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  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: ASTM Biodiesel Specifications

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ASTM Biodiesel Specifications to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: ASTM Biodiesel Specifications on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: ASTM Biodiesel Specifications on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: ASTM Biodiesel Specifications on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: ASTM Biodiesel Specifications on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: ASTM Biodiesel Specifications on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data

  2. Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel ...

  3. Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Latest ASTM fuel specifications on biodiesel blends are summarized as well as future needs for improved fuel quality, process quality controls, and new performance testing procedures. PDF icon deer08_howell.pdf More Documents & Publications Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel Biodiesel

  4. Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_howell.pdf More Documents & Publications Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future

  5. Ecological considerations for the use of chemical dispersants in oil spill response: Mangroves. (ASTM standard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-03-01

    Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  6. ASTM PV INSTALLATON COMMISSIONING, OPERATIONS & MAINTENNCE (ICOMP) STANDARD PRACTICE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASTM PV INSTALLATON COMMISSIONING, OPERATIONS & MAINTENNCE (ICOMP) STANDARD PRACTICE MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT ASTM International subcommittee E44.09 Photovoltaic Electric Power Conversion will be holding a meeting for their WK43549 Practice for Installation Commissioning Operation and Maintenance Process task group on Thursday, May 8, 2014 at 8:00am until 1:00pm. This meeting will follow the Sandia/EPRI 2014 PV Systems Symposium. The scope of WK43549 is to work with others around the world to

  7. ASTM sampling methods and analytical validation for lead in paint, dust, soil, and air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, K.; Schlecht, P.C.; Song, R.; Feng, A.; DeWalt, G.; McKnight, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    ASTM Subcommittee E06.23 on Abatement/Mitigation of Lead Hazards has developed a number of standards that are concerned with the sampling of leas in environmental media, namely paint, dust, soil and airborne particulate. An ASTM practice for the collection of airborne particulate lead in the workplace has been published. New ASTM standards for the collection of dry paint film samples, surface soil samples, and surface dust wipe samples for subsequent lead analysis have also been promulgated. Other draft standards pertinent to lead sampling are under development. The ASTM standards concerned with lead sample collection are accompanied by separate sample preparation standard practices and a standard analysis method. Sample preparation and analytical methods have been evaluated by interlaboratory testing; such analyses may be used to assess the efficacy of sampling protocols.

  8. ASTM standard practice for testing fixed-wavelength photometric detectors used in liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, T.; Fritz, G.T.; Palmer, L.R.

    1981-08-01

    A standard testing procedure has been devised for fixed-wavelength photometric detectors (FWPD) used in liquid chromatography. The need for this procedure, the objectives for developing it, and the means for accomplishing the objectives are outlined. Salient details of the procedure are discussed including the determination of nine characteristics of FWPDs. After an evaluation by ten laboratories, the revised procedure was balloted and revised again according to ASTM procedures (1). The final revised version is now available from ASTM as Standard Practice E 685 (2).

  9. SP Newsprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 45 MW steam turbine at SP Newsprint in Dublin, Georgia.

  10. Impact of ASTM Standard E722 update on radiation damage metrics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell

    2014-06-01

    The impact of recent changes to the ASTM Standard E722 is investigated. The methodological changes in the production of the displacement kerma factors for silicon has significant impact for some energy regions of the 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence response function. When evaluating the integral over all neutrons energies in various spectra important to the SNL electronics testing community, the change in the response results in an increase in the total 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence of 2 7%. Response functions have been produced and are available for users of both the NuGET and MCNP codes.

  11. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.; Louthan, M.; PNNL, B.

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to identical conditions and the material responses to thermo-mechanical exposures will be different depending on the materials and systems used. The discussions at the workshop showed several gaps in the standardization of processes and techniques necessary to assess the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloy cladding during dry storage and transport. The development of, and adherence to, standards to help bridge these gaps will strengthen the technical basis for long term storage and post-storage operations, provide consistency across the nuclear industry, maximize the value of most observations, and enhance the understanding of behavioral differences among alloys. The need for, and potential benefits of, developing the recommended standards are illustrated in the various sections of this report.

  12. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductilemore » fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.« less

  13. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Qiao, Dongxiao [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductile fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.

  14. Selecting surface geophysical methods for geological, hydrological, geotechnical, and environmental investigation: The rationale for the ASTM provisional guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, W.; Benson, R.; Snelgrove, F.; Soloyanis, S.

    1999-07-01

    The ASTM Provisional Guide (PS 78-97) for Selecting Surface Geophysical Methods was developed as a guide for project managers, contractors, geologists, and geophysicists to assist in selecting the most likely geophysical method or methods to conduct specific subsurface investigations. Numerous surface geophysical methods and techniques exist that can be used to determine subsurface soil and rock properties and their distribution. These same methods are also widely used to investigate and locate manmade structures such as buried objective and landfills. This paper discusses the general uses of surface geophysics and the use of the provisional guide. This paper is not intended to be used as he guide. The ASTM Provisional Guide provides direction in selecting the most appropriate geophysical method or methods for a specific application under general site conditions. Secondary methods are also proposed that, under certain circumstances, should be evaluated before a final selection is made. Some typical conditions under which a primary or secondary method might or might not provide satisfactory results are given in the provisional guide. references for further information about selected methods and to method-specific ASTM guides are also provided. Secondary methods usually have less than desired performance, higher cost, or greater labor requirements as compared to the primary methods.

  15. Development of ASTM Standard for SiC-SiC Joint Testing Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, George; Back, Christina

    2015-10-30

    As the nuclear industry moves to advanced ceramic based materials for cladding and core structural materials for a variety of advanced reactors, new standards and test methods are required for material development and licensing purposes. For example, General Atomics (GA) is actively developing silicon carbide (SiC) based composite cladding (SiC-SiC) for its Energy Multiplier Module (EM2), a high efficiency gas cooled fast reactor. Through DOE funding via the advanced reactor concept program, GA developed a new test method for the nominal joint strength of an endplug sealed to advanced ceramic tubes, Fig. 1-1, at ambient and elevated temperatures called the endplug pushout (EPPO) test. This test utilizes widely available universal mechanical testers coupled with clam shell heaters, and specimen size is relatively small, making it a viable post irradiation test method. The culmination of this effort was a draft of an ASTM test standard that will be submitted for approval to the ASTM C28 ceramic committee. Once the standard has been vetted by the ceramics test community, an industry wide standard methodology to test joined tubular ceramic components will be available for the entire nuclear materials community.

  16. Extensible Argonne SP Scheduling System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-01-24

    The Argonne SP Scheduler provides deterministic queuing of jobs for exclusive access to the SP nodes for either batch or interactive use.

  17. ARM - Instrument - sp2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentssp2 Documentation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Instrument Categories Aerosols The SP2 measures the soot (black carbon) mass of individual aerosol particles by laser-induced incandescence down to concentrations as low as 10 ng/m^3. The SP2 is part of the Aerosol Observing System (AOS). See Also Contact(s) Stephen Springston Brookhaven

  18. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an - 2 -...

  19. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an...

  20. Enel Green Power SpA formerly Erga SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA formerly Erga SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enel Green Power SpA (formerly Erga SpA) Place: Pisa, Italy Zip: 56122 Sector: Geothermal energy, Hydro, Renewable Energy,...

  1. Solarcell SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solarcell SpA Place: Brugherio, Italy Product: Italian manufacturer of PV cells. References: Solarcell SpA1 This article is a stub. You...

  2. Cyanobacterium sp. for production of compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2015-10-13

    A genetically enhanced cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp. ABICyano1, is disclosed. The enhanced Cyanobacterium sp. ABICyano1 produces a compound or compounds of interest.

  3. Innova SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Innova SpA Place: Italy Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Innova SpA1 This...

  4. ARM - Campaign Instrument - sp2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Instrument Categories Aerosols...

  5. Argonne's SpEC Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Jason

    2014-05-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  6. Argonne's SpEC Module

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Harper, Jason

    2014-06-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  7. Metalco SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Metalco SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Metalco SpA Place: Italy Product: Italy-based active metal construction company offering solutions for PV applications. References:...

  8. Almeco SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Almeco SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Almeco SpA Place: Milan, Italy Zip: 20098 Product: Milan-based lighting company. Manufactures daylight saving systems and light pipes...

  9. Fortesa SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fortesa SpA Place: Italy Sector: Solar Product: Italy-based developer of PV solar plants. References: Fortesa SpA1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  10. Enia SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enia SpA Place: Parma, Italy Zip: 43100 Product: Italian utility company. Coordinates: 44.79864, 10.339925 Show Map Loading map......

  11. Argonne's SpEC Module | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SpEC Module Share Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles

  12. Enel SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enel SpA Place: Roma, Italy Zip: 198 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Rome-based electricity distributor and generator, also supplies gas and is active in telecommunications....

  13. SP Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SP Energy Co Ltd Place: Moongyeong, North Gyeongsang, Korea (Republic) Product: Korea-based project developer involved with building...

  14. Solar Utility SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Utility SpA Place: Italy Sector: Solar Product: Italy-based solar PV project developer. References: Solar Utility SpA1 This...

  15. SunTergrid SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SunTergrid SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: SunTergrid SpA Place: Roma, Italy Sector: Solar Product: Italy-based solar project developer and subsidiary of Terna SpA....

  16. Compagnia Italiana Energia SpA CIE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compagnia Italiana Energia SpA CIE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Compagnia Italiana Energia SpA (CIE) Place: Torino, Italy Zip: 10143 Sector: Renewable Energy Product:...

  17. Enel Produzione SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Produzione SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enel Produzione SpA Place: Roma, Italy Zip: 198 Sector: Biomass, Geothermal energy, Hydro, Services, Wind energy Product:...

  18. Edison SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA Place: Milan, Italy Zip: 20121 Sector: Hydro, Wind energy Product: Independent power producer with approximately 9,300MW of hydro, fossil fuel and wind generation assets....

  19. HERA SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HERA SpA Place: Bologna, Italy Zip: 40127 Sector: Services Product: Hera is a large Italian multiple-service group, born as the result of the first significant aggregation of...

  20. ARM - Campaign Instrument - sp2-air

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -air Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Single Particle Soot Photometer - Airborne (SP2-AIR)...

  1. Pramac SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Italy Zip: 53031 Product: Pramac is predominately a manufacturer of handling systems and power systems, entered the PV industry in December 2007. References: Pramac SpA1 This...

  2. AHSS Stamping Project … A/SP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project … A/SP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    061 | Department of Energy AHSS Stamping Project … A/SP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project … A/SP 061 AHSS Stamping Project … A/SP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project … A/SP 061 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm041_xia_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Nonlinear Strain Paths Advanced High-Strength Steel Stamping Characterization of Thermo-Mechanical Behaviors of Advanced High Strength

  3. TerniEnergia SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TerniEnergia SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: TerniEnergia SpA Place: Terni, Italy Zip: 5100 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Italy-based developer of renewable energy...

  4. Fintel Energy Group SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fintel Energy Group SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fintel Energy Group SpA Place: Pollenza, Italy Zip: 62010 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Italy-based energy operator...

  5. Microsoft Word - FY 2015 SP Performance Appraisal System Guidance - Final

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Executive Resources Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer U.S. Department of Energy FY 2015 Senior Professional (SP) Performance Appraisal System Opening Guidance 2 Table of Contents Contents I. SP PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL TEMPLATE and TIMELINE ....................................................................... 3 II. PERFORMANCE PLAN - CRITICAL ELEMENTS .......................................................................................... 3 III. SP SUMMARY RATING LEVEL

  6. ARM - Campaign Instrument - sp-ams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentssp-ams Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) Instrument Categories Aerosols Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Black carbon

  7. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ES6 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6 Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non-growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was

  8. FY 2014 Senior Executive Service (SES) and Senior Professional (SP)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Performance Appraisal Cycle - Closeout Guidance | Department of Energy Senior Executive Service (SES) and Senior Professional (SP) Performance Appraisal Cycle - Closeout Guidance FY 2014 Senior Executive Service (SES) and Senior Professional (SP) Performance Appraisal Cycle - Closeout Guidance The FY 2014 performance appraisal cycle for both SES and SP members, which includes Senior Level (SL) and Scientific or Professional (ST) employees, concludes on September 30, 2014. In order to prepare

  9. Preliminary SP-100/Stirling heat exchanger designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, P.; Tower, L.; Dawson, R.; Blue, B.; Dunn, P.

    1994-09-01

    Analytic modeling of several heat exchanger concepts to couple the SP-100 nuclear reactor lithium loop and the Space Stirling Power Convertor (SSPC) was performed. Four 25 kWe SSPC`s are used to produce the required 100 kW of electrical power. This design work focused on the interface between a single SSPC and the primary lithium loop. Manifolding to separate and collect the four channel flow was not modeled. This work modeled two separate types of heat exchanger interfaces (conductive coupling and radiative coupling) to explore their relative advantages and disadvantages. The minimum mass design of the conductively coupled concepts was 18 kg or 0.73 kg/kWe for a single 25 kWe convertor. The minimum mass radiatively coupled concept was 41 kg or 1.64 kg/kWe. The direct conduction heat exchanger provides a lighter weight system because of its ability to operate the Stirling convertor evaporator at higher heat fluxes than those attainable by the radiatively coupled systems. Additionally the conductively coupled concepts had relatively small volumes and provide potentially simpler assembly. Their disadvantages were the tight tolerances and material joining problems associated with this refractory to superalloy interface. The advantages of the radiatively coupled designs were the minimal material interface problems.

  10. MX Group SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA Place: Villasanta, Italy Zip: 20058 Product: MX group is a turnkey provider of manufacturing plants for PV and other electronic equipment. Coordinates: 45.606895, 9.3066...

  11. PaSol Italia SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: PaSol Italia SpA Place: Varallo Pombia, Italy Zip: 28040 Sector: Solar Product: PA.SOL was formed by local private investors in order to initiate local PV module...

  12. Shewanella loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial mats in the Pacific Ocean A novel marine bacterial strain, PV-4T, isolated from a microbial mat located at a hydrothermal vent...

  13. Caloramator sp. Tolerance of Pretreatment Inhibitors from Lignocellulosics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Innovation Portal Caloramator sp. Tolerance of Pretreatment Inhibitors from Lignocellulosics Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL inventors discovered a novel microorganism that displays exceptional tolerance to several growth inhibitors generated during dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.DescriptionVanillin, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural and lignin are known to inhibit the growth of microorganisms, such

  14. DOE ARM SP2 Deployment at Boston College_Aerodyne led Coated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SP2 Deployment at Boston College-Aerodyne- Led Coated Black Carbon Study (BC4) Final ... DOESC-ARM-15-068 SP2 Deployment at Boston College- Aerodyne-Led Coated Black Carbon Study ...

  15. ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA formerly Greenergy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: ErgyCapital SpA (formerly Greenergy Capital) Place: Milan, Italy Zip: 20121 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy...

  16. NSS5/SP-STM2 Joint International Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw-Wai Hla

    2009-05-03

    The NSS5/SP-STM2 conference was held in Athens, Ohio July 15-19, 2008. The conference brought together a prestigious group of scientists from all over the globe to focus for 3 days on a variety of nanoscience topics, particularly on nanoscale spectroscopy and spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. The conference was attended by many young scientists as well as senior scientists. Attendees to the conference were drawn from more than 10 countries and included 28 invited speakers, who are the leading scientists in their respective research areas. Included among the invited speakers were 4 plenary speakers - eminent scientists in their fields. The conference was divided into two parallel sessions the NSS5 session and the SP-STM2 session.

  17. The transputer based GA. SP data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, D.; Avano, B.; DePoli, M.; Maron, G. ); Negro, A.; Parlati, G. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, the new data acquisition for the GA.SP detector is presented. It is a distributed system based on a network of 40 T800 and T222 transputers linked to a VME system used for histogram storage. A 100 MBit/s FDDI ring connects the system to UNIX workstations used for the experiment control, histogram display and second level data analysis.

  18. FY 2015 Senior Executive Service (SES) and Senior Professional (SP) Performance Appraisal Opening Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The FY 2015 performance appraisal cycle for both SES and SP members, which includes Senior Level (SL) and Scientific or Professional (ST) employees, concludes on September 30, 2015.

  19. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reservoir Flow and Permeability Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. ...

  20. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  1. PAH bioconcentration in Mytilus sp from Sinclair Inlet, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, J.; Young, D.; Ozretich, R.; Echols, S.

    1995-12-31

    Approximately 20 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured by GC/MS in seawater and whole soft tissues of the intertidal mussel Mytilus sp. collected in July 1991 within and around Puget Sound`s Sinclair Inlet. Low variability was observed in the water concentrations collected over three days at control sites, yielding reliable values for the exposure levels experienced by this bioindicator mollusk. Mean water concentrations of acenaphthene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene in the control region were 2.7 {+-} 0.8, 2.8 {+-} 0.8, and 3.1 {+-} 0.7 ng/liter, respectively. Levels measured near sites of vessel activity were higher but much more variable; this reduced the reliability of the tissue/water bioconcentration factors (BCF) obtained from these samples. An empirical model relating values of Log BCF and Log Kow for the control zone samples supports the utility of this estuarine bioindicator for monitoring general levels of PAH in nearshore surface waters.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - AAVP.ASTM.Monterey..ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Science Team Meeting Hyatt Regency Monterey Monterey, CA Rickey Petty March 29 th , 2007 ARM Aerial Vehicle Program (AAVP) ARM-UAV conducted 12 major field campaigns Field Campaigns to date: Fall 1993, Edwards AFB, CA Spring 1994, Northern OK Fall 1995, Northern OK Spring 1996, Northern OK Fall 1996, Northern OK Fall 1997, Northern OK Spring 1999, PMRF Kauai, HI Summer 1999, Monterey, CA Winter 2000, Northern OK Fall 2002, Northern OK Fall 2004, North Slope, AK Winter 2006, Darwin, Australia

  3. Nuclear facility licensing, documentaion, and reviews, and the SP-100 test site experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, B.C.; Deobald, T.L.; Bitten, E.J.

    1991-06-01

    The required approvals and permits to test a nuclear facility are extensive. Numerous regulatory requirements result in the preparation of documentation to support the approval process. The principal regulations for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) include the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Air Act, and Atomic Energy Act. The documentation prepared for the SP-100 Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) included an Environmental Assessment, state permit applications, and Safety Analysis Reports. This paper discusses the regulation documentation requirements and the SP-100 NAT Test Site experience. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  5. FY 2016 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL OPENING GUIDANCE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FY 2016 performance appraisal cycle for both SES and SP members, which includes Senior Level (SL) and Scientific or Professional (ST) employees, concludes on December 15, 2015. These documents...

  6. FY 2015 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL CYCLE- CLOSEOUT GUIDANCE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The FY 2015 performance appraisal cycle for both SES and SP members, which includes Senior Level (SL) and Scientific or Professional (ST) employees, concluded on September 30, 2015.  In order to...

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - SP2 Deployment at Boston College-Aerodyne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deployment at Boston College-Aerodyne led Coated Black Carbon Study (BC4) ARM Data ... Campaign : SP2 Deployment at Boston College-Aerodyne led Coated Black Carbon Study (BC4) ...

  8. Energia Servizi Engineering SpA E S Engineering | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SpA (E&S Engineering) Place: Rome, Italy Sector: Hydro, Wind energy Product: Italian developer of biogas, wind, mini-hydro and PV projects. Coordinates: 41.90311,...

  9. Overview of the 1985 NASA Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaby, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the 1985 (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities in support of the SP-100 Program is presented. The SP-100 program is being conducted in support of the Department of Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. This effort is keyed on the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of a 25 kW(e) Stirling space-power technology-feasibility demonstrator engine. Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of a 9000-h goal endurance test conducted on a 2 kW(e) free-piston Stirling/linear alternator system employing hydrostatic gas bearings. Dynamic balancing of the RE-1000 engine (a 1 kW(e) free-piston Stirling engine) using a passive dynamic absorber is discussed, along with the results of a parametric study showing the relationships of Stirling power converter specific weight and efficiency as functions of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Planned tests are described covering a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept for potential SP-100 application.

  10. Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K.

    2012-01-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

  11. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  12. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx 2010.11.15 - 2011.04.25 Lead Scientist :...

  14. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  16. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaby, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine will be discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept will be presented.

  17. Gas production and behavior in the coolant of the SP-100 Space Nuclear Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGhee, J.M.

    1989-08-01

    The radiologic generation and subsequent behavior of helium gas in the lithium coolant of SP-100 class space nuclear power reactors was investigated analytically in a two part study. Part One of the study consisted of a calculation of coolant radiologic helium gas production rates in a SP-100 class reactor using the discrete ordinates code TWODANT. Cross sections were developed from ENDF/B-V data via the MATXS6s master cross section library. Cross sections were self shielded assuming one homogeneous core region, and doppler broadened to 1300 K using the cross section preparation code TRANSX. Calculations were performed using an S{sub 4}/P{sub 1} approximation and 80 neutron energy groups. Part Two of the study consisted of a theoretical investigation into the behavior of helium gas in the primary loop of lithium cooled space reactors. The SP-100 space power system was used as a representative of such a system. Topics investigated included: (1) heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation; (2) bubble growth/collapse by diffusion, mechanical temperature/pressure effects, and coalescence; and, (3) the effects on bubble distribution of microgravity, magnetic fields, and inertially induced buoyancy. 104 refs., 78 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. Elastic properties, sp fraction, and Raman scattering in low and high pressure synthesized diamond-like boron rich carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Burgess, Katherine; Jia, Ruth; Sharma, Shiv; Ming, Li-Chung; Liu, Yongsheng; Ciston, Jim; Hong, Shiming

    2014-10-07

    Dense BC{sub x} phases with high boron concentration are predicted to be metastable, superhard, and conductors or superconductors depending on boron concentration. However, up to this point, diamond-like boron rich carbides BC{sub x} (dl-BC{sub x}) phases have been thought obtainable only through high pressure and high temperature treatment, necessitating small specimen volume. Here, we use electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, surface Brillouin scattering, laser ultrasonics (LU) technique, and analysis of elastic properties to demonstrate that low pressure synthesis (chemical vapor deposition) of BC{sub x} phases may also lead to the creation of diamond-like boron rich carbides. The elastic properties of the dl-BC{sub x} phases depend on the carbon spversus sp content, which decreases with increasing boron concentration, while the boron bonds determine the shape of the Raman spectra of the dl-BC{sub x} after high pressure-high temperature treatment. Using the estimation of the density value based on the sp fraction, the shear modulus ? of dl-BC?, containing 10% carbon atoms with sp bonds, and dl-B?C?, containing 38% carbon atoms with sp bonds, were found to be ? = 19.3 GPa and ? = 170 GPa, respectively. The presented experimental data also imply that boron atoms lead to a creation of sp bonds during the deposition processes.

  19. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more » and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  20. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.

  1. Genomes of three facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strainsreflect host plant biogeography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, J.Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry,Alison; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, M. Pilar; Ggoltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga; Labarre,Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez,Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth; Niemann, James; Pujic,Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt,Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde,Claudio; Wall, Luis; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2006-02-01

    Filamentous actinobacteria from the genus Frankia anddiverse woody trees and shrubs together form N2-fixing actinorhizal rootnodule symbioses that are a major source of new soil nitrogen in widelydiverse biomes 1. Three major clades of Frankia sp. strains are defined;each clade is associated with a defined subset of plants from among theeight actinorhizal plant families 2,3. The evolution arytrajectoriesfollowed by the ancestors of both symbionts leading to current patternsof symbiont compatibility are unknown. Here we show that the competingprocesses of genome expansion and contraction have operated in differentgroups of Frankia strains in a manner that can be related to thespeciation of the plant hosts and their geographic distribution. Wesequenced and compared the genomes from three Frankia sp. strains havingdifferent host plant specificities. The sizes of their genomes variedfrom 5.38 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (HFPCcI3) to 7.50Mbp for amedium host range strain (ACN14a) to 9.08 Mbp for a broad host rangestrain (EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported forsuch closely related bacteria. Since the order of divergence of thestrains is known, the extent of gene deletion, duplication andacquisition could be estimated and was found to be inconcert with thebiogeographic history of the symbioses. Host plant isolation favoredgenome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genomeexpansion. The results support the idea that major genome reductions aswell as expansions can occur in facultatively symbiotic soil bacteria asthey respond to new environments in the context of theirsymbioses.

  2. A reliability and mass perspective of SP-100 Stirling cycle lunar-base powerplant designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1991-06-01

    The purpose was to obtain reliability and mass perspectives on selection of space power system conceptual designs based on SP-100 reactor and Stirling cycle power-generation subsystems. The approach taken was to: (1) develop a criterion for an acceptable overall reliability risk as a function of the expected range of emerging technology subsystem unit reliabilities; (2) conduct reliability and mass analyses for a diverse matrix of 800-kWe lunar-base design configurations employing single and multiple powerplants with both full and partial subsystem redundancy combinations; and (3) derive reliability and mass perspectives on selection of conceptual design configurations that meet an acceptable reliability criterion with the minimum system mass increase relative to reference powerplant design. The developed perspectives provided valuable insight into the considerations required to identify and characterize high-reliability and low-mass lunar-base powerplant conceptual design.

  3. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  4. Draft genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singapore wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dichosa, Armand E. K.; Davenport, Karen W.; Li, Po-E; Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Daligault, Hajnalka; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Kunde, Yuliya; McMurry, Kim; Lo, Chien -Chi; Reitenga, Krista G.; et al

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we report here the genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singaporean wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets (GMDs) and single-cell genomics (SCG). This approach provided a single clonal microcolony that was sufficient to obtain a 4.9-Mbp genome assembly of an ecologically relevant Thauera species.

  5. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-?B through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  6. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  7. Additive synthesis with DIASS-M4C on Argonne National Laboratory`s IBM POWERparallel System (SP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaper, H.; Ralley, D.; Restrepo, J.; Tiepei, S.

    1995-12-31

    DIASS-M4C, a digital additive instrument was implemented on the Argonne National Laboratory`s IBM POWER parallel System (SP). This paper discusses the need for a massively parallel supercomputer and shows how the code was parallelized. The resulting sounds and the degree of control the user can have justify the effort and the use of such a large computer.

  8. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  9. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  10. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.B.; Durand, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage.

  11. Nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. ASTM special technical publication 1350

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.A.; Fairhurst, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of the symposium was to highlight recent developments in nondestructive and automated testing for soil and rock properties. Speakers present results of recent research in these areas that have practical application for the rapid and economical testing of soil and rock. Authors were encouraged to identify which testing equipment and methods have sufficient practical application to warrant standards development.

  12. Field instrumentation for soil and rock. ASTM special technical publication 1358

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, G.N.; Marr, W.A.

    1999-07-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Instrumentation associated with soil structure interaction; Instrumentation support construction activities; Instrumentation to monitor landfills; Instrumentation for monitoring settlement and stability; Data acquisition and data management; and Instrumentation for measuring physical properties in the field. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Observation of Cleavage Fracture after Substantial Dimple Rupture in ASTM A710 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, Walter Graham; Lloyd, Wilson Randolph

    2000-07-01

    A major concern often arising in structural integrity predictions is the possibility that low-energy brittle fracture could result as a consequence of cleavage either under normal operating or design accident conditions. This can be especially troublesome when the leak-before-break (LBB) approach shows an additional safety margin of the design. For LBB to be applicable, the fracture process must remain ductile (dimple rupture), and not change to cleavage. The American Society for Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Code) provides guidelines for avoiding cleavage fracture for Code-accepted materials. Experimental results for a non-Code steel are provided, and show that cleavage may occur for a thickness under16 mm (where the code suggests it will not) after stable crack growth (?a) of up to 20 mm. This work is still in progress; test results are provided along with possible reasons for the mode transition, but complete explanations are still being developed.

  14. Overview of the 1986 free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaby, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities include a free-piston Stirling space-power technology feasibility demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power Stirling advanced technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including test results. Future space-power projections are presented along with a description of a study that will investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power module to the 150 kW power range. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. A description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept will be presented whereby the displacer of a 1 kWe free-piston Stirling engine is modified to demonstrate the bearing concept. And finally the goals of a conceptual design for a 25 kWe Solar Advanced Stirling Conversion System capable of delivering electric power to an electric utility grid will be discussed. The solar work is under an interagency agreement between DOE/Sandia National Laboratory and NASA Lewis.

  15. SpArcFiRe: Scalable automated detection of spiral galaxy arm segments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B. E-mail: whayes@uci.edu

    2014-08-01

    Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takes about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ?644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as 'galaxies'. We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral 'arm', leading us to prefer the term 'arm segment'. We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle armwhich is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.

