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1

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Examples 1 & 2 Example 1 1.0 Summary The 322-M Metallurgical Laboratory is currently categorized as a Radiological Facility. It is inactive with no future DOE mission. In May of 1998 it was ranked Number 45 in the Inactive Facilities Risk Ranking database which the Facilities Decommissioning Division maintains. A short-term surveillance and maintenance program is in-place while the facility awaits final deactivation. Completion of the end points described in this deactivation project plan will place the 322-M facility into an End State that can be described as "cold and dark". The facility will be made passively safe requiring minimal surveillance and no scheduled maintenance.

2

Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Completed in 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2. Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Completed in 2003; Ending Region & State: Begins in State - Region: Pipeline/Project Name: FERC Docket ...

3

Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides the list of completed EM cleanup projects from various sites across the country from 2005 to present, along with the each project’s performance related to cost, schedule, and...

4

Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present December 7, 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Before, during, and after pictures of the K-33 building decontamination,...

5

Foothills pipeline project prebuild being completed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

September 1982 marked the completion of the 395-mile eastern leg of the Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline project; the western leg went into service in October 1981. The design capacities are, respectively, 1.075 billion and 240 million CF/day. Phase 11 of the project will consist of installing the northern, large-diameter sections in Alberta, British Columbia, the Yukon, and Alaska, along with additional facilities on the two completed legs.

Stewart, M.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

GRI baseline projection: Methodology and assumptions 1996 edition. Topical report, January-December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report documents the methodology employed in producing the 1996 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection. DRI/McGraw-Hill`s Energy Group (DRI) maintains an energy modeling system for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that is used to produce an annual projection of the supply and demand for energy by regions in the United States. The 1996 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection is produced using several different models. The models analyze various pieces of the U.S. energy markets and their solutions are based on a framework of exogenous assumptions provided by GRI. The report describes the integration and solution procedures of the models and the assumptions used to produce the final projection results.

Rhodes, M.R.; Baxter, R.P.; Nottingham, R.P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

GRI baseline projection: Methodology and assumptions 1995 edition. Topical report, January-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the methodology employed in producing the 1995 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection. DRI/McGraw-Hill`s Energy Group (DRI) maintains an energy modeling system for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that is used to produce an annual projection of the supply and demand for energy by regions in the United States. The 1995 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection is produced using several different models. The models analyze various pieces of the U.S. energy markets and their solutions are based on a framework of exogeneous assumptions provided by GRI. The report describes the integration and solution procedures of the models and the assumptions used to produce the final projection results.

Baxter, R.P.; Silveira, T.S.; Harshbarger, S.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy Resources to New Mexico Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean...

10

Science with the Square Kilometer Array: Motivation, Key Science Projects, Standards and Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) represents the next major, and natural, step in radio astronomical facilities, providing two orders of magnitude increase in collecting area over existing telescopes. In a series of meetings, starting in Groningen, the Netherlands (August 2002) and culminating in a `science retreat' in Leiden (November 2003), the SKA International Science Advisory Committee (ISAC), conceived of, and carried-out, a complete revision of the SKA science case (to appear in New Astronomy Reviews). This preface includes: (i) general introductory material, (ii) summaries of the key science programs, and (iii) a detailed listing of standards and assumptions used in the revised science case.

C. Carilli; S. Rawlings

2004-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

SRS - Area Completion Projects - ARF/IRF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4/16/2012 4/16/2012 SEARCH GO spacer Administrative Record File/Information Repository File Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting Documentation General Information and Technologies Public Involvement Home SRS Home Area Completion Projects Administrative Record File/Information Repository File (ARF/IRF) Index of documents contained in the ARF/IRF is available at the University of South Carolina Libraries - Aiken and Columbia on microfilm and/or CD. This index is in PDF (portable document format) which requires Adobe Acrobat Reader software to be installed on your computer. Disclaimer - The scanning process used to transfer documents into the portable document format may unintentionally create minor inaccuracies in the text. The viewer is warned that minor spelling errors may occur and numerical data may be missing decimal points or exponential values. Should the viewer have any questions regarding a particular section of text, an accurate hardcopy is always available from the Area Completion Project Document Control at the Savannah River Site, Debbie Rice at 803-725-3885.

12

Completed Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Completed Projects Completed Projects Project Assessment (OPA) OPA Home About Project Management SC Projects Review Dates (updated November 2013) Project Construction Photos Completed Projects Current Projects Other Links SC Federal Project Directors (FPD) and FPD Resources Contact Information Project Assessment U.S. Department of Energy SC-28/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4840 F: (301) 903-8520 E: sc.opa@science.doe.gov Project Construction Photos Completed Projects Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Photos of completed SC projects Advanced Photon Source External link Building 51 and Bevatron D&D .pdf file (1.1MB) LHC ATLAS .pdf file (322KB) LHC CMS .pdf file (166KB) Linac Coherent Light Source .pdf file (4.6MB)

13

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOEs Idaho site Loss-Of-Fluid Test Reactor Facility (before) Idaho Cleanup Project workers have completed all...

14

Performance of 50 Completed ATP Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... project. Cross-sectional photomicrograph of a light emitting diode showing device active layers and buried mirror overgrowth. ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer test (CPT) truck at ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 to collect inferred lithology data for the vadose zone. Results from this study are used to make recommendations for future modeling efforts involving the ECP plots. The conceptual model of the ECP hydrogeology differs from the conceptual model of the current ELLWF disposal area in that for the ECP plots, the topography (ground surface) is generally lower in elevation; The Upland and top of Tobacco Road lithostratigraphic units are missing (eroded); The water table occurs lower in elevation (i.e., it occurs in lower stratigraphic units); and the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) often occurs within the vadose zone (rather than in the saturated zone). Due to the difference in the hydrogeology between the current ELLWF location and the ECP plots, different vadose zone properties are recommended for the ECP plots versus the properties recommended by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current disposal units. Results from this study do not invalidate or conflict with the current PA's use of the Upper and Lower Vadose Zone properties as described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current ELLWF disposal units. The following modeling recommendations are made for future modeling of the ECP plots where vadose zone properties are required: (1) If a single vadose zone property is preferred, the properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the Upper Vadose Zone encompass the general physical properties of the combined sands and clays in the ECP vadose zone sediments despite the differences in hydrostratigraphic units. (2) If a dual zone system is preferred, a combination of the Lower Zone properties and the Clay properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) are appropriate for modeling the physical properties of the ECP vadose zone. The Clay properties would be assigned to the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) and any other significant clay layers, while the Lower Zone properties would be assigned for the remainder of the vadose zone. No immediate updates or changes are recommended for

Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRsDEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 All Active DOE Technical...

17

Performance of 50 Completed ATP Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lenslet array that corrects the beams before they enter the transformer. ... the scope of the project to include other conditions, besides arrhythmia, that ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

19

Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy Resources to New Mexico Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy Resources to New Mexico April 21, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu issued the following statement on the completion and startup today of the Abiquiu Hydropower Project in New Mexico - the first hydropower project funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to be completed nationwide. "Today marks a major milestone in securing America's clean energy future as we celebrate the completion of the Department of Energy's first major Recovery Act-funded water power project. By increasing renewable energy output at existing hydropower facilities, we can create clean energy jobs,

20

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

CompleteProject List.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name Project Title Proposed DOE Name Project Title Proposed DOE Funds* Cost Share Agua Caliente Band Cahuilla Indians Strategic Energy Plan Development for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians $89,312 $15,366 Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association Aleutian Pribilof Island Wind Energy Development $194,633 $0 Aroostook Band of Micmacs Micmac Strategic Energy Planning Initiative $81,320 $10,716 Citizen Potawatomi Nation Fire Lake Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Demonstration $240,000 $210,410 Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Feasibility Study for Geothermal Energy Power Development $219,497 $32,524 Fort Bidwell Tribe Geothermal Direct Use Feasibility Study $130,492 $9,014 Grand Traverse Band Wind/Solar/Biomass Feasibility Study $95,810 $8,600 Hopi Tribe, The Feasibility Study for a Hopi Utility Scale Wind

22

Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the approved cost and schedule baselines. In 2013, NNSA completed five projects on time, including HPFL, and collectively more than 10 million under budget. NNSA has been...

23

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

24

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

25

Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work CWI President and CEO John Fulton greets newly hired ICP employees at a June orientation session in Idaho Falls....

26

Evaluating the Uncertainty Induced by the Virtual Salt Flux Assumption in Climate Simulations and Future Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unphysical virtual salt flux (VSF) formulation widely used in the ocean component of climate models has the potential to cause systematic and significant biases in modeling the climate system and projecting its future evolution. Here a ...

Jianjun Yin; Ronald J. Stouffer; Michael J. Spelman; Stephen M. Griffies

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name A complete and normalized 61850 substation Country Spain Headquarters Location Madrid, Spain Coordinates 40.488735°, -3.284912° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.488735,"lon":-3.284912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2012 August 14, 2012 AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Coun- ties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. "We excavated and disposed of over five million pounds of contaminated soil from three specific sites along the stream, erected miles of fence and placed over 2,000 signs in order to make Lower Three Runs safe and to reduce our site's footprint by another 10 percent," said Chris

30

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2007 projections. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

32

AEO Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for the for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33

SRS - Area Completion Projects - Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2013 5/2013 SEARCH GO spacer Administrative Record File/Information Repository File Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting Documentation General Information and Technologies Public Involvement Home SRS Home Area Completion Projects Federal Facility Agreement and Supporting Documentation * Federal Facility Agreement -The document that directs the comprehensive remediation of the Savannah River Site Appendix Affected by Modification: Appendix D Issuance of EPA and SCDHEC approved Revision.0 Appendix D for Fiscal Year 2013 (Print Date: 08/27/2013). The SCDHEC provided a comment on the Revision 0 Appendix D for Fiscal Year 2013 (Print Date: 08/27/2013) on Spetember 26, 2013. The EPA provided conditional approval, pending resolution of the SCDHEC's comment, of theRevision 0 Appendix D for Fiscal Year 2013 (Print Date: 08/27/2013) on October 30, 2013.

34

Performance of Second 50 Completed ATP Projects — Status ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the customers who would respond to the lower prices, and determine what ... projected from current records using projective visualization (PV), a new ...

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Department of Energy Completes Five Recovery Act Projects - Moves Closer to Completing Recovery Act Funded Work at Oak Ridge Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program recently completed five projects at the Oak Ridge site funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

36

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Performance of Second 50 Completed ATP Projects — Status ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high-quality care throughout a patient's lifetime. ... a successful project (tremendous cost savings spread ... in 1995 included standalone kiosks, wireless ...

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

NETL: Natural Gas and Petroleum Environmental Completed Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Name Primary Performer DE-FC26-06NT42937 Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach Interstate Oil...

40

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fernald closure project - Lessons learned in the execution of this successful project, completed October 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: This paper explores the history and lessons learned on the United States' Department of Energy's (DoE's) Fernald Closure Project - from the completion of the uranium-production mission to the implementation of the Records of Decision defining the cleanup standards and the remedies that were achieved. Cleaning up Fernald and returning it to the people of Ohio was a $4.4 billion dollar mega environmental-remediation project that was completed in October 2006. During a period of nearly 37 years, Fernald produced 250,000 tons of high-purity, low-enriched uranium for the U.S. defense program, generating more than six million tons of liquid and solid waste as it carried out its Cold War mission. The facility was shut down in 1989 and clean up began in 1992, when Fluor won the contract to clean up the site. The project comprised four phases: 1. Determining the extent of damage to the environment and groundwater at, and adjacent to, the production facilities 2. Selecting cleanup criteria - final end states that had to be met to protect human health and the environment 3. Selecting and implementing the remedial actions that would meet the cleanup goals 4. Doing the work safely, compliantly and cost-effectively. In the project's early stages, there were strained relationships and total distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of aquifer contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. (authors)

Murphy, Cornelius [Fluor Hanford Inc. P.O. Box 1000, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Reising, Johnny [Department of Energy - DOE (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 This report presents major assumptions of NEMS that are used to generate the projections in the AEO2006. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

44

Microsoft Word - EM Completed Projects 2005 to Present Cover 2013-12-16.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completed Projects 2005-Present Completed Projects 2005-Present December 16, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Photos of Pit 9 buried waste retrieval operations inside the Accelerated Retrieval Project IV retrieval enclosure at the Idaho Site (from ENERGY.GOV's Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/departmentofenergy/). In order to promote transparency with stakeholders and the public, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is posting key project management information. This web page provides the list of completed EM cleanup projects from various sites across the country from 2005 to present, along with the each project's performance related to cost, schedule, and scope. The EM cleanup projects address large quantities of radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel, excess

45

Microsoft Word - EM Completed Projects 2005 to Present Cover 2013-11-05.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completed Projects 2005-Present Completed Projects 2005-Present November 5, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Photos of Pit 9 buried waste retrieval operations inside the Accelerated Retrieval Project IV retrieval enclosure at the Idaho Site (from ENERGY.GOV's Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/departmentofenergy/). In order to promote transparency with stakeholders and the public, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is posting key project management information. This web page provides the list of completed EM cleanup projects from various sites across the country from 2005 to present, along with the each project's performance related to cost, schedule, and scope. The EM cleanup projects address large quantities of radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel, excess

46

Complete  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 History File Checklist 11_0613 Page 1 of 5 2 History File Checklist 11_0613 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: ISD History File Checklist Document Number: ISDF-012 Rev. 11_0613 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ADM, QAM, ISD, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-035 Analysis Feasibility Assessment, ISDF-044 Course Feasibility Assessment, ISDF-045 Analysis Project Plan, ISDF-046 Training Design/Development Summary, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 Script Template (Web), ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template (ILT), ISDF-005 WBT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-008 ILT Student Feedback Survey, ISDF-009 Design-Development Review Checklist, ISDF-010 After Action Report Template, ISDF-011 ISD

47

LM Completes X-Ray Film Digitization Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes X-Ray Film Digitization Project Completes X-Ray Film Digitization Project LM Completes X-Ray Film Digitization Project January 7, 2013 - 12:02pm Addthis Nearly 400,000 x-rays of former DOE contractor employees have been digitized to support LM records retention requirements. Nearly 400,000 x-rays of former DOE contractor employees have been digitized to support LM records retention requirements. What does this project do? Goal 2. Preserve, protect, and share records and information The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) has successfully completed a project to digitize nearly 400,000 medical x-rays of former DOE contractor employees. The x-rays, from the Rocky Flats and Grand Junction, Colorado; Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula, Ohio; and Pinellas, Florida; sites, are needed to

48

Workers Complete Y-12's Largest Recovery Act Project Ahead of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

project, emptying all legacy material from Alpha 5. The cleanout of the 613,000-square-foot facility was completed at a cost of about 100 million one month ahead of schedule....

