuninger, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has extended its search for solar axions by using {sup 3}He as a buffer gas. At T=1.8 K this allows for larger pressure settings and hence sensitivity to higher axion masses than our previous measurements with {sup 4}He. With about 1 h of data taking at each of 252 different pressure settings we have scanned the axion mass range 0.39 eV < or approx. m{sub a} < or approx. 0.64 eV. From the absence of excess x rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g{sub a}{gamma} < or approx. 2.3x10{sup -10} GeV{sup -1} at 95% C.L., the exact value depending on the pressure setting. Kim-Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov axions are excluded at the upper end of our mass range, the first time ever for any solar axion search. In the future we will extend our search to m{sub a} < or approx. 1.15 eV, comfortably overlapping with cosmological hot dark matter bounds.

  3. Liverpool Telescope 2: a new robotic facility for rapid transient follow-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copperwheat, C M; Barnsley, R M; Bates, S D; Bersier, D; Bode, M F; Carter, D; Clay, N R; Collins, C A; Darnley, M J; Davis, C J; Gutierrez, C M; Harman, D J; James, P A; Knapen, J; Kobayashi, S; Marchant, J M; Mazzali, P A; Mottram, C J; Mundell, C G; Newsam, A; Oscoz, A; Palle, E; Piascik, A; Rebolo, R; Smith, R J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liverpool Telescope is one of the world's premier facilities for time domain astronomy. The time domain landscape is set to radically change in the coming decade, with synoptic all-sky surveys such as LSST providing huge numbers of transient detections on a nightly basis; transient detections across the electromagnetic spectrum from other major facilities such as SVOM, SKA and CTA; and the era of `multi-messenger astronomy', wherein astrophysical events are detected via non-electromagnetic means, such as neutrino or gravitational wave emission. We describe here our plans for the Liverpool Telescope 2: a new robotic telescope designed to capitalise on this new era of time domain astronomy. LT2 will be a 4-metre class facility co-located with the Liverpool Telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on the Canary island of La Palma. The telescope will be designed for extremely rapid response: the aim is that the telescope will take data within 30 seconds of the receipt of a trigger from another...

  4. QCD nature of dark energy at finite temperature: cosmological implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Azizi; N. Katirci

    2015-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Veneziano ghost field has been proposed as an alternative source of dark energy whose energy density is consistent with the cosmological observations. In this model, the energy density of QCD ghost field is expressed in terms of QCD degrees of freedom at zero temperature. We extend this model to finite temperature to search the model predictions from the late time to the early universe. We depict the variations of QCD parameters entering the calculations, dark energy density, equation of state, Hubble and deceleration parameters on temperature from zero to a critical temperature. We compare our results with the observations and theoretical predictions existing at different eras.It is found that this model safely define the universe from quark condensation up to now and its predictions are not in tension with those of the standard cosmology. The finite temperature ghost dark energy predictions on the Hubble parameter slightly better fit to observations compared to those of zero temperature.

  5. QCD nature of dark energy at finite temperature: cosmological implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azizi, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Veneziano ghost field has been proposed as an alternative source of dark energy whose energy density is consistent with the cosmological observations. In this model, the energy density of QCD ghost field is expressed in terms of QCD degrees of freedom at zero temperature. We extend this model to finite temperature to search the model predictions from the late time to the early universe. We depict the variations of QCD parameters entering the calculations, dark energy density, equation of state, Hubble and deceleration parameters on temperature from zero to a critical temperature. We compare our results with the observations and theoretical predictions existing at different eras.It is found that this model safely define the universe from quark condensation up to now and its predictions are not in tension with those of the standard cosmology. The finite temperature ghost dark energy predictions on the Hubble parameter slightly better fit to observations compared to those of zero temperature.