  16. Effect of mono- and dichromatic light quality on growth rates and photosynthetic performance of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Konopka, Allan; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Zhang, Shuyi; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2014-09-19

    Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was grown to steady state in optically thin turbidostat cultures under conditions for which light quantity and quality was systematically varied by modulating the output of narrow-band LEDs. Cells were provided photons absorbed primarily by chlorophyll (680 nm) or phycocyanin (630 nm) as the organism was subjected to four distinct mono- and dichromatic regimes. During cultivation with dichromatic light, growth rates displayed by Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 were generally proportional to the total incident irradiance at values < 275 mol photons m-2 s-1 and were not affected by the ratio of 630:680 nm wavelengths. Notably, under monochromatic light conditions, cultures exhibited similar growth rates only when they were irradiated with 630 nm light; cultures irradiated with only 680 nm light grew at rates that were 60 70% of those under other light quality regimes at equivalent irradiances. The functionality of photosystem II and associated processes such as maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport, rate of cyclic electron flow, and rate of dark respiration generally increased as a function of growth rate. Nonetheless, some of the photophysiological parameters measured here displayed distinct patterns with respect to growth rate of cultures adapted to a single wavelength including phycobiliprotein content, which increased under severely light-limited growth conditions. Additionally, the ratio of photosystem II to photosystem I increased approximately 40% over the range of growth rates, although cells grown with 680 nm light only had the highest ratios. These results suggest the presence of effective mechanisms which allow acclimation of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 acclimation to different irradiance conditions.

  17. OO84O4c6sP HNF-SD-WM-II-740, Rev. OB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OO84O4c6sP HNF-SD-WM-II-740, Rev. OB Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes M. J. Kupfer, A. L. Boldt, K. M. Hodgson, 1. W. Shelton, B. C. Simpson, and R. A. Watrous (LMHC); M. D. LeClair (SAIC); G. L. Borsheini (BA); R. T. Winward (MA); B. A. Higley and R. M. Orme (NHC); N.. G. Colton (PNNL); S. L. Lambert and D. E. Place (SESC); and W. W. Schulz (W S) Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract

  18. Reversible elastic deformation of functionalized sp{sup 2} carbon at pressures of up to 33?GPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soignard, Emmanuel; Hochheimer, Hans D.; Yarger, Jeff; Raj, Rishi

    2014-10-06

    We show that sp{sup 2} carbon bonded to silicon and oxygen can withstand reversible elastic deformation at pressures of up to 33?GPa. These experiments were carried out in a diamond anvil cell. In-situ Raman spectroscopy was employed to record the reversibility of elastic deformation by measuring the movement in the D and G peaks of carbon. Above 33?GPa the material, a silicon oxycarbide, transforms into an unidentified state which is retained upon unloading down to ambient pressure. Thermodynamical analysis suggests that the material could have transformed into a crystalline state at these ultrahigh pressures, driven by mechanical work.

  19. Evidence regarding the UV sunscreen role of a mycosporine-like compound in the cyanobacterium Gloeocapsa sp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Wingard, C.E.; Castenholz, R.W. )

    1993-01-01

    The mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) have been thought to serve a UV sunscreen role in organisms that produce or contain them because MAAs present strong absorbance in the UV region and because there is no other apparent biological function. The researchers used the cyanobacterium Gloeocapsa sp. to assess the possible sunscreen role of MAAs. Five conditions are evaluated: (1) absorption of radiation high enough to provide benefit to the organisms; (2) correlation of presence of the compound with enhansed fitness under UV; (3) concentration of the compound and resistance to UV still present under physiological inactivity; (4) effect maximal at wavelengths of maximal absorption; (5) loss of protection after artificial removal of compound. The results indicate that only a small sunscreen effect can be ascribed to the MAA in the Gloecapsa sp. under these experimental conditions. It is possible however, that in the typical undisturbed colonial growth form, MAAs and their screening action may become major factors in resistance to UV radiation. 25 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of a chromosomal mercury resistance determinant from a Bacillus sp. with broad-spectrum mercury resistance. [Mercury reductase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Levinson, H.S.; Mahler, I. ); Moore, M.; Walsh, C. ); Silver, S. )

    1989-01-01

    A 13.5-kilobase HindIII fragment, bearing an intact mercury resistance (mer) operon, was isolated from chromosomal DNA of broad-spectrum mercury-resistant Bacillus sp. strain RC607 by using as a probe a clone containing the mercury reductase (merA) gene. The new clone, pYW33, expressed broad-spectrum mercury resistance both in Escherichia coli and in Bacillus subtilis, but only in B. subtilis was the mercuric reductase activity inducible. Sequencing of a 1.8-kilobase mercury hypersensitivity-producing fragment revealed four open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 may code for a regulatory protein (MerR). ORF2 and ORF4 were associated with cellular transport function and the hypersensitivity phenotype. DNA fragments encompassing the merA and the merB genes were sequenced. The predicted Bacillus sp. strain RC607 MerA (mercuric reductase) and MerB (organomercurial lyase) were similar to those predicted from Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 (67 and 73% amino acid identities, respectively); however, only 40% of the amino acid residues of RC607 MerA were identical to those of the mercuric reductase from gram-negative bacteria. A 69-kilodalton polypeptide was isolated and identified as the merA gene product by examination of its amino-terminal sequence.

  1. Spatially-Resolved Analysis of Glycolipids and Metabolites in Living Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Konopka, Allan; Laskin, Julia

    2013-04-07

    Microorganisms release a diversity of organic compounds that couple interspecies metabolism, enable communication, or provide benefits to other microbes. Increased knowledge of microbial metabolite production will contribute to understanding of the dynamic microbial world and can potentially lead to new developments in drug discovery, biofuel production, and clinical research. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) is an ambient ionization technique that enables detailed chemical characterization of molecules from a specific location on a surface without special sample pretreatment. Due to its ambient nature, living bacterial colonies growing on agar plates can be rapidly and non-destructively analyzed. We performed spatially resolved nano-DESI analysis of living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies on agar plates. We use high resolution mass spectrometry and MS/MS analysis of the living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies to detect metabolites and lipids, and confirm their identities. We found that despite the high salt content of the agar (osmolarity ca. 700 mM), nano-DESI analysis enables detailed characterization of metabolites produced by the colony. Using this technique, we identified several glycolipids found on the living colonies and examined the effect of the age of the colony on the chemical gradient of glucosylglycerol secreted onto agar.

  2. Genome Sequence of Thermotoga sp Strain RQ2, a Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Geothermally Heated Region of the Seafloor near Ribeira Quente, the Azores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swithers, Kristen S; DiPippo, Jonathan L; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Lykidis, A; Land, Miriam L; Stetter, Karl O; Nelson, Karen E; Gogarten, Peter; Noll, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Thermotoga sp. strain RQ2 is probably a strain of Thermotoga maritima. Its complete genome sequence allows for an examination of the extent and consequences of gene flow within Thermotoga species and strains. Thermotoga sp. RQ2 differs from T. maritima in its genes involved in myo-inositol metabolism. Its genome also encodes an apparent fructose phosphotransferase system (PTS) sugar transporter. This operon is also found in Thermotoga naphthophila strain RKU-10 but no other Thermotogales. These are the first reported PTS transporters in the Thermotogales.

  3. Mutations that affect structure and assembly of light-harvesting proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, L.K.; Rayner, M.C.; Eiserling, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701 was mutagenized with UV irradiation and screened for pigment changes that indicated genetic lesions involving the light-harvesting proteins of the phycobilisome. A previous examination of the pigment mutant UV16 showed an assembly defect in the phycocyanin component of the phycobilisome. Mutagenesis of UV16 produced an additional double mutant, UV16-40, with decreased phycoerythrin content. Phycocyanin and phycoerythrin were isolated from UV16-40 and compared with normal biliproteins. The results suggested that the UV16 mutation affected the alpha subunit of phycocyanin, while the phycoerythrin beta subunit from UV16-40 had lost one of its three chromophores. Characterization of the unassembled phycobilisome components in these mutants suggests that these strains will be useful for probing in vivo the regulated expression and assembly of phycobilisomes.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; Brettin, T.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. C.; Han, Cliff F.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, F.; Land, M.; Hauser, L.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Richardson, P. M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Sanford, Robert A.; Loeffler, Frank E.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacteriums genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  7. Draft Genome sequence of Frankia sp. Strain QA3, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from the root nodule of Alnus nitida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Arnab; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Chen, Amy; Davenport, Karen W.; Deshpande, Shweta; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Gtari, Maher; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Markowitz, Victor; Mavromatis, K; Nolan, Matt; Nouioui, Imen; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Santos, Catarina; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Tavares, Fernando; Teshima, Hazuki; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Wishart, Jessie; Tisa, Louis S.

    2013-01-01

    Members of actinomycete genus Frankia form a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants. We report a high-quality draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. stain QA3, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from root nodules of Alnus nitida.

  8. Draft Genome sequence of Frankia sp. strains CN3 , an atypical, non-infective (Nod-) ineffective (Fix-) isolate from Coriaria nepalensis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Chen, Amy; Davenport, Karen W.; Deshpande, Shweta; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Markowitz, Victor; Mavromatis, K; Nolan, Matt; Nouioui, Imen; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Santos, Catarina; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Tavares, Fernando; Hazuki, Teshima; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Tisa, Louis S.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Frankia sp. strain CN3, which was isolated from Coriaria nepalensis. This genome sequence is the first from the fourth lineage of Frankia, that are unable to re-infect actinorhizal plants. At 10 Mb, it represents the largest Frankia genome sequenced to date.

  9. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Peters, John W.

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an anaerobic, metal-reducing bacterium isolated from a contaminated subsurface environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, S.; Lapidus, A.; Barry, K.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Pitluck, S.; Sims, D.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacteriums genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  12. Draft genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singapore wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dichosa, Armand E. K.; Davenport, Karen W.; Li, Po-E; Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Daligault, Hajnalka; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Kunde, Yuliya; McMurry, Kim; Lo, Chien -Chi; Reitenga, Krista G.; Daughton, Ashlynn R.; Shen, Xiaohong; Frietze, Seth; Wang, Dongping; Johnson, Shannon L.; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Schuster, Stephan; Chain, Patrick S.; Han, Cliff

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we report here the genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singaporean wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets (GMDs) and single-cell genomics (SCG). This approach provided a single clonal microcolony that was sufficient to obtain a 4.9-Mbp genome assembly of an ecologically relevant Thauera species.

  13. Hybrid radiosity-SP{sub 3} equation based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xueli E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Zhang, Qitan; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn

    2014-01-14

    To provide an ideal solution for a specific problem of gastric cancer detection in which low-scattering regions simultaneously existed with both the non- and high-scattering regions, a novel hybrid radiosity-SP{sub 3} equation based reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescence tomography was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP{sub 3}) was combined with the radiosity equation to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues, which provided acceptable accuracy for the turbid medium with both low- and non-scattering regions. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated with digital mouse based simulations and a gastric cancer-bearing mouse based in situ experiment. Primary results demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the proposed algorithm for the turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions.

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic dynamics in the metabolism of a diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 during a diurnal light–dark cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Welkie, David; Zhang, Xiaohui; Markillie, Meng; Taylor, Ronald; Orr, Galya; Jacobs, Jon; Bhide, Ketaki; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Gritsenko, Marina; Mitchell, Hugh; et al

    2014-12-29

    Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 is an excellent cyanobacterial model organism with great potential to be applied as a biocatalyst for the production of high value compounds. Like other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterial species, it has a tightly regulated metabolism synchronized to the light-dark cycle. Utilizing transcriptomic and proteomic methods, we were able to quantify the relationships between transcription and translation underlying central and secondary metabolism in response to nitrogen free, 12 hour light and 12 hour dark conditions.

  15. Transcriptomic and proteomic dynamics in the metabolism of a diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 during a diurnal lightdark cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welkie, David; Zhang, Xiaohui; Markillie, Meng; Taylor, Ronald; Orr, Galya; Jacobs, Jon; Bhide, Ketaki; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Gritsenko, Marina; Mitchell, Hugh; Smith, Richard D; Sherman, Louis A

    2014-12-29

    Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 is an excellent cyanobacterial model organism with great potential to be applied as a biocatalyst for the production of high value compounds. Like other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterial species, it has a tightly regulated metabolism synchronized to the light-dark cycle. Utilizing transcriptomic and proteomic methods, we were able to quantify the relationships between transcription and translation underlying central and secondary metabolism in response to nitrogen free, 12 hour light and 12 hour dark conditions.

  16. Coal liquefaction process wherein jet fuel, diesel fuel and/or ASTM No. 2 fuel oil is recovered

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Richard F.; Ryan, Daniel F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for the liquefaction of coal and similar solid carbonaceous materials wherein a hydrogen donor solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the naphthenic components from the solvent or diluent fraction are separated and used as jet fuel components. The extraction increases the relative concentration of hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) components and as a result reduces the gas yield during liquefaction and decreases hydrogen consumption during said liquefaction. The hydrogenation severity can be controlled to increase the yield of naphthenic components and hence the yield of jet fuel and in a preferred embodiment jet fuel yield is maximized while at the same time maintaining solvent balance.

  17. Integrated in silico analyses of regulatory and metabolic networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 reveal relationships between gene centrality and essentiality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2015-03-27

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as ‘topologically important.’ Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termedmore » as ‘functionally important’ genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.« less

  18. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray cystallographic studies of a proline-specific aminopeptidase from Aneurinibacillus sp. strain AM-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akioka, Makoto [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University, Shimogamo, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Nakano, Hiroaki [Department of Structural Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Horikiri, Aya; Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University, Shimogamo, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Shimizu, Tetsuya; Nakatsu, Toru; Kato, Hiroaki [Department of Structural Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Watanabe, Kunihiko, E-mail: kwatanab@kpu.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University, Shimogamo, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan)

    2006-12-01

    Preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of a proline-specific aminopepitdase from Aneurinibacillus sp, strain AM-1 was carried out. To elucidate the structure and molecular mechanism of a characteristic proline-specific aminopeptidase produced by the thermophile Aneurinibacillus sp. strain AM-1, its gene was cloned and the recombinant protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.8 resolution from the recombinant aminopeptidase crystal. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.62, b = 68.20, c = 76.84 . A complete data set was also obtained from crystals of SeMet-substituted aminopeptidase. Data in the resolution range 202.1 from the MAD data set from the SeMet-substituted crystal were used for phase determination.

  19. Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Water Quality at Multiple Locations on the Snake and Columbia Rivers using CRiSP/RealTime, 1998 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, W. Nicholas; Hayes, Joshua A.; Shaw, Pamela

    1999-07-21

    Since 1988, wild salmon have been PIT-tagged through monitoring and research programs conducted by the Columbia River fisheries agencies and Tribes. Workers at the University of Washington have used detection data at Lower Granite Dam to generate predictions of arrival distributions for various stocks at the dam. The prediction tool is known as RealTime. In 1996, RealTime predictions were linked to a downstream migration model, CRiSP.1. The composite model, known as CRiSP/RealTime, predicts the arrival distribution and fraction transported at downriver locations.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor-2 up-regulates the expression of nestin through the RasRafERKSp1 signaling axis in C6 glioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Kai-Wei; Huang, Yuan-Li; Wong, Zong-Ruei; Su, Peng-Han; Huang, Bu-Miin; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan ; Yang, Hsi-Yuan

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: Nestin expression in C6 glioma cells is induced by FGF-2. Nestin expression is induced by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. The FGFR inhibitor SU5402 blocks the FGF-2-induced nestin expression. The mRNA of FGFR1 and 3 are detected in C6 glioma cells. RasRafERKSp1 signaling pathway is responsibe for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. -- Abstract: Nestin is a 240-kDa intermediate filament protein expressed mainly in neural and myogenic stem cells. Although a substantial number of studies have focused on the expression of nestin during development of the central nervous system, little is known about the factors that induce and regulate its expression. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an effective mitogen and stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of a subset of nestin-expressing cells, including neural progenitor cells, glial precursor cells, and smooth muscle cells. To assess whether FGF-2 is a potent factor that induces the expression of nestin, C6 glioma cells were used. The results showed that nestin expression was up-regulated by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Our RT-PCR results showed that C6 glioma cells express FGFR1/3, and FGFRs is required for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. Further signaling analysis also revealed that FGF-2-induced nestin expression is mediated through FGFRMAPKERK signaling axis and the transcriptional factor Sp1. These findings provide new insight into the regulation of nestin in glial system and enable the further studies on the function of nestin in glial cells.

  1. The Dark Side of Algae Cultivation. Characterizing night biomass loss in three photosynthetic algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina and Picochlorum sp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmundson, Scott J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2015-10-28

    Night biomass loss in photosynthetic algae is an essential parameter that is often overlooked when modeling or optimizing biomass productivities. Night respiration acts as a tax on daily biomass gains and has not been well characterized in the context of biofuel production. We examined the night biomass loss in three algae strains that may have potential for commercial biomass production (Nannochloropsis salina- CCMP1776, Chlorella sorokiniana- DOE1412, and Picochlorum sp. LANL-WT). Biomass losses were monitored by ash free dry weight (AFDW mg/L-1) and optical density (OD750) on a thermal-gradient incubator. Night biomass loss rates were highly variable (ranging from -0.006 to -0.59 day -1), species-specific, and dependent on both culture growth phase prior to the dark period and night pond temperature. In general, the fraction of biomass lost over a 10 hour dark period, which ranged from ca. 1 to 22% in our experiments, was positively correlated with temperature and declined as the culture transitioned from exponential to linear to stationary phase. The dynamics of biomass loss should be taken into consideration in algae strain selection, are critical in predictive modeling of biomass production based on geographic location and can influence the net productivity of photosynthetic cultures used for bio-based fuels or products.

  2. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Peters, John W.

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  3. Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a cellulolytic and filamentous thermophile that represents a novel lineage (Kallotenuales ord. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov.) within the class Chloroflexia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Jesse; Gieler, Brandon; Heisler, Devon; Palisoc, Maryknoll; Williams, Amanda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ming, Hong; Yu, Tian T.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Li, Wen J.; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-08-15

    Several closely-related, thermophilic, and cellulolytic bacterial strains, designated JKG1T, JKG2, JKG3, JKG4, and JKG5, were isolated from a cellulolytic enrichment (corn stover) incubated in the water column of Great Boiling Spring, NV. Strain JKG1T had cells of a diameter of 0.7 - 0.9 ?m and length of ~2.0 ?m that formed non-branched multicellular filaments reaching >300 ?m. Spores were not formed and dense liquid cultures were red. The temperature range for growth was 45-65 C, with an optimum of 55 C. The pH range for growth was 5.6-9.0, with an optimum of 7.5. JKG1T grew as an aerobic heterotroph, utilizing glucose, sucrose, xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, carboxymethylcellulose, filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, xylan, starch, casamino acids, tryptone, peptone, yeast extract, acetate, citrate, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol as sole carbon sources, and was not observed to photosynthesize. The cells stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the new isolates in the class Chloroflexia, but distant from other cultivated members, with the highest sequence identity of 82.5% to Roseiflexus castenholzii. The major quinone was menaquinone-9; no ubiquinones were detected. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C18:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C18:0, and iso-C17:0. C16:0, iso-C16:0, and C17:0. The peptidoglycan amino acids were alanine, ornithine, glutamic acid, serine, and asparagine. Whole-cell sugars included mannose, rhamnose, glucose, galactose, ribose, arabinose, and xylose. Morphological, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic results suggest that JKG1T is representative of a new lineage within the class Chloroflexia, which we propose to designate Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov., Kallotenuales ord. nov.

  4. Fig. 20.1.sp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  5. Fig. 20.2.sp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. Fig. 20.3.sp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  7. Fig. 20.5.sp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  8. Accumulation of Pb and Cu heavy metals in sea water, sediment, and leaf and root tissue of Enhalus sp. in the seagrass bed of Banten Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauziah, Faiza Choesin, Devi N.

    2014-03-24

    Banten Bay in Indonesia is a coastal area which has been highly affected by human activity. Previous studies have reported the presence of lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) heavy metals in the seawater of this area. This study was conducted to measure the accumulation of Pb and Cu in seawater, sediment, leaf tissue, and root tissue of the seagrass species Enhalus sp. Sampling was conducted at two observation stations in Banten Bay: Station 1 (St.1) was located closer to the coastline and to industrial plants as source of pollution, while Station 2 (St.2) was located farther away offshore. At each station, three sampling points were established by random sampling. Field sampling was conducted at two different dates, i.e., on 29 May 2012 and 30 June 2012. Samples were processed by wet ashing using concentrated HNO{sub 3} acid and measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). Accumulation of Pb was only detected in sediment samples in St.1, while Cu was detected in all samples. Average concentrations of Cu in May were as follows: sediment St.1 = 0.731 ppm, sediment St.2 = 0.383 ppm, seawater St.1 = 0.163 ppm, seawater St.2 = 0.174 ppm, leaf St.1 = 0.102 ppm, leaf St.2 = 0.132 ppm, root St.1= 0.139 ppm, and root St.2 = 0.075 ppm. Average measurements of Cu in June were: sediment St.1 = 0.260 ppm, leaf St.1 = 0.335 ppm, leaf St.2 = 0.301 ppm, root St.1= 0.047 ppm, and root St.2 = 0.060 ppm. In June, Cu was undetected in St.2 sediment and seawater at both stations. In May, Cu concentration in seawater exceeded the maximum allowable threshold for water as determined by the Ministry of the Environment. Spatial and temporal variation in Pb and Cu accumulation were most probably affected by distance from source and physical conditions of the environment (e.g., water current and mixing)

  9. Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Biodiesel Research Update Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel

  10. Cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (TcbB) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, expressed in Escherichia coli DH5{alpha}(pTCB149), catalyzes enantioselective dehydrogenase reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raschke, H.; Fleischmann, T.; Meer, J.R. van der; Kohler, H.P.E.

    1999-12-01

    cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (CDD) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, cloned into Escherichia coli DH5{alpha}(pTCB149) was able to oxidize cis-dihydrodihydroxy derivatives (cis-dihydrodiols) of dihydronaphthalene, indene, and four para-substituted toluenes to the corresponding catechols. During the incubation of a nonracemic mixture of cis-1,2-indandiol, only the (+)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was oxidized; the (-)-cis-(S,2R) enantiomer remained unchanged, CDD oxidized both enantiomers of cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, but oxidation of the (+)-cis-(1S,2R) enantiomer was delayed until the (-)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was completely depleted. When incubated with nonracemic mixtures of para-substituted cis-toluene dihydrodiols, CDD always oxidized the major enantiomer at a higher rate than the minor enantiomer. When incubated with racemic 1-indanol, CDD enantioselectively transformed the (+)-(1S) enatiomer to 1-indanone. This stereoselective transformation shows that CDD also acted as an alcohol dehydrogenase. Additionally, CDD was able to oxidize (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene, (+)-cis-monochlorobiphenyl dihydrodiols, and (+)-cis-toluene dihydrodiol to the corresponding catechols.

  11. Thermoflexus hugenholtzii gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, microaerophilic, filamentous bacterium representing a novel class in the Chloroflexi, Thermoflexia classis nov., and description of Thermoflexaceae fam. nov. and Thermoflexales ord. nov.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Gevorkian, Jonathan; Despujos, Fairuz; Cole, Jesse; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Ming, Hong; Li, Wen J.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2014-06-06

    A thermophilic, filamentous, heterotrophic bacterium designated strain JAD2T was isolated from sediment of Great Boiling Spring in Nevada, USA. Cells had an average diameter of 0.3 m and length of 4.0 m, and formed filaments typically ranging in length from 20 m to 200 m. Filaments were negative for the Gram stain reaction, spores were not formed, and motility was not observed. The optimum temperature for growth was 75 C with a range from 67.5-75 C, and the optimum pH for growth was 6.75 with a range from 6.5-7.75. Peptone, tryptone or yeast extract were able to support growth when supplemented with a vitamin solution, but no growth was observed using a variety of defined organic substrates. Strain JAD2T was a facultative microaerophile, with optimal growth at 1% v/v O2 and an upper limit of 8% O2, and anaerobic growth was stimulated by fumarate but inhibited by sulfite and elemental sulfur. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C16:0, C19:0, C18:0, C20:0, and C19:1. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.3%. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses using 16S rRNA gene sequences and other conserved genes placed JAD2T and other members of the yet-uncultivated GAL35 group within the phylum Chloroflexi, but not within any existing class in this phylum. These results indicate that strain JAD2T is the first cultivated representative of a new lineage within the phylum Chloroflexi, for which we propose the name Thermoflexus hugenholtzii gen. nov., sp. nov., type strain JAD2T, within Thermoflexia classis nov., Thermoflexales ord. nov., and Thermoflexaceae fam. nov.

  12. IMAT SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    33074 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar Product: Italy-based company specializing in manufacturing of components for household refrigeration. Their main renewable energy focus is...

  13. Sorgenia SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Product: Sorgenia produces electricity from both renewable energy sources and natural gas. It also buys and sells electricity and gas in the market and provides energy...

  14. Microsoft Word - 2011_sp_02.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Claudette (H1) Ivan (H5) Katrina (H5) & Rita (H5) Erin (TS) & Dean (H5) Natural Gas (right axis) Crude Oil (left...

  15. Microsoft Word - 2011_sp_01.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notice - June 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration June 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Notice: Suspension of Regional Residential Heating Oil and Propane Price Forecasts Because of fiscal year 2011 budget reductions, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has suspended surveys that were the source of historical price data published in Tables 12-15 and 34-38 of the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) that supported the residential retail

  16. Microsoft Word - 2012_sp_02.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast 1 July 10, 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast Since the mid-1980s, benchmark crude oil prices such as West Texas Intermediate (WTI) in the United States and Brent crude oil in Europe have served as reference points that the market uses for pricing other crude oils. The historically close relationships between the major benchmarks made WTI prices a reliable indicator of the average cost of crude oil to U.S. refiners,

  17. Microsoft Word - 2012_sp_04.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations 1 September 11, 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations Average daily temperatures during the summer and winter months, reported as population- weighted cooling degree days (CDDs) and heating degree days (HDDs), respectively, are important in explaining and forecasting the consumption of energy for space cooling and heating in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy

  18. Microsoft Word - 2013_sp_02.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Crude Oil Production Outlook 1 February 14, 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Key drivers for EIA's short-term U.S. crude oil production outlook Crude oil production increased by 790,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) between 2011 and 2012, the largest increase in annual output since the beginning of U.S. commercial crude oil production in 1859. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects U.S. crude oil production to continue rising over the next two years represented in the

  19. Microsoft Word - 2013_sp_05.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimates of Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Disruptions 1 September 10, 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: EIA Estimates of Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Disruptions 1 Unplanned crude oil and liquid fuels supply disruptions may occur frequently in many countries and for a variety of reasons, including conflicts, natural disasters, and technical difficulties. Although crude oil and liquid fuels supply disruptions may occur at any time, recent outages have particularly unsettled the

  20. Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Biodiesel Research Update Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel

  1. Technical Standards Newsletter - April 2007 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 *American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) ... 2 *ASTM International ... 2 *American Nuclear Society (ANS)...

  2. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PCC 6803 works bidirectionally with a bias to H2 production Authors: McIntosh, C. L., ... can be easily monitored as current under rapidly changing experimental conditions. ...

  3. Microsoft Word - FY 2015 SP Performance Appraisal System Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Results Driven, Business Acumen and Building Coalitions. ... values, and other factors. o Balances change and ... o Implements organizational vision that aligns key ...

  4. sp3-hybridized framework structure of group-14 elements discovered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with energy band gaps close to the optimal values for optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications. With metal-atom encapsulation, the P42mnm structure would also be a...

  5. Solution Package Scope Definition, Report 72, Salt Waste (SP #72)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supporting Technical Document for the Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II Report)

  6. Solar Ventures SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 20122 Sector: Solar Product: Solar PV project developer investor, focused on the Italian market and considering projects in Greece and France. References: Solar Ventures...

  7. FY 2016 SES and SP Opening Guidance Memo_0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  8. SP-100 Program: space reactor system and subsystem investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.B.

    1983-09-30

    For a space reactor power system, a comprehensive safety program will be required to assure that no undue risk is present. This report summarizes the nuclear safety review/approval process that will be required for a space reactor system. The documentation requirements are presented along with a summary of the required contents of key documents. Finally, the aerospace safety program conducted for the SNAP-10A reactor system is summarized. The results of this program are presented to show the type of program that can be expected and to provide information that could be usable in future programs.

  9. Improved Martensitic Steel for High Temperature Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined. U.S. Department of...

  10. Seismic Capacity of Threaded, Brazed, and Grooved Pipe Joints

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    joints * 4 tests o Brazed (copper) * 4 tests Grooved Couplings o Catalog items o ASTM A106 Grade B piping o ASTM A 536 couplings o Lateral deflections imposed well above...

  11. Progress Energy Florida - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    greater than 0.70, and must be an Energy Star labeled roof product based on ASTM E-903 or ASTM C-1549 testing. Building envelope improvements like ceiling insulation,...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biofuel Specifications Ethanol-blended gasoline must conform to ASTM D4814, E85 must conform to ASTM D4806, and biodiesel-blended fuel containing at least 6%, but no more than 20%, biodiesel must conform to ASTM D7467. Additionally, biobutanol must be an agriculturally derived isobutyl alcohol that meets ASTM D7862 for butanol for blending with gasoline for use as a motor fuel. Gasoline blended with biobutanol must conform to ASTM D4814. The state defers to the U.S. Environmental Protection

  13. System and method for introduction and stabilization of genes in Thermus sp.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kayser, Kevin J.; Park, Ho-Shin; Kilbane, II, John J.