49

Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget | High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed ... Press Release Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget

50

Recovery Act Investment Moves EM Past Milestone of 100 Project Completions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2, 2012 August 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently paused to observe a notable achievement: completion of more than 100 projects in its $6 billion cleanup of the Manhattan Project and Cold War legacy. "We marked an important milestone when we safely completed a significant amount of work - 103 of the 129 projects and activities that comprise the Recovery Act- funded cleanup in 12 states across the DOE Complex," EM Recovery Act Program Director Thomas Johnson said. "In addition, we are on schedule to complete the bulk of the remaining projects in this fiscal year and the last few in fiscal year 2013." Johnson noted other significant accomplishments in the program. More than 90

51

Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go Into Service To Accept Contaminated Soil and Debris Months Ahead of Schedule and Millions Under Budget Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go Into Service To Accept Contaminated Soil and Debris Months Ahead of Schedule and Millions Under Budget February 23, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Todd Nelson, Washington Closure (509) 372-9097 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, WASH. - Two new super cells are going into service to expand disposal capacity for contaminated soil and debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

52

Closeout of the Melton Valley Completion Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy DOE Order 413.3A (Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets) identifies major milestones in a project life cycle that require approval upon achievement, including Critical Decision-4 (CD-4), the project completion milestone. A CD-4 document is required for all DOE projects in accordance with DOE Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for Acquisition of Capital Assets. A conditional CD-4 report was prepared for the Melton Valley Completion Project (MVCP) in order to document the completion of the remedial action in the Melton Valley watershed. Approval of the MVCP CD-4 was 'conditional' pending final resolution of a small quantity of unexpected pyrophoric material, with no current disposition pathway, remaining in one of the waste trenches that were to be remediated as part of the completion project. This paper will provide an overview of the MVCP remediation work and the process successfully used to demonstrate closeout of a major CERCLA project in accordance with DOE requirements. In summary: The MV ROD was planned to be completed in 12 years; however, under the ACP the remedial activities were completed 6 years ahead of schedule (September 2006). Highlights of the remedial actions include: - Completion of remedial action activities at 219 release sites identified in the MV ROD. - Construction of 58 hectares of multilayer caps for SWSA 4, SWSA 5, SWSA 6, Pits 2, 3 and 4 and Trenches 5, 6, and 7; - Complete excavation, retrieval and over-pack of 204 casks, 8 boxes, and 530 m{sup 3} of loose waste from the TRU waste retrieval project; - Complete demolition and disposition of approx. 557 m{sup 2} of various buildings such as HRE ancillary facilities, NHF, Liquid LLW pumping stations, 7841 Scrap Yard, misc. storage buildings, and well P and A; - Removal of LLW sludges and stabilization of T-1, T-2, and HFIR tanks; - In situ grouting/stabilization of approx. 12 km of inactive waste pipelines; - Excavation and disposition of approx. 38,000 m{sup 3} of soil from HFIR impoundments, HRE cryogenic pond, IHP and contaminated soil from miscellaneous leak sites; - Completion of in-situ grouting of LLLW matrix at Trenches 5 and 7. The CD-4 document to demonstrate attainment of the project completion milestone was prepared to document close-out activities. Approval of the MVCP CD-4 was obtained but deemed 'conditional' pending final resolution of a small quantity of unexpected pyrophoric material, with no current disposition pathway, remaining in Trench 13 of the 22 Trench Area in SWSA 5N. DOE is currently evaluating options for the final disposition of this material and has committed to resolution of the issue by the end of Fiscal Year 2008. At that time, all aspects of the Melton Valley Completion Project will be complete. (authors)

Bonilla, R.; Johnson, Ch. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, R. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adams, V. [U.S. DOE, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Workers Complete Y-12's Largest Recovery Act Project Ahead of Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) re- cently celebrated the early completion of its largest Recovery Act- funded project, emptying all legacy material from Alpha 5. The clea- nout of the 613,000-square-foot facility was completed at a cost of about $100 million one month ahead of schedule. Built in 1944, Alpha 5 is the largest building at Y-12, and was formerly used for uranium separation activities. With cleanout complete, Oak Ridge's Environmental Management (EM) program plans to demol- ish the structure to reduce the site's footprint and to gain access to previously unreachable mercury sources in the soil that need to be removed. A key to the project's accelerated completion was a modified approach for sorting and removing legacy waste from the facility. Custom boxes

54

Annual Energy Outlook 96 Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in the Appendix. 1 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview. The National Energy Modeling System The projections

55

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (completed May 31, 2011)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (Completed May 31, 2010) Description NeuCo, Inc. (which acquired original participant Pegasus Technologies), a developer of power plant control and optimization technologies, demonstrated the capability to optimize mercury speciation and control of emissions from an existing power plant. This demonstration took place at an 890 megawatt (MW) utility boiler in Jewett,

56

Portsmouth Site Closes a Busy Year with Several D&D Project Completions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Closes a Busy Year with Several D&D Project Portsmouth Site Closes a Busy Year with Several D&D Project Completions Portsmouth Site Closes a Busy Year with Several D&D Project Completions December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers have removed more than 25 percent of the process gas equipment from the X-326 facility since starting that work in 2012. This past year they removed 54 of 200 cells. Once the equipment is removed, the 30-acre building will be ready for demolition. Workers have removed more than 25 percent of the process gas equipment from the X-326 facility since starting that work in 2012. This past year they removed 54 of 200 cells. Once the equipment is removed, the 30-acre building will be ready for demolition. Built in 1953, the PORTS X-102 Cafeteria was a 19,000-square-foot building that served as a gathering spot for employees over the years. Age caught up with the building and it was closed in 2012. Demolition of the structure was completed the week of Aug. 19, eight days ahead of schedule.

57

Grande Ronde Model Watershed Project; Dark Canyon Riparian Exclosure, Completion Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Field Office, Vale District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) submitted a project proposal for funding in 2002 through the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP). The project consisted of constructing two riparian exclosures to prevent livestock grazing in the riparian areas of Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek. The BLM completed the NEPA documentation and supplied the fencing materials. Funding from BPA through the GRMWP was used to complete the construction of the two exclosures. This project was completed in the fall of 2002. The project area is located in Union County, Oregon on BLM managed land adjacent to Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek, T. 3. S., R. 35 E., Section 24 and 25. Section 24 is along Dark Canyon Creek and section 25 is along Meadow Creek. Approximately 0.4 miles of stream would be protected from grazing with the construction of the two exclosures. A two person crew was hired to construct a four-strand barbed wire fence. The fence enclosed the riparian area on both sides of each creek so that no grazing would occur within the riparian area on BLM managed land. Total fence length is approximately 1.25 miles. Materials consisted of metal fence posts, barbed wire, rockjacks, fence stays, and 2 x 4's. The fence was constructed in the fall of 2002. The riparian area is effectively excluded from livestock grazing at this time. The construction of the exclosures should enhance riparian vegetation, increase bank stability, and improve riparian and in-stream habitat by exclusion of livestock in the riparian areas. Monitoring will ensure that the exclosures continues to be effective. Annual monitoring will include photo-points and compliance checks during the grazing season by BLM personnel. The BLM will submit a monitoring report, which includes the results of the annual monitoring, to the GRMWP in years 2005 and 2007. The exclosures do cross the creeks so maintenance may be needed on occasion, especially after high flow events in the creeks. Material such as logs which are mobilized during high stream flows may damage the exclosures requiring maintenance to keep cattle from grazing in the riparian areas. The BLM spent approximately $4,000 on fencing materials and $1,375 on NEPA compliance. In addition, the estimated cost of the monitoring over five years is expected to be approximately $1,600. The $5,050 that the BLM received from the BPA for the project was used to hire two temporary employees to construct the exclosures.

Kuck, Todd

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Errata  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 as of 4/4/2000 1. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 4-Speed Automatic" should be .045 instead of .030. On table 20 "the fractional fuel efficiency change for 5-Speed Automatic" should be .065 instead of .045. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 2. Table 28 should be labeled: "Alternative-Fuel Vehicle Attribute Inputs for Compact Cars for Two Stage Logit Model". (Change made on 3/6/2000) 3. The capital costs in Table 29 should read 1998 dollars not 1988 dollars. (Change made on 3/6/2000) 4. Table 37 changed the label "Year Available" to "First Year Completed." Changed the second sentence of Footnote 1 to read "these estimates are costs of new projects

60

Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S.

62

Workers Complete Y-12's Largest Recovery Act Project Ahead of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12's Largest Recovery Act Project Ahead of Schedule More Documents & Publications Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-11-02 Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash...

63

100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report: December 2008 to December 2009  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the final status of buildings after the completion of D4 activities at the 100 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site from December 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009.

K.G. Finucane, J.P. Harrie

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

64

Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Well Completion Report is being provided as part of the implementation of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). The CADD/CAP is part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) funded project for the investigation of CAU 447 at the Project Shoal Area (PSA). All work performed on this project was conducted in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996), and all applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations. Investigation activities included the drilling, construction, and development of three monitoring/validation (MV) wells at the PSA. This report summarizes the field activities and data collected during the investigation.

Rick Findlay

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

66

Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to the to the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Household Expenditures Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Oil and Gas Supply Module

67

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20041 (AEO2004), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every two years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2004 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the U.S. Congress, the Administration, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies.

68

A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE PLANT AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification melter was shut down in September 2002 after being used to vitrify High Level Waste (HLW) and process system residuals for six years. Processing of the HLW occurred from June 1996 through November 2001, followed by a program to flush the remaining HLW through to the melter. Glass removal and shutdown followed. The facility and process equipment is currently in a standby mode awaiting deactivation. During HLW processing operations, nearly 24 million curies of radioactive material were vitrified into 275 canisters of HLW glass. At least 99.7% of the curies in the HLW tanks at the WVDP were vitrified using the melter. Each canister of HLW holds approximately 2000 kilograms of glass with an average contact dose rate of over 2600 rem per hour. After vitrification processing ended, two more cans were filled using the Evacuated Canister Process to empty the melter at shutdown. This history briefly summarizes the initial stages of process development and earlier WVDP experience in the design and operation of the vitrification systems, followed by a more detailed discussion of equipment availability and failure rates during six years of operation. Lessons learned operating a system that continued to function beyond design expectations also are highlighted.

Petkus, Lawrence L.; Paul, James; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene; May, Joseph

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

69

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 27 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing

70

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

71

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Module Energy Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 21 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Module The LFMM International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the LFMM IEM computes BRENT and WTI prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, and generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail. The IEM also provides, for each year of the projection period, endogenous and

72

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20031 (AEO2003), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2003 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of EnergyÂ’s Office of Policy and International Affairs, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

73

The Edwards School of Business is once again taking proposals for consulting projects to be completed by MBA students. Accepted projects will cost $2,500 depending on scope, plus expenses, which typically run between $500  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be completed by MBA students. Accepted projects will cost $2,500 depending on scope, plus expenses, whichThe Edwards School of Business is once again taking proposals for consulting projects typically run between $500 and $1,000. Though you are not limited to these, typically projects fall within

Saskatchewan, University of

74

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to AEO2013 Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual

75

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2012 Assumptions to AEO2012 Release Date: August 2, 2012 | Next Release Date: August 2013 | Full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 [1] (AEO2012), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in AEO2012 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA) of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the

76

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

77

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, and (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform. A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2003, DOE/EIA- M062(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003).

78

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

79

The disciplined use of simplifying assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplifying assumptions --- everyone uses them but no one's programming tool explicitly supports them. In programming, as in other kinds of engineering design, simplifying assumptions are an important method for dealing with complexity. Given a complex ...

Charles Rich; Richard C. Waters

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States. States. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 93 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2007) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Primary inputs for the module are varied. One set of key assumptions concerns estimates of domestic technically recoverable oil and gas resources. Other factors affecting the projection include the assumed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 August 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

82

Completed EISs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completed EISs Completed EISs Number of EISs in report: 294 Number Title Prog Office Ops Office Federal Register Notices Notice Date Citation Agency Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility, Bonneville County, Idaho (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0471 5/20/2011 EPA 76 FR 29240 Adopted American Centrifuge Plant in Piketon, Pike County, Ohio (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0468 5/20/2011 EPA 76 FR 29240 Adopted Cushman Hydroelectric Project, Mason County, Washington (Adopted) EE DOE/EIS-0456 10/8/2010 EPA 75 FR 62386 NOA FEIS 11/29/2010 DOE 75 FR 73059 ROD Genesis Solar Energy Project, California (also identified as NextEra - Ford Dry Lake Solar Project) (Adopted) LP DOE/EIS-0455 11/23/2009 BLM 74 FR 61167 NOI 4/9/2010 BLM 75 FR 18204 NOA DEIS 8/27/2010 EPA 75 FR 52736 NOA FEIS 8/30/2010 BLM 75 FR 52966 NOA FEIS 12/17/2010 EPA 75 FR 78992

83

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask and MCO Helium Purge System Design Review Completion Report Project A.5 and A.6  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the design verification performed on the Cask and Multiple Canister Over-pack (MCO) Helium Purge System. The helium purge system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask Loadout System (CLS) at 100K area. The design verification employed the ''Independent Review Method'' in accordance with Administrative Procedure (AP) EN-6-027-01.

ARD, K.E.

2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

84

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20061 (AEO2006), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System

85

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

link.gif (1946 bytes) link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Tables to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage introduction.gif (4117 bytes) This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 19991 (AEO99), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3

86

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009),1 including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2009 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

87

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 [1] (AEO2010), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2010 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

88

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20081 (AEO2008), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2008 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The AEO projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

89

Projects Completed Year-to-Date Grand Total: $114,360,905 1,038,467Grand Total SF:Text25:09-Nov-10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Location: Branch Campus Architect Project Cost Project Name SFContractor Project Start/End Project,983,29974,624Total SF:Total Projects 5Totals for Branch Campus Project Location: HSC Architect Project Cost Project/30/2010 Mary Gauer Total Cost: $13,070,289118,332Total SF:Total Projects 12Totals for HSC Project Location

New Mexico, University of

90

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20021 (AEO2002), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2002 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of

91

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook2001 Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20011 (AEO2001), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2001 were produced with the National Energy

92

Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLIMATE ACTION PLANNING TOOL FORMULAS AND ASSUMPTIONS Climate Action Planning Tool Formulas and Assumptions The Climate Action Planning Tool calculations use the following formulas and assumptions to generate the business-as-usual scenario and the greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals for the technology options. Business-as-Usual Scenario All Scope 1 (gas, oil, coal, fleet, and electricity) and Scope 2 calculations increase at a rate equal to the building growth rate. Scope 3 calculations (commuters and business travel) increase at a rate equal to the population growth rate. Assumptions New buildings will consume energy at the same rate (energy use intensity) as existing campus buildings. Fleet operations will be proportional to total building area.