  6. Cosmology from HI galaxy surveys with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdalla, Filipe B; Camera, Stefano; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kirk, Donnacha; Klöckner, Hans-Rainer; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Santos, Mario G; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) has the potential to produce galaxy redshift surveys which will be competitive with other state of the art cosmological experiments in the next decade. In this chapter we summarise what capabilities the first and the second phases of the SKA will be able to achieve in its current state of design. We summarise the different cosmological experiments which are outlined in further detail in other chapters of this Science Book. The SKA will be able to produce competitive Baryonic Oscillation (BAOs) measurements in both its phases. The first phase of the SKA will provide similar measurements as optical and IR experiments with completely different systematic effects whereas the second phase being transformational in terms of its statistical power. The SKA will produce very accurate Redshift Space Distortions (RSD) measurements, being superior to other experiments at lower redshifts, due to the large number of galaxies. Cross correlations of the galaxy redshift data from the SKA with ...

  7. Transition redshift in $f(T)$ cosmology and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Saridakis, Emmanuel N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract constraints on the transition redshift $z_{tr}$, determining the onset of cosmic acceleration, predicted by an effective cosmographic construction, in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity. In particular, employing cosmography we obtain bounds on the viable $f(T)$ forms and their derivatives. Since this procedure is model independent, as long as the scalar curvature is fixed, we are able to determine intervals for $z_{tr}$. In this way we guarantee that the Solar-System constraints are preserved and moreover we extract bounds on the transition time and the free parameters of the scenario. We find that the transition redshifts predicted by $f(T)$ cosmology, although compatible with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM predictions, are slightly smaller. Finally, in order to obtain observational constraints on $f(T)$ cosmology, we perform a Monte Carlo fitting using supernova data, involving the most recent union 2.1 data set.

  8. Hyperboloidal Slices and Artificial Cosmology for Numerical Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles W. Misner

    2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary report proposes integrating the Maxwell equations in Minkowski spacetime using coordinates where the spacelike surfaces are hyperboloids asymptotic to null cones at spatial infinity. The space coordinates are chosen so that Scri+ occurs at a finite coordinate and a smooth extension beyond Scri+ is obtained. The question addressed is whether a Cauchy evolution numerical integration program can be easily modified to compute this evolution. In the spirit of the von Neumann and Richtmyer artificial viscosity which thickens a shock by many orders of magnitude to facilitate numerical simulation, I propose artificial cosmology to thicken null infinity Scri+ to approximate it by a de Sitter cosmological horizon where, in conformally compactified presentation, it provides a shell of purely outgoing null cones where asymptotic waves can be read off as data on a spacelike pure outflow outer boundary. This should be simpler than finding Scri+ as an isolated null boundary or imposing outgoing wave conditions at a timelike boundary at finite radius.

  9. Asymptotically Flat Wormhole Solutions in a Generic Cosmological Constant Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Heydarzade; N. Riazi; H. Moradpour

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a number of reasons to study wormholes with generic cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. Recent observations indicate that present accelerating expansion of the universe demands $\\Lambda>0$. On the other hand, some extended theories of gravitation such as supergravity and superstring theories posses vacuum states with $\\Lambdaenergy density and pressure profiles which support such a geometry are obtained. It is shown that for having such a geometry, the wormhole throat $r_0$, the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and the equation of state parameter $\\omega$ should satisfy two specific conditions. The possibility of setting different values for the parameters of the model helps us to find exact solutions for the metric functions, mass functions and energy-momentum profiles. At last, the volume integral quantifier, which provides useful information about the total amount of energy condition violating matter is discussed briefly.

  10. On the Einstein-Cartan cosmology vs. Planck data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palle, Davor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first comprehensive analyses of Planck data reveal that the cosmological model with dark energy and cold dark matter can satisfactorily explain the essential physical features of the expanding Universe. However, the inability to simultaneously fit large and small scale TT power spectrum, scalar power index smaller than one and the observations of the violation of the isotropy found by few statistical indicators of the CMB, urge theorists to search for explanations. We show that the model of the Einstein-Cartan cosmology with clustered dark matter halos and their corresponding clustered angular momenta coupled to torsion, can account for small scale - large scale discrepancy and larger peculiar velocities (bulk flows) for galaxy clusters. The nonvanishing total angular momentum (torsion) of the Universe enters as a negative effective density term in the Einstein-Cartan equations causing partial cancellation of the mass density. The integrated Sachs-Wolfe contribution of the Einstein-Cartan model is negativ...