    2005-03-01

    A method for introducing and stabilizing heterologous and recombinant genes in a thermophilic host in which a characteristic gene defining a detectable host characteristic is inactivated or deleted from the thermophilic host, resulting in a modified thermophilic host expressing an absence of the detectable host characteristic. A DNA fragment of interest is inserted into the modified thermophilic host together with an intact characteristic gene, whereby the detectable host characteristic is restored to the thermophilic host, thereby enabling detection and confirmation of successful transformation using plasmid vectors and integration of the DNA fragment into the chromosome of the thermophilic host.

  14. Assessment of Radioactive Liquid Effluents Release at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessa Nisti, Marcelo; Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete

    2008-08-07

    A continuous effluent monitoring program has been established at IPEN's plant in order to allow an environmental impact assessment due to radioactive liquid effluent discharge to sanitary system. Representative samples of radioactive liquid effluents are analyzed by using high resolution gamma spectroscopy and instrumental neutron activation analysis, facing to Brazilian radioprotection regulatory rules. The results are consolidating yearly in the Institute source-term. In this paper, results of the source-term are presented, concerning to years 2004, 2005 and 2006. The total activity discharged was 8.5xl0{sup 8} Bq, 5.7x10{sup 8} Bq and 2.7xl0{sup 8} Bq, respectively. As the release is strongly dependent on the total amount of the effluent and on the dilution factor, special attention is needed in order to obtain the correct value of that last one. The estimated inside plant dilution factor, considering the recent facilities and the reshaping of the sewerage system was 80, 180 and 130, for period of 2004, 2005 and 2006 discharged liquid radioactive effluent.

  15. OpL^^f-B^ JPL D-1085 D O Technical Information Report SP-100...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Several smsdler DOD contracts are expected to be in place shortly. Early in fiscal year 1984 a contract will be let by JPL to study civiliancommercial missions. NASA has also set ...

  16. Dynamic proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2012-02-03

    Understanding the dynamic nature of protein abundances provides insights into protein turnover not readily apparent from conventional, static mass spectrometry measurements. This level of data is particularly informative when surveying protein abundances in biological systems subjected to large perturbations or alterations in environment such as cyanobacteria. Our current analysis expands upon conventional proteomic approaches in cyanobacteria by measuring dynamic changes of the proteome using a 13C15N-L-leucine metabolic labeling in Cyanothece ATCC51142. Metabolically labeled Cyanothece ATCC51142 cells grown under nitrogen sufficient conditions in continuous light were monitored longitudinally for isotope incorporation over a 48 h period, revealing 422 proteins with dynamic changes in abundances. In particular, proteins involved in carbon fixation, pentose phosphate pathway, cellular protection, redox regulation, protein folding, assembly and degradation showed higher levels of isotope incorporation suggesting that these biochemical pathways are important for growth under non-diazotrophic conditions. Calculation of relative isotope abundances (RIA) values allowed to measure actual active protein synthesis over time for different biochemical pathways under non-diazotrophic conditions. Overall results demonstrated the utility of 'non-steady state' pulsed metabolic labeling for systems-wide dynamic quantification of the proteome in Cyanothece ATCC51142 that can also be applied to other cyanobacteria.

  17. AHSS Stamping Project … A/SP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AHSS Stamping Project ASP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project ASP 061 AHSS Stamping Project ASP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project ASP 061 2011 DOE Hydrogen and ...

  18. Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus Paecilomyces sp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, J.F.

    1985-08-08

    A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process includes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Smartgrid EV Communication module (SpEC) SAE DC Charging Digital...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Makes electric vehicles more convenient and reliable Can be used to achieve smart grid communication Can be used as a PEV or EVSE emulator to aid in testing and protocol...

  20. Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), g1-aircraft, sedlacek sp2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sedlacek, Art

    The primary objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in 2010 was to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their optical and hygroscopic properties in central California, with a focus on the Sacramento urban plume.

  1. Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus paecilomyces sp.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Jung Fu

    1989-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process in cludes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces, which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol, is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate.

  2. Treatment Facility D Krauter, P.W.; Harrar, J.E.; Orloff, S.P...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lab., CA (United States) USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States) United States 1998-01-01 English Technical Report...

  3. Microsoft Word - BL SP3 Table 11-03 v19 - final1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EXPERIMENTAL STATIONS - PROJECTED CAPABILITIES AFTER SPEAR3 COMMISSIONING Projections could vary depending upon completion of upgrade activities and radiation shielding requirements BEAM LINE ID (Scientific Disciplines) EXPERIMENTAL STATION TYPE (Energy/Wave Length Range) TECHNIQUES/ CAPABILITIES (Sci/Technical Contacts) http://www- ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/staff/ sci_support.html INSTRUMENTATION AVAILABLE (Web Links) http://www- ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/beamlines/ bl_characteristics.html STATUS AT

  4. Biofuels from Microalgae: Review of Products, Processes and Potential, with Special Focus on Dunaliella sp.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Benemann, John R.

    2009-12-31

    There is currently great interest in using microalgae for the production of biofuels, mainly due to the fact that microalgae can produce biofuels at a much higher productivity than conventional plants and that they can be cultivated using water, in particular seawater, and land not competing for resources with conventional agriculture. However, at present such microalgae-based technologies are not yet developed and the economics of such processes are uncertain. We review power generation by direct combustion, production of hydrogen and other fuel gases and liquids by gasification and pyrolysis, methane generation by anaerobic digestion, ethanol fermentations, and hydrogen production by dark and light-driven metabolism. We in particular discuss the production of lipids, vegetable oils and hydrocarbons, which could be converted to biodiesel. Direct combustion for power generation has two major disadvantages in that the high N-content of algal biomass causes unacceptably high NOx emissions and losses of nitrogen fertilizer. Thus, the use of sun-dried microalgal biomass would not be cost-competitive with other solid fuels such as coal and wood. Thermochemical conversion processes such as gasification and pyrolysis have been successfully demonstrated in the laboratory but will be difficult to scale up commercially and suffers from similar, though sometimes not as stringent, limitations as combustion. Anaerobic digestion of microalgal cells yields only about 0.3 L methane per g volatile solids destroyed, about half of the maximum achievable, but yields can be increased by adding carbon rich substrates to circumvent ammonia toxicity caused by the N-rich algal biomass. Anaerobic digestion would be best suited for the treatment of algal biomass waste after value-added products have been separated. Algae can also be grown to accumulate starches or similar fermentable products, and ethanol or similar (e.g., butanol) fermentations could be applied to such biomass, but research is required on increasing solvent yields. Dark fermentation of algal biomass can also produce hydrogen, but, as for other fermentations, only at low yields. Hydrogen can also be generated by algae in the light, however, this process has not yet been demonstrated in any way that could be scaled up and, in any event, Dunaliella, is not known to produce hydrogen. In response to nutrient deficiency (nitrogen or silicon), some microalgae accumulate neutral lipids which, after physical extraction, could be converted, via transesterification with methanol, to biodiesel. Nitrogen-limitation does not appear to increase either cellular lipid content or lipid productivity in Dunaliella. Results from life cycle energy analyses indicate that cultivation of microalgal biomass in open raceway ponds has a positive energy output ratio (EOR), approaching up to 10 (i.e., the caloric energy output from the algae is 10 times greater than the fossil energy inputs), but EOR are less than 1 for biomass grown in engineered photobioreactors. Thus, from both an energetic as well as economic perspective, only open ponds systems can be considered. Significant long-term R&D will be required to make microalgal biofuels processes economically competitive. Specifically, future research should focus on (a) the improvement of biomass productivities (i.e., maximizing solar conversion efficiencies), (b) the selection and isolation of algal strains that can be mass cultured and maintained stably for long periods, (c) the production of algal biomass with a high content of lipids, carbohydrates, and co-products, at high productivity, (d) the low cost harvesting of the biomass, and (e) the extraction and conversion processes to actually derive the biofuels. For Dunaliella specifically, the highest potential is in the co-production of biofuels with high-value animal feeds based on their carotenoid content.

  5. FY15 SES SP Performance Appraisal Cycle_Memo to Heads of Departmental _0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  6. Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), g1-aircraft, sedlacek sp2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedlacek, Art

    2011-08-30

    The primary objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in 2010 was to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their optical and hygroscopic properties in central California, with a focus on the Sacramento urban plume.

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    supplies (1) regression analysis (1) solar energy (1) standards (1) trap waste (1) ... by comparison with baseline data. 3. Production of 240 gallons per day of ASTM ...

  8. PSADEFS.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ASTM. The acronym for the American Society for Test- ing and Materials. Atmospheric Crude ... Example: (1) Unextracted paraffinic oils that would not meet the Viscosity Index test. ...

  9. NREL's e-Ca Test: A Scalable, High-Sensitivity Water Permeation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL's e-Ca Test is this technique Test Method Standards and References Description Range (gm 2 day) Advantages Disadvantages Cup Test ASTM E96 Scavenger method using ...

  10. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends PDF icon Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

  11. Lowering Drilling Cost, Improving Operational Safety, and Reducing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a splitting tensile strength method. This method is similar to ASTM C496-90 (standard test method for splitting tensile strength of cylindrical concrete specimens). For this...

  12. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 21, 2015 ACRONYMS ASME B&PVC American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials CISCC Chloride Induced ...

  13. untitled

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Materials). 2008. Masonry Standards, ASTM C73293 ("Center Point Loading") Boiler Pressure Vessel Code 2008, Section II, Table 1A IBC (International Building Code) 2006, IBC-2006 ...

  14. X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation...

  15. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation...

  16. Glossary API Gravity: An

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation...

  17. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of E15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EPA Waiver Decision, E15 Implementation Issues, Federal and State Blending Restrictions, Action by ASTM / NCWM to address higher ethanol blends

  18. Developing the Next Generation of Gridded TMYs (Presentation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o Outreach * Standards, expert committees, and collaborations o ASTM G03-radiometry o IEA Task 46 Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting o Subcontracts and cooperative...

  19. Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration OT oxygen ... potential to emit PUHCA Public Utility Holding Company Act ...

  20. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Device Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for secondary reference cell calibration under American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. One of only four...

  1. June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from severe macular degeneration. - 62713 Donivan Porterfield Porterfield named ASTM Fellow The award recognizes Porterfield for his extensive knowledge and commitment to...

  2. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes all products designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial...

  3. Requirements Flowdown and Graded Approach to QA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    various consensus standards promulgated by the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) and in engineering specifications developed in accordance with design approaches...

  4. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending...

  5. TWC Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Questions for Follow Up 1. How to heat treat tanks modified in place to achieve ASTM certification? 2. Glass alternative - committeeagency (Issue Manager first) *...

  6. BicycleDraftPolicy.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wear helmets that have been approved by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) or the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). * Bicyclists, like...

  7. FEM94

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turbines. This case study was prepared for the American Society of Testing Material' s (ASTM) Standard Technical Publication (STP) on fatigue education. Using the LIFE2 code, the...

  8. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effective Date: 6107 Vol. 2: iv LIST OF TERMS ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials CFR Code of Federal Regulations CWP...

  9. Focus Areas 1 and 4 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    various consensus standards promulgated by the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) and in engineering specifications developed in accordance with design approaches...

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Solar spectrum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are those by Wehrli (1985), Kurucz (1995), American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) (2000) and recently published spectrum described by Gueymard (2004). The spectrum of...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Assembled Using Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven D. Brown; Sagar M. Utturkar; Timothy S. Magnuson; Allison E. Ray; Farris L. Poole; W. Andrew Lancaster; Michael P. Thorgersen; Michael W. W. Adams; Dwayne A. Elias

    2014-09-01

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (24). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  12. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterizedmore » as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).« less

  13. Microsoft Word - Final New England Constraint STEO Supplement 011713v1 clean _4_ LF_SP_rev cw.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New England Natural Gas Constraints 1 January 18, 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Constraints in New England likely to affect regional energy prices this winter Since November, New England has had the highest average spot natural gas prices in the nation. Average prices at the Algonquin Citygate trading point, a widely used index for New England natural gas buyers, have been $3 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) higher than natural gas prices at the Henry Hub, and more than $2

  14. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope???????® and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope???????® were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs @ -40???????°C (-40???????°F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundri

  15. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs {at} -40 C (-40 F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundries is adequate to produce a product free from intermetallic phases.

  16. Soils Project Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process with ROTC 1 and ROTC 2, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick; Sloop, Christina

    2012-04-01

    This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process the NNSA/NSO Soils Activity uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process is used to establish FALs in accordance with the risk-based corrective action (RBCA) process stipulated in Chapter 445 of the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) as described in the ASTM International (ASTM) Method E1739-95 (NAC, 2008; ASTM, 1995). It is designed to provide a set of consistent standards for chemical and radiological corrective actions.

  17. Click to add heading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of analytical modeling and design * Post-test analyses to extend results 12 4.1- Material Testing * ASTM tests for concrete and rebar materials - preliminary concrete mixes and ...

  18. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gravity of 22 degrees or below. Interme- diate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 de- grees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation...

  19. Explanatory notes for research cell efficiency records

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60904-3 edition 2 or ASTM G173. The reference temperature is 25C and the area is the cell total area or the area defined by an aperture. Cell efficiency results are provided...

  20. CX-012552: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Use of the ASTM G 36-94 Method for the Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41879 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-010700: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of ASTM Standard for SiC-SiC Joint Testing - General Atomics CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/19/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  2. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    form a fuel suitable for use in spark-ignition engines. Motor gasoline, as defined in ASTM Specification D 4814 or Federal Specification VV-G-1690C, is characterized as having a...

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oil made by blending distillate fuel oil and residual fuel oil stocks. It conforms with ASTM Specification D 396 or Federal Specification VV-F-815C and is used extensively in...

  4. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    oils and lighter hydrocarbons are distilled away in refinery operations. It conforms to ASTM Specifications D396 and D975 and Federal Specification VV-F-815C. No. 5, a residual...

  5. IHS Standards Expert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (1986- ) ANSI nuclear standards API (selected) ASCE ASHRAE ASME ASME-BPVC ASQ ASSESAFE ASTM AWS DRM (11th ed.) EIA IAPMO 2009 (Mechanical, Plumbing, Solar) Uncheck "Most Recent...

  6. Fry receives Charles W. Briggs Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fry receives Charles W. Briggs Award Fry receives Charles W. Briggs Award The ASTM International Committee E07 on Nondestructive Testing has honored David Fry with the Charles W....

  7. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-001 General Atomics EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SECTION A. Project Title: Development of ASTM Standard for SiC-SiC Joint Testing - General Atomics SECTION B. Project Description General Atomics (GA) proposes to develop an...

  8. BioFuel Oasis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 94710 Product: A worker-owned cooperative to sell commercial biodiesel that meets ASTM standards. References: BioFuel Oasis1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  9. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recovery point and a final maximum boiling point of 572 degrees Fahrenheit and meeting ASTM Specification D 1655 and Military Specifications MIL-T-5624P and MIL-T-83133D (Grades...

  10. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  11. June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists called DREAM3D. - 62514 David Fry Fry receives Charles W. Briggs Award The ASTM International Committee E07 on Nondestructive Testing has honored David Fry with the...

  12. Arsenic transformation predisposes human skin keratinocytes to UV-induced DNA damage yet enhances their survival apparently by diminishing oxidant response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Yang; Kojima, Chikara; Chignell, Colin; Mason, Ronald; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2011-09-15

    Inorganic arsenic and UV, both human skin carcinogens, may act together as skin co-carcinogens. We find human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) are malignantly transformed by low-level arsenite (100 nM, 30 weeks; termed As-TM cells) and with transformation concurrently undergo full adaptation to arsenic toxicity involving reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress response to high arsenite concentrations. Oxidative DNA damage (ODD) is a possible mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis and a hallmark of UV-induced skin cancer. In the current work, inorganic arsenite exposure (100 nM) did not induce ODD during the 30 weeks required for malignant transformation. Although acute UV-treatment (UVA, 25 J/cm{sup 2}) increased ODD in passage-matched control cells, once transformed by arsenic to As-TM cells, acute UV actually further increased ODD (> 50%). Despite enhanced ODD, As-TM cells were resistant to UV-induced apoptosis. The response of apoptotic factors and oxidative stress genes was strongly mitigated in As-TM cells after UV exposure including increased Bcl2/Bax ratio and reduced Caspase-3, Nrf2, and Keap1 expression. Several Nrf2-related genes (HO-1, GCLs, SOD) showed diminished responses in As-TM cells after UV exposure consistent with reduced oxidant stress response. UV-exposed As-TM cells showed increased expression of cyclin D1 (proliferation gene) and decreased p16 (tumor suppressor). UV exposure enhanced the malignant phenotype of As-TM cells. Thus, the co-carcinogenicity between UV and arsenic in skin cancer might involve adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure generally mitigating the oxidative stress response, allowing apoptotic by-pass after UV and enhanced cell survival even in the face of increased UV-induced oxidative stress and increased ODD. - Highlights: > Arsenic transformation adapted to UV-induced apoptosis. > Arsenic transformation diminished oxidant response. > Arsenic transformation enhanced UV-induced DNA damage.

  13. Final predictions of ambient conditions along the east-west crossdrift using the 3-D UZ site-scale model. Level 4 milestoneSP33ABM4.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritcey, A.C.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Wu, Y.S.; Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson,G.S.

    1998-03-01

    In 1998, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is expected to continue construction of an East-West Cross Drift. The 5-meter diameter drift will extend from the North Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), near Station 19+92, southwest through the repository block, and over to and through the Solitario Canyon Fault. This drift is part of a program designed to enhance characterization of Yucca Mountain and to complement existing surface-based and ESF testing studies. The objective of this milestone is to use the three-dimensional (3-D) unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model to predict ambient conditions along the East-West Cross Drift. These predictions provide scientists and engineers with a priori information that can support design and construction of the East-West Cross Drift and associated testing program. The predictions also provide, when compared with data collected after drift construction, an opportunity to test and verify the calibration of the 3-D UZ site-scale model.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (24). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  15. Structural insulated panels produced from recycled Expanded-Polystrene (EPS) foam scrap. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinnell, A.

    1996-11-01

    This report documents a research project undertaken to assess the feasibility of using scrap reground expanded polystyrene (EPS) in the manufacture of structural insulated panels (SIPs) in order to save material costs and reduce the amount of EPS waste products to be disposed. The project team, managed by Steven Winter Associates, Inc., a Norwalk, Connecticut-based building systems research and consulting firm included: Thermal Foams, Inc., a Buffalo-based manufacturer of EPS products; BASF Corp., the world`s largest producer of EPS beads; Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which performed thermal tests (ASTM C-518); RADCO, Inc. which performed material properties tests: density (ASTM C-303), flexural strength (ASTM C-203), tensile strength (ASTM D-1623), and transverse load test of SIPs panels (ASTM E-72). The report documents the manufacturing and testing process and concludes that there was relatively little difference in the thermal and structural characteristics under normal loading conditions of the panels tested with varying amount of regrind (from 10% - 25%) and those made with 100% virgin beads. The report recommends that additional tests be undertaken, but suggests that, based on the test results, reground EPS can be successfully used in the cores of SIPs in amounts up to 25%.

  16. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotani, Hirokazu (Muko, JP); Hiraoka, Nobutsugu (Muko, JP); Obayashi, Akira (Uji, JP)

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  17. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On November, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-12-18

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  18. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON SEPTEMBER 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  19. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON NOVEMBER 21, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received two samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on November 21, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  20. Analytical Results For MOX Colemanite Concrete Samples Received On September 4, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2013-09-24

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received three samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on September 4, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the boron partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. None of the samples met the lower limit for hydrogen partial density.

  1. Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson III, George R. ); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin ); Freerks, Robert L. )

    2013-01-15

    Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

  2. NREL Survey Shows Dramatic Improvement in B100 Biodiesel Quality - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Survey Shows Dramatic Improvement in B100 Biodiesel Quality April 15, 2013 The latest national survey of 100% biodiesel (B100) "blend stock" samples by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) found that 95% of the samples from 2011-12 met ASTM International fuel quality specifications. The ASTM standards serve as guidelines for industry and are designed to ensure quality at the pump for consumers - along with reliable operation of

  3. On defining core properties for composite sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSautel, J.M.; Sikarskie, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    In the interests of performance, fuel economy, as well as other factors, weight reduction in transportation vehicles is receiving considerable attention. It is well know that sandwich construction can provide a structural component that has both high stiffness and high strength per unit weight. In a sandwich structure a low density, low stiffness, low strength core is bonded between two high stiffness, high strength facesheets producing a structure that is particularly efficient in resisting bending loads. A key element in a sandwich construction is the core. Its` properties, particularly its` shear modulus and yield/failure stress, must be accurately known for proper structural design. Two ASTM standards exist for determining these properties; ASTM C273-88 and ASTM C393-94. The ASTM C273-88 is a simple shear test on the core material alone, while the ASTM C393-94 obtains core properties through bending data on sandwich beams. It is well known, particularly for the lower cost cores, e.g. foams, that differences in properties, sometimes appreciable, exist for these two tests. One of the main purposes of the present paper is to show that specimen geometry can have a first order effect on the material properties, i.e. only for ratios of sandwich beam length to thickness in the ASTM C393-94 test greater than 20 do the results of the two ASTM tests approach each other. A second objective of the paper is to determine the effect of the shear test plate thickness in the ASTM C273-88 test. Steel plates of thickness {1/4} inches, 5/8 inches, and 1 inch were used, i.e. bonded to the core specimens and then tested in simple shear. Only for the stiffest cores tested were any statistically different results obtained and then only minor differences for the {1/4} inches plates. Some typical test results through to core yield/failure are shown to demonstrate the different post yield behaviors.

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuels Mandate All gasoline sold in the state must be blended with 10% ethanol (E10). Gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or above is exempt from this mandate, as is gasoline sold for use in certain non-road applications. Gasoline that contains at least 9.2% agriculturally derived ethanol that meets ASTM specification D4806 complies with the mandate. For the purpose of the mandate, ethanol must meet ASTM specification D4806. The governor may suspend the renewable fuels mandate for

  5. Subject: Executive and Senior Level Pay and Performance Management System …

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FY 2016 Senior Professional (SP) Performance Appraisal System Opening Guidance 2 Table of Contents Contents I. SP PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL TEMPLATE and TIMELINE ....................................................................... 3 II. PERFORMANCE PLAN - CRITICAL ELEMENTS .......................................................................................... 3 III. SP SUMMARY RATING LEVEL DEFINITIONS

  6. Accelerating the development of transparent graphene electrodes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. Covalent attachment rehybridized some of the delocalized graphene sp2 orbitals to localized sp3 states....

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 -1 1 0 * SP1 yields the diffusion equation * SP3 can be simplified to two moment equations (0 , 2...

  8. Factors Affecting the Stability of Biodiesel Sold in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Ratcliff, M.; Moens, L.; Lawrence, R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a survey of biodiesel quality and stability in the United States, 27 biodiesel (B100) samples were collected from blenders and distributor nationwide. For this sample set, 85% met all of the requirements of the industry standard for biodiesel, ASTM D6751.

  9. Analysis of Biodiesel Blends Samples Collected in the United States in 2008 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.; Fouts, L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    NREL sampled and tested the quality of U.S. B20 (20% biodiesel, 80% petroleum diesel) in 2008; 32 samples from retail locations and fleets were tested against a proposed ASTM D7467 B6-B20 specification, now in effect.

  10. Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-07-30

    A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

  11. High Efficiency Spectrum Splitting Prototype Submodule Using Commercial CPV Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keevers, M.; Lau, J.; Green, M.; Thomas, I.; Lasich, J.; King, R.; Emery, K.

    2014-11-01

    This presentation summarizes progress on the design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept, prototype spectrum splitting CPV submodule using commercial CPV cells, aimed at demonstrating an independently confirmed efficiency above 40% at STC (1000 W/m2, AM1.5D ASTM G173-03, 25 degrees C).

  12. Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Discussion Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion ASTM T.G. G1.06.08 Goals and Workshop, May 17, 2005. Formed on November 11, 2004. Identify major laboratory facilities and capabilities. PDF icon hpwgw_discission_zawierucha.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Proceedings of the 2005 Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

  13. Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compositional Analysis Laboratory * Provide customized analytical method development for a wide variety of feedstocks and process intermediates * Derive comprehensive biomass analysis results backed by 20 years of experience supporting the biomass conversion industry * Write publicly available Laboratory Analytical Procedures, several of which have been adapted by ASTM International and used and referenced worldwide * Provide training classes on biomass analysis and method development to help

  14. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  15. Survey of Flex Fuel in 2014. CRC Project E-85-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, Teresa L.

    2015-07-27

    ASTM D5798 sets the specifications for Ethanol Flex Fuel, which currently permits between 51 volume percent (vol%) and 83 vol% ethanol. The vapor pressure varies seasonally and geographically and is divided into four distinct classes to ensure year-round driveability. This project is the first survey of Ethanol Flex Fuel since these specification changes were made to Specification D5798.

  16. Biodiesel Research Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Update Biodiesel Research Update 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory PDF icon 2004_deer_mccormick.pdf More Documents & Publications Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Performance of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends

  17. Technical Standards Newsletter - April 2003 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Technical Standards Newsletter - April 2003 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - April 2003 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated........................................... 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Sent for Coordination..................... 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published........................................ 2 American National Standards Institute.......................................................... 2 ASTM

  18. Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nate Brown, Federal Aviation Administration, presentation at the Industry Roundtable on Update on ASTM Approval. PDF icon 10_brown_roundtable.pdf More Documents & Publications An Update on FAA Alternative Jet Fuel Efforts CAAFI Progress Update Support to Biofuels in Latin America and the Caribbean

  19. Niagara Air Quality Survey Report, 1987: Occidental Chemical Corporation, Niagara Falls, New York, USA, non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) incineration test. Report no. ARB-166-87-AR/SP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R.W.; DeBrou, G.

    1988-01-01

    An ambient air quality survey was conducted in the Niagara Falls area of Ontario from October 8-12, 1987 to provide on-site real-time screening for selected polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and other chlorinated organics at times when the Occidental Chemical Corporation was conducting tests at its liquid hazardous waste incineration facility in Niagara Falls, N.Y. During the incineration tests, the winds were such that the gaseous emissions from the Occidental facility were carried into the U.S. Since the monitoring units were restricted to the Canadian side of the Niagara River, only upwind air quality parameters could be measured.

  20. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR DETERMINING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.

    2013-09-30

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded datasets suitable for analysis (sample types 3 and 4). The intact saltstone sample (sample type 1) did not yield any measureable outflow over the pressure range of the outflow test (0-1000 cm H{sub 2}O). This was expected because the estimated air entry pressure for intact saltstone is on the order of 100,000 cm H{sub 2}O (Dixon et al., 2009). The intact saltstone sample with a single saw cut smooth surface fracture (sample type 2) did not produce useable data because the fracture completely drained at less than 10 cm H{sub 2}O applied pressure. The cumulative outflow data from sample types 3 and 4 were analyzed using an inverse solution of the Richards equation for water flow in variably saturated porous media. This technique was implemented using the computer code Hydrus-1D (im?nek et al., 2008) and the resulting output included the van Genuchten-Mualem water retention and relative permeability parameters and predicted saturated hydraulic conductivity (Van Genuchten, 1980; Van Genuchten et al., 1991). Estimations of relative permeability and saturated conductivity are possible because the transient response of the sample to pressure changes is recorded during the multi-step outflow extraction test. Characteristic curves were developed for sample types 3 and 4 based on the results of the transient outflow method and compared to that of intact saltstone previously reported by Dixon et al. (2009). The overall results of this study indicate that the outflow extraction method is suitable for measuring the hydraulic properties of micro-fractured porous media. The resulting cumulative outflow data can be analyzed using the computer code Hydrus-1D to generate the van Genuchten curve fitting parameters that adequately describe fracture drainage. The resulting characteristic curves are consistent with blended characteristic curves that combine the behaviors of low pressure drainage associated with fracture flow with high pressure drainage from the bulk saltstone matrix.