93

Hierarchy of Mesoscale Flow Assumptions and Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present research proposes a standard nomenclature for mesoscale meteorological concepts and integrates existing concepts of atmospheric space scales, flow assumptions, governing equations, and resulting motions into a hierarchy useful in ...

P. Thunis; R. Bornstein

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Importance of denitrification to the efficiency of waste-water treatment in forested wetlands. Project completion report  

SciTech Connect

Wastewater, even after secondary treatment, typically contains high concentrations of nutrients that can cause eutrophication of receiving waters and deterioration of water quality. Therefore, there has been much interest in the use of natural wetlands as a simple and energy-efficient means of removing nutrients from wastewater and improving water quality. The utilization of a wetland for tertiary treatment of wastewater is based on the ability of the wetland to act as a nutrient sink. One of the most important processes in wetland ecosystems that influences their capacity as a nitrogen sink is the gaseous exchange of nitrogen with the atmosphere known as denitrification. Since denitrification represents a loss of nitrogen to the atmosphere, the mechanism tends to be most favorable for the removal of nitrogen. The objectives of the research project were to (1) determine the temporal and spatial ambient rates of denitrification and compare these rates to those of sediments amended with increased concentrations of nitrate comparable to concentrations of total nitrogen in the sewage effluent to be discharged; and (2) determine the proportion of total denitrification that can be attributed to direct utilization of nitrate loaded into the wetland, as compared to nitrate produced via nitrification within the wetland. Although nitrate is readily denitrified, short-term incubation rates are relatively low which is attributed to the presently low nitrate concentrations and subsequent reduced denitrifying microbial population in the wetland sediments. Nitrate concentrations varied seasonally associated with increased flooding during spring. Rates of nitrification coupled with denitrification were investigated with nitrogen-15 isotopes. Nitrification is limited in the wetland sedments; therefore, controls the rate of total nitrogen loss from the system.

Twilley, R.R.; Boustany, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

96

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

97

Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

Faler, Michael P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to the Annual Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3

99

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Analysis & Projections. Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, Congressional reports. Markets & ...

100

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

COMPLETED: Nanoscale Thermal Properties Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... To this end, we are advancing nano-thermomechanometry by exploiting a scanned probe microscopy heating tip method based on batch ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Solving projective complete intersection faster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a new method for solving square polynomial systems with no zero at infinity. We analyze its complexity, which indicates substantial improvements, compared with the previously known methods for solving such systems. We describe ...

Bernard Mourrain; Philippe Trebuchet

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

TIP Project Briefs - Complete File  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and more reliable flood-control infrastructure ... Adding tailored nanocrystals to polymers can result ... Polymer nanocomposites can be designed that are ...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Release date: June 2008 Next release date: March 2009 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Petroleum Market Module

105

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20001 (AEO2000), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2000 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of EnergyÂ’s Office of Policy, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

106

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

107

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 143 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation in the Annual Energy Outlook Legislation Brief Description AEO Handling Basis Residential Sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories a. Room Air Conditioners Current standard of 8.82 EER Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, b. Other Air Conditioners (<5.4 tons) Current standard 10 SEER for central air conditioner and heat pumps, increasing to 12 SEER in 2006. Federal Register Notice of Final Rulemaking, c. Water Heaters Electric: Current standard .86 EF, incr easing to .90 EF in 2004. Gas: Curren

108

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Area Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 9),

109

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

110

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1 (AEO2007), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant to formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports. 2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 3 , which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2007 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and

111

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

112

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Completed EISs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOEEIS-0456 1082010 EPA 75 FR 62386 NOA FEIS 11292010 DOE 75 FR 73059 ROD Genesis Solar Energy Project, California (also identified as NextEra - Ford Dry Lake Solar Project)...

114

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administrati...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy...

115

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Table 41  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

> Forecasts >Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook> Download Report Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF...

116

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

117

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M068(2003) April 2003. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

118

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document provides key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions related to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions were extracted from a number of NGNP Project sources such as licensing related white papers, previously issued requirement documents, and preapplication interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

Wayne Moe

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on AddThis.com...

120

Completion technology  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that current economic conditions in the oil patch have provided a climate for continuous search for more economical completion designs and tools. Aside from more cost-effective completion tools, there are several ways to reduce related costs. For example, inadequate communication of technical requirements between operator and service company results in a tremendous amount of needless expense. This article explains the concerns of completion tool manufacturers and service companies so operating companies can better understand their required inputs and internal workings. The essence of the article is that well completion and production costs can be improved through better communication.

Longbottom, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.106

122

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Contacts Specific questions about the information in this report may be directed to: Introduction Paul D. Holtberg 202/586-1284 Macroeconomic Activity Module Ronald F. Earley Yvonne Taylor 202/586-1398 202/586-1398 International Energy Module G. Daniel Butler 202/586-9503 Household Expenditures Module/ Residential Demand Module John H. Cymbalsky 202/586-4815 Commercial Demand Module Erin E. Boedecker 202/586-4791 Industrial Demand Module T. Crawford Honeycutt 202/586-1420 Transportation Demand Module John D. Maples 202/586-1757 Electricity Market Module Laura Martin 202/586-1494 Oil and Gas Supply Module/Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Joseph Benneche 202/586-6132 Petroleum Market Module Bill Brown 202/586-8181

123

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

124

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 17 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents interactions between the U.S. economy and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP), is a key determinant of growth in the demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected

125

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

126

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2000, DOE/EIA-M062(2000), January 2000.

127

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by obtaining market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation Report: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO62/1, January 1999.

128

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

129

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security systems, microwave ovens, set-top boxes, home audio equipment, rechargeable electronics, and VCR/DVDs. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric appliances. The module's output includes number Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central

130

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy.

131

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

132

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and

133

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

134

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

135

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

136

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M060(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

137

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

138

THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT.  

SciTech Connect

As of October 2001, approximately 7,000 yd{sup 3} of stockpiled soil remained at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) after the remediation of the BNL Chemical/Animal/Glass Pits disposal area. The soils were originally contaminated with radioactive materials and heavy metals, depending on what materials had been interred in the pits, and how the pits were excavated. During the 1997 removal action, the more hazardous/radioactive materials were segregated, along with, chemical liquids and solids, animal carcasses, intact gas cylinders, and a large quantity of metal and glass debris. Nearly all of these materials have been disposed of. In order to ensure that all debris was removed and to characterize the large quantity of heterogeneous soil, BNL initiated an extended sorting, segregation, and characterization project directed at the remaining soil stockpiles. The project was co-funded by the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office (DOE EM) through the BNL Environmental Restoration program and through the DOE EM Office of Science and Technology Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program. The focus was to remove any non-conforming items, and to assure that mercury and radioactive contaminant levels were within acceptable limits for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Soils with mercury concentrations above allowable levels would be separated for disposal as mixed waste. Sorting and segregation were conducted simultaneously. Large stockpiles (ranging from 150 to 1,200 yd{sup 3}) were subdivided into manageable 20 yd{sup 3} units after powered vibratory screening. The 1/2-inch screen removed almost all non-conforming items (plus some gravel). Non-conforming items were separated for further characterization. Soil that passed through the screen was also visually inspected before being moved to a 20 yd{sup 3} ''subpile.'' Eight samples from each subpile were collected after establishing a grid of four quadrants: north, east, south and west, and two layers: top and bottom. Field personnel collected eight 100-gram samples, plus quality assurance (QA) duplicates for chemical analysis, and a 1-liter jar of material for gamma spectroscopy. After analyses were completed and reviewed, the stockpiles were reconstructed for later disposal as discrete entities within a disposal site profile. A field lab was set up in a trailer close to the stockpile site, equipped with instrumentation to test for mercury, RCRA metals, and gamma spectroscopy, and a tumbler for carrying out a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) protocol. Chemical analysis included X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to screen for high (>260 ppm) total mercury concentrations, and modified TCLP tests to verify that the soils were not RCRA hazardous. The modified TCLP tests were 1/10th scale, to minimize secondary (leachate) waste and maximize tumbler capacity and sampler throughput. TCLP leachate analysis was accomplished using a Milestone Direct Mercury Analyzer (DMA80). Gamma spectroscopy provided added assurance of previously measured Am-241, Cs-137, and Co-60 contamination levels.

BOWERMAN,B.S.; ADAMS,J.W.; HEISER,J.; KALB,P.D.; LOCKWOOD,A.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Completed DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completed) Completed) Project Number Title Document ID SLM / ORG Author / Phone / Email Status / Review Date P1020-2002REV National Phenomena hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE-STD-1020-2012 James O'Brien (HS-30) P1066-1999REV Fire Protection and Emergency Services Program and Design Criteria (revision to DOE-STD-1066-99) DOE-STD-1066-2012 James O'Brien (HS-30)

140

FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The benefits are superb, as measured in quite a number of different ways.

Brown, Ian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

China National Machinery Industry Complete Engineering Corporation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

construction project, trading, military equipment manufacturing, real estate and waste-to-energy project development. References China National Machinery Industry Complete...

142

NETL: News Release - Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection Operations in Illinois 2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Injection Operations in Illinois 2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Project Publications News Release Release Date: November 28, 2012 Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Washington, D.C. - Fifteen research projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and risks, have been selected to receive a total of $28 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The projects, valued at just over $36.6 million over two years, add to the research portfolio for FE's Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program, which develops technologies and strategies to improve the safety and minimize the environmental impacts of oil and natural gas exploration and production.

143

COMPLETE LISTING:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPLETE LISTING: COMPLETE LISTING: DISPOSITION AUTHORITIES FROZEN UNDER THE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MORATORIUM MARCH 2008 Listed below are all the disposition authorities which are under the moratorium on the destruction of health related records as of March 2008. All records scheduled under these authorities at Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters and field sites should be preserved past their normal retention periods unless an headquarters organization or a field site has obtained permission to remove records scheduled under the authority from the moratorium. Questions about the moratorium and what records should be preserved under it should be directed to Marsha Lawn on 301-903-3721 or at Marsha.Lawn@hq.doe.gov. ENVIRONMENTAL RECORDS SCHEDULE Item Series Title

144

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

145

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

Phillip Mills

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

147

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Market...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs. The key assumptions underlying the coal production modeling are: As capacity...

148

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the...

149

Completion milestones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southeastern Environmental Resources Alliance (SERA) is a joint effort between the US Department of Energy, the states of Georgia and South Carolina, and Westinghouse US Department of Energy, the states of Georgia Savannah River Company (WSRC). The original proposal for SERA, submitted under the Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), is based on improving the competitiveness of manufacturers within Georgia and South Carolina by addressing the costs associated with environmental and waste management issues. By using the many technologies available through the national laboratories, universities, the Savannah River Site, and the commercial sector, SERA will improve the competitive position of companies that would otherwise have no access to those technologies. This Start-Up Plan details the steps SERA will take to begin effective operations by June 1, 1995, and will focus on the short-term needs of the program. This plan will serve as a supplement to the original SERA proposal, and will address the major milestones included in the Department of Energy`s Cooperative Agreement. Also documented are the planning processes that SERA will use to ensure the long-term viability of the program. The planning process will include additional work elements that are referenced by the original proposal, but, for the purposes of program start-up, are not immediately addressed. The major milestones and schedules are provided for each goal.

Westbury, G.D.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

BPA Riparian Fencing and Alternative Water Development Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed, 2000 and 2001 Asotin Creek Fencing Final Report of Accomplishments.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for endangered salmonids since 1994. The ''Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00'' teamed BPA and the Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding to plant approximately 84,191 trees and shrubs in the Asotin Creek Watershed. In addition BPA and private cost-share dollars were utilized to drill 3 wells, provide 15 off-site alternative water developments (troughs), 5 spring developments, and 9,100 feet of riparian fencing. The trees will provide shade and long-term LWD recruitment to the stream. The wells, alternative water developments, springs and fencing will reduce direct animal impacts on the stream. In one area alone, a well, 3,000 ft of riparian fence with 5 alternative water developments will exclude 300 head of cattle from using the stream as a source of drinking water during the winter months.

Johnson, B.J. (Bradley J.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AVoCS 2006 Assumption-Commitment Support for CSP Model Checking Nick Moffat1 Systems Assurance using CSP. In our formulation, an assumption-commitment style property of a process SYS takes the form-Guarantee, CSP, Model Checking, Compositional Reasoning 1 Introduction The principle of compositional program

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

Preliminary Review of Models, Assumptions, and Key Data used in Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document is in response to a request by Ming Zhu, DOE-EM to provide a preliminary review of existing models and data used in completed or soon to be completed Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses (PA/CA) documents, to identify codes, methodologies, main assumptions, and key data sets used.

Arthur S. Rood; Swen O. Magnuson

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ED 5 - Palo Verde Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ED 5 - Palo Verde Project June 22rd Customer Meeting Presentation November 19th Proposal Decision Notification Letter Assumptions Summary of Comments October 6th Customer Meeting...

154

Project 197  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will bring economic value to both the industrial customers and to the participating companies. * Complete project by June 2006. Accomplishments A ceramic membrane and seal...

155

Evaluation of 1991-1992 Brood Overwinter-Reared Coho Released from Net Pens in Youngs Bay, Oregon : Final Completion Report Youngs Bay Terminal Fishery Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Funding from Bonneville Power Administration was provided to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s Fisheries Project to identify and develop terminal fishing opportunities. The 1991 and 1992 brood fingerling coho from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife hatcheries were successfully reared during the winter period to smolt stage in Youngs Bay utilizing floating net pens. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries during 1991--93 from 2-week net-pen acclimation releases, total accountability of coho adults averaged 40,540 fish, with the Youngs Bay commercial harvest accounting for 39%. With reduced ocean harvest impacts during 1994 and 1995, 92% of 51,640 coho in 1994 and 68% of 23,599 coho in 1995 (based on coded-wire-tag recoveries) were accounted for in the Youngs Bay commercial fishery for combined 2-week and overwinter acclimation net-pen releases. Overwinter net-pen acclimation coho accounted for 35,063 and 15,775 coho adults in 1994 and 1995 with 93% and 68% accountable in the Youngs Bay commercial harvest. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries, less than 1% of the adults resulting from releases at Youngs Bay net pens strayed to hatcheries, while none were recovered on spawning ground surveys during 1991--95. The highest survival rates were observed for 1991 and 1992 brood overwinter coho released in early May. Time of release, not rearing strategy, appears to be the determining factor affecting survival in Youngs Bay.