  11. Interpreting the unresolved intensity of cosmologically redshifted line radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switzer, Eric R; Masui, Kiyoshi W; Pen, Ue-Li; Voytek, Tabitha C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas, and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ~10^2-10^3 times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well-known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments, and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data itself. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they ...

  12. Photon-Axion-Like Particle Coupling Constant and Cosmological Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Piotrovich; Yu. N. Gnedin; T. M. Natsvlishvili

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimated the photon-pseudoscalar particle mixing constant from the effect of cosmological alignment and cosmological rotation of polarization plane of distant QSOs. This effect is explained in terms of birefringent phenomenon due to photon-pseudoscalar (axion-like) particle mixing in a cosmic magnetic field. On the contrary, one can estimate the strength of the cosmic magnetic field using the constraints on the photon-axion-like particle coupling constant from the CAST experiment and from SNe Ia dimming effect. In a result, the lower limit on the intergalactic ($z\\approx 1\\div 2$) magnetic field appears at the level of about $4\\times 10^{-10}\\div 10^{-11}$ G.

  13. Testing the cosmological constant as a candidate for dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratochvil, Jan; Linde, Andrei; Linder, Eric V.; Shmakova, Marina

    2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It may be difficult to single out the best model of dark energy on the basis of the existing and planned cosmological observations, because many different models can lead to similar observational consequences. However, each particular model can be studied and either found consistent with observations or ruled out. In this paper, we concentrate on the possibility to test and rule out the simplest and by far the most popular of the models of dark energy, the theory described by general relativity with positive vacuum energy (the cosmological constant). We evaluate the conditions under which this model could be ruled out by the future observations made by the Supernova/Acceleration Probe SNAP (both for supernovae and weak lensing) and by the Planck Surveyor cosmic microwave background satellite.

  14. Early Universe Cosmology, Effective Supergravity, and Invariants of Algebraic Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Kuver

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of light scalars can have profound effects on early universe cosmology, influencing its thermal history as well as paradigms like inflation and baryogenesis. Effective supergravity provides a framework to make quantifiable, model-independent studies of these effects. The Riemanian curvature of the Kahler manifold spanned by scalars belonging to chiral superfields, evaluated along supersymmetry breaking directions, provides an order parameter (in the sense that it must necessarily take certain values) for phenomena as diverse as slow roll modular inflation, non-thermal cosmological histories, and the viability of Affleck-Dine baryogenesis. Within certain classes of UV completions, the order parameter for theories with $n$ scalar moduli is conjectured to be related to invariants of $n$-ary cubic forms (for example, for models with three moduli, the order parameter is given by the ring of invariants spanned by the Aronhold invariants). Within these completions, and under the caveats spelled out, thi...

  15. Quintessence and (anti-)Chaplygin gas in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamon, Raphael; Woehr, Andreas J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concordance model of cosmology contains several unknown components such as dark matter and dark energy. Many proposals have been made to describe them by choosing an appropriate potential for a scalar field. We study four models in the realm of loop quantum cosmology: the Chaplygin gas, an inflationary and radiationlike potential, quintessence and an anti-Chaplygin gas. For the latter we show that all trajectories start and end with a type II singularity and, depending on the initial value, may go through a bounce. On the other hand the evolution under the influence of the first three scalar fields behaves classically at times far away from the big bang singularity and bounces as the energy density approaches the critical density.

  16. Cosmological viability conditions for f(T) dark energy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently f(T) modified teleparallel gravity where T is the torsion scalar has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy. We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of these models and find conditions for the cosmological viability of f(T) dark energy models as geometrical constraints on the derivatives of these models. We show that in the phase space exists two cosmologically viable trajectory which (i) The universe would start from an unstable radiation point, then pass a saddle standard matter point which is followed by accelerated expansion de sitter point. (ii) The universe starts from a saddle radiation epoch, then falls onto the stable matter era and the system can not evolve to the dark energy dominated epoch. Finally, for a number of f(T) dark energy models were proposed in the more literature, the viability conditions are investigated.

  17. Nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology (NPAC) capability review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present document represents a summary self-assessment of the status of the Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) capability across Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the purpose of this review, we have divided the capability into four theme areas: Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, and Applied Physics. For each theme area we have given a general but brief description of the activities under the area, a list of the Laboratory divisions involved in the work, connections to the goals and mission of the Laboratory, a brief description of progress over the last three years, our opinion of the overall status of the theme area, and challenges and issues.

  18. Dark Energy Coupled with Dark Matter in Viscous Fluid Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Brevik; V. V. Obukhov; A. V. Timoshkin

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate cosmological models with two interacting fluids: dark energy and dark matter in flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. The interaction between dark energy and dark matter is described in terms of the parameters present in the inhomogeneous equation of state when allowance is made for bulk viscosity, for the Little Rip, the Pseudo Rip, and the bounce universes. We obtain analytic representation for characteristic properties in these cosmological models, in particular the bulk viscosity $\\zeta=\\zeta(H,t)$ as function of Hubble parameter and time. We discuss the corrections of thermodynamical parameters in the equations of state due coupling between the viscous fluid and dark matter. Some common properties of these corrections are elucidated.

  19. Interacting Dark Energy in Ho?ava-Lifshitz Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M R Setare

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In the usual Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz cosmological models, the scalar field is responsible for dark matter. Using an additional scalar field, Saridakis \\cite{sari} has formulated Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz cosmology with an effective dark energy sector. In the paper \\cite{sari} the scalar fields do not interact with each other, here we extend this work to the interacting case, where matter scalar field $\\phi$ interact with dark energy scalar field $\\sigma$. We will show that in contrast with \\cite{sari}, where $\\sigma$-filed is absent, we can obtain $w_d ^{\\rm eff}dark energy presenting phantom behaviour. This behaviour is pure effect of the interaction.

  20. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to these choices of system parameters.

  1. An efficient probe of the cosmological CPT violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Mingzhe; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an efficient method based on the linear regression algorithm to probe the cosmological CPT violation using the CMB polarisation data. We validate this method using simulated CMB data and apply it to recent CMB observations. We find that a combined data sample of BICEP1 and BOOMERanG 2003 favours a nonzero isotropic rotation angle at $2.3\\sigma$ confidence level, ie, $\\Delta\\alpha=-3.3 \\pm1.4$ deg (68% CL) with systematics included.

  2. Termodinamica del universo temprano desde una cosmolog\\`Ia newtoniana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C, W A Rojas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a model of fluent material universe from a modified Newtonian cosmology proposed by D'Inverno and Tawfik. From this perspective, it shows a list of space-time curvature k with energy E, density \\rho, specific heat $C_{p}$ and the fluid temperature gradient considered $\\Delta T$ corresponding to standard thermodynamic variables. We determined the coupling constants accompanying the matter density for different values we can take k

  3. Termodinamica del universo temprano desde una cosmologÌa newtoniana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Rojas C

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a model of fluent material universe from a modified Newtonian cosmology proposed by D'Inverno and Tawfik. From this perspective, it shows a list of space-time curvature k with energy E, density \\rho, specific heat $C_{p}$ and the fluid temperature gradient considered $\\Delta T$ corresponding to standard thermodynamic variables. We determined the coupling constants accompanying the matter density for different values we can take k

  4. GUP vs polymer quantum cosmology: the Taub model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Valerio Battisti; Orchidea Maria Lecian; Giovanni Montani

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of the cosmological singularity in the Taub model is discussed within the two frameworks. An internal time variable is ruled out and the only remaining degree of freedom (the anisotropy) of the Universe is quantized according to such schemes. The resulting GUP Taub Universe is singularity-free, differently from the second case, where the classical singularity is not tamed by the polymer-loop quantum effects.

  5. Cosmology using the Parkes Multibeam Southern-Sky HI Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Thomas

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the implications of the Parkes HI Multibeam Southern Sky Survey for cosmology. It will determine the local mass function of HI clouds, detecting several hundred per decade of mass. Each of these will come with a redshift and, for the more massive clouds, an estimate of the velocity width. This will provide an ideal database for peculiar motion studies and for measurements of biasing of galaxies relative to the underlying matter distribution.

  6. Non-Cosmological FRB's from Young Supernova Remnant Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new extragalactic but non-cosmological explanation for FRB's based on very young pulsars in supernova remnants. Within a few hundred years of a core-collapse supernova the ejecta is confined within $\\sim$1 pc, providing a high enough column density of free electrons for the observed 500-1500 pc/cm$^3$. By extrapolating a Crab-like pulsar to its infancy in an environment like that of SN 1987A, we hypothesize such an object could emit supergiant pulses sporadically which would be bright enough to be seen at a few hundred megaparsecs. In this scenario Faraday rotation at the source gives RM's much larger than the expected cosmological contribution. If the emission were pulsar-like, then the polarization vector could swing over the duration of the burst, which is not expected from non-rotating objects. In this model, the scattering, large DM, and commensurate RM all come from one place which is not the case for the cosmological interpretation. The model also provides testable predictions of the flux ...

  7. Inflationary Cosmology: Is Our Universe Part of a Multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, Alan (MIT) [MIT

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1981, Guth proposed the theory of the inflationary universe, a modification of the Big Bang theory, which is generally accepted by scientists to explain how the universe began. Nevertheless, the Big Bang theory leaves some questions, and the theory of inflation attempts to answer them. Guth states that a repulsive gravitational force generated by an exotic form of matter brought about the expansion of the universe. He postulates that the universe underwent an expansion of astronomical proportions within the first trillionth of a second of its existence, during which the seeds for its large-scale structure were generated. Guth and colleagues have further explored the possibility of mimicking inflation in a hypothetical laboratory, thereby creating a new universe, and they concluded that it might be theoretically possible. If it happened, the new universe would not endanger our own universe. Instead, it would slip through a wormhole, a hypothetical space-time travel shortcut, and rapidly disconnect from our universe. In this talk, Guth will explain the inflationary theory and review the features that make it scientifically plausible. In addition, he will discuss the biggest mystery in cosmology: Why is the value of the cosmological constant, sometimes called the "anti-gravity" effect, so remarkably small compared to theoretical expectations? Guth will explain how the inflationary theory, combined with other ideas from elementary particle physics and cosmology, can provide a possible explanation for this discrepancy.

  8. Non-minimal Higgs inflation and frame dependence in cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinwachs, Christian F. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna, Italy and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a very general class of cosmological models with scalar fields non-minimally coupled to gravity. A particular representative in this class is given by the non-minimal Higgs inflation model in which the Standard Model Higgs boson and the inflaton are described by one and the same scalar particle. While the predictions of the non-minimal Higgs inflation scenario come numerically remarkably close to the recently discovered mass of the Higgs boson, there remains a conceptual problem in this model that is associated with the choice of the cosmological frame. While the classical theory is independent of this choice, we find by an explicit calculation that already the first quantum corrections induce a frame dependence. We give a geometrical explanation of this frame dependence by embedding it into a more general field theoretical context. From this analysis, some conceptional points in the long lasting cosmological debate: 'Jordan frame vs. Einstein frame' become more transparent and in principle can be resolved in a natural way.

  9. Improved cosmological bound on the thermal axion mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melchiorri, Alessandro; Mena, Olga [INFN Sez. di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', P.le A. Moro, 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Slosar, Anze [Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Road, OX3RH1, Oxford (United Kingdom); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Relic thermal axions could play the role of an extra hot dark matter component in cosmological structure formation theories. By combining the most recent observational data we improve previous cosmological bounds on the axion mass m{sub a} in the so-called hadronic axion window. We obtain a limit on the axion mass m{sub a}<0.42 eV at the 95% C.L. (m{sub a}<0.72 eV at the 99% C.L.). A novel aspect of the analysis presented here is the inclusion of massive neutrinos and how they may affect the bound on the axion mass. If neutrino masses belong to an inverted hierarchy scheme, for example, the above constraint is improved to m{sub a}<0.38 eV at the 95% C.L. (m{sub a}<0.67 eV at the 99% C.L.). Future data from experiments as CAST will provide a direct test of the cosmological bound.

  10. Fluid Mechanics Explains Cosmology, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the interstellar medium by the Herschel, Planck etc. infrared satellites throw doubt on standard {\\Lambda}CDMHC cosmological processes to form gravitational structures. According to the Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics (HGD) cosmology of Gibson (1996), and the quasar microlensing observations of Schild (1996), the dark matter of galaxies consists of Proto-Globular-star-Cluster (PGC) clumps of Earth-mass primordial gas planets in metastable equilibrium since PGCs began star production at 0.3 Myr by planet mergers. Dark energy and the accelerating expansion of the universe inferred from SuperNovae Ia are systematic dimming errors produced as frozen gas dark matter planets evaporate to form stars. Collisionless cold dark matter that clumps and hierarchically clusters does not exist. Clumps of PGCs began diffusion from the Milky Way Proto-Galaxy upon freezing at 14 Myr to give the Magellanic Clouds and the faint dwarf galaxies of the 10^22 m diameter baryonic dark matter Galaxy halo. The first stars persist as old globular star clusters (OGCs). Water oceans and the biological big bang occurred at 2-8 Myr. Life inevitably formed and evolved in the cosmological primordial organic soup provided by 10^80 big bang planets and their hot oceans as they gently merged to form larger binary planets and small binary stars.

  11. Dynamics and chaos in the unified scalar field cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukes-Gerakopoulos, Georgios [Research Center for Astronomy, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efesiou 4, GR-11527, Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR-15783 Zografos (Greece); Basilakos, Spyros; Contopoulos, George [Research Center for Astronomy, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efesiou 4, GR-11527, Athens (Greece)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of the closed scalar field FRW cosmological models in the framework of the so-called unified dark matter (UDM) scenario. Performing a theoretical as well as a numerical analysis we find that there is a strong indication of chaos in agreement with previous studies. We find that a positive value of the spatial curvature is essential for the appearance of chaoticity, though the Lyapunov number seems to be independent of the curvature value. Models that are close to flat (k{yields}0{sup +}) exhibit a chaotic behavior after a long time while pure flat models do not exhibit any chaos. Moreover, we find that some of the semiflat models in the UDM scenario exhibit similar dynamical behavior with the {lambda} cosmology despite their chaoticity. Finally, we compare the measured evolution of the Hubble parameter derived from the differential ages of passively evolving galaxies with that expected in the semiflat unified scalar field cosmology. Based on a specific set of initial conditions we find that the UDM scalar field model matches well the observational data.

  12. Paradoxes of cosmological physics in the beginning of the 21-st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshev, Yurij

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the history of cosmology physical paradoxes played important role for development of contemporary world models. Within the modern standard cosmological model there are both observational and conceptual cosmological paradoxes which stimulate to search their solution. Confrontation of theoretical predictions of the standard cosmological model with the latest astrophysical observational data is considered. A review of conceptual problems of the Friedmann space expending models, which are in the bases of modern cosmological model, is discussed. The main paradoxes, which are discussed in modern literature, are the Newtonian character of the exact Friedmann equation, the violation of the energy conservation within any comoving local volume, violation of the limiting recession velocity of galaxies for the observed high redshift objects. Possible observational tests of the nature of the cosmological redshift are discussed

  13. Paradoxes of cosmological physics in the beginning of the 21-st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yurij Baryshev

    2015-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the history of cosmology physical paradoxes played important role for development of contemporary world models. Within the modern standard cosmological model there are both observational and conceptual cosmological paradoxes which stimulate to search their solution. Confrontation of theoretical predictions of the standard cosmological model with the latest astrophysical observational data is considered. A review of conceptual problems of the Friedmann space expending models, which are in the bases of modern cosmological model, is discussed. The main paradoxes, which are discussed in modern literature, are the Newtonian character of the exact Friedmann equation, the violation of the energy conservation within any comoving local volume, violation of the limiting recession velocity of galaxies for the observed high redshift objects. Possible observational tests of the nature of the cosmological redshift are discussed

  14. On the Running of the Cosmological Constant in Quantum General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. F. L. Ward

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present arguments that show what the running of the cosmological constant means when quantum general relativity is formulated following the prescription developed by Feynman.

  15. Cosmological Constant as Vacuum Energy Density of Quantum Field Theories on Noncommutative Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Jun Wang

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach to understand hierarchy problem for cosmological constant in terms of considering noncommutative nature of space-time. We calculate that vacuum energy density of the noncommutative quantum field theories in nontrivial background, which admits a smaller cosmological constant by introducing an higher noncommutative scale $\\mu_{NC}\\sim M_p$. The result $\\rho_\\Lambda\\sim 10^{-6}\\Lambda_{SUSY}^8M_p^4/\\mu_{NC}^8$ yields cosmological constant at the order of current observed value for supersymmetry breaking scale at 10TeV. It is the same as Banks' phenomenological formula for cosmological constant.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of alternative sky observation modes with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szanecki, M; Nied?wiecki, A; Sitarek, J; Bednarek, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate possible sky survey modes with the Middle Sized Telescopes (MST, aimed at covering the energy range from $\\sim$100 GeV to 10 TeV) subsystem of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). We use the standard CTA tools, CORSIKA and sim_telarray, to simulate the development of gamma-ray showers, proton background and the telescope response. We perform simulations for the H.E.S.S.-site in Namibia, which is one of the candidate sites for the CTA experiment. We study two previously considered modes, parallel and divergent, and we propose a new, convergent mode with telescopes tilted toward the array center. For each mode we provide performance parameters crucial for choosing the most efficient survey strategy. For the non-parallel modes we study the dependence on the telescope offset angle. We show that use of both the divergent and convergent modes results in potential advantages in comparison with use of the parallel mode. The fastest source detection can be achieved in the divergent mode with larger offs...

  17. Late Quaternary history of the Atacama Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    families: Abrocomidae (Abrocoma cinerea, `chinchilla rats'); Chinchillidae (Lagidium viscacia and Lagidium

  18. Spectral Analysis of the Crab Pulsar and Nebula with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Crab Pulsar is a relatively young neutron star. The pulsar is the central star in the Crab Nebula, a remnant of the supernova SN 1054, which was observed on Earth in the year 1054. The Crab Pulsar has been extensively observed in the gamma-ray energy band by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, during its first months of data taking. The LAT data have been used to reconstruct the fluxes and the energy spectra of the pulsed gamma-ray component and of the gamma-rays from the nebula. The results on the pulsed component are in good agreement with the previous measurement from EGRET, while the results on the nebula are consistent with the observations from Earth based telescopes.

  19. Relay telescope including baffle, and high power laser amplifier utilizing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system includes an optical path having an intracavity relay telescope with a telescope focal point for imaging an output of the gain medium between an image location at or near the gain medium and an image location at or near an output coupler for the laser system. A kinematic mount is provided within a vacuum chamber, and adapted to secure beam baffles near the telescope focal point. An access port on the vacuum chamber is adapted for allowing insertion and removal of the beam baffles. A first baffle formed using an alignment pinhole aperture is used during alignment of the laser system. A second tapered baffle replaces the alignment aperture during operation and acts as a far-field baffle in which off angle beams strike the baffle a grazing angle of incidence, reducing fluence levels at the impact areas.

  20. Metrology for x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Haizhang; Li, Xiaodan; Grindel, M.W.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mirrors used in x-ray telescope systems for observations outside of the earth`s atmosphere are usually made of several thin nested shells, each formed by a pair of paraboloidal and hyperboloidal surfaces. The thin shells are very susceptible to self-weight deflection caused by gravity and are nearly impossible to test by conventional interferometric techniques. The metrology requirements for these mirrors are extremely challenging. This paper presents a prototype of a Vertical Scanning Long Trace Profiler (VSLTP) which is optimized to measure the surface figure of x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical orientation. The optical system of the VSLTP is described. Experimental results from measurements on an x-ray telescope mandrel and tests of the accuracy and repeatability of the prototype VSLTP are presented. The prototype instrument has achieved a height measurement accuracy of about 50 nanometers with a repeatability of better than 20 nanometers, and a slope measurement accuracy of about 1 microradian.