  1. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  2. 9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-11-27

    One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

  3. Organization and Functions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Working to Ensure the Safety and Security of Hazardous Material Shipments Organization and Functions Mission Unit EM-30 Deputy Assistant Secretary/ADAS Waste Management Director Office of Packaging and Transportation EM-33 Regulations & Standards Support * ANSI * ASME/ ASTM * DHS * DOD FEMA * FMCSA * FRA * IAEA * ICAO * IMO * NRC * Orders * PHMSA TSA * UN TDG SCOE Packaging Certification * CoCs for Type B/AF Packages * DOE Exemptions * DOT Special Permits & COCA * QA * RAMPAC * SCALE *

  4. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Product Prices by Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline (Finished) A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gas Plant Operator Any firm,

  5. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline (Finished) A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gas Plant Operator Any firm,

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Prices and Expenditures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Asphalt: A dark brown-to-black cement-like material obtained by petroleum processing and containing bitumens as the predominant component; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. ASTM: The American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation gasoline (finished): A complex mixture of

  7. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Renewable Diesel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Renewable Diesel Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_cornforth.pdf More Documents & Publications Renewable Diesel Fuels: Status of Technology and R&D Needs Biodiesel Progress: ASTM Specifications and 2nd Generation Biodiesel Recent Research to Address

  9. Fuel Quality Challenges: An OEM Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Challenges An OEM Perspective HCD Workshop - Troy, MI Tim McGuire, Fuel Cell, 12June2014 Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America, Inc Progress * Fuel Specification - SAE J2719 Standard  Reasonable  OEMs in design cycle with specification  Need confidence on delivered H2 * Detection  ASTM  Proprietary * Regulation  NIST Handbook 130 (2012)  California Code of Regulations, Title 4, Division 9, Chapter 6, Article 8, Hydrogen Fuel Mercedes-Benz Research

  10. Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) March 22, 2015 Bio-Oil Technology Area Review Principal Investigator : Zia Abdullah Organization: Battelle Memorial Institute 1 Goal Statement * 1,000 hrs. TOS * H/C product 30% blendable with ASTM petroleum fuels * Compatibility with petroleum refining unit operations * Fast Pyrolysis * In-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis * Ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis * Hydropyrolysis * Hydrothermal liquefaction * Solvent liquefaction Addresses all FOA-

  11. Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) Fact sheet providing questions and answers on the use of biodiesel as an alternative vehicle fuel. PDF icon 47504.pdf More Documents & Publications Biodiesel_Fuel_Management_Best_Practices_Report.pdf Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Performance of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends

  12. Biodiesel Outlook - An Engine Manufacturer's Perspective | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Outlook - An Engine Manufacturer's Perspective Biodiesel Outlook - An Engine Manufacturer's Perspective The engine's fuel systems and the fuels they deliver are increasingly critical to the overall performance as engines change to reduce levels of both regulated and non-regulated emissions. PDF icon deer08_gault.pdf More Documents & Publications Biodiesel ASTM Update and Future Technical Needs Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel

  13. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. February 2007 Standards Actions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 01-26-2007 Activity

  15. Microsoft Word - z Appendix A to Z sheets for JC.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    APPENDIX A Laboratory Report COORDINATED BY:_____________________________ APPROVED BY:____________________ Insulation Group LAB REPORT # 2013092 Abridged ASTM C518 Test Report Page 1 of 3 TITLE: Bally Foam C518 Testing With & Without Metal Skin FILE: Foam DATE: May 23, 2013 PROJECT NO.: 3200 TO: Guy Senter - Bally Refrigerated Boxes REQUESTED BY: Gallagher, Kevin J. CONDUCTED BY: Yuan, Sam PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION: Sample ID Manufacturer Product ID Date Code Product Description 15583 Bally

  16. Nanomaterial Laboratory Safety, Boise State University | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Nanomaterial Laboratory Safety, Boise State University Nanomaterial Laboratory Safety, Boise State University A nanomaterial, as defined by The ASTM Committee on Nanotechnology, is a particle withlengths in 2 or 3 dimensions between 1 to 100 nm that mayor may not have a size related intensive property. Nanomaterials are of increasing interest due to their unique properties compared to the same material on the micro and macroscopic scales and their potential associated applications

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions Biodiesel is defined as the monoalkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from plant or animals that meet the registration requirements for fuels and fuel additives established in Section 211 of the Clean Air Act, Title 42 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, section 7545, and the requirements of ASTM D6751. Renewable diesel is defined as diesel fuel derived from biomass using a thermal depolymerization process that meets the registration

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Definition and Specifications Alternative fuels include biofuel, ethanol, methanol, hydrogen, coal-derived liquid fuels, electricity, natural gas, propane gas, or a synthetic transportation fuel. Biofuel is defined as a renewable, biodegradable, combustible liquid or gaseous fuel derived from biomass or other renewable resources that can be used as transportation fuel, combustion fuel, or refinery feedstock and that meets ASTM specifications and federal quality requirements for

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions Biodiesel is defined as a fuel that is comprised of mono-alkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from vegetable oil or animal fats and that meets ASTM D6751. Green diesel is defined as a fuel produced from non-fossil renewable resources, including agricultural or silvicultural plants, animal fats, residue, and waste generated from the production, processing, and marketing of agricultural products, silvicultural products, and other renewable

  20. Spreader beam analysis for the CASTOR GSF cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, E.P.

    1997-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the 150% rated capacity load test performed by DynCorp Hoisting and Rigging on the CASTOR GSF special cask lifting beams. The two lifting beams were originally rated and tested at 20,000kg (44,000lb) by the cask manufacturer in Germany. The testing performed by DynCorp rated and tested the lifting beams to 30,000 kg (66,000 lb) +0%, -5%, for Hanford Site use. The CASTOR GSF cask, used to transport isotopic Heat Sources (canisters), must be lifted with its own designed lifting beam system (Figures 1, 2, and 3). As designed, the beam material is RSt 37-2 (equivalent to American Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM] A-570), the eye plate is St 52-2 (equivalent to ASTM A-516), and the lifting pin is St 50 (equivalent to ASTM A-515). The beam has two opposing 58 mm (2.3 in.) diameter by 120 mm(4.7 in.) length, high grade steel pins that engage the cask for lifting. The pins have a manual locking mechanism to prevent disengagement from the casks. The static, gross weight (loaded) of the cask 18,640 kg (41,000 lb) on the pins prevents movement of the pins during lifting. This is due to the frictional force of the cask on the pins when lifting begins.

  1. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1131, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3}.

  2. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE POURED JULY 25, 2012 - CURED 28 DAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A. D.; Best, D. R.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-18

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use Colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples 8.1.2, 8.2.2, 8.3.2, and 8.4.2 were received on 8/1/2012 and analyzed after curing for 28 days. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.09 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density was 7.48E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.71E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  3. Analysis of CCRL proficiency cements 151 and 152 using the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, Jeffrey W. . E-mail: jeffrey.bullard@nist.gov; Stutzman, Paul E.

    2006-08-15

    To test the ability of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software to predict cement hydration properties, characterization of mineralogy and phase distribution is necessary. Compositional and textural characteristics of Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) cements 151 and 152 were determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis followed by computer modeling of hydration properties. The general procedure to evaluate a cement is as follows: (1) two-dimensional SEM backscattered electron and X-ray microanalysis images of the cement are obtained, along with a measured particle size distribution (PSD); (2) based on analysis of these images and the measured PSD, three-dimensional microstructures of various water-to-cement ratios are created and hydrated using VCCTL, and (3) the model predictions for degree of hydration under saturated conditions, heat of hydration (ASTM C186), setting time (ASTM C191), and strength development of mortar cubes (ASTM C109) are compared to experimental measurements either performed at NIST or at the participating CCRL proficiency sample evaluation laboratories. For both cements, generally good agreement is observed between the model predictions and the experimental data.

  4. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JANUARY 15, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Best, D.

    2013-02-13

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. SRNL received twelve samples of colemanite concrete for analysis on January 15, 2013. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642, the average partial hydrogen density was measured using method ASTM E 1311, and the average partial boron density of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The lower limits and measured values for the total density, hydrogen partial density, and boron partial density are presented. For all the samples tested, the total density and the hydrogen partial density met or exceeded the specified limit. All of the samples met or exceeded the boron partial density lower bound with the exception of samples G3-M11-2000-H, G3-M11-3000-M, and G5-M1-3000-H which are below the limit of 1.65E-01 g/cm3.

  5. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE PBC-44.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.; Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

    2012-12-20

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Sample PBC-44.2 was received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.03 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm3. The average partial hydrogen density was 6.64E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.70E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  6. Analytical Results Of MOX Colemanite Concrete Sample PBC-44.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A. D.; Best, D. R.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-10-18

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Sample PBC-44.2 was received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.03 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density was 6.64E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.97E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  7. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES POURED AUGUST 29, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Best, D.; Reigel, M.

    2012-10-30

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples poured 8/29/12 were received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642 was within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.6.1, 8.7.1, and 8.5.3 as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density of each sample met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.5.1, 8.6.3, and 8.7.3 did not meet the lower bound. The samples, as received, were not wrapped in a moist towel as previous samples and appeared to be somewhat drier. This may explain the lower hydrogen partial density with respect to previous samples.

  8. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLES POURED AUGUST 29, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.; Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

    2012-12-20

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples poured 8/29/12 were received on 9/20/2012 and analyzed. The average total density of each of the samples measured by the ASTM method C 642 was within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.6.1, 8.7.1, and 8.5.3 as measured using method ASTM E 1311 met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density of each sample met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method. The average partial hydrogen density of samples 8.5.1, 8.6.3, and 8.7.3 did not meet the lower bound. The samples, as received, were not wrapped in a moist towel as previous samples and appeared to be somewhat drier. This may explain the lower hydrogen partial density with respect to previous samples.

  9. Solar Park Co Ltd S P | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Ltd S P Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar & Park Co Ltd (S&P) Place: Gwangju, Korea (Republic) Product: S&P Corp is a metal manufacturer, which owns and operates at least...

  10. Process for biological material carbon-carbon bond formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, R.I.; Jung, S.; Mindock, C.A.

    1998-12-22

    A process for providing vicinal dimethyl long chain between alkyl groups of organic compounds is described. The process uses intact or disrupted cells of various species of bacteria, particularly Thermoanaerobacter sp., Sarcina sp. and Butyrivibrio sp. The process can be conducted in an aqueous reaction mixture at room temperatures. 8 figs.

  11. Process for biological material carbon-carbon bond formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I.; Jung, Seunho; Mindock, Carol A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for providing vicinal dimethyl long chain between alkyl groups of organic compounds is described. The process uses intact or disrupted cells of various species of bacteria, particularly Thermoanaerobacter sp., Sarcina sp. and Butyrivibrio sp. The process can be conducted in an aqueous reaction mixture at room temperatures.

  12. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890-5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890-5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was determined. The best method for calculating volume percentage ferrite was determined between the Ferits

  13. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 ???¢????????Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels???¢??????? for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope???????® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope???????® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890 ???¢???????? 5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890 ???¢???????? 5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly

  14. Safety pharmacology Current and emerging concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamdam, Junnat; Sethu, Swaminathan; Smith, Trevor; Alfirevic, Ana; Alhaidari, Mohammad; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Box, Helen; Cross, Michael; Delaunois, Annie; Dermody, Ailsa; Govindappa, Karthik; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Jenkins, Rosalind; Kenna, Gerry; Lemmer, Bjrn; Meecham, Ken; Olayanju, Adedamola; Pestel, Sabine; Rothfuss, Andreas; and others

    2013-12-01

    Safety pharmacology (SP) is an essential part of the drug development process that aims to identify and predict adverse effects prior to clinical trials. SP studies are described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7A and S7B guidelines. The core battery and supplemental SP studies evaluate effects of a new chemical entity (NCE) at both anticipated therapeutic and supra-therapeutic exposures on major organ systems, including cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal. This review outlines the current practices and emerging concepts in SP studies including frontloading, parallel assessment of core battery studies, use of non-standard species, biomarkers, and combining toxicology and SP assessments. Integration of the newer approaches to routine SP studies may significantly enhance the scope of SP by refining and providing mechanistic insight to potential adverse effects associated with test compounds. - Highlights: SP mandatory non-clinical risk assessments performed during drug development. SP organ system studies ensure the safety of clinical participants in FiH trials. Frontloading in SP facilitates lead candidate drug selection. Emerging trends: integrating SP-Toxicological endpoints; combined core battery tests.

  15. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

  16. SRC-I demonstration plant analytical laboratory methods manual. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klusaritz, M.L.; Tewari, K.C.; Tiedge, W.F.; Skinner, R.W.; Znaimer, S.

    1983-03-01

    This manual is a compilation of analytical procedures required for operation of a Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) demonstration or commercial plant. Each method reproduced in full includes a detailed procedure, a list of equipment and reagents, safety precautions, and, where possible, a precision statement. Procedures for the laboratory's environmental and industrial hygiene modules are not included. Required American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods are cited, and ICRC's suggested modifications to these methods for handling coal-derived products are provided.

  17. Fuel Properties Database from the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFDC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This database contains information on advanced petroleum and non-petroleum based fuels, as well as key data on advanced compression ignition fuels. Included are data on physical, chemical, operational, environmental, safety, and health properties. These data result from tests conducted according to standard methods (mostly American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The source and test methods for each fuel data set are provided with the information. The database can be searched in various ways and can output numbers or explanatory text. Heavy vehicle chassis emission data are also available for some fuels.

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Glossary API gravity: An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it may be calculated in terms of the following formula: The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM:

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Glossary G L O S S A R Y Asphalt: A dark brown-to-black cement-like material obtained by petro- leum processing and containing bitumens as the predominant component; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. ASTM:

  20. A Vehicle Manufacturer's Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Manufacturer's Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels Tom Leone, Ford Motor Company DOE "Biomass 2014" meeting Washington, D.C. July 29, 2014 2 Octane rating of fuel The octane rating of a fuel is measured on a standardized test engine with variable compression ratio ASTM D2699 and D2700 3 Efficiency Improvement (%) Heywood textbook, Figure 15-14 Compression Ratio Compression Ratio (CR)  Higher CR can improve efficiency  But higher CR causes more knock and spark retard at

  1. Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    See OSTI ID Number 960443

    2008-12-31

    Various laboratory tests were carried at the R & D facility of BJ Services in Tomball, TX with BJ Services staff to predict and evaluate the performance of the Ceramicrete slurry for its effective use in permafrost cementing operations. Although other standards such as those of the American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) and Construction Specification Institute (CSI) exist, all these tests were standardized by the API. A summary of the tests traditionally used in the cement slurry design as well as the API tests reference document are provided in Table 7. All of these tests were performed within the scope of this research to evaluate properties of the Ceramicrete.

  2. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  3. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JULY 22, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Best, D.

    2014-05-19

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the boron oxide content of the colemanite raw aggregate material prior to it being mixed into the concrete. SRNL received ten samples of colemanite for analysis on July 22, 2013. The elemental boron content of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The boron oxide content was calculated using the oxide conversion factor for boron.

  4. ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR MOX COLEMANITE SAMPLES RECEIVED ON JULY 22, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Best, D.

    2013-08-13

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is tasked with measuring the boron oxide content of the colemanite raw aggregate material prior to it being mixed into the concrete. SRNL received ten samples of colemanite for analysis on July 22, 2013. The elemental boron content of each sample was measured according to ASTM C 1301. The boron oxide content was calculated using the oxide conversion factor for boron.

  5. Sensitivity of silicon 1-MeV damage function to cross-section evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Danjaji, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    The electronics radiation hardness-testing community uses the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E722-93 Standard Practice to define the energy dependence of the nonionizing neutron damage to silicon semiconductors. This neutron displacement damage response function is defined to be equal to the silicon displacement kerma. An Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) {sup 28}Si cross-section evaluation and the NJOY code are used to define the standard response function to be used in reporting 1-MeV (silicon) neutron damage and in determining neutron damage equivalence between test facilities. This paper provides information for the precision and bias section of the E722 standard.

  6. Building America Expert Meeting: Code Challenges with Multifamily Area Separation Walls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Focus Meeting Code Challenges with Multi-Family Area Separation Walls Date/Time: Monday, Sept. 29, 2014, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm EST Location: web meeting Host: IBACOS, Inc., www.IBACOS.com Meeting Manager: Armin Rudd, arudd@abtsystems.us Agenda 10:30: Opening by Armin Rudd and Duncan Prahl Explain the reason, purpose, goals and expected outcomes of the meeting Facilitated open discussion *Review typical UL 263 (ASTM E119) area separation wall Designs (U336, U347, U373) *Review the tested

  7. Status of Legislative & Regulatory Developments Marilyn J. Herman President, Herman & Associates RFG Survey Association Annual Board of Directors Meeting July 23, 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marilyn J. Herman President, Herman & Associates SAE Government and Industry Meeting Washington, DC January 27, 2011 2 EPA Waiver Decision E15 Implementation Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM / NCWM to address higher ethanol blends 3 October 13, 2010 - EPA granted partial waiver for E15 in MY 2007 and newer light duty vehicles January 21, 2011 - EPA granted partial waiver for E15 in MY 2001-2006 light duty vehicles Did not approve E15 for older vehicles (pre-2001)

  8. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Sales Requirements It is unlawful for any person to sell, offer for sale, assist in the sale of, deliver, or permit to be sold or offered for sale any biodiesel, biomass-based diesel, or biomass-based diesel blend unless it meets applicable registration requirements for fuels and additives. Biodiesel must meet Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, section 79, and ASTM Standard D6751. Biomass-based diesel and biomass-based diesel blends must meet the requirements in Title 42

  10. Dr. Oliver Simpson Metallurgical Laboratory

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oliver Simpson Metallurgical Laboratory p. 0. Box 5207 Chicago DO, Illinola ~. : Dear Dr. Simpson: Since your telephone call of's week ago regarding a possible 5000 pound order for regular rotary fired SP beryllium oxide for AC Spark Plug Company, Flint, Michigan,, we have been .busv reviewring our production achodules and have now established the-following~schedule eon SP beryllium oxide production: Vie plan to' commence pr.oducMon of SP beryllLum oxide on September 16 and expect to pounds

  11. Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectrum of carbon-60, the researchers were able to establish that low-density liquid carbon contains predominantly twofold-coordinated chain structures (sp hybridization). As...

  12. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in angular moments (the spherical harmonics method) or a stochastic approach (the ... Augustus (diffusion-P 1 ) and Spartan (simplified spherical harmonics, SP N ) codes. ...

  13. 2002 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recommendations NERSC did the following: Improved debug and interactive turnaround during prime time by setting aside 5% of the SP compute pool for interactive and debug jobs from...

  14. Washington's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biofuels LLC Energy Generation Facilities in Washington's 2nd congressional district S.P. Everett Biomass Facility Utility Companies in Washington's 2nd congressional district...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "Instituto de Fsica de So Carlos, Universidade de So Paulo, So Carlos-SP ... CreatorsAuthors contains: "Instituto de Fsica de So Carlos, Universidade de So ...

  16. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have been conducted specifically for the geothermal program at Blue Mountain include a self-potential (SP) survey, and additional IPelectrical resistivity traversing. These...

  17. Microsoft Word - ORNL-TM-2008-185.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and development rms root mean square rpm revolutions per minute SEM scanning electron microscopy Si silicon SP specific power TC thermocouple THS Toyota Hybrid System USCAR ...

  18. A=12O (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed: see (1968AJ02, 1972WA07, 1973SP1A, 1974IR04

  19. Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Richards...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groundwater flux patterns Notes Researchers collected 2700 SP measurements. Equilibrium temperature data from wells and shallow (305 cm) holes was correlated to geoelectrical...

  20. Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on May 2008 a multidisciplinary study involving Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Self-Potential (SP), CO2 soil diffuse degassing and soil...

  1. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak...

  3. Non-Destructive Analysis Calibration Standards for Gaseous Diffusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Current practices used to perform NDA measurements frequently have poorly defined uncertainties due to multiple factors. Working reference material (WRM) standards and container-sp...

  4. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of performance between the SP and UCLA's own Appleseed cluster of G4 Macintosh computers will also be presented. Kernel and Application Code Performance for a Spectral...

  5. Advanced Leds | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Coventry, England, United Kingdom Zip: CV5 6SP Product: Advanced Leds develops LED technology for outdoor lighting, including street lighting applications. Coordinates:...

  6. T-546: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross-Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scripting Attacks Arbitrary Code | Department of Energy 6: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Arbitrary Code T-546: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Arbitrary Code January 31, 2011 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft MHTML Input Validation Hole May Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Microsoft 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, XP SP3, 7; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: A

  7. Biomass Boiler Market is Projected to Reach USD 8,907.0 Million...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Naval SpA, Hurst Boiler & Welding Co, Inc., Jernforsen Energi System AB, Justsen Energiteknik AS, Kohlbach Group, LAMBION Energy Solutions GmbH, Leroux & Lotz Technologies,...

  8. History and Results of Surface Exploration in the Kilauea East...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (SP) surveys, possibly resistivity soundings, and soil gas surveys. Authors Murray C. Gardner, James R. McNitt, Christopher W. Klein, James B. Koenig and Dean Nakano...

  9. Polo Nacional de Biocombustiveis Brazilian Biofuels Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nacional de Biocombustiveis Brazilian Biofuels Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name: Polo Nacional de Biocombustiveis (Brazilian Biofuels Programme) Place: Piracicaba (SP),...

  10. Biocapital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biocapital Place: CharqueadaSP, Brazil Sector: Biofuels Product: Brazilian biodiesel producer which operates as a biofuels distributor and...

  11. Office\tof\tExecutive\tResources Office\tof\tthe\tChief\tHuman\tCapital...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Executive Resources Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer U.S. Department of Energy FY 2015 Senior Executive Service (SES) and Senior Professional (SP) Performance ...

  12. FY 2016 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    APPRAISAL OPENING GUIDANCE FY 2016 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL OPENING GUIDANCE FY 2016 performance appraisal cycle for ...

  13. Patent Record Announcement | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exceptional technology that's not yet commercialized, but is viewed as a potential market game-changer, for Signa SP MRI Magnet; a Coolidge Fellowship Award in 1998, the...

  14. Friends of Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Map Contact Member Spotlight sp3 Nanocarriers May Carry New Hope for Brain Cancer Therapy Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a new family of nanocarriers, called...

  15. Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the rock using well log data. Notes Information is given on the following logs: dual-induction focused log, including resistivity, sp, and conductivity; acoustic log; compensated...

  16. T-578: Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 8: Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure T-578: Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure March 15, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft Windows is prone to a vulnerability that may allow attackers to inject arbitrary script code into the current browser session. PLATFORM: Windows 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, XP SP3, 7; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft MHTML. A remote user can conduct

  17. ANALYTIC EXPRESSIONS FOR THE LIGHT-SCATTERING CROSS SECTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of r and m, with many "wiggles" on many scales, and its computation, though straightforward, is time intensive. A simple expression for Q sp would simplify calculation of...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The dosimetric parameters Sc, Sp and TPR vary depending on radio, the transmission effect of the MLC, inverse square law and dose profile are used for the calculation....

  19. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery for thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, T.B.; Bolivar, J.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) (DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP)] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

  20. Performance Management | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Management Performance Management Documents available for download November 10, 2015 FY 2016 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE...

  1. An investigation of the radiolytic stability of a resorcinol- formaldehyde ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.L.; Bibler, N.E.; Bibler, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Radiolytic stability of a resorcinol-formaldehyde polycondensation-type cation exchange resin was investigated for up to lE09 rads total dose. The resorcinol-formaldehyde resin is a resin that has potential cesium decontamination applications at Pacific Northwest and Savannah River. We have determined both radiation and storage effects on performance of the resin using 101-AW Hanford simulant and ASTM Type-I water. Distribution coefficient determinations, total carbon analysis, and physical observations lead us to conclude that radiation up to lE08 rads does not significantly affect the performance of the resin. The resin is more stable to radiation in water than in 101-AW Hanford simulant. Also radiation or storage does not affect the thermal stability of the resin. Gas production rates for several resin slurries increased in the order of resin/101-AW Hanford simulant, resin/ASTM water, and resin/0.5 M HNO{sub 3}. H{sub 2} is produced from radiolysis of resin in 101-AW Hanford simulant with a G value of G(H{sub 2}) of 0.11 {plus_minus} 0.02 molecules/100eV and in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} with a G value of G(H{sub 2}) of 0.27 {plus_minus} 0.02 molecules/lOOeV.

  2. A NEW APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTARY DECOMISSIONING STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence M. Zull; Richard H. Meservey; Lawrence E. Boing

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Reutilization (DDR) Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) is to advance the technology of decontamination, decommissioning, and reutilization of nuclear and former nuclear installations, materials, facilities, and sites [1]. This includes sharing collective decommissioning experiences and lessons learned with others in the industry. An integral part of the work of the DDR Division is the preparation of voluntary decommissioning standards through its recently re-established DDR Standards Committee. This Committee intends to support development of various standards with other divisions of the ANS. The Committee also intends to participate with external organizations to disseminate information and lessons learned regarding decontamination activities, and participate in the development of voluntary decommissioning standards. External organizations, such as ASTM International, are involved in the development of consensus standards for nuclear decommissioning work. This paper describes the work of the DDR Standards Committee on a new co-operative initiative with ASTM International to develop voluntary consensus standards for nuclear decommissioning work.

  3. Improved mechanical properties of A 508 class 3 steel for nuclear pressure vessel through steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J.T.; Kwon, H.K.; Kim, K.C.; Kim, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The present work is concerned with the steelmaking practices which improve the mechanical properties of the A 508 class 3 steel for reactor pressure vessel. Three kinds of steelmaking practices were applied to manufacture the forged heavy wall shell for reactor pressure vessel, that is, the vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD), modified VCD containing aluminum and silicon-killing. The segregation of the chemical elements through the thickness was quite small so that the variations of the tensile properties at room temperature were small and the anisotropy of the impact properties was hardly observed regardless of the steelmaking practices. The Charpy V-notch impact properties and the reference nil-ductile transition temperature by drop weight test were significantly improved by the modified VCD and silicon-killing as compared with those of the steel by VCD. Moreover, the plane strain fracture toughness values of the materials by modified VCD and silicon-killing practices was much higher than those of the steel by VCD. These were resulted from the fining of austenite grain size. It was observed that the grain size was below 20 {micro}m (ASTM No. 8.5) when using the modified VCD and silicon-killing, compared to 50 {micro}m (ASTM No. 7.0) when using VCD.

  4. Quality Parameters and Chemical Analysis for Biodiesel Produced in the United States in 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.; Fouts, L.; Chupka, G.

    2013-03-01

    Samples of biodiesel (B100) from producers and terminals in 2011were tested for critical properties: free and total glycerin, flash point, cloud point, oxidation stability, cold soak filterability, and metals. Failure rates for cold soak filterability and oxidation stability were below 5%. One sample failed flash point due to excess methanol. One sample failed oxidation stability and metal content. Overall, 95% of the samples from this survey met biodiesel quality specification ASTM D6751. In 2007, a sampling of B100 from production facilities showed that nearly 90% met D6751. In samples meeting D6751, calcium was found above the method detection limit in nearly half the samples. Feedstock analysis revealed half the biodiesel was produced from soy and half was from mixed feedstocks. The saturated fatty acid methyl ester concentration of the B100 was compared to the saturated monoglyceride concentration as a percent of total monoglyceride. The real-world correlation of these properties was very good. The results of liquid chromatograph measurement of monoglycerides were compared to ASTM D6751. Agreement between the two methods was good, particularly for total monoglycerides and unsaturated monoglycerides. Because only very low levels of saturated monoglycerides measured, the two methods had more variability, but the correlation was still acceptable.

  5. THE PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TEST HOW AND WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-15

    The Product Consistency Test (PCT), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard C1285, is currently used world wide for testing glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for high level waste (HLW), low level waste (LLW), and hazardous wastes. Development of the PCT was initiated in 1986 because HLW glass waste forms required extensive characterization before actual production began and required continued characterization during production ({ge}25 years). Non-radioactive startup was in 1994 and radioactive startup was in 1996. The PCT underwent extensive development from 1986-1994 and became an ASTM consensus standard in 1994. During the extensive laboratory testing and inter- and intra-laboratory round robins using non-radioactive and radioactive glasses, the PCT was shown to be very reproducible, to yield reliable results rapidly, to distinguish between glasses of different durability and homogeneity, and to easily be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples. In 1997, the scope was broadened to include hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste glasses. In 2002, the scope was broadened to include glass-ceramic waste forms which are currently being recommended for second generation nuclear wastes yet to be generated in the nuclear renaissance. Since the PCT has proven useful for glass-ceramics with up to 75% ceramic component and has been used to evaluate Pu ceramic waste forms, the use of this test for other ceramic/mineral waste forms such as geopolymers, hydroceramics, and fluidized bed steam reformer mineralized product is under investigation.

  6. Large forging manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thamboo, Samuel V.; Yang, Ling

    2002-01-01

    A process for forging large components of Alloy 718 material so that the components do not exhibit abnormal grain growth includes the steps of: a) providing a billet with an average grain size between ASTM 0 and ASTM 3; b) heating the billet to a temperature of between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; c) upsetting the billet to obtain a component part with a minimum strain of 0.125 in at least selected areas of the part; d) reheating the component part to a temperature between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; e) upsetting the component part to a final configuration such that said selected areas receive no strains between 0.01 and 0.125; f) solution treating the component part at a temperature of between 1725.degree. F. and 1750.degree. F.; and g) aging the component part over predetermined times at different temperatures. A modified process achieves abnormal grain growth in selected areas of a component where desirable.