Hirose, Paul S.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Notes 01. The fundamental assumptions and equations of lubrication theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental assumption in Lubrication Theory. Derivation of thin film flow equations from Navier-Stokes equations. Importance of fluid inertia effects in thin film flows. Some fluid physical properties

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Prognostic Evaluation of Assumptions Used by Cumulus Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a spectral-type cumulus parameterization that includes moist downdrafts within a three-dimensional mesoscale model, various disparate closure assumptions are systematically tested within the generalized framework of dynamic control, static ...

Georg A. Grell

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Computational soundness for standard assumptions of formal cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This implementation is conceptually simple, and relies only on general assumptions. Specifically, it can be thought of as a 'self-referential' variation on a well-known encryption scheme. 4. Lastly, we show how the ...

Herzog, Jonathan, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1 Francis X. Johnson, Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H. Sanstad and...

160

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Feedback link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Interactive Data Queries to the AEO99 bullet1.gif...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap assumptions document. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel as a key element in the implementation of the Roadmap Methodology for the INEL Site. The development and identification of these assumptions in an important factor in planning basis development and establishes the planning baseline for all subsequent roadmap analysis at the INEL.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Lab completes first Recovery Act cleanup project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facility began in May and proceeded quickly. As part of the cleanup, a nearly new backup diesel generator was removed from the building and later donated to a nonprofit hospital...

163

Performance of 50 Completed ATP Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... semiconductors. The low-cost blue light emitting diode (LED) produced with new silicon carbide crystal technology. Benefits ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Performance of 50 Completed ATP Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Prototypes and pilot models of flat fluorescent ... Distributed Multi-agent-based optimization technology. ... on a generic mathematical model of thermal ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Procrastination on Long-Term Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

how people may incur costs on projects they never complete.to complete the project when these costs are allocatedcompletes the project under exogenous cost structure (c; k),

O'Donoghue, Ted; Rabin, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

167

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Release date: April 2007 Next release date: March 2008 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Petroleum Market Module

168

A Comparison of the Free Ride and CISK Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent paper Fraedrich and McBride have studied the relation between the “free ride” and CISK (conditional instability of the second kind) assumptions in a well-known two-layer model. Here the comparison is extended to a more general case. ...

Torben Strunge Pedersen

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EOS Land Validation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation The EOS Land Validation Project Overview EOS Land Validation Logo The objective of the EOS Land Validation Project is to achieve consistency, completeness,...

170

Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with type strain genome sequencing projects registered inResearch, Braunschweig) Genome sequencing and annotationthe complete Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Clum, Alicia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9., Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 11.1. Petroleum Product Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.2. Year Round Gasoline Specifications by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 11.3. Gasolline Sulfur Content Assumptions, by Region and Gasoline Type, Parts per Million (PPM). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version

172

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.9232544°, -91.09694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.9232544,"lon":-91.09694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

174

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA- 7, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described. EMM Regions The supply regions used in EMM are based on the North American Electric Reliability Council regions and

175

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

176

Effects of internal gain assumptions in building energy calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of direct solar gains in buildings can be affected by operating profiles, such as schedules for internal gains, thermostat controls, and ventilation rates. Building energy analysis methods use various assumptions about these profiles. The effects of typical internal gain assumptions in energy calculations are described. Heating and cooling loads from simulations using the DOE 2.1 computer code are compared for various internal-gain inputs: typical hourly profiles, constant average profiles, and zero gain profiles. Prototype single-family-detached and multi-family-attached residential units are studied with various levels of insulation and infiltration. Small detached commercial buildings and attached zones in large commercial buildings are studied with various levels of internal gains. The results of this study indicate that calculations of annual heating and cooling loads are sensitive to internal gains, but in most cases are relatively insensitive to hourly variations in internal gains.

Christensen, C.; Perkins, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ad Building demolition, recycling completed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ad Building demolition, recycling completed Ad Building demolition, recycling completed Ad Building demolition, recycling completed Demolition of the Administration Building helps Los Alamos meet an NNSA directive to reduce its structural footprint, modernize its infrastructure, and provide workers with safe, energy-efficient facilities. October 11, 2011 Demolition of the administration building Demolition of the Administration Building Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email Project finished under budget, ahead of schedule LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 11, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed demolition of its former Administration Building. Demolition of the 316,500-square-foot building that was home to seven Laboratory directors was completed five months ahead of the original schedule and

178

Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Facilities development project plan  

SciTech Connect

While the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) project is subject to future Administration policy decisions, budget proposals and Congressional actions, this Project Plan sets forth a feasible technical, cost, and schedule plan associated with the development of 750 million barrels of SPR crude oil storage and for enhancement of the SPR's distribution system to achieve a distribution capability of 4.5 million barrels per day. Assuming future adoption by the Administration and Congress of the project schedule identified in this Project Plan, The Total Project Cost (TPC) in program year dollars is $2,500,000,000. The TPC excludes post-development operations, capital improvement projects, terminal standby services, and oil acquisition. Under the same assumption, the schedule objectives of this project are: completion of the 750-million-barrel reserve, excluding oil fill, by September 30, 1992 in accordance with the storage capacity development schedule presented in Attachment 1. Completion of distribution enhancements to provide a distribution capability of 4.5 million barrels per day by September 30, 1992 in accordance with the following schedule: 3.0 million barrels per day by July 31, 1987; 3.5 million barrels per day by September 30, 1989; and 4.5 million barrels per day by September 30, 1992.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA- M068(2004). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

180

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M068(2008). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

182

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Projects If you need help finding information on a particular project, please contact the content manager. Search Hydrates Projects Active Projects | Completed...

183

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M060(2008) (Washington, DC, 2008). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

184

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2010, DOE/EIA-M060(2010) (Washington, DC, 2010). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel), and other mine supply costs.

185

PROJECT COMPLETION REPORT * IFCPAR PROJECT No. 2805-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'huiles essentielles d'agrumes Stabilization of liquid-liquid interface in membrane contactors: application by the use of membrane contactors which eliminate the need for a decantation step and afford a broader choice. In fact, it requires such a tight process control that the use of membrane contactors is currently

Bhattacharya, P. K.

186

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Petroleum Market Module Figure 8. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining

187

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

188

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

189

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA-M060(2004) (Washington, DC, 2004). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

190

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

191

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

192

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) petroleum.gif (4999 bytes) The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below. 75

193

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

194

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA-M060(2002) (Washington, DC, January 2002). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

195

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of AEO99 Cases Summary of AEO99 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.57 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $29.35 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated Residential: 1999 Technology

196

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

197

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

198

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

199

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Macroeconomic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

200

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

202

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

203

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Document>ation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2009), (Washington, DC, January 2009).

204

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in Three Cases, 1995-2035 Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2035 (2008 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

205

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

206

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA-M060(2001) January 2001. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

207

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7), 7), (Washington, DC, January 2007). Key Assumptions The output of the U.S. economy, measured by GDP, is expected to increase by 2.9 percent between 2005 and 2030 in the reference case. Two key factors help explain the growth in GDP: the growth rate of nonfarm employment and the rate of productivity change associated with employment. As Table 3 indicates, for the Reference Case GDP growth slows down in each of the periods identified, from 3.0 percent between 2005 and 2010, to 2.9 percent between 2010 and 2020, to 2.8 percent in the between 2020 and 2030. In the near term from 2005 through 2010, the growth in nonfarm employment is low at 1.2 percent compared with 2.4 percent in the second half of the 1990s, while the economy is expected to experiencing relatively strong

208

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2030 (2006 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids

209

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.14

210

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 3. OPEC Oil Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Table 4. Worldwide Oil Reserves as of January 1, 2002 (Billion Barrels) Printer Friendly Version Region Proved Oil Reserves Western Hemisphere 313.6 Western‘Europe 18.1 Asia-Pacific 38.7

211

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Transmission and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

212

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2007), (Washington, DC, January 2007).

213

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

214

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module. A detailed description of the MAM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2008), (Washington, DC, January 2008).

215

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, 7, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

216

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

217

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

218

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

219

Functions and Requirements for the Transition Project  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the functional requirement baseline for the Transition of 100 K Area Facilities Project (Transition Project). This baseline information consists of top-level functions, requirements, concept description, interface description, issues, and enabling assumptions.

YANOCHKO, R.M.

2000-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

Operational Waste Volume Projection  

SciTech Connect

Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

STRODE, J.N.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

222

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

223

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

224

Active code completion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Code completion menus have replaced standalone API browsers for most developers because they are more tightly integrated into the development workflow. Refinements to the code completion menu that incorporate additional sources of information have similarly ...

Cyrus Omar; YoungSeok Yoon; Thomas D. LaToza; Brad A. Myers

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Completed Sites Listing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As of fiscal year 2012, EM (and its predecessor organization UMTRA) completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 24 states.

226

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies - Examples 1 & 2 - Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Facility End State Decisions - Examples 3, 4 & 5 - Includes expected conditions at completion of the deactivation, DOE mission use, extended S&M, decommissioned and/or dismantled, etc.

227

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).109 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

228

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

229

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

230

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids supply and demand curves (1 curve per year; 2008-2030; approximated, isoelastic fit to previous NEMS results). These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2008 with IEO2007 and the STEO some functionality was removed from IEM while a new algorithm was implemented. Based on the difference between U.S. total petroleum liquids production (consumption) and the expected U.S. total liquids production (consumption) at the current WTI price, curves for global petroleum liquids consumption (production) were adjusted for each year. According to previous operations, a new WTI price path was generated. An exogenous oil supply module, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also used in IEM to provide annual regional (country) level production detail for conventional and unconventional liquids.

231

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohol and ethers, natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of refining activities in three U.S. regions. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of traditional and new petroleum products. The linear programming results are used to determine end-use product prices for each Census Division using the assumptions and methods described below.100

232

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA-M060(2006) (Washington, DC, 2006). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

233

A Graphical Approach to Diagnosing the Validity of the Conditional Independence Assumptions of a Bayesian Network Given Data  

SciTech Connect

Bayesian networks have attained widespread use in data analysis and decision making. Well studied topics include: efficient inference, evidence propagation, parameter learning from data for complete and incomplete data scenarios, expert elicitation for calibrating Bayesian network probabilities, and structure learning. It is not uncommon for the researcher to assume the structure of the Bayesian network or to glean the structure from expert elicitation or domain knowledge. In this scenario, the model may be calibrated through learning the parameters from relevant data. There is a lack of work on model diagnostics for fitted Bayesian networks; this is the contribution of this paper. We key on the definition of (conditional) independence to develop a graphical diagnostic method which indicates if the conditional independence assumptions imposed when one assumes the structure of the Bayesian network are supported by the data. We develop the approach theoretically and describe a Monte Carlo method to generate uncertainty measures for the consistency of the data with conditional independence assumptions under the model structure. We describe how this theoretical information and the data are presented in a graphical diagnostic tool. We demonstrate the approach through data simulated from Bayesian networks under different conditional independence assumptions. We also apply the diagnostic to a real world data set. The results indicate that our approach is a reasonable way of visualizing and inspecting the conditional independence assumption of a Bayesian network given data.

Walsh, Stephen J.; Whitney, Paul D.

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 13 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 14 for eleven building categories 15 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

235

A Statistical Analysis of the Dependency of Closure Assumptions in Cumulus Parameterization on the Horizontal Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated data from the UCLA cumulus ensemble model are used to investigate the quasi-universal validity of closure assumptions used in existing cumulus parameterizations. A closure assumption is quasi-universally valid if it is sensitive neither ...

Kuan-Man Xu

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 nd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% - Two projects completed in the 2 nd Qtr FY09. This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of scope within 125% of NTB TPC by FY12. Establish Baseline N/A Near-term Baselines established for all EM cleanup projects. 3. Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, 95% of line item projects and EM cleanup projects by FY11 and FY12, respectively.

237

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

None

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Ultraviolet Complete Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultraviolet complete (UV) quantum gravity theory is formulated in which vertex functions in Feynman graphs are entire functions and the propagating gravitons are described by local, causal propagators. A scalar-tensor action describes classical gravity theory. The cosmological constant problem is investigated in the context of the UV complete quantum gravity.

Moffat, J W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Complete Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

240

Complete Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Complete Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

242

Special Project Proposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A special project is defined as an endea vor that fulfills the TMS Mission ... It is to be submitted the earlier of: 90 days of project completion or ... Cost Analysis:.

243

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90%...

244

Comparing Efficiency Projections (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Realized improvements in energy efficiency generally rely on a combination of technology and economics [47]. The figure below illustrates the role of technology assumptions in the AEO2010 projections for energy efficiency in the residential and commercial buildings sector. Projected energy consumption in the Reference case is compared with projections in the Best Available Technology, High Technology, and 2009 Technology cases and an estimate based on an assumption of no change in efficiency for building shells and equipment.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 and 27) including incremental fuel 6 and 27) including incremental fuel efficiency improvement, incremental cost, first year of introduction, and fractional horsepower change. These assumed technology characterizations are scaled up or down to approximate the differences in each attribute for 6 Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) size classes of cars and light trucks. The vehicle sales share module holds the share of vehicle sales by import and domestic manufacturers constant within a vehicle size class at 1999 levels based on National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration data. 32 EPA size class sales shares are projected as a function of income per capita, fuel prices, and average predicted vehicle prices based on endogenous calculations within the MTCM

246

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Area Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 9). The LP model is created by aggregating individual refineries within a PADD into one representative refinery, and linking all five PADD's via crude and product transit links. This representation provides the marginal costs of production for a number of conventional and new petroleum products. In order to interact with other NEMS modules with different regional representations,

247

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

248

Department of Energy Completes Demolition of K-33 Building -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

its largest demolition project to date. The removal of K-33, a former gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facility spanning 32-acres, was completed several months ahead of...

249

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% - No 1 st Qtr FY09 completions. This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of scope within 125% of NTB TPC by FY12. Establish Baseline N/A Near-term Baselines established for all EM cleanup projects. 3. Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, 95% of line item projects and EM cleanup projects by FY11 and FY12, respectively. 85% Line Item

250

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% 72% This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). No 3 rd qtr FY09 completions. 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of scope within 125% of NTB TPC by FY12. Establish Baseline N/A Near-term Baselines established for all EM cleanup projects. 3. Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, 95% of line item projects and EM cleanup projects by FY11 and FY12, respectively. 85% Line Item

251

Complete Urban Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observation program using ground and airborne thermal infrared radiometers is used to estimate the surface temperature of urban areas, taking into account the total active surface area. The authors call this the complete urban surface ...

J. A. Voogt; T. R. Oke

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Making abstract interpretations complete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Completeness is an ideal, although uncommon, feature of abstract interpretations, formalizing the intuition that, relatively to the properties encoded by the underlying abstract domains, there is no loss of information accumulated in abstract computations. ...

Roberto Giacobazzi; Francesco Ranzato; Francesca Scozzari

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The World Energy Projection System  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Projection System World Energy Projection System May 1998 Continuing with this release, annual updates to the model will be available. Check this space for scheduled future releases. Note: If you are familiar with the model and just wish to download the latest version, click HERE. The World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the

254

Project Management Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Project Management Resources Project Management Resources Performance & Project Completion Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present EM Current Project Performance Office of Engineering and Construction Management (OECM) Monthly Project Dashboard Project Management Resources DOE Office of Environmental Management Project & Contract Management Improvement Timeline Project Management Approach Using Earned Value Management Root Cause Analysis and Corrective Actions Plan DOE Order 413.3B DOE Directives OMB Capital Programming Guide OECM Project Management Career Development Program OECM Project Management Policy and Guidance per Office of Management Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) Project Management Institute (PMI) Construction Industry Institute (CII)

255

Project Construction Photos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Project Construction Photos Project Assessment (OPA) OPA Home About OPA Project Management SC Projects Review Dates (updated August 2013) Project Construction Photos Completed...

256

Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

257

A Review of Electric Vehicle Cost Studies: Assumptions, Methodologies, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions Battery costs and capacities: Lead acid batteryElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: Lead acidElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: N i C d

Lipman, Timothy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Detachments of Complete Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detachment of a graph $G$ is formed by splitting each vertex into one or more subvertices, and sharing the incident edges arbitrarily among the subvertices. In this paper we consider the question of whether a graph $H$ is a detachment of some complete ...

Keith Edwards

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Complete genome sequence of Beutenbergia cavernae type strain (HKI 0122T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the complete genome sequencing and annotation. In60%. Strains with a genome-sequencing project regis- tered8] and the complete Genome sequencing and annotation Genome

Land, Miriam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments AE01 - Micro-undulator FEL Experiment. Spokesperson: I. Ben-Zvi, BNL. (1992 - 1997) AE02. - Inverse FEL Accelerator. Spokesperson: A. van Steenbergen, BNL. [Yale, Columbia]. (1992-1997) AE03 - Laser Grating Accelerator Experiment. Spokesperson: R. Fernow, BNL. [Princeton, LANL]. (1992- 1996) AE05 - Nonlinear-Compton Scattering. Spokesperson: K. McDonald, Princeton (1992-) AE06 - Inverse Cherenkov Acceleration. Spokesperson: W. Kimura, STI Optronics. [UCSB,BNL]. (1992-1997) AE08 - Far Infrared Radiation Source. Spokesperson J. Walsh, Dartmouth. [Oxford, BNL]. (1992 - 1994) AE09. - Photocathode R&D. Spokesperson: T. Rao, BNL. (1992 - ) AE10. - High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL. Spokesperson: L.H. Yu, BNL. [ANL] (1992 - 2001)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

262

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

263

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

264

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

265

FEMP Renewable Energy Project Assistance Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Project Assistance Application Renewable Energy Project Assistance Application Please complete electronically Request Date: _________________________________________________________________________________________ Federal Agency: _______________________________________________________________________________________ Federal Agency Contact Person Name: ______________________________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ E-mail: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Project Name: ________________________________________________________________________________________ Project Location: City _________________________________________ State ___________ Zip Code __________________

266

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 4 8 4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2008 Target FY 2008 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 75% 76% This is a 3-year rolling average Data includes FY06 to FY08. (37/48) 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of scope within 125% of NTB TPC by FY12. Establish Baseline N/A Near-term Baselines established for all EM cleanup projects. 3. Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, 95% of line item projects and EM cleanup projects by FY11 and FY12, respectively.

267

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target 1st Qtr FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 73% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

268

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Quarter Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Forecast FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 71% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

269

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% 73% This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of scope within 125% of NTB TPC by FY12. Establish Baseline N/A This metric has been overcome by events. Beginning in FY10, EM projects are to be measured against metric #1 above. 3. Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, 95% of line item projects and EM cleanup projects by FY11 and FY12,

270

Proposed methodology for completion of scenario analysis for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. [Assessment of post-closure performance for a proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the methodology to complete an assessment of postclosure performance, considering all credible scenarios, including the nominal case, for a proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste at the Hanford Site, Washington State. The methodology consists of defensible techniques for identifying and screening scenarios, and for then assessing the risks associated with each. The results of the scenario analysis are used to comprehensively determine system performance and/or risk for evaluation of compliance with postclosure performance criteria (10 CFR 60 and 40 CFR 191). In addition to describing the proposed methodology, this report reviews available methodologies for scenario analysis, discusses pertinent performance assessment and uncertainty concepts, advises how to implement the methodology (including the organizational requirements and a description of tasks) and recommends how to use the methodology in guiding future site characterization, analysis, and engineered subsystem design work. 36 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

Roberds, W.J.; Plum, R.J.; Visca, P.J.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NGPL Louisiana station nears completion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Construction on a 3,600-hp compressor station on the Louisiana line of Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America near Henry, La., was scheduled for completion later this month. The Louisiana line extends some 205 miles along the Gulf Coast between New Caney, Tex., and the Henry hub area. The new compressor station will be located about 44 miles west of the Henry hub. Work began on the $5.1 million expansion project in Cameron Parish, La., in May following Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) certification. By mid-September, the compressor building, service building, and meter house has been erected, final compressor inspections were under way, and gas piping tie-ins had been completed, according to NGPL. Powered by three 1,200-hp Solar Saturn gas-fired centrifugal engines, the station is designed to increase the capacity of the Louisiana line east of the Stingray pipeline system by up to 220 MMcfd. Current capacity for east bound flows is approximately 900 MMcfd.

Not Available

1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Recovery Act Investment Moves EM Past Milestone of 100 Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Investment Moves EM Past Milestone of 100 Project Completions Recovery Act Investment Moves EM Past Milestone of 100 Project Completions The Office of Environmental...

273

Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project  

SciTech Connect

KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Project Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle School Home Energy Audit Middle School Home Energy Audit Project Homepage NTEP Home - Project Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Pages Abstract: This set of lessons provides an opportunity for midlevel students to gain a basic understanding of how energy is turned into power, how power is measured using a meter, the costs of those units and the eventual reduction of energy consumption and cost to the consumer. Introduction to Research: By conducting energy audits of their own homes and completing exercises to gain baclground information, students begin to see the importance of energy in their daily lives. By using the Internet as a research tool, students gain develop research skills as they gain knowledge for their project. They use e-mail to collaborate with energy experts and share results with other

275

The World Energy Projection System  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

wepstitle.gif (8166 bytes) wepstitle.gif (8166 bytes) Continuing with this release, annual updates to the model will be available. Check this space for scheduled future releases. Note: If you are familiar with the model and just wish to download the latest version, click HERE. The World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the

276

The World Energy Projection System  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Continuing with this release, annual updates to the model will be Continuing with this release, annual updates to the model will be available. Check this space for scheduled future releases. Note: If you are familiar with the model and just wish to download the latest version, click HERE. The World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the

277

Property:CompletionNotes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CompletionNotes CompletionNotes Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CompletionNotes Property Type Text Description List of data that still needs to be researched and entered for the NEPA document Subproperties This property has the following 2 subproperties: C CA-96062042 D DOI-BLM-CA-ES-2013-002+1793-EIS Pages using the property "CompletionNotes" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + 8/2: Data reviewed for completion C CA-017-05-051 + 8/9 Data entry complete. Attached FONSI does not seem to be fully related to the attached EA. The FONSI is for a geothermal well and slimhole exploration project and the EA is for a pipeline project. Need to add Public Health and Safety as a resource 8/22/13 - The 'FONSI/DR is actually for EA CA-170-02-15 Bassalt Canyon..dated Jan 2002 KW 8/26/13 - I deleted the FONSI from this page. Filename is incorrect for the file and stands as "CA-017-05-51-EA-DR -FONSI.pdf," Andrew Gentile. Unable to find Final EA or FONSI online. When RMP added, add "Inyo National Forest "Land and Resource Management Plan" (LRMP) 1988"

278

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Actual FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Actual Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 84% Line Item 77% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

279

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 69% Line Item 67% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

280

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 84% Line Item 78% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Quarter First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Actual & Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 79% Line Item 71% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

282

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Quarter Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 90% Line Item 84% Line Item 78% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is based on a 3-year rolling average (FY09 to FY11). TPC is Total Project Cost. 2a. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: (Pre- RAC/CAP) 90% of Projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY12. 2b. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation,

283

PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Restoration Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area Churchill County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1166 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

284

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Examples 1 - 80 Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies - Examples 1 & 2 - Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Facility End State Decisions - Examples 3, 4 & 5 - Includes expected conditions at completion of the deactivation, DOE mission use, extended S&M, decommissioned and/or dismantled, etc.

285

Department of Energy Completes Demolition of K-33 Building - Largest  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolition of K-33 Building - Demolition of K-33 Building - Largest Completed Demo Project in Oak Ridge History Department of Energy Completes Demolition of K-33 Building - Largest Completed Demo Project in Oak Ridge History September 30, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Ben Williams http://www.oakridge.doe.gov 865-576-0885 OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Environmental Management (EM) program recently completed its largest demolition project to date. The removal of K-33, a former gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facility spanning 32-acres, was completed several months ahead of schedule. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funded the $51 million project. "The expedited removal of K-33 significantly changes our site's landscape, and moves DOE closer to transitioning the East Tennessee

286

Heterogeneous Correlation Modeling Based on the Wavelet Diagonal Assumption and on the Diffusion Operator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article discusses several models for background error correlation matrices using the wavelet diagonal assumption and the diffusion operator. The most general properties of filtering local correlation functions, with wavelet formulations, are ...

Olivier Pannekoucke

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Microwave Properties of Ice-Phase Hydrometeors for Radar and Radiometers: Sensitivity to Model Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified framework is presented for assessing the qualitative sensitivities of computed microwave properties, satellite brightness temperatures, and radar reflectivities to assumptions concerning the physical properties of ice-phase ...

Benjamin T. Johnson; Grant W. Petty; Gail Skofronick-Jackson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan  

SciTech Connect

Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE`s Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. The plan is based on realistic assumptions and addresses three separate funding scenarios.

Ross, W.E.

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Decision-Support Framework for Choosing a Project Delivery System (PDS) in a Multi-Project Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on schedule • Minimize project cost • Complete the projectacceptable as well as the minimum desired project costs.For example, the total project cost is preferred to be below

Chih, Ying-Yi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Diamond Shamrock nears completion of major expansions  

SciTech Connect

With completion later this year of a second refined products line into Colorado, Diamond Shamrock Inc., San Antonio, will have added more than 600 miles of product and crude-oil pipeline on its system and expanded charge and production capacities at its two state-of-the-art refineries, all within 30 months. The projects aim at improving the company's ability to serve markets in the U.S. Southwest and increasing capacities and flexibility at its two refineries. The paper describes these projects under the following headings: new products service; another new line; and refineries, crude pipelines; Three Rivers expansion and Supplies for McKee.

True, W.R.

1993-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

JEA successfully completes world's largest CFB demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) has successfully completed an eighth year landmark demonstration project that continues in baseload commercial operation. It scales up atmospheric fluidized-bed technology demonstration to the near-300-MW size, providing important data on a technology that can achieve > 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% NOx reduction at relatively high efficiencies and at costs comparable to those of conventional pulverized coal plants. The article recounts the history of the project. Performance tests showed a blend of coal and petcoke were most efficient as a feedstock. 3 figs.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

FUSRAP Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Project Project 23b 14501 FUSRAP TECHNICAL BULLETIN N O . - R 3 v . L DATE: 1.2 9-99 SUBJECT : Pr.pec.d BY T r m L u d Approval Summary of the results for the Springdale characterization activities performed per WI-94-015, Rev. 0. TUO separate radiological characterization surveys and a limited cherical characterization survey were performed on the Springdale Site in Octcjer and December, 1993. The design of the radiological surveys were to supplement and define existing ORNL surveys. The limited cher.ica1 characterization survey was performed to assist in the completion of waste disposal paperwork. Radiological contamination is primarily ir. the 'belt cutting and belt fabrication'areas of the building with a small erea of contamination in the south end of the building. The chemiccl sac~le

294

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview: Why 14 C for MVA? * Technical status: Cartridges, injections, lasers * Summary * Organizational chart * Collaborators 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Permanent storage of CO 2 can be demonstrated by adding carbon-14 ( 14 C) prior to injection. This research project aims to demonstrate this by tagging fossil CO 2 with 14 C at a field site. When completed, this system will show that 14 C can be a safe and effective tracer for sequestered CO 2 . A laser-based 14 C measurement method is being adapted for continuous monitoring. This technology contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent

295

STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

Stephen Wolhart

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Microsoft Word - EM Completed Projects 2005 to Present Cover...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ground water remediation, solid waste stabilization and disposition, nuclear and non-nuclear decommissioning and demolition. In each of these cleanup categories, EM has to...

297

Grouting project to protect Snake River Plain Aquifer completed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treated locations contain waste contaminated with mobile forms of the radionuclides technetium-99 and iodine-129 produced during historical operations at the DOEs Idaho Site....

298

Performance of Second 50 Completed ATP Projects — Status ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ie, logic and evolution) models accommodated by the ... included a distributed agent-based platform for ... to use a distributed function model versus the ...

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

299

Performance of the Third 50 Completed ATP Projects Status ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... listed is sorted in descending order of performance rating, then by ... on "a unique national measurement facility for soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy ...

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

300

The World Energy Projection System April 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The World Energy Projection System April 2002 The World Energy Projection System April 2002 Continuing with this release, annual updates to the model will be available. Check this space for scheduled future releases. Note: If you are familiar with the model and just wish to download the latest version, click HERE. The World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Appendix G: Major Assumptions for the Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasts Forecasts Summary of the AEO2001 Cases/ Scenarios - Appendix Table G1 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Model Results (Formats - PDF, ZIP) - Appendix Tables - Reference Case - 1998 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Download Report - Entire AEO2001 (PDF) - AEO2001 by Chapters (PDF) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Acronyms bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Contacts Related Links bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO2001 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 (Only available on the Web) - Regional and more detailed AEO 2001 Reference Case Results - 1998, 2000 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Forecast Homepage bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage Appendix G Major Assumptions for the Forecasts Component Modules Major Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2001

302

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook EIA Glossary Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0554(2004) Release date: February 2004 Next release date:February 2005 The Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. Table of Contents Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Household Expenditures Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module Appendix A Adobe Acrobat Logo

303

project finance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

project finance project finance Dataset Summary Description This dataset highlights trends in financing terms for U.S. renewable energy projects that closed financing between Q3 2009 and Q3 2010. Information tracked includes debt interest rates, equity returns, financial structure applied, PPA duration, and other information. NREL's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) tracks renewable energy project financing terms by technology and project size. The intelligence gathered is intended to reveal industry trends and to inform input assumptions for models. Source NREL Date Released March 27th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass financial geothermal project finance solar PV wind onshore Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon RE Project Finance Trends Q3 2009 - Q3 2010 (xlsx, 309.2 KiB)

304

Code Completion From Abbreviated Input  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abbreviation Completion is a novel technique to improve the efficiency of code-writing by supporting code completion of multiple keywords based on non-predefined abbreviated input - a different approach from conventional ...

Miller, Robert C.

305

On the use of the parabolic concentration profile assumption for a rotary desiccant dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

The current work describes a model for a desiccant dehumidifier which uses a parabolic concentration profile assumption to model the diffusion resistance inside the desiccant particle. The relative merits of the parabolic concentration profile model compared with widely utilized rotary desiccant wheel models are discussed. The periodic steady-state parabolic concentration profile model developed is efficient and can accommodate a variety of materials. These features make it an excellent tool for design studies requiring repetitive desiccant wheel simulations. A quartic concentration profile assumption was also investigated which yielded a 2.8 percent average improvement in prediction error over the parabolic model.

Chant, E.E. [Univ. of Turabo, Gurabo (Puerto Rico); Jeter, S.M. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Project Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Construction Project Construction Project Construction October 16, 2013 - 5:14pm Addthis Building Design Project Construction Commisioning Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule. Construction Team

307

Fundamentals of horizontal well completions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas wells are drilled horizontally for a variety of reasons, chiefly to improve production without drilling multiple vertical wells and to prevent water or gas coning. Benefits of horizontal drilling are well documented. This article addresses the fundamentals of completing a horizontal well, discussing completion by (1) open hole, (2) casing packers, (3) slotted or perforated liner, and (4) cemented casing/liner. Completion methods 1 through 3 are generally known as ''drain hole'' completions, and method 4 is commonly called the ''case hole'' or ''stimulated'' completion.

Austin, C.; Zimmerman, C.; Sullaway, B.; Sabins, F.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

2010sr27[cooling_tower_complete].doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Friday, September 17, 2010 Friday, September 17, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov K Cooling Tower Project Reaches Completion Aiken, S.C. - One of the most visual milestones of cleanup projects underway within the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management was the demolition of the K-Reactor Cooling Tower at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Now, this American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project has been

309

User_CompleteSF182  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completing an External Training Request (SF-182) Completing an External Training Request (SF-182) © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Job Aid: Completing an External Training Request (SF-182) Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of completing an external training request form (SF-182). Complete an External Training Request (SF-182) - 11 Steps Task A Task A. Complete an External Training Request (SF-182) From the Home page, click the External Requests easy link. Click New Request to create a new training request form. Before completing the request form, it is recommended that you review the form to determine the required fields, indicated by red asterisks. This will assist you to determine the information you need to

310

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions October 17, 2006 Simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants fuelled by natural gas are among the bulk-emission and efficient gas turbine technology made combined-cycle gas turbine power plants the "resource of choice

311

External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N. [Chicago Bridge and Iron Technical Services Co., Plainfield, IL (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you with additional clarification on: 1) the specific activities that must be accomplished before an environmental cleanup project is complete; and 2) the specific activities that need to be accomplished before the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) responsibility for a site, or portions of a site, is complete. Definition of Environmental Management (EM) Completion More Documents & Publications EM SSAB Conference Calls - January 27, 2011 Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet

313

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Progress Report No. 1. During the next six months, efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation as documented in Technical Progress Report No. 2. This report details work done with Anadarko and ChevronTexaco in the Table Rock Field in Wyoming.

None

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart: project timeline - Project Milestones - Budget - Bibliography * Thank you 29 30 Organization Chart * Project team: Purdue University - Dr. Brenda B. Bowen: PI, student...

315

DEACTIVATION COMPLETION AND TURNOVER Deactivation Completion and Turnover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPLETION AND TURNOVER COMPLETION AND TURNOVER Deactivation Completion and Turnover Overview of Turnover Turnover Checklists End-Points Closeout Method End-Point Files Description Examples of End-Point Closeout Methods Closeout Method Subjects of This Chapter Achieving consensus that deactivation is complete can involve several parties including the deactivation contractor, the Field Office, DOE Headquarters, the post-deactivation contractor, regulators, and stakeholders.  Overview of Turnover  Turnover Checklists and Documents  End-Points Closeout and Verification Overview of Turnover When facility deactivation activities are complete, some of the possibilities for the subsequent receiving organization include:  In cases of facilities that are contaminated, turnover to a remediation organization for managing

316

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Final Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 86% Construction 87% Cleanup 84% 77% Pre-CAP 89% Post-CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 4th Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 100% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

317

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Quarter Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 87% Construction 87% Cleanup 87% 77% Pre-CAP 90% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 3rd Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 98% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

318

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Quarter First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 84% Construction 83% Cleanup 85% 77% Pre-CAP 86% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 1st Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 94% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

319

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90%* 88% Construction 87% Cleanup 89% 77% Pre-CAP 92% Post- CAP This is based on a 3- year rolling average (FY10 to FY12). TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2012 Target FY 2012 2nd Qtr Actual Comment Certified EVM Systems: Post CD-3, (greater than $20 million). 95%* 96% EVM represents Earned Value Management. Certified FPD's at CD-1: Projects

320

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Macroeconomic Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Macroeconomic Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: World Electricity Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) World Electricity Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Greenhouse Gases Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Greenhouse Gases Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Natural Gas Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Natural Gas Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Main Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Main Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Information Center

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

325

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Coal Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Coal Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: District Heat Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) District Heat Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Commercial Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Commercial Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Victoria Zaretskaya

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Residential Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Residential Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

330

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Adrian Geagla

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Industrial Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) World Industrial Model (WIM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Peter Gross

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

NETL: News Release - DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2, 2005 August 2, 2005 DOE, Jacksonville Utility Complete Major Clean Coal Technology Project Eight Year Demonstration Project Results in One of World's Cleanest Coal-Based Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy and JEA, the public utility of Florida, have achieved a significant milestone in the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program by completing a project in which JEA's Northside Generating Station was converted into one of the cleanest burning coal-fired power plants in the world. MORE INFO Read the final project report [PDF-438KB] As part of the 8-year, $320 million cost-shared project, JEA installed state-of-the-art technology known as circulating fluidized bed combustion in a 300?megawatt combustor-triple the size of any previous

333

CAVITY LIKE COMPLETIONS IN WEAK SANDS PREFERRED UPSTREAM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

SciTech Connect

The technology referred to as Cavity Like Completions (CLC) offers a new technique to complete wells in friable and unconsolidated sands. A successfully designed CLC provides significant increases in well PI (performance index) at lower costs than alternative completion techniques. CLC technology is being developed and documented by a partnership of major oil and gas companies through a GPRI (Global Petroleum Research Institute) joint venture. Through the DOE-funded PUMP program, the experiences of the members of the joint venture will be described for other oil and gas producing companies. To date six examples of CLC completions have been investigated by the JV. The project was performed to introduce a new type of completion (or recompletion) technique to the industry that, in many cases, offers a more cost effective method to produce oil and gas from friable reservoirs. The project's scope of work included: (1) Further develop theory, laboratory and field data into a unified model to predict performance of cavity completion; (2) Perform at least one well test for cavity completion (well provided by one of the sponsor companies); (3) Provide summary of geo-mechanical models for PI increase; and (4) Develop guidelines to evaluate success of potential cavity completion. The project tracks the experiences of a joint industry consortium (GPRI No. 17) over a three year period and compiles results of the activities of this group.

Ian Palmer; John McLennan

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental Impact Assessment Approach, Assumptions, and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT APPROACH, ASSUMPTIONS, AND METHODOLOGY This EIS evaluates potential impacts on human health and the natural environment from building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at three alternative locations at the Paducah site and for a no action alternative. These impacts might be positive, in that they would improve conditions in the human or natural environment, or negative, in that they would cause a decline in those conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the potential impacts associated with the EIS alternatives, summarizes the major assumptions that formed the basis of the evaluation, and provides some background information on human health

335

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously derived supply curves, initial price paths and international regional supply and demand levels into NEMS. These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS because NEMS is not an international model. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2007 with the IEO2006 and the STEO some functionality was removed from the IEM. More analyst time was devoted to analyzing price relationships between marker crude oils and refined products. A new exogenous oil supply model, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also developed to incorporate actual investment occurring in the international oil market through 2015 and resource assumptions through 2030. The GWOB model provides annual country level oil production detail for eight conventional and unconventional oils.

336

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion More...

337

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

338

Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects (Double-Gatefold Brochure)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

How Does WEF Work? How Does WEF Work? Inputs The user enters data about the project, including: * General assumptions * Capital costs * Operating expenses * Financing assumptions * Tax assumptions * Economic assumptions * Financial constraining assumptions. Extensive help notes describe each input and provide reasonable default values. Outputs * Minimum energy payment to meet financial criteria * Levelized cost of energy * Payback period * Net present value * Internal rate of return * Summary and detailed cash flows. As an alternative option, if the user enters a first-year energy payment, the program will calculate the rate of return, coverage ratios, etc. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects The National Renewable Energy Laboratory created

339

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of national energy consumption by fuel typeenergy consumption in homes under differing assumptions, scenarios, and policies. At the national

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. Koomey. 1994. Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions andunits) Table A 3 : Number of Appliances in Existing Homes (sector, including appliances and heating, ventilation, and

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Complete genome sequence of Denitrovibrio acetiphilus type strain (N2460T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the complete genome sequencing and annotation. Figure 160%. Strains with a genome sequencing project registered inexamined to date. Genome sequencing and annotation Genome

Kiss, Hajnalka

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

BERGMAN TB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Property:ProjectName | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProjectName ProjectName Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ProjectName Property Type String Description Project name for smart grid projects Pages using the property "ProjectName" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 0.4 kV remote control (Smart Grid Project) + 0.4 kV remote control + 2 220 kV SSSC device for power flow control (Smart Grid Project) + 220 kV SSSC device for power flow control + A A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) + A complete and normalized 61850 substation + ADELE Project AACAES (Smart Grid Project) + ADELE Project AACAES + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration +

344

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FALLS, Idaho - The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) successfully closed out a 796 million nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning project. The work was completed about...

345

PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 When completed, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be...

346

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition Energy Department Completes K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building Demolition December 19, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 K-25 Demolition - Oak Ridge 2013 Media Contacts Ben Williams, DOE, (865) 574-4912 Wayne McKinney, UCOR, (865) 576-6284 Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today, the Department of Energy announced that its contractor URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, or UCOR, has completed demolition of the K-25 gaseous diffusion building, the largest facility in the DOE complex. UCOR took over the project in 2011 and has maintained a strong safety record while completing the demolition over one year ahead of its current schedule and approximately $300 million under the current budget. All debris removal is expected to be completed in spring 2014.

347

Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The High Level Waste (HLW) Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team was formed on March 13, 1998, and chartered to identify options, evaluate alternatives, and recommend a selected alternative(s) for processing HLW salt to a permitted wasteform. This requirement arises because the existing In-Tank Precipitation process at the Savannah River Site, as currently configured, cannot simultaneously meet the HLW production and Authorization Basis safety requirements. This engineering study was performed in four phases. This document provides the technical bases, assumptions, and results of this engineering study.

Dimenna, R.A.; Jacobs, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Durate, O.E.; Paul, P.K.; Elder, H.H.; Pike, J.A.; Fowler, J.R.; Rutland, P.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Smith III, F.G.; Hang, T.; Subosits, S.G.; Campbell, S.G.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting. DE-AC03-76SF00098 #12;i ABSTRACT This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which

349

Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

350

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Horizontal completions challenge for industry  

SciTech Connect

As the technology to drill horizontal wells continues to evolve, the problem of efficiently and cost-effectively completing such wells grows. The economics of applying horizontal technology in high-productivity reservoirs demands both increased production and lower development costs. Such high productivity reservoirs are typical of the Gulf of Mexico, North Sea, South China basin, and other areas. Lowering development costs is achieved by drilling fewer wells and in the offshore environment by reducing the number of platforms and other well structures. Specifically addressed in this article are the problems of achieving high efficiency, long lasting completions while controlling costs in unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sandstone reservoirs.

Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Spatz, E.

1988-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

CONTENTS Japan Completes First Offshore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Japan Completes First Offshore Japan Completes First Offshore Production Test .............................1 New Seismic Data Over Known Hydrate Occurrences in the Deepwater Gulf of Mexico .........3 Gas Hydrate Reservoirs in the Offshore Caribbean Region of Colombia ..........................................7 CSEM Survey of a Methane Vent Site, Offshore West Svalbard...12 Pressure Core Analysis Tools Used to Characterize Hydrate- Bearing Sediments from The Nankai Trough ..............................19 Using Noble Gas Signatures to Fingerprint Gas Streams Derived from Dissociating Methane Hydrate .......................................... 23 Announcements ...................... 27 * North Slope Oil and Gas Lands Set Aside for Methane Hydrate Research * 2014 Offshore Technology Conference to Have Sessions on

353

Project 244  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT PARTNER Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA PROJECT PARTNERS Ohio University Athens, OH Texas A&M University-Kingsville Kingsville, TX WEBSITES http:...

354

Projects | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Conferences Supporting Organizations Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Projects Projects 1-10 of 180 Results Prev...

355

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit...