  7. Method of improving fatigue life of cast nickel based superalloys and composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Denzine, Allen F.; Kolakowski, Thomas A.; Wallace, John F.

    1978-03-14

    The invention consists of a method of producing a fine equiaxed grain structure (ASTM 2-4) in cast nickel-base superalloys which increases low cycle fatigue lives without detrimental effects on stress rupture properties to temperatures as high as 1800.degree. F. These superalloys are variations of the basic nickel-chromium matrix, hardened by gamma prime [Ni.sub.3 (Al, Ti)] but with optional additions of cobalt, tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium, columbium, tantalum, boron, zirconium, carbon and hafnium. The invention grain refines these alloys to ASTM 2 to 4 increasing low cycle fatigue life by a factor of 2 to 5 (i.e. life of 700 hours would be increased to 1400 to 3500 hours for a given stress) as a result of the addition of 0.01% to 0.2% of a member of the group consisting of boron, zirconium and mixtures thereof to aid heterogeneous nucleation. The alloy is vacuum melted and heated to 250.degree.-400.degree. F. above the melting temperature, cooled to partial solidification, thus resulting in said heterogeneous nucleation and fine grains, then reheated and cast at about 50.degree.-100.degree. F. of superheat. Additions of 0.1% boron and 0.1% zirconium (optional) are the preferred nucleating agents.

  8. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2007-09-13

    The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

  9. Microstructural evolution during solution treatment of Co-Cr-Mo-C biocompatible alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacchi, J.V.; Fornaro, O.; Palacio, H.

    2012-06-15

    Three different Co-Cr-Mo-C alloys conforming to ASTM F75 standard were poured in an industrial environment and subjected to a conventional solution treatment at 1225 Degree-Sign C for several time intervals. The microstructural changes and transformations were studied in each case in order to evaluate the way in which treatment time influences the secondary phase fraction and clarify the microstructural changes that could occur. To assess how treatment time affects microstructure, optical microscopy and image analyzer software, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry analysis were employed. The main phases detected in the as-cast state were: {sigma}-phase, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The latter presented two different morphologies, blocky type and lamellar type. Despite being considered the most detrimental feature to mechanical properties, {sigma}-phase and lamellar carbides dissolution took place in the early stages of solution treatment. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides featured two different behaviors. In the alloy obtained by melting an appropriate quantity of alloyed commercial materials, a decrease in size, spheroidization and transformation into M{sub 6}C carbides were simultaneously observed. In the commercial ASTM F75 alloy, in turn, despite being the same phase, only a marked decrease in precipitates size was noticed. These different behaviors could be ascribed to the initial presence of other phases in the alloy obtained from alloyed materials, such as {sigma}-phase and 'pearlitic' carbides, or to the initial precipitate size which was much larger in the first than in the commercial ASTM F75 alloy studied. M{sub 6}C carbides dissolved directly in the matrix as they could not be detected in samples solution-treated for 15 min. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys were poured under an industrial environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformation of existing phases followed during conventional solution treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In as-cast/treated samples, phases were identified by color metallography, SEM and EDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M{sub 23}C{sub 6} {yields} M{sub 6}C transformation was corroborated by SEM and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbide spheroidization was also detected prior a noticeably carbide size decreasing.

  10. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on Ethanol Engine Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P; West, Brian H

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a very attractive fuel from an end-use perspective because it has a high chemical octane number and a high latent heat of vaporization. When an engine is optimized to take advantage of these fuel properties, both efficiency and power can be increased through higher compression ratio, direct fuel injection, higher levels of boost, and a reduced need for enrichment to mitigate knock or protect the engine and aftertreatment system from overheating. The ASTM D5798 specification for high level ethanol blends, commonly called E85, underwent a major revision in 2011. The minimum ethanol content was revised downward from 68 vol% to 51 vol%, which combined with the use of low octane blending streams such as natural gasoline introduces the possibility of a lower octane E85 fuel. While this fuel is suitable for current ethanol tolerant flex fuel vehicles, this study experimentally examines whether engines can still be aggressively optimized for the resultant fuel from the revised ASTM D5798 specification. The performance of six ethanol fuel blends, ranging from 51-85% ethanol, is compared to a premium-grade certification gasoline (UTG-96) in a single-cylinder direct-injection (DI) engine with a compression ratio of 12.9:1 at knock-prone engine conditions. UTG-96 (RON = 96.1), light straight run gasoline (RON = 63.6), and n-heptane (RON = 0) are used as the hydrocarbon blending streams for the ethanol-containing fuels in an effort to establish a broad range of knock resistance for high ethanol fuels. Results show that nearly all ethanol-containing fuels are more resistant to engine knock than UTG-96 (the only exception being the ethanol blend with 49% n-heptane). This knock resistance allows ethanol blends made with 33 and 49% light straight run gasoline, and 33% n-heptane to be operated at significantly more advanced combustion phasing for higher efficiency, as well as at higher engine loads. While experimental results show that the octane number of the hydrocarbon blend stock does impact engine performance, there remains a significant opportunity for engine optimization when considering even the lowest octane fuels that are in compliance with the current revision of ASTM D5798 compared to premium-grade gasoline.

  11. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance for both the wrought and cast duplex alloys; (3) Castings generally have better toughness than their wrought counterparts in the temperature range of ???????¢????????????????80???????????????°C to +20???????????????°C; (4) All shield metal arc (SMA) test welds in DSS castings, with recommended or over matching filler metal, indicate that welding is not a significant factor when considering DSS applications.

  12. Background:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iSUPPLIER PORTAL ACCESS SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS Oracle PO Team mlbritt Page 1 10/28/2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS Recommended Browsers for iSupplier Portal Recommended Microsoft Internet Explorer Browser Settings (MSIE) Recommended Firefox Browser Settings Recommended Safari Browser Settings SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS AND TROUBLESHOOTING HINTS Recommended Browsers for iSupplier Portal BROWSER WINDOWS XP SP2 & WINDOWS XP SP3 WINDOWS VISTA & WINDOWS VISTA SP1 MAC OS X V10.3.9 MAC OS X V10.4.7 OR HIGHER

  13. Improved test method to verify the power rating of a photovoltaic (PV) project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchula, A.; Pligavko, A.; King, D.; Marion, B.; Townsend, T.; Mitchell, L.; Dierauf, T.; Kimber, A.; Osterwald, C. R.; Newmiller, Jeff; Emery, K.; Talmud, F.; Whitaker, Chuck; Myers, D.; Forbess, J.; Granata, Jennifer E.; Levitsky, T.

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the PVUSA power rating method and presents two additional methods that seek to improve this method in terms of model precision and increased seasonal applicability. It presents the results of an evaluation of each method based upon regression analysis of over 12 MW of operating photovoltaic (PV) systems located in a wide variety of climates. These systems include a variety of PV technologies, mounting configurations, and array sizes to ensure the conclusions are applicable to a wide range of PV designs and technologies. The work presented in this paper will be submitted to ASTM for use in the development of a standard test method for certifying the power rating of PV projects.

  14. Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines Research Diesel Fuels: Analysis of Physical and Chemical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallant, Tom; Franz, Jim; Alnajjar, Mikhail; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Sluder, Scott; Cannella, William C; Fairbridge, Craig; Hager, Darcy; Dettman, Heather; Luecke, Jon; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Zigler, Brad

    2009-01-01

    The CRC Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines working group has worked to identify a matrix of research diesel fuels for use in advanced combustion research applications. Nine fuels were specified and formulated to investigate the effects of cetane number aromatic content and 90% distillation fraction. Standard ASTM analyses were performed on the fuels as well as GC/MS and /u1H//u1/u3C NMR analyses and thermodynamic characterizations. Details of the actual results of the fuel formulations compared with the design values are presented, as well as results from standard analyses, such as heating value, viscosity and density. Cetane number characterizations were accomplished by using both the engine method and the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT/sT) apparatus.

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  16. QuickSite{sup SM}, the Argonne expedited site characterization methodology,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, J.C.; Meyer, W.T.

    1997-09-01

    Expedited site characterization (ESC), developed by Argonne National Laboratory, is an interactive, integrated process emphasizing the use of existing data of sufficient quality, multiple complementary characterization methods, and on-site decision making to optimize site investigations. The Argonne ESC is the basis for the provisional ESC standard of the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials). QuickSite{sup SM} is the implementation package developed by Argonne to facilitate ESC of sites contaminated with hazardous wastes. At various sites, Argonne has successfully implemented QuickSite{sup SM} and demonstrated the technical superiority of the ESC process over traditional methodologies guided by statistics and random-sampling approaches. For example, in a QuickSite{sup SM} characterization of a perched aquifer at the Pantex Plant in Texas, past data and geochemical analyses of existing wells were used to develop a model for recharge and contaminant movement. With the model as a guide, closure was achieved with minimal field work.

  17. Microstructural Changes Due to Alkali-Silica Reaction during Standard Mortar Test

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Jun-Ho; Struble, Leslie; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructural development of mortar bars with silica glass aggregate undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) under the conditions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test C1260 was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and qualitative X-ray microanalysis. Cracking in the aggregate, the hydrated paste, and the paste-aggregate interface was important in the development of the microstructure. Cracks were characterized according to their location, their relationship to other cracks, and whether they are filled with ASR gel. Expansion of the bars was approximately 1% at 12 days and 2% at 53 days. They fell apart by 63 days. The barsmore » contained two zones, an inner region that was undergoing ASR and an outer and much more highly damaged zone that extended further inward over time. Evidence of ASR was present even during the period when specimens were immersed in water, prior to immersion in NaOH solution.« less

  18. Methods of cracking a crude product to produce additional crude products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mo, Weijian; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay

    2009-09-08

    A method for producing a crude product is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce one or more crude products. At least one of the crude products has a boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. as determined by ASTM Method D5307. The crude product having the boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. is catalytically cracked to produce one or more additional crude products. At least one of the additional crude products is a second gas stream. The second gas stream has a boiling point of at most 38.degree. C. at 0.101 MPa.

  19. Saybolt universal viscosity converted to kinematic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anaya, C.; Bermudez, O.

    1987-09-21

    This article describes a program for personal and handheld computers, written in Basic, which has been developed for the conversion of Saybolt universal viscosity in Saybolt Universal Seconds (SSU or SUS) to kinematic viscosity in centistokes (cSt), at any selected temperature. It was developed using the mathematical relationship presented in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D2161-82. In the standard, an equation is presented to convert kinematic viscosity to Saybolt universal viscosity, but nothing is presented to convert from Saybolt to kinematic because it is necessary to find the roots of a nonexplicit function. There are several numerical methods that can be used to determine the roots of the nonexplicit function, and therefore, convert Saybolt universal viscosity to kinematic viscosity. In the program, the first iteration of the second-order Newton-Raphson method is followed by the Wegstein method as a convergence accelerator.

  20. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2004-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, wear problems of mineral processing equipment including screens, sieve bends, heavy media vessel, dewatering centrifuge, etc., were identified. A novel surface treatment technology, high density infrared (HDI) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated samples were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of AISI 4140 and ASTM A36 steels can be increased 3 and 5 folds, respectively by the application of HDI coatings.

  1. Procedures for ground-water investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water investigations are carried out to fulfill the requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet the requirements of DOE Orders. Investigations are also performed for various clients to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). National standards including procedures published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the US Geological Survey were utilized in developing the procedures contained in this manual.

  2. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  4. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Tao; R. Honaker; B. K. Parekh

    2007-09-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral and coal processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a significant improvement of the service life.

  5. SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

    2005-05-01

    The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

  6. Uncertainty of silicon 1-MeV damage function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danjaji, M.B.; Griffin, P.J.

    1997-02-01

    The electronics radiation hardness-testing community uses the ASTM E722-93 Standard Practice to define the energy dependence of the nonionizing neutron damage to silicon semiconductors. This neutron displacement damage response function is defined to be equal to the silicon displacement kerma as calculated from the ORNL Si cross-section evaluation. Experimental work has shown that observed damage ratios at various test facilities agree with the defined response function to within 5%. Here, a covariance matrix for the silicon 1-MeV neutron displacement damage function is developed. This uncertainty data will support the electronic radiation hardness-testing community and will permit silicon displacement damage sensors to be used in least squares spectrum adjustment codes.

  7. Maximize revenue by analyzing crude oil treating parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrino, V.L.; Crane, T.L.; Heiman, M.S.; Pantermuhl, L.

    1983-10-01

    In the past the Chemshare Design 2000 program has been utilized to model gas processing plant streams. This paper describes how the Chemshare Design 2000 program may be used to maximize lease revenues by modeling a crude oil treating system and presents a technique of recombining an ASTM Distillation and a gas sample to arrive at the original composition of the inlet oil stream for use with the Chemshare Program. Next the treating facility operations are evaluated in order to maximize revenues which depending on the crude could mean an increase or decrease in the treating temperatures and pressures. For a lease producing 21,000 BOPD the losses can easily surpass $2 MM per year due to oil shrinkage and gravity differential.

  8. Maximize revenue by analyzing crude oil treating parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiman, M.S.; Pellegrino, V.L.; Pantermuehl, L.A.; Crane, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    In the past, the Chemshare Design 2000 program has been utilized to model gas processing plant streams. This study describes how the Chemshare Design 2000 program may be used to maximize lease revenues by modeling a crude oil treating system and presents a technique of recombining an ASTM distillation and a gas sample to arrive at the original composition of the inlet oil stream for use with the Chemshare Program. Next the treating facility operations are evaluated in order to maximize revenues which, depending on the crude, could mean an increase or decrease in the treating temperatures and pressures. For a lease producing 21,000 bopd the losses can easily surpass $2.0 MM/yr due to oil shrinkage and gravity differential.

  9. Final Scientific Report - "Novel Steels for High Temperature Carburizing"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKimpson, Marvin G.; Liu, Tianjun; Maniruzzaman, Md

    2012-07-27

    This program was undertaken to develop a microalloy-modified grade of standard carburizing steel that can successfully exploit the high temperature carburizing capabilities of current commercial low pressure (i.e. 'vacuum') carburizing systems. Such steels can lower the amount of energy required for commercial carburizing operations by reducing the time required for deep-case carburizing operations. The specific technical objective of the work was to demonstrate a carburizing steel composition capable of maintaining a prior austenite grain size no larger than ASTM grain size number 5 after exposure to simulated carburizing conditions of 1050 C for 8 hr. Such thermal exposure should be adequate for producing carburized case depths up to about 2 mm. Such carburizing steels are expected to be attractive for use across a wide range of industries, including the petroleum, chemical, forest products, automotive, mining and industrial equipment industries. They have potential for reducing energy usage during low pressure carburizing by more than 25%, as well as reducing cycle times and process costs substantially. They also have potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from existing low pressure carburizing furnaces by more than 25%. High temperature carburizing can be done in most modern low pressure carburizing systems with no additional capital investment. Accordingly, implementing this technology on carburizing furnaces will provide a return on investment significantly greater than 10%. If disseminated throughout the domestic carburizing community, the technology has potential for saving on the order of 23 to 34 trillion BTU/year in industrial energy usage. Under the program, two compositions of microalloyed, coarsening-resistant low alloy carburizing steels were developed, produced and evaluated. After vacuum annealing at 1050oC for 8 hrs and high pressure gas quenching, both steels exhibited a prior austenite ASTM grain size number of 5.0 or finer. For comparison, a control alloy of similar composition but without the microalloy additions exhibited a duplex prior austenite grain size with grains ranging from ASTM grain size 3 down to ASTM grain size 1 after similar processing and thermal exposure. These results confirm the potential for using microalloy additions of Ti, B, Nb, Al, rare earths and/or N for austenite grain size control in Cr-Mo (i.e. 4000-series) low alloy carburizing steels. They also demonstrate that these microalloy additions will not compromise the processability of the steel; all three materials produced under the program could be hot worked readily using normal steel processing protocols. To fully realize the technical and commercial potential of these steels, there is a need to continue development work using larger-scale heats. These larger-scale heats are needed to provide adequate material for fatigue testing of quenched and tempered alloys, to conduct more complete investigations of potential alloy chemistries and to provide additional material for processing studies. It will also be beneficial to carefully review intellectual property issues associated with this family of steels, since existing Japanese patent literature suggests that significant microstructural and/or process characterization work may be needed on new materials to confirm that these materials fall outside existing patent claims.

  10. Characterization of low-VOC latex paints: Volatile organic compound content, VOC and aldehyde emissions, and paint performance. Final report, January 1997--January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortmann, R.; Lao, H.C.; Ng, A.; Roache, N.

    1999-04-01

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as `low-odor,` `low-VOC (volatile organic compound),` or `no-VOC.` Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints and to identify the predominant VOCs and aldehydes in the emissions following application to test substrates. The performance of the paints was evaluated and compared to that of commonly used conventional latex paints by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard methods that measured parameters such as scrubbability, cleanability, and hiding power. The report describes the paints that were tested, the test methods, and the experimental data. Results are presented that can be used to evaluate the low-odor/low-VOC paints as alternatives to conventional latex wall paints that contain and emit higher concentrations of VOCs.

  11. Degradation of Nylon 6,6 Fire-Suppression Casing from Plutonium Glove Boxes Under Alpha and Neutron Irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Millsap, Donald W.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Wang, Matthew Y.

    2015-04-23

    Nylon 6,6 tensile specimens, conforming to the casing for self-contained fire extinguisher systems, have been irradiated using both an accelerator He++ ion beam and a 5-Ci PuBe neutron source to model the radiation damage these systems would likely incur over a lifetime of operation within glove boxes. Following irradiation, these samples were mechanically tested using standard practices as described in ASTM D638. The results of the He++ study indicate that the tensile strength of the nylon specimens undergoes some slight (<10%) degradation while other properties of the samples, such as elongation and tangent modulus, appear to fluctuate with increasing dosemore » levels. The He++-irradiated specimens also have a noticeable level of discoloration corresponding to increasing levels of dose. The neutron-irradiated samples show a higher degree of mechanical degradation than the He++-irradiated samples.« less

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockward, Tommy

    2012-07-16

    For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

  13. Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

    2012-03-30

    Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

  14. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels: Recent progress and new approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Hins, A.; Zaluzec, N.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of several types of BWR field components fabricated from solution-annealed austenitic stainless steels (SSs), including a core internal weld, were investigated by means of slow-strain-rate test (SSRT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and field-emission-gun advanced analytical electron microscopy (FEG-AAEM). Based on the results of the tests and analyses, separate effects of neutron fluence, tensile properties, alloying elements and major impurities identified in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications, minor impurities, water chemistry, and fabrication-related variables were determined. The results indicate strongly that minor impurities not specified by the ASTM-specifications play important roles, probably through a complex synergism with grain-boundary Cr depletion. These impurities, typically associated with steelmaking and component fabrication processes, are very low or negligible in solubility in steels and are the same impurities that have been known to promote intergranular SCC significantly when they are present in water as ions or soluble compounds. It seems obvious that IASCC is a complex integral problem which involves many variables that are influenced strongly by not only irradiation conditions, water chemistry, and stress but also iron and steelmaking processes, fabrication of the component, and joining and welding. Therefore, for high-stress components in particular, it would be difficult to mitigate IASCC problems at high fluence based on the consideration of water chemistry alone, and other considerations based on material composition and fabrication procedure would be necessary as well.

  15. Impact of Biodiesel Impurities on the Performance and Durability of DOC, DPF and SCR Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; McCormick, R.; Luecke, J.; Brezny, R.; Geisselmann, A.; Voss, K.; Hallstrom, K.; Leustek, M.; Parsons, J.; Abi-Akar, H.

    2011-06-01

    It is estimated that operating continuously on a B20 fuel containing the current allowable ASTM specification limits for metal impurities in biodiesel could result in a doubling of ash exposure relative to lube-oil derived ash. The purpose of this study was to determine if a fuel containing metals at the ASTM limits could cause adverse impacts on the performance and durability of diesel emission control systems. An accelerated durability test method was developed to determine the potential impact of these biodiesel impurities. The test program included engine testing with multiple DPF substrate types as well as DOC and SCR catalysts. The results showed no significant degradation in the thermo-mechanical properties of cordierite, aluminum titanate, or silicon carbide DPFs after exposure to 150,000 mile equivalent biodiesel ash and thermal aging. However, exposure of a cordierite DPF to 435,000 mile equivalent aging resulted in a 69% decrease in the thermal shock resistance parameter. It is estimated that the additional ash from 150,000 miles of biodiesel use would also result in a moderate increases in exhaust backpressure for a DPF. A decrease in DOC activity was seen after exposure to 150,000 mile equivalent aging, resulting in higher HC slip and a reduction in NO{sub 2} formation. The metal-zeolite SCR catalyst experienced a slight loss in activity after exposure to 435,000 mile equivalent aging. This catalyst, placed downstream of the DPF, showed a 5% reduction in overall NOx conversion activity over the HDDT test cycle.

  16. Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacchi, J.V.; Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O.; Palacio, H.A.

    2011-01-15

    The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

  17. Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ningileri, Shridas T.; Boggess, Todd A; Stalheim, Douglas

    2013-01-02

    The main objective of the study is as follows: Identify steel compositions/microstructures suitable for construction of new pipeline infrastructure and evaluate the potential use of the existing steel pipeline infrastructure in high pressure gaseous hydrogen applications. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 5.5 MPa (800 psi), 11 MPa (1600 psi) and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi). Based on reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 5.5 MPa (800 psi) and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi). The basic format for this phase of the study is as follows: Microstructural characterization of volume fraction of phases in each alloy; Tensile testing of all four alloys in He and H{sub 2} at 5.5 MPa (800 psi), 11 MPa (1600 psi), and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi). RA performance was used to choose the two best performers for further mechanical property evaluation; Fracture testing (ASTM E1820) of two best tensile test performers in H{sub 2} at 5.5 MPa (800 psi) and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi); Fatigue testing (ASTM E647) of two best tensile test performers in H2 at 5.5 MPa (800 psi) and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi) with frequency =1.0 Hz and R-ratio=0.5 and 0.1.

  18. Status of Initial Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Graphite Grades for NGNP Appkications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strizak, Joe P; Burchell, Timothy D; Windes, Will

    2011-12-01

    Current candidate graphite grades for the core structures of NGNP include grades NBG-17, NBG-18, PCEA and IG-430. Both NBG-17 and NBG-18 are manufactured using pitch coke, and are vibrationally molded. These medium grain products are produced by SGL Carbon SAS (France). Tayo Tanso (Japan) produces IG-430 which is a petroleum coke, isostatically molded, nuclear grade graphite. And PCEA is a medium grain, extruded graphite produced by UCAR Carbon Co. (USA) from petroleum coke. An experimental program has been initiated to develop physical and mechanical properties data for these current candidate graphites. The results will be judged against the requirements for nuclear grade graphites set forth in ASTM standard D 7219-05 "Standard Specification for Isotropic and Near-isotropic Nuclear Graphites". Physical properties data including thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion, and mechanical properties data including tensile, compressive and flexural strengths will be obtained using the established test methods covered in D-7219 and ASTM C 781-02 "Standard Practice for Testing Graphite and Boronated Graphite Components for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors". Various factors known to effect the properties of graphites will be investigated. These include specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation (ag and wg) within a billet, and billet-to-billet variations. The current status of the materials characterization program is reported herein. To date billets of the four graphite grades have been procured, and detailed cut up plans for obtaining the various specimens have been prepared. Particular attention has been given to the traceability of each specimen to its spatial location and orientation within a billet.

  19. Measuring Bio-Oil Upgrade Intermediates and Corrosive Species with Polarity-Matched Analytical Approaches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Connatser, Raynella M; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Keiser, James R; Choi, Jae-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Integrating biofuels with conventional petroleum products requires improvements in processing to increase blendability with existing fuels. This work demonstrates analysis techniques for more hydrophilic bio-oil liquids that give improved quantitative and qualitative description of the total acid content and organic acid profiles. To protect infrastructure from damage and reduce the cost associated with upgrading, accurate determination of acid content and representative chemical compound analysis are central imperatives to assessing both the corrosivity and the progress toward removing oxygen and acidity in processed biomass liquids. Established techniques form an ample basis for bio-liquids evaluation. However, early in the upgrading process, themore » unique physical phases and varied hydrophilicity of many pyrolysis liquids can render analytical methods originally designed for use in petroleum-derived oils inadequate. In this work, the water solubility of the organic acids present in bio-oils is exploited in a novel extraction and titration technique followed by analysis on the water-based capillary electrophoresis (CE) platform. The modification of ASTM D664, the standard for Total Acid Number (TAN), to include aqueous carrier solvents improves the utility of that approach for quantifying acid content in hydrophilic bio-oils. Termed AMTAN (modified Total Acid Number), this technique offers 1.2% relative standard deviation and dynamic range comparable to the conventional ASTM method. The results of corrosion product evaluations using several different sources of real bio-oil are discussed in the context of the unique AMTAN and CE analytical approaches developed to facilitate those measurements. Keywords: biomass, capillary electrophoresis, Total Acid Number, pyrolysis oil upgrading, carboxylic acid, corrosion« less

  20. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Constantz; Randy Seeker; Martin Devenney

    2010-06-30

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO{sub 2} to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM{trademark} was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which is a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.

  1. Stabilizing soft fine-grained soils with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edil, T.B.; Acosta, H.A.; Benson, C.H.

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of self-cementing fly ashes derived from combustion of subbituminous coal at electric power plants for stabilization of soft fine-grained soils. California bearing ratio (CBR) and resilient modulus (M{sub r}) tests were conducted on mixtures prepared with seven soft fine-grained soils (six inorganic soils and one organic soil) and four fly ashes. The soils were selected to represent a relatively broad range of plasticity, with plasticity indices ranging between 15 and 38. Two of the fly ashes are high quality Class C ashes (per ASTM C 618) that are normally used in Portland cement concrete. The other ashes are off-specification ashes, meaning they do not meet the Class C or Class F criteria in ASTM C 618. Tests were conducted on soils and soil-fly ash mixtures prepared at optimum water content (a standardized condition), 7% wet of optimum water content (representative of the typical in situ condition in Wisconsin), and 9-18% wet of optimum water content (representative of a very wet in situ condition). Addition of fly ash resulted in appreciable increases in the CBR and M{sub r} of the inorganic soils. For water contents 7% wet of optimum, CBRs of the soils alone ranged between 1 and 5. Addition of 10% fly ash resulted in CBRs ranging between 8 and 17, and 18% fly ash resulted in CBRs between 15 and 31. Similarly, M{sub r} of the soil alone ranged between 3 and 15 MPa at 7% wet of optimum, whereas addition of 10% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 12 and 60 MPa and 18% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 51 and 106 MPa. In contrast, except for one fly ash, addition of fly ash generally had little effect on CBR or M{sub r} of the organic soil.

  2. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-08-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for total constituents and durability tested as a granular waste form. A subset of the granular material was stabilized in a clay based geopolymer matrix at 42% and 65% FBSR loadings and durability tested as a monolith waste form. The 65 wt% FBSR loaded monolith made with clay (radioactive) was more durable than the 67-68 wt% FBSR loaded monoliths made from fly ash (non-radioactive) based on short term PCT testing. Long term, 90 to 107 day, ASTM C1308 testing (similar to ANSI/ANS 16.1 testing) was only performed on two fly ash geopolymer monoliths at 67-68 wt% FBSR loading and three clay geopolymer monoliths at 42 wt% FBSR loading. More clay geopolymers need to be made and tested at longer times at higher FBSR loadings for comparison to the fly ash monoliths. Monoliths made with metakaolin (heat treated) clay are of a more constant composition and are very reactive as the heat treated clay is amorphous and alkali activated. The monoliths made with fly ash are subject to the inherent compositional variation found in fly ash as it is a waste product from burning coal and it contains unreactive components such as mullite. However, both the fly ash and the clay based monoliths perform well in long term ASTM C1308 testing. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) tests: ASTM C1285 testing (Product Consistency Test) of granular and monolithic waste forms; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive to ESTD and pilot scale granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant  Comparison of granular radioactive to granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant made using the SRNL BSR; Comparison of monolithic BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR and ESTD non-radioactive waste forms made of fly ash; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR non-radioactive waste forms made of fly ash; Comparison of granular BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR non-radioactive waste forms made of clay; ASTM C1308 Accelerated Leach Test for Diffusive Releases from Solidified Waste and a Computer Program to Model Diffusive, Fractional Leaching from Cylindrical Waste Forms; Comparison of BSR non-radioactive waste forms to monolithic ESTD non-radioactive waste forms made from fly ash; Testing of BSR non-radioactive monoliths made from clay for comparison to non-radioactive monoliths made from fly ash; ASTM C39 Compressive Strength of Cylindrical Concrete Specimens; Comparison of monolithic BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR and ESTD non-radioactive waste forms; EPA Manual SW-846 Method 1311, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP); Comparison of granular BSR radioactive to ESTD and pilot scale granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant; Comparison of granular radioactive to granular non-radioactive waste form made from the Rassat simulant made using the SRNL BSR; Comparison of monolithic BSR radioactive waste forms to monolithic BSR non-radioactive waste forms.

  3. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final report Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G. (1982) 19 SP-100, the US Space Nuclear Reactor Power Program. Technical information report ...

  4. EMGeo Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods (QMR in one case, and IDR in the other), both solvers are dominated by memory bandwidth intensive operations like sparse matrix-vector multiply (SpMV), dot...

  5. Publications and Presentations at Scientific Meetings | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giammar, and B.M. Tebo (2008) Indirect UO2 oxidation by Mn(II)-oxidizing spores of Bacillus sp. strain SG-1 and the effect of U and Mn concentrations. Environ. Sci. Technol....

  6. Beta.-glucosidase coding sequences and protein from orpinomyces PC-2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong; Ximenes, Eduardo A.

    2001-02-06

    Provided is a novel .beta.-glucosidase from Orpinomyces sp. PC2, nucleotide sequences encoding the mature protein and the precursor protein, and methods for recombinant production of this .beta.-glucosidase.

  7. Orpinomyces xylanase proteins and coding sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, X.L.; Ljungdahl, L.G.; Chen, H.

    1998-10-20

    Xylanases having high specific activities from Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 are provided as well as methods for their purification. DNA sequences encoding these proteins are also provided. 8 figs.

  8. Spatially separated excitons in 2D and 1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Fermi surfaces Low SP tunneling rate between layers Picture credit: Kharitonov et al., Phys. Rev. B 78 Phase coherence between the two layers Transport of excitons can be...

  9. V-151: RSA Archer eGRC Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Upload...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    V-151: RSA Archer eGRC Bugs Let Remote Authenticated Users Upload Files and Let Remote ... The vendor has issued a fix (5.3SP1). Addthis Related Articles V-084: RSA Archer eGRC ...

  10. A=7H (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (Not illustrated) A search for 7H in 7Li(π-, π+)7H was unsuccessful (1965GI10). See also (1975BE31, 1977SP1B; theor.

  11. OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of fissile material. This SP limits the number of waste packages per exclusive use trailer to 2. This year, approval was received from the Department of Energy (DOE)Oak Ridge...

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Platform Validation of WAIL at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Polonsky, I.N., Love, S.P., and Davis, A.B., Los Alamos National Laboratory Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation...

  13. SREL Reprint #3051

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tides, terrapins spent more time in the marsh (Spartina sp., mud, and occasional shallow water) than in open water of the creek channel. Terrapins remained within the same tidal...

  14. Bacillus MGA3 aspartokinase II gene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schendel, Frederick J. (Oakdale, MN); Flickinger, Michael C. (St. Paul, MN)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides the isolated DNA sequence encoding the .alpha.B dimer subunit of the lysine-sensitive aspartokinase II isozyme from the thermophilic methylotrophic Bacillus sp. MGA3.

  15. BPA-2015-01782-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    751-782 1 or by email at jcrnurray@bpa.gov. Sillccrel:. ), H.-.:. ' .ranit L. Murray ) I c:;td Rca lt ySpda l i st bee: Aircraft Services - TC-SP-Hanger M. Stolfus -...

  16. Bonneville Power Administration Overview As of December 1, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration Overview As of August 11, 2015 Grand Coulee Dam High Voltage Transmission Columbia Generating Station Moody's: Aa1Stable S&P: AA-Stable Fitch: AA...

  17. Glossary Glossary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    calculated in terms of the following for- mula: Deg API 141.5 sp gr60degF 60degF - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed...

  18. Freepower Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Freepower Ltd Place: Andover, United Kingdom Zip: SP10 3TY Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Develops a 120kW Organic Rankine Cycle Turbine Generator that uses heat from...

  19. STEAB Teleconference Minutes September 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... EJ, SB and Steve Payne (SP) believe a resolution needs to go to DOE right away in order to ... efficiency in manufacturing to retain jobs; Supporting private sector energy ...

  20. ScottishPower Renewable Energy Holdings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ScottishPower Renewable Energy Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name: ScottishPower Renewable Energy Holdings Place: Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: G2 8SP Sector: Wind...

  1. 2000 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "NERSC has been the most stable supercomputer center in the country particularly with the migration from the T3E to the IBM SP". "Makes supercomputing easy." Below are the survey...

  2. NUREG/CR-6399

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Layout of CVN Specimen in 1--78Sp HB2 Nozzle Dropout (A212B) (Remainder block from manufacture of L-S operational assessment CVN specimens) 12 11 16" I I 4 ' 7 1 4" Dlstance...

  3. Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (1974) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as many as 100 or more distinct local events; more than two thousand events with S-P times of less than three seconds were detected; observed low value for Poisson's ratio which...

  4. MMA WBF Power LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: MMA WBF Power LP -- Bolthouse S&P and Rowen Farms Solar Place: California Phone Number: 415-986-8038 or 800-331-1534 Website:...

  5. Edipower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Edipower Place: Sesto San Giovanni, Italy Zip: 20099 Product: Italian power producer, 50% owned by Edison SpA. References: Edipower1 This article is a...

  6. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova, Italy E-mail: mbmcgarry@wisc.edu Received 2 September 2014, revised 21 October 2014 Accepted for publication 31...

  7. D E -F G 0 2 -1 0 E R 2 6 0 2 1

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...terialld0&confld5397 9 Sp ecial issue at IEEE C om m u n ication s ab ou t M on itorin g ... P I was an editor for a Special Issue at IEEE Communications, focusing on Monitoring and ...

  8. NUG Meeting February 22, 2001

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8:45 - 9:30 Walt Polansky Perspectives from Washington 9:30 - 10:30 Bill Kramer Status reports: IBM SP Phase 2 plans, NERSC-4 plans, NERSC-2 decommissioning 10:30 - ... ...

  9. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status reports: IBM SP Phase 2 plans, NERSC-4 plans, NERSC-2 decommissioning February 22, 2001 | Author(s): Bill Kramer | Download File: Kramer.Status.Plans.Feb2001.ppt | ppt | 6.8 ...

  10. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status reports: IBM SP Phase 2 plans, NERSC-4 plans, NERSC-2 decommissioning February 22, 2001 | Author(s): Bill Kramer | Download File: Kramer.Status.Plans.Feb2001.ppt | ppt | 6.8

  11. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perspectives from Washington 9:30 - 10:30 Bill Kramer Status reports: IBM SP Phase 2 plans, NERSC-4 plans, NERSC-2 decommissioning 10:30 - 10:45 Break 10:45 - 11:15 Bill Kramer ...

  12. Microsoft Word - 200812-24_DSI-DraftContract_blackline.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successor. 8.4.5.7 "S&P" shall mean Standard and Poor's Rating Services (a division of McGraw-Hill, Inc.) or its successor. 9. EMPLOYMENT EXPENDITURES AND CAPITAL INVESTMENT 9.1...

  13. Microsoft Word - 200812-24_DSI-DraftContract_redline.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successor. 8.4.5.7 "S&P" shall mean Standard and Poor's Rating Services (a division of McGraw-Hill, Inc.) or its successor. 9. EMPLOYMENT EXPENDITURES AND CAPITAL INVESTMENT 9.1...

  14. Microsoft Word - DSI Block 12_05_08.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successor. 8.4.5.7 "S&P" shall mean Standard and Poor's Rating Services (a division of McGraw-Hill, Inc.) or its successor. 9. EMPLOYMENT EXPENDITURES AND CAPITAL INVESTMENT 9.1...

  15. 07Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 6Li(n, ), E thermal; measured E; deduced Q. 1968SP01: 6Li(n, ), E thermal; measured E, I; deduced Q....

  16. 20F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 19F(n, ), E thermal; measured E; deduced Q. 1968SP01: 19F(n, ), E thermal; measured E, I; deduced Q. 20F...

  17. 13C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 12C(n, ), E thermal; measured E; deduced Q. 1968SP01: 12C(n, ), E thermal; measured E, I; deduced Q....

  18. Microsoft Word - Final 2012 Prepayment RFO Template as Amended...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or any official statement as to a possible downgrading, suspension or withdrawal of any rating by Moody's, S&P or Fitch of the Bonds, or debt instruments of a character and...

  19. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release on July 17, 2002) Are Stocks Going Up or Down? No, were not talking about the stock market (e.g., the Dow, NASDAQ, or the S&P). Theres no question as to which way...

  20. Site planning and integration fiscal year 1999 multi-year work plan (MYWP) update for WBS 1.8.2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHULTZ, E.A.

    1998-10-01

    The primary mission of the Site Planning and Integration (SP and I) project is to assist Fluor Daniel Project Direction to ensure that all work performed under the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is adequately planned, executed, controlled, and that performance is measured and reported in an integrated fashion. Furthermore, SP and I is responsible for the development, implementation, and management of systems and processes that integrate technical, schedule, and cost baselines for PHMC work.

  1. SREL Reprint #3256

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Siren sp. Predation Thomas M. Luhring1,2, J. Whitfield Gibbons1, and Parker W. Gibbons1 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2University of Missouri, Division of Biological Sciences, 105 Tucker Hall, Columbia, MO 65211, USA Abstract: The first confirmed observation of a Barred Owl depredating a sirenid. SREL Reprint #3256 Luhring, T. M., J. W. Gibbons, and P. W. Gibbons. 2013. Siren sp. Predation. Herpetological Review 44(3): 491-49

  2. Advanced High-Strength Steel Stamping | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Strength Steel Stamping Advanced High-Strength Steel Stamping 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm063_hsiung_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications AHSS Stamping Project … A/SP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project … A/SP 061 FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive Metals-Steel 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials

  3. Nonlinear Strain Paths | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nonlinear Strain Paths Nonlinear Strain Paths 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm064_stoughton_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications AHSS Stamping Project … A/SP 050; Nonlinear Strain Paths Project … A/SP 061 FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive Metals - Wrought FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive Metals-Wrought

  4. Convection feedbacks in a super-parameterization GCM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Convection feedbacks in a super-parameterization GCM Luo, Zhengzhao (Johnny) Colorado State University Stephens, Graeme Colorado State University Category: Modeling Both the Colorado State University (CSU) and Goddard super-parameterization GCM (SP-GCM) simulate a super-active Asian summer monsoon with unrealistically enhanced levels of precipitation. The underlying physical mechanism for this monsoon bias in the CSU SP-GCM is shown to involve enhanced convection-wind-evaporation feedbacks. The

  5. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint Bird, L.; Milligan, M. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation Tettamanti, S. [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy)]; Crudeli, R. [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)] Failure analyses and weld repair of boiler feed water pumps Vulpen, R. van

  6. Landscape NERSC template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL ENERGY RESEARCH SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING CENTER 1 A Comparison of Performance Analysis Tools on the NERSC SP Jonathan Carter NERSC User Services NATIONAL ENERGY RESEARCH SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING CENTER 2 Performance Tools on the IBM SP * PE Benchmarker - IBM PSSP - Trace and visualize hardware counters values or MPI and user-defined events * Paraver - European Center for Parallelism at Barcelona (CEPBA) - Trace and visualize program states, hardware counters values, and MPI and user-defined

  7. DOE SES PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE SES PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT DOE SES PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT This covers Department of Energy SES executives, as well as those Presidential appointees who have retained eligibility for SES performance appraisals and awards under 5 U.S.C. 3392(c). Documents Available for Download November 10, 2015 FY 2016 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL OPENING GUIDANCE FY 2016 performance appraisal cycle for both SES and SP members, which includes Senior Level

  8. Relationship between the structure and electrical characteristics of diamond-like carbon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takabayashi, Susumu Otsuji, Taiichi; Yang, Meng; Ogawa, Shuichi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Jeko, Radek; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2014-09-07

    To elucidate the relationship between the structure and the electrical characteristics of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, DLC films were synthesized in a well-controlled glow discharge with the aid of photoelectrons in an argon/methane atmosphere. The dielectric constant and breakdown strength of the films exhibited opposite behaviors, depending on the total pressure during the synthesis. The product of these two values decreased monotonically as the pressure increased. The Raman spectra were analyzed with a Voigt-type formula. Based on the results, the authors propose the sp{sup 2} cluster model for the DLC structure. This model consists of conductive clusters of sp{sup 2} carbons surrounded by a dielectric matrix sea of sp{sup 2} carbon, sp{sup 3} carbon, and hydrogen, and indicates that the dielectric constant of the whole DLC film is determined by the balance between the dielectric constant of the matrix and the total size of the clusters, while the breakdown strength is determined by the reciprocal of the cluster size. The model suggests that a high-? DLC film can be synthesized at a middle pressure and consists of well-grown sp{sup 2} clusters and a dense matrix. A low-? DLC film can be synthesized both at low and high pressures. The sp{sup 2} cluster model explains that a low-? DLC film synthesized at low pressure consists of a dense matrix and a low density of sp{sup 2} clusters, and exhibits a high breakdown strength. On the other hand, a low-? film synthesized at high pressure consists of a coarse matrix and a high density of clusters and exhibits a low breakdown strength.

  9. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  10. Nuclear safety for the space exploration initiative. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dix, T.E.

    1991-11-01

    The results of a study to identify potential hazards arising from nuclear reactor power systems for use on the lunar and Martian surfaces, related safety issues, and resolutions of such issues by system design changes, operating procedures, and other means are presented. All safety aspects of nuclear reactor power systems from prelaunch ground handling to eventual disposal were examined consistent with the level of detail for SP-100 reactor design at the 1988 System Design Review and for launch vehicle and space transport vehicle designs and mission descriptions as defined in the 90-day Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) study. Information from previous aerospace nuclear safety studies was used where appropriate. Safety requirements for the SP-100 space nuclear reactor system were compiled. Mission profiles were defined with emphasis on activities after low earth orbit insertion. Accident scenarios were then qualitatively defined for each mission phase. Safety issues were identified for all mission phases with the aid of simplified event trees. Safety issue resolution approaches of the SP-100 program were compiled. Resolution approaches for those safety issues not covered by the SP-100 program were identified. Additionally, the resolution approaches of the SP-100 program were examined in light of the moon and Mars missions.

  11. Performance analysis of distributed symmetric sparse matrix vector multiplication algorithm for multi-core architectures. Analysis of Distributed Sparse Symmetric Algorithm

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oryspayev, Dossay; Aktulga, Hasan Metin; Sosonkina, Masha; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2015-07-14

    Sparse matrix vector multiply (SpMVM) is an important kernel that frequently arises in high performance computing applications. Due to its low arithmetic intensity, several approaches have been proposed in literature to improve its scalability and efficiency in large scale computations. In this paper, our target systems are high end multi-core architectures and we use messaging passing interface + open multiprocessing hybrid programming model for parallelism. We analyze the performance of recently proposed implementation of the distributed symmetric SpMVM, originally developed for large sparse symmetric matrices arising in ab initio nuclear structure calculations. We also study important features of this implementationmoreand compare with previously reported implementations that do not exploit underlying symmetry. Our SpMVM implementations leverage the hybrid paradigm to efficiently overlap expensive communications with computations. Our main comparison criterion is the CPU core hours metric, which is the main measure of resource usage on supercomputers. We analyze the effects of topology-aware mapping heuristic using simplified network load model. Furthermore, we have tested the different SpMVM implementations on two large clusters with 3D Torus and Dragonfly topology. Our results show that the distributed SpMVM implementation that exploits matrix symmetry and hides communication yields the best value for the CPU core hours metric and significantly reduces data movement overheads.less

  12. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  13. Performance analysis of distributed symmetric sparse matrix vector multiplication algorithm for multi-core architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oryspayev, Dossay; Aktulga, Hasan Metin; Sosonkina, Masha; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2015-07-14

    In this article, sparse matrix vector multiply (SpMVM) is an important kernel that frequently arises in high performance computing applications. Due to its low arithmetic intensity, several approaches have been proposed in literature to improve its scalability and efficiency in large scale computations. In this paper, our target systems are high end multi-core architectures and we use messaging passing interface + open multiprocessing hybrid programming model for parallelism. We analyze the performance of recently proposed implementation of the distributed symmetric SpMVM, originally developed for large sparse symmetric matrices arising in ab initio nuclear structure calculations. We also study important features of this implementation and compare with previously reported implementations that do not exploit underlying symmetry. Our SpMVM implementations leverage the hybrid paradigm to efficiently overlap expensive communications with computations. Our main comparison criterion is the "CPU core hours" metric, which is the main measure of resource usage on supercomputers. We analyze the effects of topology-aware mapping heuristic using simplified network load model. Furthermore, we have tested the different SpMVM implementations on two large clusters with 3D Torus and Dragonfly topology. Our results show that the distributed SpMVM implementation that exploits matrix symmetry and hides communication yields the best value for the "CPU core hours" metric and significantly reduces data movement overheads.

  14. Nodal surfaces and interdimensional degeneracies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loos, Pierre-Franois; Bressanini, Dario

    2015-06-07

    The aim of this paper is to shed light on the topology and properties of the nodes (i.e., the zeros of the wave function) in electronic systems. Using the electrons on a sphere model, we study the nodes of two-, three-, and four-electron systems in various ferromagnetic configurations (sp, p{sup 2}, sd, pd, p{sup 3}, sp{sup 2}, and sp{sup 3}). In some particular cases (sp, p{sup 2}, sd, pd, and p{sup 3}), we rigorously prove that the non-interacting wave function has the same nodes as the exact (yet unknown) wave function. The number of atomic and molecular systems for which the exact nodes are known analytically is very limited and we show here that this peculiar feature can be attributed to interdimensional degeneracies. Although we have not been able to prove it rigorously, we conjecture that the nodes of the non-interacting wave function for the sp{sup 3} configuration are exact.

  15. Performance analysis of distributed symmetric sparse matrix vector multiplication algorithm for multi-core architectures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oryspayev, Dossay; Aktulga, Hasan Metin; Sosonkina, Masha; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2015-07-14

    In this article, sparse matrix vector multiply (SpMVM) is an important kernel that frequently arises in high performance computing applications. Due to its low arithmetic intensity, several approaches have been proposed in literature to improve its scalability and efficiency in large scale computations. In this paper, our target systems are high end multi-core architectures and we use messaging passing interface + open multiprocessing hybrid programming model for parallelism. We analyze the performance of recently proposed implementation of the distributed symmetric SpMVM, originally developed for large sparse symmetric matrices arising in ab initio nuclear structure calculations. We also study important featuresmore » of this implementation and compare with previously reported implementations that do not exploit underlying symmetry. Our SpMVM implementations leverage the hybrid paradigm to efficiently overlap expensive communications with computations. Our main comparison criterion is the "CPU core hours" metric, which is the main measure of resource usage on supercomputers. We analyze the effects of topology-aware mapping heuristic using simplified network load model. Furthermore, we have tested the different SpMVM implementations on two large clusters with 3D Torus and Dragonfly topology. Our results show that the distributed SpMVM implementation that exploits matrix symmetry and hides communication yields the best value for the "CPU core hours" metric and significantly reduces data movement overheads.« less

  16. Advancements in Ti Alloy Powder Production by Close-Coupled Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidloff, Andy; Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Byrd, David

    2011-04-01

    As the technology for titanium metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) becomes more readily available, efficient Ti alloy fine powder production methods are required. An update on a novel close-coupled gas atomization system has been given. Unique features of the melting apparatus are shown to have measurable effects on the efficiency and ability to fully melt within the induction skull melting system (ISM). The means to initiate the melt flow were also found to be dependent on melt apparatus. Starting oxygen contents of atomization feedstock are suggested based on oxygen pick up during the atomization and MIM processes and compared to a new ASTM specification. Forming of titanium by metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) has been extensively studied with regards to binders, particle shape, and size distribution and suitable de-binding methods have been discovered. As a result, the visibility of Ti-MIM has steadily increased as reviews of technology, acceptability, and availability have been released. In addition, new ASTM specification ASTM F2885-11 for Ti-MIM for biomedical implants was released in early 2011. As the general acceptance of Ti-MIM as a viable fabrication route increases, demand for economical production of high quality Ti alloy powder for the preparation of Ti-MIM feedstock correspondingly increases. The production of spherical powders from the liquid state has required extensive pre-processing into different shapes thereby increasing costs. This has prompted examination of Ti-MIM with non-spherical particle shape. These particles are produced by the hydride/de-hydride process and are equi-axed but fragmented and angular which is less than ideal. Current prices for MIM quality titanium powder range from $40-$220/kg. While it is ideal for the MIM process to utilize spherical powders within the size range of 0.5-20 {mu}m, titanium's high affinity for oxygen to date has prohibited the use of this powder size range. In order to meet oxygen requirements the top size cut has traditionally been 45 {mu}m, and in some instances a bottom cut at +5 {mu}m is made to remove ultra-fine particles and reduce oxygen content. Predictably, use of irregular shaped or larger particle feedstock powder can reduce part quality as sintering shrinkage and part detail suffer. Thus, widespread production and technological use of Ti-MIM is limited due in large part to Ti alloy feedstock cost and availability, not MIM processing capability. Lower cost feedstock of fine, spherical Ti alloy powder with sufficient purity must be available in order to fully utilize the advantages of the Ti-MIM processing route allowing expansion of the market to small complex Ti parts in many high volume applications.

  17. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

  18. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2004-04-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. Our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. The first two of these areas have resulted in valuable information about the limitations of lubricity and viscosity additives that are presently available in terms of their impact on the viscosity of DME and on wear rates on injector hardware. The third area, that of development of an injector durability test stand, has not resulted in a functioning experiment. Some information is provided in this report to identify the remaining tasks that need to be performed to make the injector stand operational. The key observations from the work are that when blended at 25 wt.% in either diesel fuel or Biodiesel fuel, DME requires more than 5 wt.% additive of all viscosity and lubricity additives tested here to even approach the lower limit of the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement. To treat neat DME sufficiently to make DME comply with the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement would require a viscosity additive with 10{sup 45} cSt viscosity, which is not possible with current additive technologies.

  19. Environmentally Safe, Large Volume Utilization Applications for Gasification Byproducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.G. Groppo; R. Rathbone

    2008-06-30

    Samples of gasification by-products produced at Polk Station and Eastman Chemical were obtained and characterized. Bulk samples were prepared for utilization studies by screening at the appropriate size fractions where char and vitreous frit distinctly partitioned. Vitreous frit was concentrated in the +20 mesh fraction while char predominated in the -20+100 mesh fraction. The vitreous frit component derived from each gasifier slag source was evaluated for use as a pozzolan and as aggregate. Pozzolan testing required grinding the frit to very fine sizes which required a minimum of 60 kwhr/ton. Grinding studies showed that the energy requirement for grinding the Polk slag were slightly higher than for the Eastman slag. Fine-ground slag from both gasifiers showed pozzoalnic activity in mortar cube testing and met the ASTM C618 strength requirements after only 3 days. Pozzolanic activity was further examined using British Standard 196-5, and results suggest that the Polk slag was more reactive than the Eastman slag. Neither aggregate showed significant potential for undergoing alkali-silica reactions when used as concrete aggregate with ASTM test method 1260. Testing was conducted to evaluate the use of the frit product as a component of cement kiln feed. The clinker produced was comprised primarily of the desirable components Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5} and Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} after raw ingredient proportions were adjusted to reduce the amount of free lime present in the clinker. A mobile processing plant was designed to produce 100 tons of carbon from the Eastman slag to conduct evaluations for use as recycle fuel. The processing plant was mounted on a trailer and hauled to the site for use. Two product stockpiles were generated; the frit stockpile contained 5% LOI while the carbon stockpile contained 62% LOI. The products were used to conduct recycle fuel tests. A processing plant was designed to separate the slag produced at Eastman into 3 usable products. The coarse frit has been shown to be suitable for use as clinker feed for producing Portland cement. The intermediate-size product is enriched in carbon (58-62% C) and may be used as recycle fuel either in the gasifier or in a PC boiler. The fines product contains 30-40% C and may also be used as a recycle gasifier fuel, as is presently done at TECO's Polk Station, however, due to gasifier operating requirements for the production of syngas, this is not feasible at Eastman.

  20. The semi-empirical tight-binding model for carbon allotropes between diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lytovchenko, V.; Kurchak, A.; Strikha, M.

    2014-06-28

    The new carbon allotropes between diamond and graphite have come under intensive examination during the last decade due to their numerous technical applications. The modification of energy gap in thin films of these allotropes was studied experimentally using optical methods. The proposed simple model of carbon clusters with variable lengths of chemical bonds allows us to imitate the transfer from diamond and diamond-like to graphite-like structures, as well as the corresponding modification of hybridization sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} for diamond-like and sp{sub z} for graphite-like phases. This enables us to estimate various allotropes parameters, like the gap E{sub g}, energies of valence E{sub v}, and conduction E{sub c} band edges, and the value of electronic affinity, i.e., optical work function X, which are all of practical importance. The obtained estimations correspond to the experimental data.

  1. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwen, D.; Bringa, E.; Krauser, J.; Weidinger, A.; Trautmann, C.; Hofsaess, H.

    2012-09-10

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between {approx}12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp{sup 3} contribution.

  2. Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

    1999-11-29

    The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

  3. TEM characterization of nanodiamond thin films.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, L.-C.; Zhou, D.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    The microstructure of thin films grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) from fullerene C{sub 60} precursors has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), bright-field electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS). The films are composed of nanosize crystallites of diamond, and no graphitic or amorphous phases were observed. The diamond crystallite size measured from lattice images shows that most grains range between 3-5 nm, reflecting a gamma distribution. SAED gave no evidence of either sp2-bonded glassy carbon or sp3-bonded diamondlike amorphous carbon. The sp2-bonded configuration found in PEELS was attributed to grain boundary carbon atoms, which constitute 5-10% of the total. Occasionally observed larger diamond grains tend to be highly faulted.

  4. heat_ghc02

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Expansion Level Calculation Time (sec) IBM SP ∇∇∇ L=2, 64PE oooo L=2, 16PE ***** L=1, 64PE xxxx L=1, 16PE (a) 0 2 4 6 8 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 Expansion Level Calculation Slowdown IBM SP ∇∇∇ L=2, 64PE oooo L=2, 16PE ***** L=1, 64PE xxxx L=1, 16PE 0 2 4 6 8 0 5 10 15 20 25 Expansion Level Communication Time (sec) IBM SP ∇∇∇ L=2, 64PE ***** L=1, 64PE oooo L=2, 16PE xxxx L=1, 16PE (b) 0 2 4 6 8 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 Expansion Level

  5. Status of Activities to Implement a Sustainable System of MC&A Equipment and Methodological Support at Rosatom Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Sanders

    2010-07-01

    Under the U.S.-Russian Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program, the Material Control and Accounting Measurements (MCAM) Project has supported a joint U.S.-Russian effort to coordinate improvements of the Russian MC&A measurement system. These efforts have resulted in the development of a MC&A Equipment and Methodological Support (MEMS) Strategic Plan (SP), developed by the Russian MEM Working Group. The MEMS SP covers implementation of MC&A measurement equipment, as well as the development, attestation and implementation of measurement methodologies and reference materials at the facility and industry levels. This paper provides an overview of the activities conducted under the MEMS SP, as well as a status on current efforts to develop reference materials, implement destructive and nondestructive assay measurement methodologies, and implement sample exchange, scrap and holdup measurement programs across Russian nuclear facilities.

  6. Low-energy D{sup +} and H{sup +} ion irradiation effects on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kue Park, Jun; Won Lee, Kyu; Hee Han, Jun; Jung Kweon, Jin; Kim, Dowan; Eui Lee, Cheol [Department of Physics and Institute for Nano Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Nano Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sun-Taek; Kim, Gon-Ho [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S. [Department of Applied Physics, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Applied Physics, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-07

    We have investigated the low-energy (100 eV) D{sup +} and H{sup +} ion irradiation effects on the structural and chemical properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Structural disorder due to the ion irradiation was identified by the Raman spectroscopy, the D{sup +} irradiation giving rise to greater structural disorder than the H{sup +} irradiation. Only sp{sup 2} bonding was identified in the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the D{sup +}-irradiated HOPG, indicating no change in the surface chemical structure. The H{sup +} irradiation, on the other hand, gave rise to sp{sup 3} bonding and ???{sup *} transition, the sp{sup 3} bonding increasing with increasing irradiation dose. It is thus shown that the chemical properties of the HOPG surface may be sensitively modified by the low-energy H{sup +} ion irradiation, but not by the low-energy D{sup +} ion irradiation.

  7. Unidirectional anisotropy in the spin pumping voltage in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilela-Leao, L. H.; Salvador, C.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2011-09-05

    Detailed measurements of the dc voltage generated in a thin Pt layer deposited on films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have been carried out to study the spin pumping effect produced by magnetostatic (MS) modes excited by a microwave field. In relatively thick YIG films the modes are far apart so that one can identify clearly the spin pumping voltage in V{sub SP} produced by each MS mode. We have discovered that when the sputter deposition of the thin Pt layer is made on the YIG film magnetized by a static magnetic field, V{sub SP} exhibits a strong unidirectional anisotropy.