356

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA-M060(2007) (Washington, DC, 2007). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Forty separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade and sulfur content), and two mine types (underground and surface). Supply curves are constructed using an econometric formulation that relates the minemouth prices of coal for the supply regions and coal types to a set of independent variables. The independent variables include: capacity utilization of mines, mining capacity, labor productivity, the user cost of capital of mining equipment, and the cost of factor inputs (labor and fuel).

357

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 3. Coal-Related  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Coal-Related Methane Assumptions Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia Eastern Interior Western Fraction of underground coal production at: Gassy mines 0.885 0.368 0.971 0.876 0.681 Nongassy mines 0.115 0.632 0.029 0.124 0.319 Production from mines with degasification systems (fraction of underground production) 0.541 0.074 0.810 0.067 0.056 Emission factors (kilograms methane per short ton of coal produced) Underground Mining Gassy mines 6.047 5.641 27.346 2.988 6.027 Nongassy mines 0.362 0.076 15.959 0.285 0.245 Degassified mines 4.085 37.724 22.025 0.310 0.000 Surface Mining 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 0.706 Post-Mining, underground-mined 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 1.505 Post-Mining, surface-mined 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 0.061 Methane recovery at active coal mines

358

Project Submission Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Cooperation International Cooperation Project Title: Country/Organizations: Foreign: Foreign POC: U.S: U.S. POC: Technology Area: Scope of Collaborative Research and Development: Justification of Approach: Work Completed to Date: Overview of Proposed Scope for FY12: Summary Brief Description of Specific Project(s): Timeline: Estimated Cost: Status: CONTINUATION or NEW? Type of Contracting Instrument: (Int'l agreements, lab-lab agreement, etc) Participant Organizations General Scope Budget Foreign (Technical Scope) US (Overhead rate) (Technical Scope) TOTAL Budget Breakdown: Overhead rates and experimental work: APPROVE ____________________ DISAPPROVE ____________________ Approving Official: Associate PDAS, Alice Williams, EM-2.1

359

Lyme Carditis with Transient Complete Heart Block  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrating complete heart block Volume XI, no . 2 : Maywith Transient Complete Heart Block Katherine W. D. Dolbecsecond-degree to first-degree heart block before complete

Dolbec, Katherine W D; Higgins, George L; Saucier, John R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Berkeley Lab - ARRA - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab Projects infrastructure Advanced Light Source User Support Building Total Project Cost: $35.1 million ARRA funding: $14.7 million The Advanced Light Source (ALS) User Support Building is a three-story, 30,928 gross-square-foot building that will house user-support operations at the ALS. It will include office and lab space for some 80 researchers. The $35-million project is funded by the DOE Office of Science. It will house experiment assembly spaces, conference rooms, and labs. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2011. Go here for more information. Bevatron demolition Total Project Cost: $50 million ARRA funding: $14.3 million Building 51, which houses the Bevatron, is an approximately 125,000 gross-square-foot, steel-frame structure built in the early 1950s. The

362

Comparison of risk-dominant scenario assumptions for several TRU waste facilities in the DOE complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to gain a risk management perspective, the DOE Rocky Flats Field Office (RFFO) initiated a survey of other DOE sites regarding risks from potential accidents associated with transuranic (TRU) storage and/or processing facilities. Recently-approved authorization basis documents at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) have been based on the DOE Standard 3011 risk assessment methodology with three qualitative estimates of frequency of occurrence and quantitative estimates of radiological consequences to the collocated worker and the public binned into three severity levels. Risk Class 1 and 2 events after application of controls to prevent or mitigate the accident are designated as risk-dominant scenarios. Accident Evaluation Guidelines for selection of Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are based on the frequency and consequence bin assignments to identify controls that can be credited to reduce risk to Risk Class 3 or 4, or that are credited for Risk Class 1 and 2 scenarios that cannot be further reduced. This methodology resulted in several risk-dominant scenarios for either the collocated worker or the public that warranted consideration on whether additional controls should be implemented. RFFO requested the survey because of these high estimates of risks that are primarily due to design characteristics of RFETS TRU waste facilities (i.e., Butler-type buildings without a ventilation and filtration system, and a relatively short distance to the Site boundary). Accident analysis methodologies and key assumptions are being compared for the DOE sites responding to the survey. This includes type of accidents that are risk dominant (e.g., drum explosion, material handling breach, fires, natural phenomena, external events, etc.), source term evaluation (e.g., radionuclide material-at-risk, chemical and physical form, damage ratio, airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, leakpath factors), dispersion analysis (e.g., meteorological assumptions, distance to receptors, plume meander, deposition, and other factors affecting the calculated {chi}/Q), dose assessments (specific activities, inhalation dose conversion factors, breathing rates), designated frequency of occurrence, and risk assignment per the DOE Standard 3011 methodology. Information from the sites is being recorded on a spreadsheet to facilitate comparisons. The first response from Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions for the Savannah River Site (SRS) also provided a detailed analysis of the major differences in methods and assumptions between RFETS and SRS, which forms much of the basis for this paper. Other sites responding to the survey include the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Hanford, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Foppe, T.L. [Foppe and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Marx, D.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Project Animate: Promoting Student Civic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matulka, a graduate student in the Political Science department was the project coordinator and we worked Coordinator Mark Matulka completed his graduate program of study in Political Science and is now a Policy

Lu, Guoiqng

364

Risk analysis for tunneling projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunnel construction is increasing world wide. Although the majority of tunnel construction projects have been completed safely, there have been several incidents that have resulted in delays, cost overruns, and sometimes ...

Sousa. Rita L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

366

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

367

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Module. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2007), (Washington, DC, 2007). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

368

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

369

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - National Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 National Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

370

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

371

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000-Table 1. Summary of the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Cases 0 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated Residential: 2000 Technology

372

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

373

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

374

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 1. Summary of AEO2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Cases 1 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 3.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $15.10 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.42 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated Residential: 2001 Technology

375

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

376

Washington International Renewable Energy Conference 2008 Pledges: Methodology and Assumptions Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2008 Washington International Renewable Energy Conference (WIREC) was held in Washington, D.C., from March 4-6, 2008, and involved nearly 9,000 people from 125 countries. The event brought together worldwide leaders in renewable energy (RE) from governments, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to discuss the role that renewables can play in alleviating poverty, growing economies, and passing on a healthy planet to future generations. The conference concluded with more than 140 governments, international organizations, and private-sector representatives pledging to advance the uptake of renewable energy. The U.S. government authorized the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the carbon dioxide (CO2) savings that would result from the pledges made at the 2008 conference. This report describes the methodology and assumptions used by NREL in quantifying the potential CO2 reductions derived from those pledges.

Babiuch, B.; Bilello, D. E.; Cowlin, S. C.; Mann, M.; Wise, A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design assumptions and bases for small D-T-fueled spherical tokamak (ST) fusion core  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in defining the assumptions and clarifying the bases for a small D-T-fueled ST fusion core are presented. The paper covers several issues in the physics of ST plasmas, the technology of neutral beam injection, the engineering design configuration, and the center leg material under intense neutron irradiation. This progress was driven by the exciting data from pioneering ST experiments, a heightened interest in proof-of-principle experiments at the MA level in plasma current, and the initiation of the first conceptual design study of the small ST fusion core. The needs recently identified for a restructured fusion energy sciences program have provided a timely impetus for examining the subject of this paper. Our results, though preliminary in nature, strengthen the case for the potential realism and attractiveness of the ST approach.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Haines, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Subcontractors complete recovery act-funded demolition under budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery act-funded demolition complete Recovery act-funded demolition complete Small business subcontractors complete recovery act-funded demolition under budget Demolition completed $16 million under budget and six months ahead of schedule. April 3, 2012 Recovery Act-funded demolitions complete The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management allocated $212 million in Recovery Act funding to Los Alamos. Some $73 million was slated for demolition. Through cost efficiencies, the Lab added two buildings to the demolition list and still finished $16 million under budget and six months ahead of schedule. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "Their outstanding performance has provided a great service to the environment and the community, resulting in a successful project under the

379

CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dig d~ch from 24-51-5TX-1 0 to 24-AX-10 and reinstall electrical wire Dig d~ch from 24-51-5TX-1 0 to 24-AX-10 and reinstall electrical wire Date: 12120/2010 DOE Coda: Contractor Coda: Project Lead: Marcus Bruckner Project Overview 1 Dig ditch from 24-51-8TX-1 0 to 24-AX-10 and remove and replace electrical wire {N 2.7o') 1. Brief project desalptlon Pnclude anything that oould impact the 2. 24-51-5TX-10 and 24-AX-10 (SW r.tN 10TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH RANGE 78WEST) environment] 2. Leg allocation 3. 1 day 3. Duration of the project 4. Major equipment to be used 4. Backhoe The table below is to be completed by the Project Leed and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and contact the Technical Assurance Department.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sensitivity of economic performance of the nuclear fuel cycle to simulation modeling assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparing different nuclear fuel cycles and assessing their implications require a fuel cycle simulation model as complete and realistic as possible. In this thesis, methodological implications of modeling choices are ...

Bonnet, Nicéphore

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

Michak, Patty

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

Malinowksi, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+): Global Activity Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Global Activity Module Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the World Energy Projection Plus (WEPS+) Global Activity Module (GAM) used to develop the International Energy Outlook for 2013 (IEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

Vipin Arora

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

Property:NEPA Completion Notes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Completion Notes Completion Notes Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Completion Notes Property Type Text Pages using the property "NEPA Completion Notes" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + 8/2: Data reviewed for completion C CA-017-05-051 + 8/9 Data entry complete. Attached FONSI does not seem to be fully related to the attached EA. The FONSI is for a geothermal well and slimhole exploration project and the EA is for a pipeline project. Need to add Public Health and Safety as a resource 8/22/13 - The 'FONSI/DR is actually for EA CA-170-02-15 Bassalt Canyon..dated Jan 2002 KW 8/26/13 - I deleted the FONSI from this page. Filename is incorrect for the file and stands as "CA-017-05-51-EA-DR -FONSI.pdf," Andrew Gentile. Unable to find Final EA or FONSI online. When RMP added, add "Inyo National Forest "Land and Resource Management Plan" (LRMP) 1988"

387

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

388

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

389

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Management Plan Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan Examples Management Plan Examples The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The elements table below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Elements of Deactivation Project Planning Deactivation Project Key Planning Elements Reference DOE O 430.1A Reference DOE G 430.1-3 DOE G 430.1- 3 Fig. 1 Link to Examples Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Sect. 6.e.7.a Sect. 4.1.1 Step 1 1. Example 1

390

50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. C. David Williams with an X-ray diffraction apparatus used to measure lattice spacing of filaments in moth wing muscle samples. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Credit: A. Kidder/University of Washington. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. To view a larger, downloadable version of the image, click on it. 50-year-old assumptions about strength muscled aside July 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - Doctors have a new way of thinking about how to treat heart and skeletal muscle diseases. Body builders have a new way of

391

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind.112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

392

Standard assumptions and methods for solar heating and cooling systems analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of inputs, assumptions, analytical methods, and a reporting format is presented to help compare the results of residential and commercial solar system analyses being performed by different investigators. By the common use of load data, meteorological data, economic parameters, and reporting format, researchers examining, for example, two types of collectors may more easily compare their results. For residential heating and cooling systems, three locations were selected. The weather data chosen to characterize these cities are the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY). A house for each location was defined that is typical of new construction in that locale. Hourly loads for each location were calculated using a computerized load model that interacts with the system specified inputs characterizing each house. Four locations for commercial cooling analyses were selected from among the existing sites for which TMYs were available. A light commercial (nominal 25-ton cooling load) office building was defined and is used in all four locations. Hourly cooling and heating loads were computed for each city and are available on magnetic tape from the Solar Energy Research Insititute (SERI).

Leboeuf, C.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Tevatron Run II Physics Projections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Document for the P5 Committee (version 8, September 30, 2005) Electroweak Precision Measurements and Standard Model Higgs Searches W Mass Measurement: 20 - 30 MeV Projections versus Integrated Luminosity (made by CDF): eps, gif, gif (log) Extrapolated from Run Ib measurement Uncertainties assumed to scale with luminosity: Statiscal uncertainties Systematic uncertainties such as Energy and momentum scale, Hadron Recoil against W Uncertainties assumed not to scale with luminosity: W production and decay: PDFs, d(sigma_W)/d(Pt), higher order QCD/QED effects Assumed to be beween 20 MeV (dashed lines) and 30 MeV (solid lines) Top Mass Measurement: ~1.5 GeV Assumptions Channel: only lepton+jets channle considered. Uncertainties that scale with luminosity - 1 / sqrt(lum)

394

Workers Complete Demolition of Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Demolition of Hanford's Historic Plutonium Workers Complete Demolition of Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults Workers Complete Demolition of Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company this month completed demolition of a large plutonium vault complex, formerly one of the highest security facilities at the Hanford site. "This project was a joint safety success between our workers who spent months cleaning out the facilities, the demolition crews who tore the buildings down and the crews who helped remove the waste for disposal. It took teamwork and cooperation to remove the complex safely and efficiently," said Ty Blackford, CH2M HILL Vice President of Decommissioning, Waste, Fuels and Remediation Services.

395

Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters Building to Save Money by Saving Energy Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters Building to Save Money by Saving Energy December 14, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - Secretary Steven Chu today announced the completion of a new cool roof installation on the Department of Energy's Headquarters West Building. There was no incremental cost to adding the cool roof as part of the roof replacement project and it will save taxpayers $2,000 every year in building energy costs. Cool roofs use lighter-colored roofing surfaces or special coatings to reflect more of the sun's heat, helping improve building efficiency, reduce cooling costs and offset carbon emissions. The cool roof and increased insulation at the facility were

396

LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. September 22, 2011 Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation. Contact Colleen Curran Communicatons Office (505) 664-0344 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 22, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed excavation of its oldest waste disposal site, Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B). The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. MDA-B was used from 1944-48 as a waste disposal site for Manhattan Project and Cold War-era research and

397

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Media Contact: News Media Contact: Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 For Immediate Release Date: June 23, 2010 Idaho Site Completes Cleanup Milestone Ahead of Schedule Idaho Falls, ID � The Department of Energy�s Idaho Operations Office, through the efforts of its cleanup contractor, CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), recently reached a key cleanup milestone three weeks ahead of schedule by completing the transfer of nearly 6.6 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel from wet to dry storage. �The transfer of spent nuclear fuel from wet to dry storage represents a major contract milestone completion by CWI, a five year endeavor,� said Jim Cooper, DOE-ID Acting Deputy Manager for the Idaho Cleanup Project. �Completion of this campaign places the spent fuel in a safer configuration for the environment, complies with DOE�s commitment to the

398

Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers successfully transferred 130 containers of remote-handled transuranic waste – each weighing up to 15 tons – to a facility for repackaging and shipment to a permanent disposal location. As part of a project funded by $90 million from the Recovery Act, the final shipment of the containers from the Materials and Fuels Complex recently arrived at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act More Documents & Publications EIS-0203-SA-03: Supplement Analysis

399

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

400

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY J.-1{p Project Information Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

}:- }:- J.-1{p Project Information Project Title: Flowline leak @ 68-66-SX-34 Date: 1/26/2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview 011..- 1. What are the environmental Elimination of the flowline@ 68-66- SX-34. Dig up and locate leak. Take p ntaminated soil to land fann and impacts? record in log book. The duration of this project will be approx. 4-days. The equipment to be used is as follows backhoe, and welder. We will be eliminating the flowline and pumping to a tank set on location.So we don't 2. What is the legal location? have any leaks in the Mure. 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? The table below Is to be completed by the Project Lead and nwlewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geothermal Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, 2010 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Citation U.S. Geothermal Inc.. 2010. U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes Production Wells Needed for Project. Boise Idaho: (!) . Report No.: N/A.

402

Assessment of Project Management Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Project Management Experience PMCDP for CEG Competency 1.12.2 Assessment of Project Management Experience PMCDP for CEG Competency 1.12.2 Applicant Name: Applicant Supervisor: Date (mm/dd/yyyy): Directions: Step 1: Use this template to show project management experience for CEG competency 1.12.2. Rate your experience (0 - 5) in the following project management related activities using the scale below. Step 2: Sign the completed form and have your supervisor review and sign it. Step 3: Once approved by your supervisor, submit the form as part of your Level I certification package. Note: Project management experience is distinguished from FPD experience and applies to general project management activities and experience. Positions that do not count towards experience in project management include: program manager, property manager, health, safety and security (HSS) positions, and

403

Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

On self-help in a site and services project in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of self-help in a site and services project is based on the assumption that given the security of land tenureship_, an owner-builder can manage the whole process of house implementation. Generally, in any ...

Soni, Praful Naran

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A HMM-based hierarchical framework for long-term population projection of small areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population Projection is the numerical outcome of a specific set of assumptions about future population changes. It is indispensable to the planning of sites as almost all successive planning activities such as the identification of land and housing ...

Bin Jiang; Huidong Jin; Nianjun Liu; Mike Quirk; Ben Searle

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

408

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development, and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

The Division of Geothermal Energy ''Geothermal Project Summaries'' provides pertinent information on each active ERDA Geothermal project, includes a listing of all contractors and a compilation of completed projects. New project summaries and necessary revisions to current project data will be prepared on a quarterly basis.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development, and demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Division of Geothermal Energy ''Geothermal Project Summaries'' provides pertinent information on each active ERDA Geothermal project, includes a listing of all contractors and a compilation of completed projects. New project summaries and necessary revisions to current project data will be prepared on a quarterly basis.

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Tucson Solar Village: Project management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tucson Solar Village is a Design/Build Project In Sustainable Community Development which responds to a broad spectrum of energy, environmental, and economic challenges. This project is designed for 820 acres of undeveloped State Trust Land within the Tucson city limits; residential population will be five to six thousand persons with internal employment provided for 1200. This is a 15 year project (for complete buildout and sales) with an estimated cost of $500 million. Details of the project are addressed with emphasis on the process and comments on its transferability.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

412

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

413

Project 364  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

765-494-5623 lucht@purdue.edu DEVELOPMENT OF NEW OPTICAL SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS, SPECIATION, AND CHEMISTRY Project Description The feasibility of...

414

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State...

415

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

416

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

417

Project 283  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NJ 07039 973-535 2328 ArchieRobertson@fwc.com Sequestration ADVANCED CO 2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION Background This project will develop a conceptual power plant design...

418

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh,...

419

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interdisciplinary Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford...

420

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Concrete products in this project * Standard 8" concrete blocks * Standard 4' x 8' fiber-cement boards CO 2 The Goals * Maximizing carbon uptake by carbonation (at least...

422

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Evaluating Potential Groundwater Impacts and Natural Geochemical...

423

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date...

424

Project 252  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford Global Climate Energy Project Terralog Technologies TransAlta University of Alaska Fairbanks Washington State Department of Natural Resources Western Interstate...

425

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research partnership to improve the understanding of CO 2 within coal and shale reservoirs. 2 2 3 Presentation Outline * Program Goal and Benefits Statement * Project...

426

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanistic insights 5 Project Overview: Scope of work * Task 1 - Pipeline and Casing Steel Corrosion Studies * Evaluate corrosion behavior of pipeline steels in CO 2 mixtures...

427

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project Program Goals * Technical...

428

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* This project pinpoints the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide conversion to acrylate, validate the chemical catalysis approach, and develop an...

429

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources...

430

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number...

431

Transition projects, Fiscal Year 1996: Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for WBS 1.31, 7.1, and 6.13. Revision 1, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) review, specific areas of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Transition Projects ``Draft`` Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) were revised in preparation for the RL approval ceremony on September 26, 1995. These changes were reviewed with the appropriate RL Project Manager. The changes have been incorporated to the MYPP electronic file, and hard copies replacing the ``Draft`` MYPP will be distributed after the formal signing. In addition to the comments received, a summary level schedule and outyear estimates for the K Basin deactivation beginning in FY 2001 have been included. The K Basin outyear waste data is nearing completion this week and will be incorporated. This exclusion was discussed with Mr. N.D. Moorer, RL, Facility Transition Program Support/Integration. The attached MYPP scope/schedule reflects the Integrated Target Case submitted in the April 1995 Activity Data Sheets (ADS) with the exception of B Plant and the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The 8 Plant assumption in FY 1997 reflects the planning case in the FY 1997 ADS with a shortfall of $5 million. PFP assumptions have been revised from the FY 1997 ADS based on the direction provided this past summer by DOE-Headquarters. This includes the acceleration of the polycube stabilization back to its originally planned completion date. Although the overall program repricing in FY 1996 allowed the scheduled acceleration to fall with the funding allocation, the FY 1997 total reflects a shortfall of $6 million.

Cartmell, D.B.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Boston College Facilities Management Summer Projects 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# Building / Location Project Description Resp Mgr Project Mgr 1 8131515 2000 Comm Ave Cooling Towers : This project completes this phase of the renewal of 2000 Commonwealth Ave with cooling tower upgrades. Mike split system for the UPS room. Terence Leahy Terence Leahy 9 8141205 Carney Hall Cooling Tower Upgrades

Huang, Jianyu

433

River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection (ORP) Project Management Plan (PMP) for the River Protection Project (RPP) describes the process for developing and operating a Waste Treatment Complex (WTC) to clean up Hanford Site tank waste. The Plan describes the scope of the project, the institutional setting within which the project must be completed, and the management processes and structure planned for implementation. The Plan is written from the perspective of the ORP as the taxpayers' representative. The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has one of the largest concentrations of radioactive waste in the world, as a result of producing plutonium for national defense for more than 40 years. Approximately 53 million gallons of waste stored in 177 aging underground tanks represent major environmental, social, and political challenges for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These challenges require numerous interfaces with state and federal environmental officials, Tribal Nations, stakeholders, Congress, and the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ). The cleanup of the Site's tank waste is a national issue with the potential for environmental and economic impacts to the region and the nation.

NAVARRO, J.E.

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

All Complete Intersection Calabi-Yau Four-Folds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an exhaustive, constructive, classification of the Calabi-Yau four-folds which can be described as complete intersections in products of projective spaces. A comprehensive list of 921,497 configuration matrices which represent all topologically distinct types of complete intersection Calabi-Yau four-folds is provided and can be downloaded at http://www-thphys.physics.ox.ac.uk/projects/CalabiYau/Cicy4folds/index.html . The manifolds have non-negative Euler characteristics in the range 0 - 2610. This data set will be of use in a wide range of physical and mathematical applications. Nearly all of these four-folds are elliptically fibered and are thus of interest for F-theory model building.

James Gray; Alexander S. Haupt; Andre Lukas

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

ORISE: Completion of environmental characterization at ORNL a Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORISE's completion of environmental characterization at ORNL is a ORISE's completion of environmental characterization at ORNL is a Recovery Act success Exterior of K-33 superstructure at ORNL This 2.8 million-square-foot facility known as K-33 was formerly used to house a uranium-enrichment operation during the Manhattan Project. The superstructure was one of three dozen facilities ORISE characterized under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-an effort that proved to be challenging due to the complexity of the facilities and the project's accelerated timeline. Photo courtesy of DOE. Over the past year and a half, funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has made its way into Oak Ridge, Tenn. That has meant that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), which is managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities, has been very busy

436

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a cost of $8.9 million, $2.9 million under budget. The manmade earthen basin received ash from the former R Area Pow- erhouse operations, which ended in 1964. The first of five reactors con- structed at SRS, the R Reactor produced nuclear materials for national defense. Recovery Act funding allowed SRS to accelerate cleanup of the basin and complete the project five years earlier than the target set in a regu- latory schedule. In late 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control determined the closure met all regulatory requirements after inspection

437

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications  

SciTech Connect

Tubel Tech has been working with the DoE Rocky Mountain test center to create a CRADA which will allow Tubel Tech to test its wireless gauge in a well at the test center. The CRADA agreement should be completed by the next quarter and Tubel Tech expects to perform the final test on this project during the next quarter as well. The wireless gauge has not been modified or upgraded during this report period.

Paul Tubel

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Manhattan Project: Science  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Science In the Laboratory Particle Accelerators and Other Technologies The Atom and Atomic Structure Nuclear Physics Bomb Design and Components Radioactivity Science and technology of the Manhattan Project Science PLEASE NOTE: The Science pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the science and technology of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of scientific topics useful for understanding the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all science pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

440

NETL: Deepwater Technology Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture | Safety & Environmental | Other UDW Technology | Completed DW Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10121-4306-01 All Electric Subsea Autonomous High Integrity Pressure Protection System (HIPPS) Architecture GE Global Research 10121-4401-02 Ultra-Deepwater Riser Concepts for High Motion Vessels Stress Engineering Services, Inc. 10121-4405-02 Ultra-deepwater Dry Tree System for Drilling and Production in the Gulf of Mexico Det Norske Veritas 10121-4505-01 Coil Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using Cost Effective Vessel Nautilus International, LLC 09121-3500-01 Intelligent Production System for Ultra-Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer for Lateral Production Control and Optimization

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Manhattan Project: Places  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Places Places "Met Lab" (Metallurgical Laboratory) Oak Ridge: Clinton Engineer Works Hanford Engineer Works Los Alamos Other Places Places of the Manhattan Project Places PLEASE NOTE: The Places pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the places where the Manhattan Project occurred have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of places involved in the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all place pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

442

Header with Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5NT42646 Zero Emissions Coal Syngas-Oxygen Turbo Machinery 5NT42646 Zero Emissions Coal Syngas-Oxygen Turbo Machinery FACT SHEET (42646) Oct. 2006 I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS A. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. B. Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. C. Clean Energy Systems, Inc. II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objective(s) - To develop a cost effective and highly efficient turbo machinery system that will work with an oxy-fuel combustor that generates very high temperature CO2 and steam mixture as the working fluid. After expansion of the working fluid, the CO2 is captured allowing near-zero emissions of NOx and carbon. The project will complete conceptual designs of alternate steam cycles and select one cycle for detailed design based on cost and feasibility studies. B. Relevancy - 1. Background: CES, Inc. has an operational oxy-fuel combustor that generates

443

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

444

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

445

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

446

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

447

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

448

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snøhvit CO Snøhvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

449

Project title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

450

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

451

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

452

Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-5  

SciTech Connect

The Well Cluster ER-20-5 drilling and completion project was conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Its primary tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, hydrological, and water chemistry data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality in addition to pathways and rates of groundwater migration. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented to obtain site-specific data about the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides that might have been produced by an underground nuclear explosion. Well Cluster ER-20-5 is the first near-field drilling project initiated at the NTS. This document presents construction data and summarizes the scientific data gathered during the drilling and well-installation phases for all three holes drilled at Well Cluster ER-20-5. Some of this information is preliminary and unprocessed, but was released so that drilling, geotechnical, well design, and completion data could be rapidly disseminated. Additional information about water levels, aquifer testing, and groundwater sampling will be reported after any of this work is performed. Any additional geologic and/or geophysical investigations conducted for this project is described in one or more analysis and interpretation reports. The lithologic and stratigraphic logs, however, are provided in final form.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Mississippi CCS Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

Doug Cathro

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing...

455

ProjectBrochure Manhattanville in West Harlem Installation of New Sewer and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sewer Project Project Brochure Borough: Manhattan Project Description: New Storm and Combined StormProjectBrochure Manhattanville in West Harlem Installation of New Sewer and Upgrade of Combined/Sanitary Sewers Project Start: September 15, 2009 Tentative Project Completion: Spring 2011 Project Cost

Qian, Ning

456

Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The World Energy Projection System April 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The World Energy Projection System April 2001 The World Energy Projection System April 2001 Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Updates April 20, 2001 (Next Release: April, 2002) Related Links To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Printer Friendly Version Continuing with this release, annual updates to the model will be available. Check this space for scheduled future releases. Note: If you are familiar with the model and just wish to download the latest version, click HERE. The World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures,

458

Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Foster, Brian [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sandia/DOE geothermal drilling and completion technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs 25% by 1982 and 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has managed this technology development program since October 1977, and this paper presents an overview of the program. A statement of program goals and structure is given. The content of the FY-79 program is presented and recent results of R and D projects are given. Plans for development of an advanced drilling and completion system are discussed.

Barnette, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Western LNG project - Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western LNG Project is a major new undertaking involving the liquefaction of conventional natural gas from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin at a plant on the British Columbia north coast. The gas in its liquid form will be shipped to Japan for consumption by utility companies. The Project represents a new era in gas processing and marketing for the Canadian natural gas industry.

Forgues, E.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assumptions complete projection" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

462

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

463

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

464

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Multiphase of Multiphase Flow for Improved Injectivity and Trapping 4000.4.641.251.002 Dustin Crandall, URS PI: Grant Bromhal, NETL ORD Morgantown, West Virginia U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Breakdown of FY12 project tasks * Facilities and personnel * Task progress to date * Planned task successes * Tech transfer and summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

465

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Project benefits s