  8. STRUCTURAL STUDIES on SINGLE PARTICLES and BIOMOLECULES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chavarha, L.E. Schulwitz Jr., K. Kumar, R.W. Loney, H. Khoojinian, S.C. Biswas, S.B. Rananavare, S.B. Hall Oregon Health & Science Univ.; Portland State Univ., Portland, OR Pulmonary surfactant lowers surface tension in the alveoli of the lungs, preventing alveolar collapse and maintaining bronchial functionality. Two essential hydrophobic proteins, SP-B & SP-C, promote rapid adsorption by the surfactant lipids to the air/water interface. Structural Effects of the Hydrophobic Surfactant

  9. Laser induced popcornlike conformational transition of nanodiamond as a nanoknife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.-C.; Chen, P.-H.; Chu, H.-L.; Lee, T.-C.; Chou, C.-C.; Chao, J.-I; Su, C.-Y.; Chen, J.S.; Tsai, J.-S.; Tsai, C.-M.; Ho, Y.-P.; Sun, K.W.; Cheng, C.-L.; Chen, F.-R.

    2008-07-21

    Nanodiamond (ND) is surrounded by layers of graphite on its surface. This unique structure feature creates unusual fluorescence spectra, which can be used as an indicator to monitor its surface modification. Meanwhile, the impurity, nitroso (C-N=O) inside the ND can be photolyzed by two-photon absorption, releasing NO to facilitate the formation of a sp{sup 3} diamond structure in the core of ND and transforming it into a sp{sup 2} graphite structure. Such a conformational transition enlarges the size of ND from 8 to 90 nm, resulting in a popcornlike structure. This transition reaction may be useful as nanoknives in biomedical application.

  10. Evidence for hybrid surface metallic band in (4??4) silicene on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoutsou, D. Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Golias, E.; Tsipas, P.; Dimoulas, A.

    2013-12-02

    The electronic band structure of monolayer (4??4) silicene on Ag(111) is imaged by angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A dominant hybrid surface metallic band is observed to be located near the bulk Ag sp-band which is also faintly visible. The two-dimensional character of the hybrid band has been distinguished against the bulk character of the Ag(111) sp-band by means of photon energy dependence experiments. The surface band exhibits a steep linear dispersion around the K{sup }{sub Ag} point and has a saddle point near the M{sup }{sub Ag} point of Ag(111) resembling the ?-band dispersion in graphene.

  11. An atlas of thermal data for biomass and other fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaur, S.; Reed, T.B.

    1995-06-01

    Biomass is recognized as a major source of renewable energy. In order to convert biomass energy to more useful forms, it is necessary to have accurate scientific data on the thermal properties of biomass. This Atlas has been written to supply a uniform source of that information. In the last few decades Thermal analysis (TA) tools such as thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, thermo mechanical analysis, etc. have become more important. The data obtained from these techniques can provide useful information in terms of reaction mechanism, kinetic parameters, thermal stability, phase transformation, heat of reaction, etc. for gas-solid and gas-liquid systems. Unfortunately, there are no ASTM standards set for the collection of these types of data using TA techniques and therefore, different investigators use different conditions which suit their requirements for measuring this thermal data. As a result, the information obtained from different laboratories is not comparable. This Atlas provides the ability to compare new laboratory results with a wide variety of related data available in the literature and helps ensure consistency in using these data.

  12. Evaluation of low-VOC latex paints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, J.C.S.; Fortmann, R.C.; Roache, N.F.; Lao, H.C.

    1999-11-01

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that the VOC contents of all four paints are considerably lower than those of conventional latex paints. Low-VOC emissions were confirmed by small chamber emission tests. However, sigificant emissions of several aldehydes, especially formaldehyde, were detected from two of the paints. ASTM methods were used to evaluate the hiding power, scrubbability, washability, dry to touch, and yellowing index. The results indicated that one of the low-VOC paints tested showed performance equivalent or superior to that of a widely used conventional latex paint used as a control. It was concluded that low-VOC latex paint can be a viable option to replace conventional latex paints for prevention of indoor air pollution. However, paints marketed as low-VOC may still have significant emissions of some individual VOCs, and some may not have performance characteristics matching those of conventional latex paints.

  13. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  14. Survey of neutron radiography facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imel, G.R.; McClellan, G.G.

    1996-08-01

    A directory of neutron radiography facilities around the world was informally compiled about ten years ago under the auspices of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), Subcommittee E7.05 (Radiology, Neutron). The work lay dormant for a number of years, but was revived in earnest in the fall of 1995. At that time, letters were mailed to all the facilities with available addresses in the original directory, requesting updated information. Additionally, information was gathered at the Second Topical meeting on neutron Radiography Facility System Design and Beam Characterization (November, 1995, Shonan Village, Japan). A second mailing was sent for final confirmation and updates in January, 1996. About 75% of the information in the directory has now been confirmed by the facility management. This paper presents a summary of the information contained in the facility directory. An electronic version of the directory in Wordperfect 6.1, uuencode, or rtf format is available by sending e-mail to the authors at imel{at}anl.gov or imel{at}baobab.cad.cea.fr. A WWW site for the directory is presently under construction.

  15. Pressure and concentration dependences of the autoignition temperature for normal butane + air mixtures in a closed vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandraratna, M.R.; Griffiths, J.F. . School of Chemistry)

    1994-12-01

    The condition at which autoignition occurs in lean premixed n-butane + air mixtures over the composition range 0.2%--2.5% n-butane by volume (0.06 < [phi] < 0.66) were investigated experimentally. Total reactant pressure from 0.1 to 0.6 MPa (1--6 atm) were studied in a spherical, stainless-steel, closed vessel (0.5 dm[sup 3]). There is a critical transition from nonignition to ignition, at pressures above 0.1 MPa, as the mixture is enriched in the vicinity of 1% fuel vapor by volume. There is also a region of multiplicity, which exhibits three critical temperatures at a given composition. Chemical analyses show that partially oxygenated components,including many o-heterocyclic compounds, are important products of the lean combustion of butane at temperatures up to 800 K. The critical conditions for autoignition are discussed with regard to industrial ignition hazards, especially in the context of the autoignition temperature of alkanes given by ASTM or BS tests. The differences between the behavior of n-butane and the higher n-alkanes are explained. The experimental results are also used as a basis for testing a reduced kinetic model to represent the oxidation and autoignition of n-butane or other alkanes.

  16. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  17. A Qualitative Comparison of the C-Ring Test and the Jones Test as Standard Practice Test Methods for Studying Stress Corrosion Cracking in Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Creep-strength-enhanced-ferritic (CSEF) steels have been widely implemented as water wall alloy materials in the coal-fired power industry for many years. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of this class of materials is currently of significant interest to the industry due to recent failures. To better understand the test methods used to characterize SCC behavior in the laboratory, three representative CSEF alloys (T23, T24, and T92) were subjected to two SCC test protocols: the Jones Test set forth in DIN 50915, and the C-ring SCC test set forth in ASTM G38-01. Samples were tested in either the as-received (normalized + tempered) condition or in the normalized condition (quenched from 1065 C). Samples were exposed to aerated water in one test case and de-aerated water in a second test case for a period of 7 days at 200 C. It was found that for both test protocols, the normalized condition with aerated water led to severe cracking for all three alloys, whereas no evidence of cracking was found for the other conditions.

  18. Correct implementation of the Argonne QuickSite{sup SM} process for preremedial site investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, J.C.; Walker, J.L.

    1997-10-01

    Expedited site characterization (ESC), developed by Argonne National Laboratory, is an interactive, integrated process emphasizing the use of existing data of sufficient quality, multiple complementary characterization methods, and on-site decision making to optimize environmental site investigations. The Argonne ESC is the basis for the provisional ESC standard guide of the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials). QuickSite{sup SM} is the implementation package developed by Argonne to facilitate ESC of sites contaminated with hazardous wastes. At various sites, Argonne has successfully implemented QuickSite{sup SM} and demonstrated the technical superiority of the ESC process over traditional methodologies guided by statistics and random-sampling approaches. A key feature in the success of QuickSite{sup SM} investigations is achieving an understanding of the subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic controls and processes at a site before extensive sampling efforts begin. The QuickSite{sup SM} investigation at the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) in California will be used to illustrate the importance of understanding these potential controls in minimizing sampling activities and correctly predicting potential contaminant migration patterns for risk assessment.

  19. NGNP Composites R&D Technical Issues Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AREVA Federal Services

    2008-09-01

    This study identifies potential applications and design requirements for ceramic materials (CMs) and ceramic composite materials (CCMs) in the NGNP hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) primary circuit. Components anticipated for fabrication from non-graphite CMs and CCMs are identified along with recommended normal and off-normal operating conditions. The evaluation defines required dimensions and material properties of the candidate materials for normal operating conditions (NOC), anticipated transients, abnormal events, and design basis events. The report also identifies additional activities required for codifying the selected materials. The activities include ASTM Standard and ASME Code development and other work to support NRC licensing of the plant. Evaluation of the NGNP baseline design indicates components requiring either CMs or CCMs depend upon the reactor operating temperatures. For a reactor outlet temperature of 900 oC, four of the five evaluated components would benefit from either CMs or CCMs. Although some thermal and mechanical data exist for most of the candidate materials, they all need additional irradiation, thermal, and mechanical testing. The codification process must take into account the type of material and the geometry of components using either CMs or CCMs. The process requires close integration of the design and the research and development (R&D) program, which has already started by using preliminary control rod component designs as the basis for establishing specimen geometry and test conditions. The remaining time and budget for completing the R&D program need further assessment.

  20. Characterization and Leaching Tests of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Form for LAW Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-10-01

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) have been evaluated. One such immobilization technology is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was involved in an extensive characterization campaign. This goal of this campaign was study the durability of the FBSR mineral product and the mineral product encapsulated in a monolith to meet compressive strength requirements. This paper gives an overview of results obtained using the ASTM C 1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT), the EPA Test Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the ASTMC 1662 Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) test. Along with these durability tests an overview of the characteristics of the waste form has been collected using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), microwave digestions for chemical composition, and surface area from Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) theory.

  1. Documentation for initial testing and inspections of Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundeen, J.E.

    1994-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to compile data generated during the initial tests and inspections of the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask. In addition, this report will verify that the testing criteria identified in section 8.1 of the BUSS Cask Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) was met. The BUSS Cask Model R-1 is a type B shipping container used for shipment of radioactive cesium-137 and strontium-90 capsules to Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The BUSS Cask body and lid are each one-piece forgings fabricated from ASTM A473, Type 304 stainless steel. The primary purpose of the BUSS Cask is to provide shielding and confinement as well as impact, puncture, and thermal protection for the capsules under both normal and accident conditions. Chapter 8 of the BUSS Cask SARP requires several acceptance tests and inspections, each intended to evaluate the performance of different components of the BUSS Cask system, to be performed before its first use. The results of the tests and inspections required are included in this document.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Wong; Denise Thronas; Robert Marshall

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  3. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  4. Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels; Phase 3: Effects of Winter Gasoline Volatility and Ethanol Content on Blend Flammability; Flammability Limits of Denatured Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; Clark, W.

    2011-07-01

    This study assessed differences in headspace flammability for summertime gasolines and new high-ethanol content fuel blends. The results apply to vehicle fuel tanks and underground storage tanks. Ambient temperature and fuel formulation effects on headspace vapor flammability of ethanol/gasoline blends were evaluated. Depending on the degree of tank filling, fuel type, and ambient temperature, fuel vapors in a tank can be flammable or non-flammable. Pure gasoline vapors in tanks generally are too rich to be flammable unless ambient temperatures are extremely low. High percentages of ethanol blended with gasoline can be less volatile than pure gasoline and can produce flammable headspace vapors at common ambient temperatures. The study supports refinements of fuel ethanol volatility specifications and shows potential consequences of using noncompliant fuels. E85 is flammable at low temperatures; denatured ethanol is flammable at warmer temperatures. If both are stored at the same location, one or both of the tanks' headspace vapors will be flammable over a wide range of ambient temperatures. This is relevant to allowing consumers to splash -blend ethanol and gasoline at fueling stations. Fuels compliant with ASTM volatility specifications are relatively safe, but the E85 samples tested indicate that some ethanol fuels may produce flammable vapors.

  5. Blender Pump Fuel Survey: CRC Project E-95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.

    2011-07-01

    To increase the number of ethanol blends available in the United States, several states have 'blender pumps' that blend gasoline with flex-fuel vehicle (FFV) fuel. No specification governs the properties of these blended fuels, and little information is available about the fuels sold at blender pumps. No labeling conventions exist, and labeling on the blender pumps surveyed was inconsistent.; The survey samples, collected across the Midwestern United States, included the base gasoline and FFV fuel used in the blends as well as the two lowest blends offered at each station. The samples were tested against the applicable ASTM specifications and for critical operability parameters. Conventional gasoline fuels are limited to 10 vol% ethanol by the U.S. EPA. The ethanol content varied greatly in the samples. Half the gasoline samples contained some ethanol, while the other half contained none. The FFV fuel samples were all within the specification limits. No pattern was observed for the blend content of the higher ethanol content samples at the same station. Other properties tested were specific to higher-ethanol blends. This survey also tested the properties of fuels containing ethanol levels above conventional gasoline but below FFV fuels.

  6. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beams effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beams effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the models energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  7. Guidelines for Transportation, Handling, and Use of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil. Part 1. Flammability and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oasmaa, Anja; Kalli, Anssi; Lindfors, Christian; Elliott, Douglas C.; Springer, David L.; Peacocke, Cordner; Chiaramonti, David

    2012-05-04

    An alternative sustainable fuel, biomass-derived fast pyrolysis oil or 'bio-oil', is coming into the market. Fast pyrolysis pilot and demonstration plants for fuel applications producing tonnes of bio-oil are in operation, and commercial plants are under design. There will be increasingly larger amounts of bio-oil transportation on water and by land, leading to a need for specifications and supporting documentation. Bio-oil is different from conventional liquid fuels, and therefore must overcome both technical and marketing hurdles for its acceptability in the fuels market. A comprehensive Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is required, backed with independent testing and certification. In order to standardise bio-oil quality specifications are needed. The first bio-oil burner fuel standard in ASTM (D7544) was approved in 2009. CEN standardisation has been initiated in Europe. In the EU a new chemical regulation system, REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals) is being applied. Registration under REACH has to be made if bio-oil is produced or imported to the EU. In the USA and Canada, bio-oil has to be filed under TOSCA (US Toxic Substances Control Act). In this paper the state of the art on standardisation is discussed, and new data for the transportation guidelines is presented. The focus is on flammability and toxicity.

  8. Outdoor Testing of GaInP2/GaAs Tandem Cells with Top Cell Thickness Varied

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, W. E.; Emergy, K. E.; Friedman, D. J.; Ottoson, L.; Young, M. S.; Ward, J. S.; Kramer, C. M.; Duda, A.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we measure the performance of GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells under direct beam sunlight outdoors in order to quantify their sensitivity to both spectral variation and GaInP2 top-cell thickness. A set of cells with five different top-cell thicknesses was mounted on a two-axis tracker with the incident sunlight collimated to exclude all except the direct beam. Current-voltage (I-V) curves were taken throughout the course of several days, along with measurements of the direct solar spectrum. Our two major conclusions are: (1) GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells designed for either the ASTM G-173 direct (G-173D) spectrum or the "air mass 1.5 global" (AM1.5G) spectrum perform the best, and (2) cells can be characterized indoors and modeled using outdoor spectra with the same result. These results are equally valid for GaInP2/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells.

  9. Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2011-08-01

    This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

  10. National 2010-2011 Survey of E85: CRC Project E-85-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the quality of E85 fuel around the country in each of the three volatility classes identified in ASTM D5798-10. Samples were collected from pumps in 21 states between July 2010 and May 2011, with almost 40 samples collected in each class. Parameters tested to assess fuel quality were volatility, ethanol content, water content, acidity, pHe, inorganic chloride and sulfate, and total sulfate. Class 1 samples more often met the volatility specification than samples from other classes, with 67% of the samples collected in this study meeting the specification. Samples in Classes 2 and 3 met the applicable volatility specifications on 43% and 30% of the time, respectively. Compliance with the ethanol specification was almost 90% in all three volatility classes, a significant improvement over previous surveys. Several samples that would have been off-specification for ethanol content under previous versions of the specification now met the specification with the reduction in ethanol content for all classes. A few samples were off-specification for pHe, acidity, water, and inorganic chloride. Few samples were off-specification for more than one property, and samples that were off-specification in one volatility class were not necessarily off-specification in the other two classes.

  11. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  12. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Isochronous Stress-Strain Curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill K. Wright; Richard N. Wright; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2014-03-01

    Isochronous stress-strain curves for Alloy 617 up to a temperature of 1000°C will be required to qualify the material for elevated temperature design in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Several potential methods for developing these curves are reviewed in this report. It is shown that in general power-law creep is the rate controlling deformation mechanism for a wide range of alloy heats, test temperatures and stresses. Measurement of the strain rate sensitivity of Alloy 617 indicates that the material is highly strain rate sensitive in the tensile deformation range above about 750°C. This suggests that the concept of a hot tensile curve as a bounding case on the isochronous stress-strain diagrams is problematic. The impact of strain rate on the hot tensile curves is examined and it is concluded that incorporating such a curve is only meaningful if a single tensile strain rate (typically the ASTM standard rate of 0.5%/min) is arbitrarily defined. Current experimentally determined creep data are compared to isochronous stress-strain curves proposed previously by the German programs in the 1980s and by the 1990 draft ASME Code Case. Variability in how well the experimental data are represented by the proposed design curves that suggests further analysis is necessary prior to completing a new draft Code Case.

  13. Structural integrity assessment of type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D.; Zawierucha, R.

    1995-12-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved the Code Case 2123 in 1992 which allows the use of Type 201LN stainless steel in the construction of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and Division 2 pressure vessels for -320{degrees}F applications. Type 201LN stainless steel is a nitrogen strengthened modified version of ASTM A240, Type 201 stainless steel with a restricted chemistry. The Code allowable design stresses for Type 201LN for Division 1 vessels are approximately 27% higher than Type 304 stainless steel and equal to that of the 5 Ni and 9 Ni steels. This paper discusses the important features of the Code Case 2123 and the structural integrity assessment of Type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic vessels. Tensile, Charpy-V-notch and fracture properties have been obtained on several heats of this steel including weldments. A linear-elastic fracture mechanics analysis has been conducted to assess the expected fracture mode and the fracture-critical crack sizes. The results have been compared with Type 304 stainless steel, 5 Ni and 9 Ni steel vessels.

  14. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L; Shingledecker, John P

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  15. DOE Fire Protection Handbook, Volume II. Fire effects and electrical and electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-08-18

    Electrical and electronic equipment, including computers, are used at critical facilities throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). Hughes Associates, Inc. was tasked to evaluate the potential thermal and nonthermal effects of a fire on the electrical and electronic equipment and methods to analyze, evaluate, and assist in controlling the potential effects. This report is a result of a literature review and analysis on the effects of fire on electrical equipment. It is directed at three objectives: (1) Provide a state-of-the-art review and analysis of thermal and nonthermal damage to electrical and electronic equipment; (2) Develop a procedure for estimating thermal and nonthermal damage considerations using current knowledge; and (3) Develop an R&D/T&E program to fill gaps in the current knowledge needed to further perfect the procedure. The literature review was performed utilizing existing electronic databases. Sources searched included scientific and engineering databases including Dialog, NTIS, SciSearch and NIST BFRL literature. Incorporated in the analysis is unpublished literature and conversations with members of the ASTM E-5.21, Smoke Corrosivity, and researchers in the electronics field. This report does not consider the effects of fire suppression systems or efforts. Further analysis of the potential impact is required in the future.

  16. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-08-01

    Software for predicting the octane number of motor gasoline by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry has been formulated. At the same time, a method has been studied to predict the composition of gasoline (in terms of the contents of paraffin, olefin, and aromatic compounds). The formulated program was evaluated by using it to predict the octane numbers of 31 samples of marketed summer gasoline (including 16 regular and 15 premium products), whose octane numbers and compositions were identified according to the ASTM standards. Also, the relationship between the PMR spectrum and gasoline composition was subjected to linear regression analysis by using the 31 samples whose octane numbers were calculated, and the appropriateness of the resultant regression equations was assessed. This report concerns the results of the study in which the octane numbers of the 31 samples were satisfactorily predicted by the formulated program and useful linear regression equation were obtained for the prediction of the composition of gasoline. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on the Durability of a Light-Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R. L.; Toops, T.; Wereszczak, A. A.; Fox, E. E.; Lance, M. J.; Cavataio, G.; Dobson, D.; Warner, J.; Brezny, R.; Nguyen, K.; Brookshear, D. W.

    2013-04-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth metal impurities found in diesel fuels are potential poisons for diesel exhaust catalysts. A set of diesel engine production exhaust systems was aged to 150,000 miles. These exhaust systems included a diesel oxidation catalyst, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Four separate exhaust systems were aged, each with a different fuel: ultralow sulfur diesel containing no measureable metals, B20 (a common biodiesel blend) containing sodium, B20 containing potassium, and B20 containing calcium, which were selected to simulate the maximum allowable levels in B100 according to ASTM D6751. Analysis included Federal Test Procedure emissions testing, bench-flow reactor testing of catalyst cores, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and measurement of thermo-mechanical properties of the DPFs. EPMA imaging found that the sodium and potassium penetrated into the washcoat, while calcium remained on the surface. Bench-flow reactor experiments were used to measure the standard nitrogen oxide (NOx) conversion, ammonia storage, and ammonia oxidation for each of the aged SCR catalysts. Vehicle emissions tests were conducted with each of the aged catalyst systems using a chassis dynamometer. The vehicle successfully passed the 0.2 gram/mile NOx emission standard with each of the four aged exhaust systems.

  18. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  19. Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: Hot-Gas Filtration; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, R.

    2012-07-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this task was that separation of char, with its associated mineral matter from pyrolysis vapors before condensation, will lead to improved oil quality and stability with respect to storage and transportation. The metric used to evaluate stability in this case was a 10-fold reduction in the rate of increase of viscosity as determined by ASTM D445 (the accelerated aging test). The primary unit operation that was investigated for this purpose was hot-gas filtration. A custom-built heated candle filter system was fabricated by the Pall Corporation and furnished to NREL for this test campaign. This system consisted of a candle filter element in a containment vessel surrounded by heating elements on the external surface of the vessel. The filter element and housing were interfaced to NREL?s existing 0.5 MTD pyrolysis Process Development Unit (PDU). For these tests the pyrolysis reactor of the PDU was operated in the entrained-flow mode. The HGF test stand was installed on a slipstream from the PDU so that both hot-gas filtered oil and bio-oil that was not hot-gas filtered could be collected for purposes of comparison. Two filter elements from Pall were tested: (1) porous stainless steel (PSS) sintered metal powder; (2) sintered ceramic powder. An extremely sophisticated bio-oil condensation and collection system was designed and fabricated at NREL and interfaced to the filter unit.

  20. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SALTSTONE FORMULATED USING 1Q11, 2Q11 AND 3Q11 TANK 50 SLURRY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Nichols, R.

    2012-06-27

    As part of the Saltstone formulation work requested by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing Saltstone samples for fresh property analysis and hydraulic conductivity measurements using actual Tank 50 salt solution rather than simulated salt solution. Samples of low level waste salt solution collected from Tank 50H during the first, second, and third quarters of 2011 were used to formulate the Saltstone samples. The salt solution was mixed with premix (45 wt % slag, 45 wt % fly ash, and 10 wt % cement), in a ratio consistent with facility operating conditions during the quarter of interest. The fresh properties (gel, set, bleed) of each mix were evaluated and compared to the recommended acceptance criteria for the Saltstone Production Facility. ASTM D5084-03, Method C was used to measure the hydraulic conductivity of the Saltstone samples. The hydraulic conductivity of Saltstone samples prepared from 1Q11 and 2Q11 samples of Tank 50H is 4.2E-9 cm/sec and 2.6E-9 cm/sec, respectively. Two additional 2Q11 and one 3Q11 sample were not successfully tested due to the inability to achieve stable readings during saturation and testing. The hydraulic conductivity of the samples made from Tank 50H salt solution compare well to samples prepared with simulated salt solution and cured under similar conditions (1.4E-9 - 4.9E-8 cm/sec).

  1. Development of Modified Pag (Polyalkylene Glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangopadhyay, Arup; McWatt, D. G.; Zdrodowski, R. J.; Liu, Zak; Elie, Larry; Simko, S. J.; Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Cuthbert, J.; Hock, E. D.

    2015-09-30

    Engine oils play a critical role in friction reduction. Improvements in engine oil technology steadily improved fuel economy as the industry moved through ILSAC GF-1 to GF-5 specifications. These improvements were influenced by changes in base oil chemistry, development of new friction modifiers and their treat levels, and the total additive package consisting of various other components. However, the improvements are incremental and further fuel consumption reduction opportunities are becoming more challenging. Polyalkylene glycol (PAG) based engine oils are being explored as a step forward for significant fuel consumption reduction. Although PAG fluids are used in many industrial applications, its application as an engine oil has been explored in a limited way. The objective of this project is to deep dive in exploring the applicability of PAG technology in engine oil, understanding the benefits, and limitations, elucidating the mechanism(s) for friction benefits, if any, and finally recommending how to address any limitations. The project was designed in four steps, starting with selection of lubricant technology, followed by friction and wear evaluations in laboratory bench tests which are relatively simple and inexpensive and also served as a screener for further evaluation. Selected formulations were chosen for more complex engine component level tests i.e., motored valvetrain friction and wear, piston ring friction using a motored single cylinder, and motored engine tests. A couple of formulations were further selected based on component level tests for engine dyno tests i.e., Sequence VID (ASTM D6709) for fuel economy, Sequence IVA (ASTM D6891) for valvetrain wear, and Sequence VG (ASTM D6593) for sludge and varnish protection. These are some of the industry standard tests required for qualifying engine oils. Out of these tests, a single PAG oil was selected for chassis roll dynamometer tests for fuel economy and emission measurements using FTP (Federal Test Procedure) metro/highway cycles. Five different PAG chemistries were selected by varying the starting alcohol, the oxide monomers (ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, or butylene oxide), capped or uncapped, homopolymer or random copolymer. All formulations contained a proprietary additive package and one which contained additional antiwear and friction modifier additives. Laboratory bench tests (Pin-on-Disk, High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR), Block-on-Ring, Mini-Traction Machine (MTM) identified formulations having friction, wear, and load carrying characteristics similar to or better than baseline GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. Motored valvetrain and motored piston ring friction tests showed nearly 50% friction reduction for some of the PAG formulations compared to GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. Motored engine tests showed up to 15% friction benefit over GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. It was observed that friction benefits are more related to PAG base oil chemistry than their lower viscosity compared to GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. Analysis of wear surfaces from laboratory bench tests and bucket tappets from motored valvetrain tests confirmed the presence of PAG molecules. The adsorption of these polar molecules is believed to be reason for friction reduction. However, the wear surfaces also had thin tribo-film derived from additive components. The tribo-film consisting of phosphates, sulfides, and molybdenum disulfide (when molybdenum additive was present) were observed for both GF-5 SAE 5W-20 and PAG fluids. However, when using PAG fluids, motored valvetrain tests showed high initial wear, which is believed to be due to delay in protective tribo-film formation. After the initial wear, the wear rate of PAG fluids was comparable to GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. The PAG oil containing additional antiwear and friction reducing additives showed low initial wear as expected. However, when this oil was evaluated in Sequence IVA test, it showed initially low wear comparable to GF-5 oil but wear accelerated with oil aging indicating rapid deterioration of additive components. ASTM Sequence VG test showed good sludge protection capability but failed to meet varnish rating for GF-5 requirement. Chassis roll dynamometer tests with PAG oil 15-1 showed about 1% fuel economy benefit over GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil in EPA city cycles only and when the oil was slightly aged (500 miles). No fuel economy benefits could be observed in combined EPA metro/highway cycles. Also, no fuel economy benefit could be observed with continued (500- 10000 miles) oil aging. However, the emission level was comparable to the reference oil and was within EPA limits. Analysis of the PAG oil following tests showed low iron content although additive components were significantly degraded. The results indicate that PAG fluids have significant friction reduction potential but there are challenges with wear and varnish protection capabilities. These limitations are primarily because the selected additive components were chosen to provide a fluid with no metal content that forms little or no sulphated ash. Significant development work is needed to identify additive components compatible with PAG chemistry including their solubility in PAG oil. Miscibility of PAG fluids with mineral base oil is another challenge for oil change service. There is PAG chemistry (oil soluble PAG, OSP) which is soluble in mineral oils but the formulation explored in this investigation did not show significant friction reduction in motored engine tests. Again, highlighting the need for additive development for specific PAG chemistry. The thermal oxidation behavior of these oils has not been explored in this investigation and needs attention.

  2. Adsorption isotherm special study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-05-01

    The study was designed to identify methods to determine adsorption applicable to Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, and to determine how changes in aquifer conditions affect metal adsorption, resulting retardation factors, and estimated contaminant migration rates. EPA and ASTM procedures were used to estimate sediment sorption of U, As, and Mo under varying groundwater geochemical conditions. Aquifer matrix materials from three distinct locations at the DOE UMTRA Project site in Rifle, CO, were used as the adsorbents under different pH conditions; these conditions stimulated geochemical environments under the tailings, near the tailings, and downgradient from the tailings. Grain size, total surface area, bulk and clay mineralogy, and petrography of the sediments were characterized. U and Mo yielded linear isotherms, while As had nonlinear ones. U and Mo were adsorbed strongly on sediments acidified to levels similar to tailings leachate. Changes in pH had much less effect on As adsorption. Mo was adsorbed very little at pH 7-7.3, U was weakly sorbed, and As was moderately sorbed. Velocities were estimated for metal transport at different pHs. Results show that the aquifer materials must be characterized to estimate metal transport velocities in aquifers and to develop groundwater restoration strategies for the UMTRA project.

  3. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF EPDM ELASTOMER AND ON THE CONDUCTIVITY OF POLYANILINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E; Marie Kane, M

    2008-12-12

    Four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer were exposed to tritium gas initially at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for between three and four months in closed containers. Material properties that were characterized include density, volume, mass, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. EPDM samples released significant amounts of gas when exposed to tritium, and the glass transition temperature increased by about 3 C. during the exposure. Effects of ultraviolet and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of polyaniline films are also documented as complementary results to planned tritium exposures. Future work will determine the effects of tritium gas exposure on the electrical conductivity of polyaniline films, to demonstrate whether such films can be used as a sensor to detect tritium. Surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma rays and ultraviolet light. The results of the gamma and UV experiments will be correlated with the tritium exposure results.

  4. Effects of constraint on upper shelf fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The upper shelf fracture toughness and tearing resistance of two structural steels, HY-100 and ASTM A533, Gr. B, were determined over a wide range of applied constraint. The constraint conditions were varied by changes in specimen geometry and loading mode. Bend specimens with shallow and deep cracks, compact specimens, and single and double edge notched tension specimens were used in this study. A rotation correction was developed for the single edge notch tension specimen which greatly improved the behavior of the J-R curves determined using this specimen. The experimental results were used to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance, T{sub mat}. The J-Q and J-T stress loci, and corresponding plots of material tearing resistance plotted against Q and T, were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance, T{sub mat}, is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

  5. {open_quotes}Methods for the determination of the Clean Air Act Title III metallic HAPS in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, J.

    1995-08-01

    The Clean Air Act was amended in 1990 and additional requirements were added to Title III {open_quotes}Air Toxics.{close_quotes} Title III identified one hundred eighty-nine hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) and Congress directed the EPA to study the effects of emissions of these HAPS on public health and the environment. EPA is to report to Congress in the fall of 1995 concerning their findings and make recommendations regarding fossil fuel fired combustion units. The outcome of the EPA recommendations will be of great interest to coal producers and users. Of the one hundred eighty-nine listed HAPS, eleven are trace metals found in coal. The producers and users may be required to analyze coal for these HAPS, to determine if selective mining and/or beneficiation can lower their occurrence, to determine their fate in the combustion process, etc. Indeed many coal companies have begun to study their reserves to aid the EPA investigation. Currently there are no EPA promulgated test methodologies for these elements in coal. Moreover, the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) does not provide standards for the analyses of all of the eleven HAPS either. In view of this lack of standardized analytical protocols the commercial laboratory is left with finding the best methods for meeting these analytical needs. This paper describes how Standard Laboratories, Inc. as a whole and particularly its Environmental Laboratory Division has met this need.

  6. Heat Capacity Uncertainty Calculation for the Eutectic Mixture of Biphenyl/Diphenyl Ether Used as Heat Transfer Fluid: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, J. C.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Mehos, M.

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to calculate the uncertainty at 95% confidence for the experimental values of heat capacity of the eutectic mixture of biphenyl/diphenyl ether (Therminol VP-1) determined from 300 to 370 degrees C. Twenty-five samples were evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to obtain the sample heat flow as a function of temperature. The ASTM E-1269-05 standard was used to determine the heat capacity using DSC evaluations. High-pressure crucibles were employed to contain the sample in the liquid state without vaporizing. Sample handling has a significant impact on the random uncertainty. It was determined that the fluid is difficult to handle, and a high variability of the data was produced. The heat capacity of Therminol VP-1 between 300 and 370 degrees C was measured to be equal to 0.0025T+0.8672 with an uncertainty of +/- 0.074 J/g.K (3.09%) at 95% confidence with T (temperature) in Kelvin.

  7. Demonstration of multifunctional DNBM corrosion inhibitors in protective coatings for Naval Air/Weapon Systems. Final report, September 1989-July 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailin, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    The corrosion protective properties of multifunctional DNBM salts (quaternary ammonium dichromate, nitrate, borate, and molybdate) have been demonstrated on high-strength steel and aluminum alloys found in prototype aerospace weapon systems. The 100% DNBM mixture added to MIL-P-23377 epoxy-polyamide, minus strontium chromate inhibitor, on bare 7075-T6 aluminum alloy resisted 1000 h ASTM B-117 salt spray. However, the coatings were not resistant to hydraulic fluid immersion at the higher concentrations required for the corrosion inhibition. Microencapsulation of the reactive DNBM mixture was adopted as a means to prevent this susceptibility, as well as the destructive oxidation of the hydroxyl groups in the epoxy resin during cure. In the scale-up operation, approximately 20 gallons of DNBM weighing 64 kg (141 lb) was prepared from the four starting quarternary salts synthesized in a chemical process pilot plant. The salts were mixed by dissolving in toluene. Following removal of solvent, the resultant dark-brown liquid, approximating molasses in viscosity, was microencapsulated by the following method: The DNBM was dispersed to form an oil-in-water emulsion in an aqueous colloidal solution of low-viscosity, high-purity methyl cellulose using a Gifford-Wood homogenizer, followed by spray drying in an Anhydro spray dryer. The maximum practicable payload was 75% DNBM. After spray drying, the capsules Corrosion inhibitors, DNBM, Microencapsulation, Epoxy primers, Protective coatings.

  8. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  9. Proposed premium diesel fuel spec elicits calls for tougher, better defined parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peckham, J.

    1998-01-01

    The debate over the definition of premium diesel fuel - what it is and what it should be - is heating up in industry circles. A number of automotive associations, additive makers and standards-setting organizations have jumped into the fray, and the fight is likely to turn volcanic when it comes down to deciding exactly what will constitute a premium diesel and how its properties will be measured. This story details some recent developments in and responses to the ongoing conflict. The Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA), representing 33 international diesel engine makers, recently launched a survey of U.S. diesel fuel marketers to see which ones will offer a fuel meeting EMA`s revised {open_quotes}FQP-1A{close_quotes} premium diesel fuel recommendations. Following the survey, EMA intends to publicize which companies offer such a fuel. The EMA premium fuel specifications are much tougher than the US standard ASTM D 975 fuel and tougher than the newly proposed {open_quotes}premium{close_quotes} diesel fuel from the National Conference of Weights & Measures (NCWM) task force. Earlier this year, Amoco became the first (and so far only) US refiner to offer a fuel meeting all the FQP specifications, but only in certain Midwest markets.

  10. Application of Direct Current Potential Drop for the J-integral vs. Crack Growth Resistance Curve Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    The direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique has been applied to derive the J-integral vs. crack growth resistance curve (J-R curve) for fracture toughness characterization of structural materials. The test matrix covered three materials including type 316LN stainless steels, Ni-based alloy 617, and one ferritic-martensitic steel, three specimen configurations including standard compact, single edge bending, and disk-shaped compact specimens, and temperatures ranging from 20 C to 650 C. When compared with baseline J-R curves derived from the ASTM normalization method, the original J-R curves from the DCPD technique yielded much smaller Jq values due to the influence of crack blunting, plastic deformation, etc. on potential drop. To counter these effects, a new procedure for adjusting DCPD J-R curves was proposed. After applying the new adjustment procedure, the average difference in Jq between the DCPD technique and the normalization method was only 5.2% and the difference in tearing modulus was 7.4%. The promising result demonstrates the applicability of the DCPD technique for the J-R curve characterization especially in extreme environments, such as elevated temperatures, where the conventional elastic unloading compliance method faces considerable challenges.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamasri; Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka; Kusnanto

    2011-01-17

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 {mu}m was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA.The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300 deg. C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-K{sub {alpha}} radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600 deg. C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm{sup 2} and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  12. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  13. Electrochemical Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Lister; R. E. Mizia; H. Tian

    2005-10-01

    The waste package site recommendation design specified a boron-containing stainless steel, Neutronit 976/978, for fabrication of the internal baskets that will be used as a corrosion-resistant neutron-absorbing material. Recent corrosion test results gave higher-than-expected corrosion rates for this material. The material callout for these components has been changed to a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ASTM-B 932-04, UNS N06464) that is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. This report discusses the results of initial corrosion testing of this material in simulated in-package environments that could contact the fuel baskets after breach of the waste package outer barrier. The corrosion test matrix was executed using the potentiodynamic and potentiostatic electrochemical test techniques. The alloy performance shows low rates of general corrosion after initial removal of a gadolinium-rich second phase that intersects the surface. The high halide-containing test solutions exhibited greater tendencies toward initiation of crevice corrosion.

  14. Norms, Standards, and Legislation for Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oils from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oasmaa, Anja; van de Beld, Bert; Saari, Pia; Elliott, Douglas C.; Solantausta, Yrjo

    2015-04-16

    Fast pyrolysis of woody biomass is close to full maturity, with first-of-its-kind commercial size installations for fuel production being commissioned in Finland (Fortum) and in The Netherlands (Empyro), and in the design phase in Brazil (Ensyn). In the industrial-scale combustion tests, the use of fast pyrolysis bio-oil (FPBO) has been demonstrated to be a viable option to replace heavy fuel oil in district heating applications. Commercially usable district heating boilers and burners suitable for FPBO are available. There is research on diesel-engine and gas-turbine applications but, so far, no proven demonstrations. FPBO is completely different from mineral oils; hence, standards are needed. Analytical methods have been systematically validated and modifications to the standards as well as completely new methods have been made. Two ASTM burner fuel standards already exist and European boiler fuel grades are being developed under CEN. The focus on CEN standardization is on boiler use, because of its commercial readiness.

  15. Titanium Sheet Fabricated from Powder for Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter, William H; Muth, Thomas R; Chen, Wei; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Jolly, Brian C; Stone, Nigel; Cantin, G.M.D.; Barnes, John; Paliwal, Muktesh; Smith, Ryan; Capone, Joseph; Liby, Alan L; Williams, James C; Blue, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    In collaboration with Ametek and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory has evaluated three different methods for converting titanium hydride-dehydride (HDH) powder into thin gauge titanium sheet from a roll compacted preform. Methodologies include sintering, followed by cold rolling and annealing; direct hot rolling of the roll-compacted sheet; and hot rolling of multiple layers of roll compacted sheet that are encapsulated in a steel can. All three methods have demonstrated fully consolidated sheet, and each process route has the ability to produce sheet that meets ASTM B265 specifications. However, not every method currently provides sheet that can be highly formed without tearing. The degree of sintering between powder particles, post processing density, and the particle to particle boundary layer where compositional variations may exist, have a significant effect on the ability to form the sheet into useful components. Uniaxial tensile test results, compositional analysis, bend testing, and biaxial testing of the titanium sheet produced from hydride-dehydride powder will be discussed. Multiple methods of fabrication and the resulting properties can then be assessed to determine the most economical means of making components for industrial applications.

  16. The Underground Corrosion of Selected Type 300 Stainless Steels After 34 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. S. Yoder; M. K. Adler Flitton

    2009-03-01

    Recently, interest in long-term underground corrosion has greatly increased because of the ongoing need to dispose of nuclear waste. Additionally, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. Current contaminant release and transport models use limited available short-term underground corrosion rates when considering container and waste form degradation. Consequently, the resulting models oversimplify the complex mechanisms of underground metal corrosion. The complexity of stainless steel corrosion mechanisms and the processes by which corrosion products migrate from their source are not well depicted by a corrosion rate based on general attack. The research presented here is the analysis of austenitic stainless steels after 33 years of burial. In this research, the corrosion specimens were analyzed using applicable ASTM standards as well as microscopic and X-ray examination to determine the mechanisms of underground stainless steel corrosion. As presented, the differences in the corrosion mechanisms vary with the type of stainless steel and the treatment of the samples. The uniqueness of the long sampling time allows for further understanding of the actual stainless steel corrosion mechanisms, and when applied back into predictive models, will assist in reduction of the uncertainty in parameters for predicting long-term fate and transport.

  17. VALIDATION OF ANALYTICAL METHODS AND INSTRUMENTATION FOR BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT: REVIEW AND SUMMARY OF AVAILABLE GUIDES, PROCEDURES, AND PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A.

    2008-12-17

    This document proposes to provide a listing of available sources which can be used to validate analytical methods and/or instrumentation for beryllium determination. A literature review was conducted of available standard methods and publications used for method validation and/or quality control. A comprehensive listing of the articles, papers, and books reviewed is given in Appendix 1. Available validation documents and guides are listed in the appendix; each has a brief description of application and use. In the referenced sources, there are varying approaches to validation and varying descriptions of validation at different stages in method development. This discussion focuses on validation and verification of fully developed methods and instrumentation that have been offered up for use or approval by other laboratories or official consensus bodies such as ASTM International, the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). This review was conducted as part of a collaborative effort to investigate and improve the state of validation for measuring beryllium in the workplace and the environment. Documents and publications from the United States and Europe are included. Unless otherwise specified, all documents were published in English.

  18. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: RECOVERY AND DOWN BLEND URANIUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-05-27

    For over fifty years, the H Canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has performed remotely operated radiochemical separations of irradiated targets to produce materials for national defense. Although the materials production mission has ended, the facility continues to play an important role in the stabilization and safe disposition of proliferable nuclear materials. As part of the US HEU Disposition Program, SRS has been down blending off-specification (off-spec) HEU to produce LEU since 2003. Off-spec HEU contains fission products not amenable to meeting the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) commercial fuel standards prior to purification. This down blended HEU material produced 301 MT of ~5% enriched LEU which has been fabricated into light water reactor fuel being utilized in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors in Tennessee and Alabama producing economic power. There is still in excess of ~10 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for beneficial use as either ~5% enriched LEU, or for use in subsequent LEU reactors requiring ~19.75% enriched LEU fuel.

  19. Development of a portable field monitor for PCBs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    With the advent of recent regulations and those yet pending concerning allowable concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), personnel in all aspects of the electric power industry, analytical support personnel, and those in the regulatory functions themselves have realized that the PCB problem, as well as these associated regulations, has far surpassed available monitoring capability. In short, detailed, stringent regulations are being set for contamination levels where no accepted ASTM procedure or instrumentation exists. The largest PCB problems occur in the form of PCB-contaminated oil in field transformers and storage containers, and pure askarel in transformers and capacitors. The most immediate need for a portable field instrument would be for use under PCB spill conditions. Portable monitors based on the principles of photoionization detection (PID) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) have been adapted and evaluated for this purpose. The latter includes both flow cell and horizontal multiple internal reflectance (HMIR) sampling configurations. Extensive work has also been performed on solvent-solvent and solvent-soil extractions, as well as PCB adsorption on packings, for use under spill conditions.

  20. Worried about leaks Don't paint before hydrotesting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batey, J.E. )

    1993-09-01

    Occasionally, painting before hydrostatic pressure testing is required in petrochemical and other industrial plants. Because some process fluids may be solvents to paint, in-service leakage could occur if the paint masks leakage during hydrotesting. To eliminate unplanned releases, it is important to know whether painting before hydrotesting could really mask leaks at the test pressures typically used in hydrotesting. Unfortunately, very little guidance is provided by national standards or codes, and empirical data are not readily available to support an answer. ASTME 1003-84, Standard Method for Hydrostatic Leak Testing, states that new systems should be tested prior to painting, where practical. However, Sections 1 and 8 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and B31.1 and B31.3 of the ASME Code for Pressure Piping are silent on this issue. To help resolve this issue, tests were done to determine the effect of paint on leak-tightness during hydrotesting. Pipe samples with through-wall pinholes were fabricated, painted, and then hydrotested.

  1. EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

    2012-08-15

    Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. Fuels and Chemicals from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Valorization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Ml 190 <0 0.25 1.2 S. coelicolor Ml45 <0 <0 0.5 S. avermitilis 41443 DSM <0 <0 4.6 Bacteria Pseudomonas putida 33015 <0 1.1 <0 Rhodococcus erythropolis 68.9 l.l 1.5 Rhodococcus sp. ...

  4. Richland Operations Office Cleanup Strategy, Scope

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IU Is ol at ed Un it RO D Re co rd of De ci si on TS D Tr ea tm en t, St or ag e, Di sp os al K A re a K Ea st Ba si n De m ol ish ed In te rim Sa fe St or ag e of K ...

  5. The AmAzing Journey of Columbia River Salmon B O N N E V I L

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 WAiTing To hATch 1 reneWing The cycLe 10 reTurn ing To spAWning grounds 9 cLimbing fish LAdders 8 sWimming upsTreAm 7 Living in The oceAn 6 yolk sac redd alevin 3 Five...

  6. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  7. T-659: Update support for RSA Authentication Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RSA posted SP4 Patch 4 of their Authentication Manager product 06/30/2011. There are a few pages of fixes in the README, but the most significant is that Authentication Manager can now be installed on Windows Server 2008 (both 32 and 64bit).

  8. EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corporate QA Performance Metrics EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics Quality Program Criteria Summary PDF icon EM Corporate QA Performance Metrics More Documents & Publications QA Corporate Board Meeting - November 2008 Instructions for EM Corporate Performance Metrics FY 2015 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL CYCLE - CLOSEOUT GUIDANCE

  9. Office of Executive Resources Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Executive Resources Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer U.S. Department of Energy FY 2014 Senior Executive Service (SES) and Senior Professional (SP) Performance Appraisal Closeout Guidance 2 Table of Contents I. FY 2014 PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL CYCLE BUSINESS RULES ............................................................................. 3 ASSESSING PERFORMANCE

  10. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1B(p, X) (Current as of 12172015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, ): deduced , S-factor Ecm 0 - 1 X4 11072012...

  11. Total synthesis of gracilioether F. Development and application of Lewis acid promoted ketenealkene [2+2] cycloadditions and late-stage CH oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasik, Christopher M.; Brown, M. Kevin

    2014-12-22

    The first synthesis of gracilioether F, a polyketide natural product with an unusual tricyclic core and five contiguous stereocenters, is described. Key steps of the synthesis include a Lewis acid promoted ketenealkene [2+2] cycloaddition and a late-stage carboxylic acid directed C(sp)H oxidation. The synthesis requires only eight steps from norbornadiene.

  12. Hanford site transuranic waste sampling plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-05-13

    This sampling plan (SP) describes the selection of containers for sampling of homogeneous solids and soil/gravel and for visual examination of transuranic and mixed transuranic (collectively referred to as TRU) waste generated at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The activities described in this SP will be conducted under the Hanford Site TRU Waste Certification Program. This SP is designed to meet the requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (CAO-94-1010) (DOE 1996a) (QAPP), site-specific implementation of which is described in the Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Characterization Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (HNF-2599) (Hanford 1998b) (QAPP). The QAPP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements and protocols for TRU waste characterization activities at the Hanford Site. In addition, the QAPP identifies responsible organizations, describes required program activities, outlines sampling and analysis strategies, and identifies procedures for characterization activities. The QAPP identifies specific requirements for TRU waste sampling plans. Table 1-1 presents these requirements and indicates sections in this SP where these requirements are addressed.

  13. The new role of scientists

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le D.G. Jentschke fait l'introduction et présente le Prof.Kowarsky, spécialiste en microbiologie, physique nucléaire et une des fondateurs du Cern. Il parle entre autre de l'énergie nucléaire (pacifique)et de remise en questions des valeurs scientifiques et techniques

  14. Office of Executive Resources Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office of Executive Resources Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer U.S. Department of Energy FY 2015 Senior Executive Service (SES) and Senior Professional (SP) Performance Appraisal Closeout Guidance 2 Table of Contents I. FY 2015 PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL CYCLE BUSINESS RULES ............................................................................. 3 ASSESSING PERFORMANCE

  15. Double layer capacitor prospects look good

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The Fourth International Seminar in Double Layer Capacitors and similar energy devices has been sponsored again by Dr. S.P. Wolsky and Dr. Nikola Marincic. The seminar was held in December 1994, at Deerfield Beach, FL. This report provides a brief description of information on supercapacitors.

  16. Project Hanford management contract quality assurance program implementation plan for nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibb, E.K.

    1997-10-15

    During transition from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Management and Operations (M and O) contract to the Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Management and Integration (M and I) contract, existing WHC policies, procedures, and manuals were reviewed to determine which to adopt on an interim basis. Both WHC-SP-1131,Hanford Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, and WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, were adopted; however, it was recognized that revisions were required to address the functions and responsibilities of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). This Quality Assurance Program Implementation Plan for Nuclear Facilities (HNF-SP-1228) supersedes the implementation portion of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. The revised Quality Assurance (QA) Program is documented in the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD), HNF-MP-599. That document replaces the QA Program in WHC-SP-1131, Rev. 1. The scope of this document is limited to documenting the nuclear facilities managed by FDH and its Major Subcontractors (MSCS) and the status of the implementation of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, at those facilities. Since the QA Program for the nuclear facilities is now documented in the QAPD, future updates of the information provided in this plan will be by letter. The layout of this plan is similar to that of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide an overview of the Project Hanford QA Program. A list of Project Hanford nuclear facilities is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides the status of facility compliance to 10 CFR 830.120. Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 provide requested exemptions, status of open items, and references, respectively. The four appendices correspond to the four projects that comprise Project Hanford.

  17. National Bio-fuel Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jezierski, Kelly

    2010-12-27

    The National Biofuel Energy Laboratory or NBEL was a consortia consisting of non-profits, universities, industry, and OEMs. NextEnergy Center (NEC) in Detroit, Michigan was the prime with Wayne State University as the primary subcontractor. Other partners included: Art Van Furniture; Biodiesel Industries Inc. (BDI); Bosch; Clean Emission Fluids (CEF); Delphi; Oakland University; U.S. TARDEC (The Army); and later Cummins Bridgeway. The program was awarded to NextEnergy by U.S. DOE-NREL on July 1, 2005. The period of performance was about five (5) years, ending June 30, 2010. This program was executed in two phases: 1.Phase I focused on bench-scale R&D and performance-property-relationships. 2.Phase II expanded those efforts into further engine testing, emissions testing, and on-road fleet testing of biodiesel using additional types of feedstock (i.e., corn, and choice white grease based). NextEnergy a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in Detroit was originally awarded a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Dept. of Energy for Phase I of the NBEL program. A few years later, NextEnergy and its partners received an additional $1.9MM in DOE funding to complete Phase II. The NBEL funding was completely exhausted by the program end date of June 30, 2010 and the cost share commitment of 20% minimum has been exceeded nearly two times over. As a result of the work performed by the NBEL consortia, the following successes were realized: 1.Over one hundred publications and presentations have been delivered by the NBEL consortia, including but not limited to: R&D efforts on algae-based biodiesel, novel heterogeneous catalysis, biodiesel properties from a vast array of feedstock blends, cold flow properties, engine testing results (several Society of Automotive Engineers [SAE] papers have been published on this research), emissions testing results, and market quality survey results. 2.One new spinoff company (NextCAT) was formed by two WSU Chemical Engineering professors and another co-founder, based on a novel heterogeneous catalyst that may be retrofitted into idled biodiesel manufacturing facilities to restart production at a greatly reduced cost. 3.Three patents have been filed by WSU and granted based on the NextCAT focus. 4.The next-generation advanced biodiesel dispensing unit (CEF F.A.S.T. unit version 2) was developed by Clean Emission Fluids (CEF). 5.NBEL aided in the preparing a sound technical basis for setting an ASTM B20 standard: ASTM Standard D7467-08 was passed in June of 2008 and officially published on October of 2008. 6.NBEL has helped to understand composition-property-performance relationships, from not only a laboratory and field testing scale, for biodiesel blends from a spectrum of feedstocks. 7.NBEL helped propel the development of biodiesel with improved performance, cetane numbers, cold flow properties, and oxidative stability. 8.Data for over 30,000 miles has been logged for the fleet testing that select members of the consortia participated in. There were five vehicles that participated in the fleet testing. Art Van provided two vehicles, one that remained idle for most of the time and one that was used often for commercial furniture deliveries, Oakland University provided one vehicle, NEC provided one vehicle, and The Night Move provided one vehicle. These vehicles were light to medium duty (2.0 to 6.6 L displacement), used B5 or B20 blends from multiple sources of feedstock (corn-, choice white grease-, and soybean-based blends) and sources (NextDiesel, BDI, or Wacker Oil), experienced a broad range in ambient temperatures (from -9 F in Michigan winters to 93 F in the summertime), and both city and highway driving conditions.

  18. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during continuous operation under DPF regeneration events. During the second stage of HD testing, the ULSD lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.5% to 0.8%, while for B20, lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.6% to 1.0%, but the fuel in the oil was 36% biodiesel. For the LD vehicle tests, the frequency of DPF regeneration events was observed to be the same for both ULSD and B20. No significant difference between the two fuels' estimated soot loading was detected by the engine control unit (ECU), although a 23% slower rate of increase in differential pressure across DPF was observed with B20. It appears that the ECU estimated soot loading is based on the engine map, not taking advantage of the lower engine-out particulate matter from the use of biodiesel. After 4,000 miles of LD vehicle operation with ULSD, fuel dilution in the lube-oil samples showed total dilution levels of 4.1% diesel. After 4,000 miles of operation with B20, total fuel in oil dilution levels were 6.7% consisting of 3.6% diesel fuel and 3.1% biodiesel. Extrapolation to the 10,000-mile oil drain interval with B20 suggests that the total fuel content in the oil could reach 12%, compared to 5% for operation on ULSD. Analysis of the oil samples also included measurement of total acid number, total base number, viscosity, soot, metals and wear scar; however, little difference in these parameters was noted.

  19. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or other industries are interested in lignin as a potential fuel or feedstock but need more information on properties.

  20. A Study of the Use of Jatropha Oil Blends in Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.

    2010-10-01

    Executive Summary: This project investigated the combustion performance of blends of unrefined Jatropha oil and its blends in laboratory boilers. Although a very limited amount of testing blends in distillate oil, ASTM No. 2 oil or heating oil was conducted, the primary interest was in testing the performance of blends with residual ASTM No. 6 oil. The basic idea is to provide a renewable fuel option to residual oil used in space heating and in industrial applications. The intent also was to explore the use of non-edible plant oil and one that might be potentially cheaper than biodiesel. The characteristics of No. 6 oil, such as high viscosity at ambient temperature, which requires it to be kept heated, make the blending with such oils feasible. Jatropha oil is one such oil and there is currently considerable interest building up in its use as a source for making biodiesel and jet fuel. A 10% blend of Jatropha oil with heating oil was burned using a standard burner in a residential boiler. Combustion performance was shown to be comparable with that of burning heating oil by itself with some noticeable differences. Typical heating oil has about 2000 ppm of sulfur, while the Jatropha oil has about 50 ppm leading to lower levels of sulphur dioxide emissions. Stack measurements also showed that the NOx emission was lower with the blend. We have previously reported similar reductions in NOx with blends of biodiesel in heating oil as well as slight reductions in PM2.5, particulates below 2.5 microns in size. Long term tests were not part of this project and hence deleterious effects on pumps, seals etc., if any, were not measured. The majority of the work involved testing blends of Jatropha oil with residual oil in a 1.5 million Btu/hr boiler with a burner modified to burn residual oil. Blends of 20 and 60% Jatropha oil and 100% Jatropha oil were burned in the combustion performance tests. The residual oil used had a sulfur content of over 2000 ppm and hence dramatic reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions are measured with the blends. Again, consistent with our past experience with biodiesel blends, significant reductions in nitrogen oxide emissions nearing 50% with 100% Jatropha oil, were also measured. This is in contrast with the use of biodiesel in diesel engines, where the NOx has a tendency to increase. In addition to the gaseous emission measurements, particulate emissions were measured using an EPA CTM-39 system to obtain both particulates, of sizes below 2.5 microns, so-called PM2.5, and of sizes larger than 2.5 microns. The results show that the particulate emissions are lower with the blending of Jatropha oil. Overall, one can conclude that the blending of Jatropha oil with residual oil is a feasible approach to using non-edible plant oil to provide a renewable content to residual oil, with significant benefits in the reduction of pollutant emissions such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulates.