Sample records for assessment programs chemical

  1. Information resources for assessing health effects from chemical exposure: Office of pesticides programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Pesticide Programs is trying to develop a complete picture of a chemical`s toxicity and exposure profile. It is also important to share information in the office`s files because of pesticides, particularly as a consequence of agricultural use, find their way into places not necessarily intended.

  2. Alternative Feedstocks Program Technical and Economic Assessment: Thermal/Chemical and Bioprocessing Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozell, J. J.; Landucci, R.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This resource document on biomass to chemicals opportunities describes the development of a technical and market rationale for incorporating renewable feedstocks into the chemical industry in both a qualitative and quantitative sense. The term "renewable feedstock?s" can be defined to include a huge number of materials such as agricultural crops rich in starch, lignocellulosic materials (biomass), or biomass material recovered from a variety of processing wastes.

  3. Environmental assessment, aircraft chemical warfare survivability test program, Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed project, the Aircraft Chemical Warfare Survivability Test Program at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, involves the testing and development of aircraft systems and operating procedures for use in an environment contaminated with chemical/biological warfare agents. The tests will be performed in accordance with a directive from the chief of Naval Operations to obtain and maintain the capability to operate in a chemically-contaminated environment. These tests will be performed under outdoor, warm-weather conditions on a dredge disposal area and adjacent runways to simulate the conditions under which a real-life threat would be encountered.

  4. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental monitoring programs Operational environments Decontamination and decommissioning projects Compliance assessments Radiological release programs ORISE is actively...

  5. Recycling and surplus chemical programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, T.J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988, 45 years of defense production came to a close at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The mission of the Hanford Site was formally changed to environmental restoration and remediation. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the management and operations (M&O) contractor leading the cleanup. Within the framework of future Site cleanup, Hanford recycling and surplus chemical programs are making a viable contribution today to waste minimization, diversion of materials from the waste stream, and setting a standard for future operations. This paper focuses on two successful efforts: paper recycling and surplus chemical sales.

  6. chemical (CHE) CHE overview programs available

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , Environmental, Manufacturing and Petroleum En- gineering. Programs Available · Chemical Engineering Bachelor Engineering (Environmental) Bachelor of Science 135 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering (Polymer Science) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Petroleum

  7. Sandia Energy - Assessment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJulyCatalystsMolten-SaltAssessment Program

  8. UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan UR Undergraduate BS Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan UR Undergraduate BS Earth and Environmental Sciences Program Learning Objectives and Assessment Plan Students will as their physical, chemical, and biological characteristics. #12;UR Earth and Environmental Sciences Program

  9. ORISE: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Training and Analysis Tool Training Tool Improves Information Sharing Between CSEPP and its Response Partners In 2006,...

  10. Sandia Energy - Assessment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    petroleum storage and refineries; and transportation systems. Assessments were an early way to help clarify the systems as they existed in the field. This knowledge has...

  11. Dow Chemical Company: Assessment Leads to Steam System Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dow Chemical Company: Assessment Leads to Steam System Energy Savings in a Petrochemical Plant Dow Chemical Company: Assessment Leads to Steam System Energy Savings in a...

  12. Watershed Assessment Program Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Proposal to model urban storm-water control practices · Teach advanced graduate course ­ BASINS and SWAT · Monitoring Activities · Modeling Activities · Remote Sensing / GIS · Sources of Funding · What do We Need · Much more monitoring being done by cities and local governments ­ Source water assessment work done

  13. Assessment of Chemical and Radiological Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SETH, S.S.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the May 14, 1997 chemical explosion at Hanford's Plutonium Reclamation Facility, the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and its prime contractor, Fluor Hanford, Inc., completed an extensive assessment to identify and address chemical and radiological safety vulnerabilities at all facilities under the Project Hanford Management Contract. This was a challenging undertaking because of the immense size of the problem, unique technical issues, and competing priorities. This paper focuses on the assessment process, including the criteria and methodology for data collection, evaluation, and risk-based scoring. It does not provide details on the facility-specific results and corrective actions, but discusses the approach taken to address the identified vulnerabilities.

  14. Assessment of government tribology programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.B.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment has been made to determine current tribology research and development work sponsored or conducted by the government. Data base surveys and discussions were conducted to isolate current projects sponsored primarily by 21 different government organizations. These projects were classified by subject, objective, energy relevance, type of research, phenomenon being investigated, variables being studied, type of motion, materials and application. An abstract of each project was prepared which included the classification, sponsor, performing organization and a project description. It was found that current work is primarily materials oriented to meet military requirements. Other than the high temperature programs very few of the tribology projects accomplish energy related objectives.

  15. Chemicals from biomass: an assessment of the potential for production of chemical feedstocks from renewable resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, T.L.; Culberson, O.L.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of the potential for production of commodity chemicals from renewable biomass resources is based on (1) a Delphi study with 50 recognized authorities to identify key technical issues relevant to production of chemicals from biomass, and (2) a systems model based on linear programming for a commodity chemicals industry using renewable resources and coal as well as gas and petroleum-derived resources. Results from both parts of the assessment indicate that, in the absence of gas and petroleum, coal undoubtedly would be a major source of chemicals first, followed by biomass. The most attractive biomass resources are wood, agricultural residues, and sugar and starch crops. A reasonable approximation to the current product slate for the petrochemical industry could be manufactured using only renewable resources for feedstocks. Approximately 2.5 quads (10/sup 15/ Btu (1.055 x 10/sup 18/ joules)) per year of oil and gas would be released. Further use of biomass fuels in the industry could release up to an additional 1.5 quads. however, such an industry would be unprofitable under current economic conditions with existing or near-commercial technology. As fossil resources become more expensive and biotechnology becomes more efficient, the economics will be more favorable. Use of the chemicals industry model to evaluate process technologies is demonstrated. Processes are identified which have potential for significant added value to the system if process improvements can be made to improve the economics. Guidelines and recommendations for research and development programs to improve the attractiveness of chemicals from biomass are discussed.

  16. Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Optics and Optical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning, and processes that underlie optics and optical engineering. 2. Strong understanding of the fundamental science, mathematics, and processes that underlie optics and optical

  17. ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING PROGRAM ASSESSMENT PLAN Program Learning underlying electrical and computer engineering analysis and design, including fundamental a sufficient foundation in the fundamental areas of electrical and computer engineering

  18. City of Aspen- Energy Assessment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Aspen encourages interested residents and businesses to increase the energy efficiency of homes and offices through the Energy Assessment Program. Participating homes and offices must...

  19. Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Financing Financing Structures Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs The property-assessed clean energy (PACE) model is an...

  20. Assessing Thermo-Hydrodynamic-Chemical Processes at the Dixie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transport Modeling Approach Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Assessing Thermo-Hydrodynamic-Chemical Processes at the Dixie...

  1. SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan Wisconsin Center for Applied, Technical Staff & Chemical Hygiene Officer kakupcho@wisc.edu 262-2982 Lab Facility Website http..........................................................................................................3 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN III. Work-site Analysis and Hazard Identification 3.1 Hazardous Chemical

  2. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  3. Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS as required under the CONTROL OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled

  4. assessment program waterborne: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along with all other public institutions O'Laughlin, Jay 11 PROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews...

  5. assessment program napap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along with all other public institutions O'Laughlin, Jay 12 PROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews...

  6. assessment program cariogram: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along with all other public institutions O'Laughlin, Jay 11 PROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews...

  7. assessment program ehap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along with all other public institutions O'Laughlin, Jay 11 PROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews...

  8. assessment programs standards: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along with all other public institutions O'Laughlin, Jay 14 PROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews...

  9. assessment program elcap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along with all other public institutions O'Laughlin, Jay 12 PROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews...

  10. The Chemical Engineering Ph.D. Program Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    and engineering knowledge in a particular area of scholarship. The conduct of this research, as well a foundation of technical knowledge in chemical engineering. This knowledge should be obtained in a wayThe Chemical Engineering Ph.D. Program Department of Chemical Engineering University of Delaware

  11. Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

    2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

  12. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurse TriageInternationalRadiological program

  13. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

  14. Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

  15. Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-1636E Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual Prepared by: Environment Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University

  16. National toxicology program chemical nomination and selection process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkirk, J.K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was organized to support national public health programs by initiating research designed to understand the physiological, metabolic, and genetic basis for chemical toxicity. The primary mandated responsibilities of NTP were in vivo and vitro toxicity testing of potentially hazardous chemicals; broadening the spectrum of toxicological information on known hazardous chemicals; validating current toxicological assay systems as well as developing new and innovative toxicity testing technology; and rapidly communicating test results to government agencies with regulatory responsibilities and to the medical and scientific communities. 2 figs.

  17. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (rev. 7/03/2012) Page 1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    employers covered by the standard develop a Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP). A CHP is a written program which, the CHP must include standard operating procedures, criteria for the implementation of chemical control for the interpretation and enforcement of policies described in this CHP. The Environmental Health & Safety staff

  18. assessment program plan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Biomedical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives 1. Students should be able to draw upon basic knowledge knowledge of the basic principles of...

  19. Assessing Revenue Streams: What Is Right for Your Program? |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Assessing Revenue Streams: What is Right for Your Program? Call Slides and Summary, January 10, 2013, The purpose of this call was to...

  20. Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability of Chemical Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahnoune, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life Cycle Assessment & Sustainability of Chemical Products Abdelhadi Sahnoune ExxonMobil Chemical Company Industrial Energy Technology Conference (IETC 2014) New Orleans, May 20-23, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-38 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial... Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Products in our daily lives Plastics Packaging - Protects and extends shelf life Building & Construction Insulation, design, flooring Plastics in Automotive Applications - Light weighting...

  1. Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences Program | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the RotatingChemical Sciences,

  2. assessment technology program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Advanced Technology Program Information Infrastructure for Healthcare Focused 137 Technology assessment of renewable energy sustainability in South Africa. Open Access...

  3. assessment program deliverables: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...1-1 2.0 Overview and Strategy of Compliance Audit and Review Program...2 37 MSU Departmental Assessment...

  4. assessment program western: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...1-1 2.0 Overview and Strategy of Compliance Audit and Review Program...2 54 MSU Departmental Assessment...

  5. Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals The following outline provides) or other sources of information. In cases where substances with significant or unusual potential hazards of experience and the degree of potential hazard associated with the proposed experiment, it may be necessary

  6. Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auletta, A.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

  7. Effect of radon dose on cleanup criteria and using RESRAD for chemical risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wallo, A. III (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy has used RESRAD, a pathway analysis program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, in conjunction with the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle to develop site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines (cleanup criteria) for many sites. This study examines the effects of the radon pathway, recently added to the RESRAD program, on the calculation of uranium, radium, and thorium cleanup criteria. The results show that the derived uranium guidelines will not be affected by the radon ingrowth considerations. The effect of radon on radium and thorium generic guidelines is more significant, but the model does indicate that at the generic soil limits used for radium and thorium the indoor radon decay product concentrations would be below the 0.02 working level standard. This study also examines the feasibility of applying RESRAD to chemical risk assessment. The results show that RESRAD can perform risk assessment of toxic chemicals after simple modifications. Expansion of the RESRAD database to include chemical compounds will increase its capability to handle chemical risk assessments. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. ELECTRIC INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TREMEL, CHARLES L

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Electric Infrastructure Technology, Training and Assessment Program was to enhance the reliability of electricity delivery through engineering integration of real-time technologies for wide-area applications enabling timely monitoring and management of grid operations. The technologies developed, integrated, tested and demonstrated will be incorporated into grid operations to assist in the implementation of performance-based protection/preventive measures into the existing electric utility infrastructure. This proactive approach will provide benefits of reduced cost and improved reliability over the typical schedule-based and as needed maintenance programs currently performed by utilities. Historically, utilities have relied on maintenance and inspection programs to diagnose equipment failures and have used the limited circuit isolation devices, such as distribution main circuit breakers to identify abnormal system performance. With respect to reliable problem identification, customer calls to utility service centers are often the sole means for utilities to identify problem occurrences and determine restoration methodologies. Furthermore, monitoring and control functions of equipment and circuits are lacking; thus preventing timely detection and response to customer outages. Finally, the two-way flow of real-time system information is deficient, depriving decision makers of key information required to effectively manage and control current electric grid demands to provide reliable customer service in abnormal situations. This Program focused on advancing technologies and the engineering integration required to incorporate them into the electric grid operations to enhance electrical system reliability and reduce utility operating costs.

  9. Planning guidance for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shumpert, B.L.; Watson, A.P.; Sorensen, J.H. [and others] and others

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This planning guide was developed under the direction of the U.S. Army and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which jointly coordinate and direct the development of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). It was produced to assist state, local, and Army installation planners in formulating and coordinating plans for chemical events that may occur at the chemical agent stockpile storage locations in the continental United States. This document provides broad planning guidance for use by both on-post and off-post agencies and organizations in the development of a coordinated plan for responding to chemical events. It contains checklists to assist in assuring that all important aspects are included in the plans and procedures developed at each Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP) location. The checklists are supplemented by planning guidelines in the appendices which provide more detailed guidance regarding some issues. The planning guidance contained in this document will help ensure that adequate coordination between on-post and off-post planners occurs during the planning process. This planning guide broadly describes an adequate emergency planning base that assures that critical planning decisions will be made consistently at every chemical agent stockpile location. This planning guide includes material drawn from other documents developed by the FEMA, the Army, and other federal agencies with emergency preparedness program responsibilities. Some of this material has been developed specifically to meet the unique requirements of the CSEPP. In addition to this guidance, other location-specific documents, technical studies, and support studies should be used as needed to assist in the planning at each of the chemical agent stockpile locations to address the specific hazards and conditions at each location.

  10. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a ``glass like`` material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  11. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a glass like'' material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  12. A program risk assessment method for aviation technology transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Jonathan Marcus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a method for assessing the potential impacts of program risks on aviation technology transitions. It first establishes a framework that provides a methodology to complete the assessment of those risks. ...

  13. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - NNSA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NNSA Production Office - 2014 Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - NNSA Production Office - 2014 In preparation for the upcoming Chief for Defense Nuclear...

  14. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Los...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the TQP self-assessment was to evaluate the personnel, procedures, and management control systems that demonstrate an effective program for ensuring the technical...

  15. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    identify significant energy savings opportunities in their Dalton, Georgia, plant's steam system. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw...

  16. assessment program emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 Project Information Form Project Title Program for Vehicle Regulatory Reform: Assessing Life Cycle-Based Geosciences Websites Summary: Project Information Form Project...

  17. NANA Geothermal Assessment Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay Hermanson

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, NANA Regional Corporation (NRC) assessed geothermal energy potential in the NANA region for both heat and/or electricity production. The Geothermal Assessment Project (GAP) was a systematic process that looked at community resources and the community's capacity and desire to develop these resources. In October 2007, the US Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program awarded grant DE-FG36-07GO17075 to NRC for the GAP studies. Two moderately remote sites in the NANA region were judged to have the most potential for geothermal development: (1) Granite Mountain, about 40 miles south of Buckland, and (2) the Division Hot Springs area in the Purcell Mountains, about 40 miles south of Shungnak and Kobuk. Data were collected on-site at Granite Mountain Hot Springs in September 2009, and at Division Hot Springs in April 2010. Although both target geothermal areas could be further investigated with a variety of exploration techniques such as a remote sensing study, a soil geochemical study, or ground-based geophysical surveys, it was recommended that on-site or direct heat use development options are more attractive at this time, rather than investigations aimed more at electric power generation.

  18. Self-assessment program implementation plan. Revision A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quets, A.L.

    1991-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This implementation plan identifies and describes the tasks that must be completed in order to successfully implement a Self-Assessment (SA) Program. The purpose of the Self-Assessment Program is to comply with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) directives and orders, Federal, State, and local regulations, operate the Pinellas Plant according to best management practices, and achieve excellence in all operating areas. The Self-Assessment Program will be applied to the Pinellas Plant facility which includes buildings, grounds, equipment, operations, and activities under the control of line management. Furthermore, all applicable disciplines under environmental protection, safety, health and management will be covered by the program. The Self-Assessment Program has been designed to accomplish the following tasks: define the scope of the Self-Assessment Program; assign organizational roles and responsibilities; address EH and S functional elements and management issues; develop a Self-Assessment program charter and policy; identify all applicable EH and S codes, regulations and standards; develop self-assessment procedures and instructions; generate a Self-Assessment Manual; develop a master schedule for facility appraisals and audits; design checklists and report formats for recording appraisal data; implement an assessment tracking and reporting system; implement a root cause analysis and corrective action system; implement a trend analysis and lessons learned system; and establish a formal training program.

  19. Outcomes Assessment and Program Improvement Master of Science in Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Outcomes Assessment and Program Improvement Master of Science in Finance SECTION 1 PAST ASSESSMENT RESULTS The Master of Science in Finance is a terminal professional degree that is designed to provide students a strong foundation in the principles and practices of finance. The program also

  20. EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass, plastic and metal bottles and containers that previously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass Disposal Guide. Do not place empty chemical bottles in commingled recycling bins on hallways, trash cans and with a 20 gallons capacity. It is made of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with 100% post-consumer recycled

  1. NANA Wind Resource Assessment Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay Hermanson

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    NANA Regional Corporation (NRC) of northwest Alaska is located in an area with abundant wind energy resources. In 2007, NRC was awarded grant DE-FG36-07GO17076 by the US Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program for funding a Wind Resource Assessment Project (WRAP) for the NANA region. The NANA region, including Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA) and Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC) have been national leaders at developing, designing, building, and operating wind-diesel hybrid systems in Kotzebue (starting in 1996) and Selawik (2002). Promising sites for the development of new wind energy projects in the region have been identified by the WRAP, including Buckland, Deering, and the Kivalina/Red Dog Mine Port Area. Ambler, Shungnak, Kobuk, Kiana, Noorvik & Noatak were determined to have poor wind resources at sites in or very near each community. However, all five of these communities may have better wind resources atop hills or at sites with slightly higher elevations several miles away.

  2. Student Learning Outcomes Committee Department/Program Assessment Results Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    . · Assessment: case analysis in MGT 721. Objective 2: Understand the link between human resource management1 Student Learning Outcomes Committee Department/Program Assessment Results Report Department is to communicate the assessment activities that have taken place during the last academic year, as well as how

  3. Program B.S. in Geology Assessment Coordinator for the program Dave Kreamer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    1 Program B.S. in Geology Assessment Coordinator for the program Dave Kreamer Department. Student Learning Outcomes for the program. By the end of the Geology program students will be able, and the environments in which they lived. 4. Recognize, in the field, various types of geologic structures, and be able

  4. UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO STUDENT/ PROGRAMS ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    for the Year 2005-06 Annual Report, 1/2005-6/2006 #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Assessment in 2005-06 ......................................................................................................................................... 34 #12;1 ANNUAL ASSESSMENT REPORT, 2006 I. Assessment in 2005-06 Effective teaching and learning

  5. Assessment of the basic energy sciences program. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A list of experts reviewing the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program and their organizations are given. The assessment plan is explained; the program examined the following: quality of science being conducted in the program, quality of performers supported by the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program, and the impact of the research on mission oriented needs. The intent of the assessment is to provide an indication of general status relative to these questions for the BES divisions. The approach to the assessment is described. The sampling plan which was used as a guide in determining the sample size and selecting the sample to evaluate the research program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are discussed. Special analyses were conducted on the dispersion of reviewers' ratings, the ratings of the lower funded projects, and the amount of time the principal investigator devoted to the project. These are presented in the final appendix together with histograms for individual rating variables for each program area. (MCW)

  6. CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM BATTERIES All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include alkaline, lithium, rechargeable, coin batteries, lead are shrink wrapped and secured with bands to keep them intact during transportation to a permitted recycling

  7. BS in Chemical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Chemical Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context (i) a recognition of the needBS in Chemical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Chemical Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http

  8. BS in Chemical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Chemical Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context (i) a recognition of the needBS in Chemical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Chemical Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET

  9. Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorson, Patrick

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a LBNL subject matter expert (SME), LBNL peer, or by anbe signed by the review author, SME, and group leader at thethe responsibility of the SME of the program being reviewed

  10. Computational Science Program Self-Assessment Report 0. Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    1 Computational Science Program Self-Assessment Report July, 2011 0. Background The Director of the Computational Science (COSC) program, Eric Stahlberg, left Wittenberg in late 2010. Since then, Interim Assistant Provost Elizabeth George and a reconstituted Computational Science Advisory Committee (made up

  11. assessment test program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessment test program First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Assessing Test Set Adequacy for...

  12. Second Line of Defense Spares Program Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is part of the Department of Energys (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The SLD Program accomplishes its critical global security mission by forming cooperative relationships with partner countries to install passive radiation detection systems that augment traditional inspection and law enforcement measures by alerting border officials to the presence of special nuclear or other radiological materials in cross-border traffic. An important tenet of the program is to work collaboratively with these countries to establish the necessary processes, procedures, infrastructure and conditions that will enable them to fully assume the financial and technical responsibilities for operating the equipment. As the number of operational deployments grows, the SLD Program faces an increasingly complex logistics process to promote the timely and efficient supply of spare parts.

  13. Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    No Gloves Yes Local exhaust ventilation No Eye Protection Yes #12;Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD Ensure adequate ventilation Ensure room is large enough Disposal measures to be used during and after

  14. Assessment B - Program Criteria | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWind Siting Articles about Wind SitingB - Program

  15. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment

  16. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Getting the most out of your Safety Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Getting the most out of your Safety Assessment

  17. Beryllium Program Performance Assessments - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefitsProgram Information About

  18. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, [June 1992--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, the Environment Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) Annual Report, is the second of three reports that document activities under the EHAP grant and details progress made during the first year of the grant. The first year was devoted to the development of a working program implementation plan. During the developmental process some key objectives were achieved such as developing a Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Environmental Studies at MUSC (Medical University of South Carolina) and conducting the first Crossroads of Humanity series Round Table Forum. The PIP (Program Implementation Program) details the objectives, management and budgetary basis for the overall management and control of the grant over the next four years, the yearly program plans provide the monthly and day-to-day programmatic and budgetary control by which the PIP was developed.

  19. assessing chemical protective: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation including speciation of the contaminant, retentionrelease rates and mechanisms, pH, and redox conditions. While it is...

  20. Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program Principal Investigators responsibilities. This Laboratory Assessment Program identifies four processes to evaluate safety and environmental to modify an assessment checklist that best addresses specific safety and environmental compliance needs

  1. Organization-Oriented Chemical Programming Peter Dittrich and Naoki Matsumaru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    organization theory, which defines a chemical organization as a closed and self- maintaining set of molecular such tool is chemical organization theory [9]. The theory allows to relate reaction rules to the po- tential). A central con- cept of the theory is the chemical organization, which is a set of molecular species

  2. JIM2L MS Program in Mechatronics: Quality Control and Program Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these are supported with the needed mathematical, modeling, simulation, and computer- programming principles applied scientific research in the field of mechatronic engineering. To contribute actively. Introduction 2. Program Mission and Goals 3. Students Learning Outcome 4. Assessment Method 5. Conclusion #12

  3. assessment program quarterly: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessment program quarterly First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Welcome to the USGS NAWQA...

  4. Groundwater Resources Program A New Tool to Assess Groundwater Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundwater Resources Program A New Tool to Assess Groundwater Resources in the Mississippi CAROLINA GEORGIA LOUISIANA Mississippi River Groundwater flow Well a quifer Alluvial aquifer Middle alluvial aquifer is the primary source of groundwater for irriga- tion in the largely agricultural region

  5. Environmental Health and Safety Chemical Hygiene Laboratory Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and intact labels. Transportation in cylinder cart. Excessive amount of flammable gases Excessive amount of oxidizing gases Excessive amount of toxic gases #12;General Appearances / Housekeeping # Compliance Items containers. Excess empty chemical containers. Containers properly labeled and intact. Flammable Liquid

  6. CHEN 3AA0 Chemical Engineering Progress Assessment II (Concepts Inventory Exam)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    CHEN 3AA0 Chemical Engineering Progress Assessment II (Concepts Inventory Exam) Instructions to as the Concept Inventory Exam (CIE). The following material discusses the nature of the CIE and the CHEN 3AA0

  7. ASSESSING CHEMICAL HAZARDS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) FOR PLANNING FUTURE D&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.; MINETT, M.J.

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents the fiscal year (FY) 2006 assessment to evaluate potential chemical and radiological hazards associated with vessels and piping in the former plutonium process areas at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Evaluations by PFP engineers as design authorities for specific systems and other subject-matter experts were conducted to identify the chemical hazards associated with transitioning the process areas for the long-term layup of PFP before its eventual final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities in the main process facilities were suspended in September 2005 for a period of between 5 and 10 years. A previous assessment conducted in FY 2003 found that certain activities to mitigate chemical hazards could be deferred safely until the D and D of PFP, which had been scheduled to result in a slab-on-grade condition by 2009. As a result of necessary planning changes, however, D and D activities at PFP will be delayed until after the 2009 time frame. Given the extended project and plant life, it was determined that a review of the plant chemical hazards should be conducted. This review to determine the extended life impact of chemicals is called the ''Plutonium Finishing Plant Chemical Hazards Assessment, FY 2006''. This FY 2006 assessment addresses potential chemical and radiological hazard areas identified by facility personnel and subject-matter experts who reevaluated all the chemical systems (items) from the FY 2003 assessment. This paper provides the results of the FY 2006 chemical hazards assessment and describes the methodology used to assign a hazard ranking to the items reviewed.

  8. Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability of Chemical Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahnoune, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Chemicals Manufacturing & Industry Energy Industry Other Quadrillion BTUs 1990 2015 2040 0 50 100 150 200 250 Industry energy demand increases ExxonMobil 2014 Outlook for Energy ESL-IE-14...

  9. Assessment of US electric vehicle programs with ac powertrains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevala, R.J. (Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Bethesda, MD (USA). Transportation Consulting Div.)

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AC powertrain technology is a promising approach to improving the performance of electric vehicles. Four major programs are now under way in the United States to develop ac powertrains: the Ford/General Electric single-shaft electric propulsion system (ETX-II), the Eaton dual-shaft electric propulsion system (DSEP), the Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) integrated ac motor drive and recharge system, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) variable reluctance motor (VRM) drive. The JPL program is sponsored by EPRI; the other three programs are funded by the US Department of Energy. This preliminary assessment of the four powertrain programs focuses on potential performance, costs, safety, and commercial feasibility. Interviews with program personnel were supplemented by computer simulations of electric vehicle performance using the four systems. Each of the four powertrains appears superior to standard dc powertrain technology in terms of performance and weight. The powertrain technologies studied in this assessment are at varying degrees of technological maturity. One or more of the systems may be ready for incorporation into an advanced electric vehicle during the early 1990s. Each individual report will have a separate abstract. 5 refs., 37 figs., 29 tabs.

  10. The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry Farid by the domino effect are the most destructive accidents related to industrial plants. Fire and explosion; Quantitative risk assessment; Explosions; Fires; Storage areas. 1. Introduction The accidents caused

  11. Co-op and Internship Program Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Michel

    Co-op and Internship Program Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science June 2013 Engineering and Materials Science (CEMS) supports both Industrial Internships and Co-op Industrial Assignments for qualified upper division students in the Chemical Engineering (ChEn) and Materials Science and Engineering

  12. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  13. Assessment of the O2Diesel Operational Safety Program: December 23, 2002 -- June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIAX LLC

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses O2Diesel's operational safety program using its ethanol-diesel blended fuel product.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.J.

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2008 spending was $531.6 million. There are approximately 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. To be a premier scientific Laboratory, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research and renew its research agenda. The competition for LDRD funds stimulates Laboratory scientists to think in new and creative ways, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining research excellence and a means to address National needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. By fostering high-risk, exploratory research, the LDRD program helps BNL to respond new scientific opportunities within existing mission areas, as well as to develop new research mission areas in response to DOE and National needs. As the largest expense in BNL's LDRD program is the support graduate students, post-docs, and young scientists, LDRD provides base for continually refreshing the research staff as well as the education and training of the next generation of scientists. The LDRD Program Assessment Report contains a review of the program. The report includes a summary of the management processes, project peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included are a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

  15. California GAMA Program: A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Bakersfield Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MTBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin that underlies Bakersfield, in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  16. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the workshop was to share lessons learned and provide a technology exchange to support development of a technically defensible waste qualification program. The objective of this report is to provide a review, from SRNL's perspective, of the WTP waste qualification program as presented during the workshop. In addition to SRNL's perspective on the general approach to the waste qualification program, more detailed insight into the specific unit operations presented by WTP during the workshop is provided. This report also provides a general overview of the SRS qualification program which serves as a basis for a comparison between the two programs. Recommendations regarding specific steps are made based on the review and SRNL's lessons learned from qualification of SRS low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to support maturation of the waste qualification program leading to WTP implementation.

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman,L.; Fox, K.J.

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2007 spending was $515 million. There are approximately 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Program Assessment Report contains a review of the program. The report includes a summary of the management processes, project peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included are a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

  18. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOX,K.J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19,2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13,2006. The goals and' objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Program Assessment Report contains a review of the program. The report includes a summary of the management processes, project peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

  19. Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Staffing Model5ThomasEnergyReceives Energy Assessment

  20. Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

  1. Utilizing toxicogenomic data to understand chemical mechanism of action in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Vickie S., E-mail: wilson.vickie@epa.gov [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Keshava, Nagalakshmi [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hester, Susan [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Segal, Deborah; Chiu, Weihsueh [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Thompson, Chad M. [ToxStrategies, Inc., 23501 Cinco Ranch Blvd., Suite G265, Katy, TX 77494 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The predominant role of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment, thus far, has been one of augmentation of more traditional in vitro and in vivo toxicology data. This article focuses on the current available examples of instances where toxicogenomic data has been evaluated in human health risk assessment (e.g., acetochlor and arsenicals) which have been limited to the application of toxicogenomic data to inform mechanism of action. This article reviews the regulatory policy backdrop and highlights important efforts to ultimately achieve regulatory acceptance. A number of research efforts on specific chemicals that were designed for risk assessment purposes have employed mechanism or mode of action hypothesis testing and generating strategies. The strides made by large scale efforts to utilize toxicogenomic data in screening, testing, and risk assessment are also discussed. These efforts include both the refinement of methodologies for performing toxicogenomics studies and analysis of the resultant data sets. The current issues limiting the application of toxicogenomics to define mode or mechanism of action in risk assessment are discussed together with interrelated research needs. In summary, as chemical risk assessment moves away from a single mechanism of action approach toward a toxicity pathway-based paradigm, we envision that toxicogenomic data from multiple technologies (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, supportive RT-PCR studies) can be used in conjunction with one another to understand the complexities of multiple, and possibly interacting, pathways affected by chemicals which will impact human health risk assessment.

  2. Chemical inventory control program for mixed and hazardous waste facilities at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ades, M.J.; Vincent, A.M. III

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed Waste (MW) and Hazardous Waste (HW) are being stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) pending onsite and/or offsite treatment and disposal. The inventory control for these wastes has recently been brought under Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) in accordance with DOE Order 5480.22. With the TSRs was the question of the degree of rigor with which the inventory is to be tracked, considering that the variety of chemicals present, or that could be present, numbers in the hundreds. This paper describes the graded approach program to track Solid Waste (SW) inventories relative to TSRs. The approach uses a ratio of the maximum anticipated chemical inventory to the permissible inventory in accordance with Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) limits for on- and off-site receptors. A specific threshold ratio can then be determined. The chemicals above this threshold ratio are to be included in the chemical inventory control program. The chemicals that fall below the threshold ratio are managed in accordance with existing practice per State and RCRA hazardous materials requirements. Additionally, the facilities are managed in accordance with process safety management principles, specifically using process hazards analyses, which provides safety assurance for even the small quantities that may be excluded from the formal inventory control program. The method yields a practical approach to chemical inventory control, while maintaining appropriate chemical safety margins. The resulting number of specific chemicals that require inclusion in a rigorous inventory control program is greatly reduced by about 80%, thereby resulting in significant reduction in chemical data management while preserving appropriate safety margins.

  3. Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

  4. Power plant system assessment. Final report. SP-100 Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.V.; Atkins, D.F.; Bost, D.S.; Berman, B.; Clinger, D.A.; Determan, W.R.; Drucker, G.S.; Glasgow, L.E.; Hartung, J.A.; Harty, R.B.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this assessment was to provide system-level insights into 100-kWe-class space reactor electric systems. Using these insights, Rockwell was to select and perform conceptual design studies on a ''most attractive'' system that met the preliminary design goals and requirements of the SP-100 Program. About 4 of the 6 months were used in the selection process. The remaining 2 months were used for the system conceptual design studies. Rockwell completed these studies at the end of FY 1983. This report summarizes the results of the power plant system assessment and describes our choice for the most attractive system - the Rockwell SR-100G System (Space Reactor, 100 kWe, Growth) - a lithium-cooled UN-fueled fast reactor/Brayton turboelectric converter system.

  5. Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal program objective and principal part of the proposed action is to improve the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuels used in research and test reactors by providing the technical means (through technical development, design, and testing) for reducing the uranium enrichment requirements of these fuels to substantially less than the 90 to 93% enrichment currently used. Operator acceptance of the reduced-enrichment-uranium (REU) fuel alternative will require minimizing of reactor performance reduction, fuel cycle cost increases, the number of new safety and licensing issues raised, and reactor and facility modifications. The other part of the proposed action is to assure the capability for commercial production and supply of REU fuel for use both in the US and abroad. The RERTR Program scope is limited to generic design studies, technical support to reactor operating organizations in preparing for conversions to REU fuels, fuel development, fuel demonstrations, and technical support for commercialization of REU fuels. This environmental assessment addresses the environmental consequences of RERTR Program activities and of specific conversions of typical reactors (the Ford Nuclear Reactor and one or two other to-be-designated demonstrations) to REU-fuel cycles, including domestic and international shipments of enriched uranium pertinent to the conduct of RERTR Program activities.

  6. ORISE: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project *1980-1981Chemical Stockpile Emergency

  7. ORISE: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project *1980-1981Chemical Stockpile Emergencyand

  8. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of technology today, promising emerging technologies and references for further reading.

  9. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemicals in food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, W.A. [Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is responsible for the wholesomeness, safety, and adulteration-free status of meat and poultry. The agency developed the National Residue Program (NRP) to monitor these products for residue of drugs, pesticides, and environmental contaminants. Today, few chemical residues are detected in meat and poultry because of the success of the NRP. 3 figs.

  10. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhart, M.; et al,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

  11. Final Environmental assessment for the Uranium Lease Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a programmatic environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue leasing withdrawn lands and DOE-owned patented claims for the exploration and production of uranium and vanadium ores. The Domestic Uranium Program regulation, codified at Title 10, Part 760.1, of the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), gives DOE the flexibility to continue leasing these lands under the Uranium Lease Management Program (ULMP) if the agency determines that it is in its best interest to do so. A key element in determining what is in DOE`s ``best interest`` is the assessment of the environmental impacts that may be attributable to lease tract operations and associated activities. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA for the ULMP, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 United States Code 4321 et seq.), as amended.Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for the ULMP,and DOE is issuing this Finding, of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  12. Twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheitlin, F.M. (ed.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the program and abstracts of the twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals, held on May 7--11, 1990, at Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The symposium, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Institute, Badger Engineers, Inc., Gas Research Institute, and American Chemical Society, consists of five sessions: Session 1, thermal, chemical, and biological processing; Session 2 and 3, applied biological research; Session 4, bioengineering research; and Session 5, biotechnology, bioengineering, and the solution of environmental problems. It also consists of a poster session of the same five subject categories.

  13. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  14. Access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Health risk assessment is based on access to comprehensive information about potentially hazardous agents in question. Relevant information is scattered throughout the literature, and often is not readily accessible. To be useful in assessment efforts, emerging scientific findings, risk assess parameters, and associated data must be compiled and evaluated systemically. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are among the federal agencies heavily involved in this effort. This symposium was a direct response by EPA and ORNL to the expressed needs of individuals involved in assessing risks from chemical exposure. In an effort to examine the state of the risk assessment process, the availability of toxicological information, and the future development and transfer of this information, the symposium provided an excellent cadre of speakers and participants from state and federal agencies, academia and research laboratories to address these topics. This stimulating and productive gathering discussed concerns associated with (1) environmental contamination by chemicals; (2) laws regulating chemicals; (3) information needs and resources; (4) applications; (5) challenges and priorities; and (6)future issues. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J. [eds.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  16. assessment program final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Linear Programming1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July...

  17. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Los Alamos Field Office- FY15

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The FY15 self-assessment of the Technical Qualifications and Federal Technical Capability program was conducted to provide Los Alamos Field Office (NA-LA) management specific information related to effectiveness of the documentation and implementation of these programs.

  18. BA Economics and BA Financial Economics Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    BA Economics and BA Financial Economics ­ Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives The program will prepare graduates: 1. Understand the "economic way model economic decisions. 3. The ability to analyze historical and current events

  19. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (NAME) MASTERS OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (NAME) MASTERS OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM LAST COMPLETED and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies which competency. COMPETENCY COMPETENCY BENCHMARK PERCENT OF STUDENTS ACHIEVING BENCHMARK FOUNDATION Clinical

  20. Field Assessment of Energy Audit Tools for Retrofit Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, J.; Bohac, D.; Nelson, C.; Smith, I.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on the use of home energy ratings as a tool to promote energy retrofits in existing homes. A home energy rating provides a quantitative appraisal of a home's asset performance, usually compared to a benchmark such as the average energy use of similar homes in the same region. Home rating systems can help motivate homeowners in several ways. Ratings can clearly communicate a home's achievable energy efficiency potential, provide a quantitative assessment of energy savings after retrofits are completed, and show homeowners how they rate compared to their neighbors, thus creating an incentive to conform to a social standard. An important consideration is how rating tools for the retrofit market will integrate with existing home energy service programs. For residential programs that target energy savings only, home visits should be focused on key efficiency measures for that home. In order to gain wide adoption, a rating tool must be easily integrated into the field process, demonstrate consistency and reasonable accuracy to earn the trust of home energy technicians, and have a low monetary cost and time hurdle for homeowners. Along with the Home Energy Score, this project also evaluated the energy modeling performance of SIMPLE and REM/Rate.

  1. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Pacific Northwest Site Office- 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This self-assessment evaluated how well the Technical Qualification and Federal Capability Programs were implemented at the Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO).

  2. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Instrument (Version 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards Environmental Health Program Self-assessment Assessment Instrument, 1/7/2010 Page 3 Essential Service #1: Monitor environmental and health status health assessment been completed? 1.1B Is the community environmental health assessment updated at least

  3. Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janeen Denise Robertson

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

  4. Preliminary Chemical Aging and Lifetime Assessment for High Density S5370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R S; Chinn, S

    2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary lifetime assessment of S5370 stress cushions has been performed. Data from three sources were obtained and reviewed to perform this assessment. The sources were the following: (1) the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Honeywell FM&T Kansas City Plant's 2-year and 9-year accelerated aging studies; (2) a large selection of weapon surveillance return data; (3) laboratory experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Honeywell FM&T Kansas City Plant on artificially aged material. The general conclusions of this study are as follows: (1) There is an inherently large degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity in S5370 cushions that complicates lifetime assessments; (2) Current surveillance testing procedures are inadequate for providing insight into aging trends; (3) LANL PMAP data suggests a 60 year load retention of greater than 40%; however, this is for low density versions and extrapolation to high density must be performed with caution and a new set of testing is recommended; (4) Results of chemical aging assessments suggest that radiation damage is minimal at stockpile relevant doses, thermal degradation leads to compression set due to disentanglement of the network structure over time and a negligible amount of chain scissioning at relevant temperatures. The compression set is accelerated by exposure to radiation; (5) In the absence of further testing, a 60-year load retention of greater than 40% is estimated.

  5. assessment program annual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Montana continues its commitment to increased accountability and linkage of Planning, Resource Allocation, and Assessment. This second annual Institutional Assessment Report...

  6. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Idaho...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Idaho Operations Office - 2014 This TQP self-assessment was performed by a review team with extensive assessment experience. The team lead has participated on past TQP...

  7. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Office of Health, Safety and Security- 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning in April 2014, a self-assessment of the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) was performed in the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The assessment was led by the HSS TQP Manager who is assigned the responsibility for maintaining and implementing the programs.

  8. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry-specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving the energy efficiency in chemical plants, with a focus on the situation in California.

  9. The Chemical Hazards Assessment Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Prevette, S. S.; Sherwood, A. R.; Fitch, L. R.; Ranade, D. G.; Oldham, R. W.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the evaluation methods and results of a chemical safety status assessment of the process equipment at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation Plutonium Finishing Plant. This assessment, designated as the Plutonium Finishing Plant Residual Chemical Hazards Assessment, focused particular emphasis on the idle and inactive plant systems, though certain active areas also were examined to the extent that these were examined during a previous facility vulnerability assessment completed in 1999. The Plutonium Finishing Plant is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation that is situated in south central Washington State.

  10. Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.; Elliott, R. N.; Chittum, A.

    Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce Daniel Trombley Engineering Associate R. Neal Elliott, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Director of Research American Council for an Energy-Efficient... of access to technical information and trained workforce. One of the most successful programs for achieving energy efficiency savings in the manufacturing sector is the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    existing literature to characterize air/water emissions expected to be encountered in the production of chemicals at OTEC plants; develop applicable control technologies

  12. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Carlsbad Field Office- 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Management Assessment (MA-12-08) was conducted from October 1-31, 2012. The management assessment team evaluated the specific requirement implementation, processes, and performance areas of the CBFO Technical Qualification Program (TQP). The assessment covered the relevant parts of DOE 0 426.1, Federal Technical Capability.

  13. An assessment of the equitability of farm program payments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Lindsey Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With increased pressures on today?s Federal Budget, there may be funding cuts on agriculture programs. These cuts would certainly bring about increased concern as to which programs and which crops take the biggest cut. A ...

  14. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Selected topics in risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voit, E.O. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is becoming increasingly clear that human health is intricately related to our chemical and physical surroundings. Recognizing the interdependence between health and environment, the Medical University of South Carolina has begun to implement a graduate program in Environmental Risk Assessment. While the infrastructure for such a program had been in place for quite a while, providing education in biostatistics, epidemiology, and mathematical modeling, specific courses in risk assessment were not available. To expedite the educational process in this area, the Department of Biometry and Epidemiology offered the course Special Topics in Risk Analysis in the Spring semester of 1993. This course was intended as an introduction for graduate students, but one faculty and one postdoctoral fellow also enrolled. The course was organized in the form of a seminar, with students or faculty presenting selected materials from the literature that covered some of the central issues in risk analysis. The presentations were subsequently written up as reports and revised according to suggestions by the instructor. This technical report comprises the presentations and reflects what has been learned in the course Special Topics in Risk Analysis. It also may serve as an easy to read introduction to the complex area of risk analysis. By the very nature of the course and this report, most of the presented material is not original. It does not necessarily reflect the authors` or the editor`s opinion and is not intended for citation. Nonetheless, the students and the instructor have paid attention to citing relevant literature in order to enable the reader to trace ideas back to the original sources. As an Appendix, this volume contains the course syllabus as well as hand-out material that the students prepared independently and that has not been edited or revised.

  15. assessment program volume: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Print) ISSN 2046-4924 (Online) Impact factor: 5.116 Health Technology AssessmentHEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT VOLUME 18 ISSUE 68 NOVEMBER 2014 ISSN 1366-5278 DOI 10.3310...

  16. Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

  17. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Office of River Protection- 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A self-assessment was performed in accordance with TRS-OA-IP-07, Management (Self) Assessment, Rev. 2, where information was retrieved from MGT-QT-PL-01, Technical Qualification Program (TQP) Plan, Rev. 3; MGT-QT-DI-01, Technical Qualification Program: Federal Technical Capability Agent Duties, Rev. 2; technical staff electronic training and qualifications files; and ORP's technical staff hard copy training and qualification files to determine the effectiveness of the implemented program and identify any weaknesses of the existing program at turn-over of responsibilities.

  18. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program preoperational testand biomass distribution at potential OTEC sites.6th OTEC conference, Washington, D.C. Payne, S.F. 1979. The

  20. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Los...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Capabilities Program (FTCP) was conducted to provide Los Alamos Field Office (NA-LA) management specific information related to effectiveness of the documentation and...

  1. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Los...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Federal Technical Capability program was conducted to provide Los Alamos Field Office management specific information related to effectiveness of the documentation and...

  2. assessment program executive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 12;Corporate Affiliates Chairman: Mark Ambrose San Diego Site Executive, Raytheon 12;Corporate Affiliates Program Welcome New CAP Members 12;Corporate Affiliates...

  3. assessment program 5-year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...1-1 2.0 Overview and Strategy of Compliance Audit and Review Program...2 First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6...

  4. assessment intervention program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Human Resource Management (HRM) specialization started as a new IN MANAGEMENT - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN (REV. 22710) MissionVision Statement...

  5. assessment program emap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Human Resource Management (HRM) specialization started as a new IN MANAGEMENT - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN (REV. 22710) MissionVision Statement...

  6. assessment program fiscal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Human Resource Management (HRM) specialization started as a new IN MANAGEMENT - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN (REV. 22710) MissionVision Statement...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (the 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) programthe 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) programprojected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants canmonitoring at Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (Plan (EDP) 1978. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. Dept.the 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  11. STUDENT LEARNING ASSESSMENT PROGRAM ARCHITECTURE: POST-PROFESSIONAL MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    1 STUDENT LEARNING ASSESSMENT PROGRAM ARCHITECTURE: POST-PROFESSIONAL MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE M technological, social and economic forces are influencing architectural design, research, practice and pedagogy and/or advanced representational and/or fabrication techniques used in architectural design

  12. Assessing Student Knowledge and Perceptions of Factors Influencing Participation in Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Lauren Joanna

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to assess student knowledge and perceptions of factors influencing participation in Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural...

  13. Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program Self-Assessment- Chief of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Report was prepared to summarize the results of the July 2013 CNS self-assessment of the Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program.

  14. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Office of Science- 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under DOE 426.1, Change 1. Headquarters and Field elements must conduct a self-assessment of Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) implementation within their organization at least every four years. These assessments must be conducted in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order (0) 226.1 B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy, dated 4-25-11, and the current objectives and criteria approved by the FTCP Chair.

  15. Integrated assessment of packaging architectures in earth observing programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva Valero, Daniel

    When designing Earth observation missions, it is essential to take into account the programmatic context. Considering individual missions as part of a whole enables overall program optimization, which may bring important ...

  16. An Assessment of the Effectiveness Of Anti-Poverty Programs in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    the programs reduced work, saving, or human capital investment? If so, should the poverty-reducing impactsAn Assessment of the Effectiveness Of Anti-Poverty Programs in the United States Yonatan Ben of Poverty. The authors would like to Janet Currie, Eric French, and Philip Jefferson for comments and Hsueh

  17. UCSD PACE Assessment Program Price List Effective 7/1/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Boards or by a private attorney representing them in a Medical Board investigation or action. Most self Program is a 2-Phase, 7-day program Phase I: Two-day Physician Assessment*: Medical Board/Private Attorney companies. Contracts may also be required for a physician referred by a private attorney representing them

  18. February 9, 2011 UMTC DOCTORAL PROGRAMS WITH NRC ASSESSMENT RANGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ,30) Computer Science (20,35) Applied Plant Sciences (22,25) Communication Studies (23,62) Health Services Science (3,15) Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics (4,3) Applied Economics (4,7) Chemical Engineering (5,4) Natural Resource Science and Management (2,4) American Studies (3,4) Food Science (3,15) Aerospace

  19. Transportation barriers to health care: assessing the Texas Medicaid program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borders, Stephen Boyce

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation is frequently cited as a barrier to health care, but rarely have researchers analyzed the problems in depth. The purpose of this study was to assess the role transportation plays in the utilization of preventive health care services...

  20. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: A sensor] The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified as the potential habitability of its regolith. INDEX TERMS: 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars; 6297

  1. Geothermal direct heat program: roundup technical conference proceedings. Volume II. Bibliography of publications. State-coupled geothermal resource assessment program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruscetta, C.A. (ed.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lists of publications are presented for the Geothermal Resource Assessment Program for the Utah Earth Science Laboratory and the following states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

  2. Information resources for assessing health effects from chemical exposure: Challenges, priorities, and future issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seigel, S. [National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues related to developing information resources for assessing the health effects from chemical exposure include the question of how to address the individual political issues relevant to identifying and determining the timeliness, scientific credibility, and completeness of such kinds of information resources. One of the important ways for agencies to share information is through connection tables. This type of software is presently being used to build information products for some DHHS agencies. One of the challenges will be to convince vendors of data of the importance of trying to make data files available to communities that need them. In the future, information processing will be conducted with neural networks, object-oriented database management systems, and fuzzy-set technologies, and meta analysis techniques.

  3. Assessment of existing H2/O2 chemical reaction mechanisms at reheat gas turbine conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weydahl, Torleif; Seljeskog, Morten; Haugen, Nils Erland L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides detailed comparisons of chemical reaction mechanisms of H2 applicable at high preheat temperatures and pressures relevant to gas turbine and particularly Alstom's reheat gas turbine conditions. It is shown that the available reaction mechanisms exhibit large differences in several important elementary reaction coefficients. The reaction mechanisms are assessed by comparing ignition delay and laminar flame speed results obtained from CHEMKIN with available data, however, the amount of data at these conditions is scarce and a recommended candidate among the mechanisms can presently not be selected. Generally, the results with the GRI-Mech and Leeds mechanisms deviate from the Davis, Li, O'Conaire, Konnov and San Diego mechanisms, but there are also significant deviations between the latter five mechanisms that altogether are better adapted to hydrogen. The differences in ignition delay times between the dedicated hydrogen mechanisms (O'Conaire, Li and Konnov) range from approximately a maxim...

  4. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M., E-mail: mortensen.holly@epa.gov [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, 109 TW Alexander Dr., Mailcode B205-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, US EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Mail Code 8623P, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  5. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

  6. Assessment of Graduate Programs: Clear, Simple, and USEFUL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    areas: 3.3.1.1 educational programs, to include student learning outcomes 3.3.1.2 administrative support learning as its starting and ending points Focused; does not try to solve all the institution's problems to resources o Topic linked to improvement of student learning o Clear identification of student learning

  7. Impact assessment of the nevada 4-h program: an examination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Steven Richard

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................. 92 63 Summated Construct Index Scores for Age Groups ................................. 93 64 Summated Construct Scale Scores for Age Groups.................................. 94 65 Summated Construct Index Scores for Gender... does involvement in 4-H programming influence youth? 5 CHAPTER II REVIEW OF LITERATURE Youth development is a process that includes support and opportunities that promote positive outcomes for young people (National Research Council...

  8. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Results of the environmental health activities and needs assessment of the South Carolina statewide family practice system for the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program: EHAP Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musham, C.; Hainer, B.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An activities and needs assessment was conducted to determine what each of the seven family practice residency programs in South Carolina is providing in environmental health education. In addition, this study was designed to determine: what are the barriers to greater emphasis on environmental health in family practice residency programs and, what the basic environmental health educational goals for family practice residency programs should be.

  9. EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

  10. Summary results of an assessment of research projects in the National Photovoltaics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Research (OER) undertook an assessment of 115 research projects (listed in Appendix A) sponsored by the National Photovoltaics Program. The Program is located within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). This report summarizes the results of that review. The Office of Solar Energy Conversion is responsible for the management of the National Photovoltaics Program. This program focuses on assisting US industry in development of fundamental technology to bring advanced photovoltaic energy systems to commercial use. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the following: (1) the quality of research of individual projects; (2) the impact of these individual projects on the mission of the program; and (3) the priority of future research opportunities.

  11. The KIVA-II computer program for transient multidimensional chemically reactive flows with sprays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its public release in 1985, the KIVA computer program has been utilized for the time dependent analysis of chemically reacting flows with sprays in two and three space dimensions. This paper describes some of the improvements to the original version that have been made since that time. The new code called KIVA-II is planned for public release in early 1988. KIVA-II improves the earlier version in the accuracy and efficiency of the computational procedure, the accuracy of the physics submodels, and in versatility and ease of use. Numerical improvements include the use of the ICE solution procedure in place of the acoustic subcycling method and the implementation of a quasi-second-order-accurate convection scheme. Major extensions to the physical submodels include the inclusion of an optional k-epsilon turbulence model, and several additions to the spray model. We illustrate some of the new capabilities by means of example solutions. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Effective monitoring of non-chromate chemical treatment programs for refinery cooling systems using sewage water as make-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AlMajnouni, A.D.; Jaffer, A.E. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treated sewage water as make-up to the cooling tower requires novel approaches to control potential cooling water problems common to refineries besides meeting environmental regulations. An intensive field study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of non-chromate treatment programs. On-line cleaning of the exchangers occurred prior to instituting the new chemical treatment program. Low carbon steel corrosion rates with minimal deposition was achieved. Microbiological fouling was controlled with chlorination and non-oxidizing biocide program. Field results are presented which compare the efficacy of these proprietary treatments to control corrosion and inhibit scale and fouling. Analytical results which provide a comprehensive performance evaluation of a new non-chromate chemical treatment program are presented.

  13. Morocco-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon Lake ElectricInformation Program[1]

  14. Argentina-UNEP Risoe Technology Needs Assessment Program | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture andsoftware and hardwareInformation Program

  15. 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, J.A.; Hemborg, H.T.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.

  16. A state-of-practice survey of policy, plan, and program assessment in Canadian provinces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, Bram F

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the introduction of the 1999 Canadian Cabinet Directive on the environmental assessment of policies, plans, and programs (PPPs), higher-order environmental assessment has been receiving increased attention in Canada. However, while practices and systems are advancing at the federal level, there has been very little attention given to recent developments in PPP assessment at the provincial level. This paper presents the results of a Canada-wide survey of PPP assessment principles and practices in 10 Canadian provincial EA jurisdictions. The findings indicate that there exists considerable variability in the provisions for and practice of PPP assessment amongst Canadian provinces, with only Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Quebec identifying recent practice experience. Included amongst the main barriers to effective implementation at the provincial level are the lack of legislative requirements for strategic EA, and the limited understanding of the nature and benefits of higher-order impact assessment.

  17. Low-temperature resource assessment program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J. [Oregon Inst. of Tech., Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center] [Oregon Inst. of Tech., Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center; Ross, H. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.] [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy - Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) recently sponsored the Low-Temperature Resource Assessment project to update the inventory of the nation`s low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resources and to encourage development of these resources. A database of 8,977 thermal wells and springs that are in the temperature range of 20{degrees}C to 150{degrees}C has been compiled for ten western states, an impressive increase of 82% compared to the previous assessments. The database includes location, descriptive data, physical parameters, water chemistry and references for sources of data. Computer-generated maps are also available for each state. State Teams have identified 48 high-priority areas for near-term comprehensive resource studies and development. Resources with temperatures greater than 50{degrees}C located within 8 km of a population center were identified for 271 collocated cities. Geothermal energy cost evaluation software has been developed to quickly identify the cost of geothermally supplied heat to these areas in a fashion similar to that used for conventionally fueled heat sources.

  18. The Texas Master Gardener program: an assessment of curriculum delivery and contribution to community development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Chyrel Ann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chair of Committee) David R. Chalmers (Co-Chair of Committee) Gene L. Theodori (Member) Glen C. Shinn (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Agricultural Education iii ABSTRACT The Texas Master Gardener Program...: An Assessment of Curriculum Delivery and Contribution to Community Development. (December 2004) Chyrel A. Mayfield, B.S., Texas Tech University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Gary J. Wingenbach Dr. David R. Chalmers Extension programs across...

  19. The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M.; Schuster, J.Eric

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.

  20. Overview of toxicity data and risk assessment methods for evaluating the chemical effects of depleted uranium compounds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, H. M.; Monette, F. A.; Avci, H. I.; Environmental Assessment

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, depleted uranium is handled or used in several chemical forms by both governmental agencies and private industry (primarily companies producing and machining depleted uranium metal for military applications). Human exposure can occur as a result of handling these compounds, routine low-level effluent releases to the environment from processing facilities, or materials being accidentally released from storage locations or during processing or transportation. Exposure to uranium can result in both chemical and radiological toxicity, but in most instances chemical toxicity is of greater concern. This article discusses the chemical toxic effects from human exposure to depleted uranium compounds that are likely to be handled during the long-term management and use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) inventories in the United States. It also reviews representative publications in the toxicological literature to establish appropriate reference values for risk assessments. Methods are described for evaluating chemical toxicity caused by chronic low-level exposure and acute exposure. Example risk evaluations are provided for illustration. Preliminary results indicate that chemical effects of chronic exposure to uranium compounds under normal operating conditions would be negligibly small. Results also show that acute exposures under certain accident conditions could cause adverse chemical effects among the populations exposed.

  1. The Chemical Engineering Department presents its new flexible engineering degree program 10-ENG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Paul I.

    of undergraduate knowledge in the field of chemical engineering, the chemical engineering department proposes a new background in combination with knowledge in a specific subtopic area of chemical engineering will now have also take the 5 Chemical Engineering Core Courses that define the fundamental knowledge of the field

  2. Date: Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Yes Glove box / isolator No Chemical apron No Safety cabinet No Gloves Yes Local exhaust ventilation/mixtures, asphyxiation in confined spaces) Ensure adequate ventilation Ensure absence of ignition sources When mixing

  3. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

  4. Super-Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation volume 2: Preliminary impact and market transformation assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.D.; Conger, R.L.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) is a collaborative utility program intended to transform the market for energy-efficient and environmentally friendly refrigerators. It is one of the first examples of a large-scale {open_quotes}market transformation{close_quotes} energy efficiency program. This report documents the preliminary impact and market transformation evaluation of SERP ({open_quotes}the Program{close_quotes}). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this evaluation for the U.S. Department of Energy. This study focuses on the preliminary impact evaluation and market transformation assessment, but also presents limited process evaluation information. It is based on interviews with refrigerator dealers and manufacturers, interviews with utility participants, industry data, and information from the Program administrators. Results from this study complement those from prior process evaluation also conducted by PNNL. 42 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Independent Assessment of Technology Characterizations to Support the Biomass Program Annual State-of-Technology Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, B.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses an investigation that addressed two thermochemical conversion pathways for the production of liquid fuels and addressed the steps to the process, the technology providers, a method for determining the state of technology and a tool to continuously assess the state of technology. This report summarizes the findings of the investigation as well as recommendations for improvements for future studies.

  6. Technical and Political Assessment of Peaceful Nuclear Power Program Prospects in North Africa and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-16840 Technical and Political Assessment of Peaceful Nuclear Power Program Prospects in North and application of resources towards developing nuclear-generated electricity and nuclear-powered desalination nations have recently expressed interest in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Many

  7. Generated on 04/07/13 by the Office of Institutional Research and Planning. Doctoral Program Profile: Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Profile: Chemical and Petroleum Engineering This program is part of the Department of Chemical://www.cpe.engr.ku.edu/prospective/graduate.html Department Faculty: Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Fall 2012 Total Faculty 23 Tenured and Tenure Track and Petroleum Engineering in the School of Engineering. Additional information available at http

  8. Formation of a performance-based MC&A assessment program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, H.D.; Wolf, D.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy Order 5633.3, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials, requires each facility possessing nuclear material (NM) to {open_quotes}establish a program to assess its control and accountability systems and procedures, and to assure the integrity and quality of these systems.{close_quotes} This paper describes the formation of a performance-based assessment group within Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) in response to this requirement. The Assessment Group was formed to evaluate both compliance to requirements and system performance capability as determined by performance testing. Evaluations address the five functional areas of MC&A: administration, containment, accounting, measurement, and inventory programs. The assessments performed by this group are used to substantiate the degree of MC&A compliance with requirements and to determine system capability to protect NM in accordance with graded safeguards. Assessment reports provide documented evidence of the integrity and quality of the systems comprising the MC&A program at WSRC.

  9. Establishing and Implementing a Waste Minimization Program in the Chemical and Oil Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollod, G. J.; Marton, R. J.

    chemicals and chemical processes, and are the best equipped to manage and reduce waste. It is the responsibility of all companies that manufacture a product or generate a waste to understand the meaning of proper waste management hierarchy, waste...

  10. Environmental Restoration Program waste minimization and pollution prevention self-assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. is currently developing a more active waste minimization and pollution prevention program. To determine areas of programmatic improvements within the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program, the ER Program required an evaluation of the program across the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site, and the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration and Waste Minimization Site. This document presents the status of the overall program as of fourth quarter FY 1994, presents pollution prevention cost avoidance data associated with FY 1994 activities, and identifies areas for improvement. Results of this assessment indicate that the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program is firmly established and is developing rapidly. Several procedural goals were met in FY 1994 and many of the sites implemented ER waste minimization options. Additional growth is needed, however, for the ER Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program.

  11. assessing non-chemical weeding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Choice of weeding option may be dictated by ground or weather conditions. On brownfield sites as inclement weather may preclude chemical weeding beyond a time when plants...

  12. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Summer undergraduate research program: Environmental studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns.

  13. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 4: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s (MUSC) vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. The significant growth in the number of environmental/health information systems that has occurred over the past few years has made data access challenging. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: immunological consequences of beryllium exposure; assessment of genetic risks to environmental diseases; low dose-rate radiation health effects; environmental risk perception in defined populations; information support and access systems; and environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine.

  14. Assessment of net lost revenue adjustment mechanisms for utility DSM programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility shareholders can lose money on demand-side management (DSM) investments between rate cases. Several industry analysts argue that the revenues lost from utility DSM programs are an important financial disincentive to utility DSM investment. A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenues incurred through successful operation of DSM programs. Explicitly defined net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states` preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This report examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The report has three objectives. First, we determine whether NLRA is a feasible and successful approach to removing the lost-revenue disincentive to utility operation of DSM programs. Second, we identify the conditions linked to successful implementation of NLRA mechanisms in different states and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior. Third, we suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. We first identify states with NLRA mechanisms where utilities are recovering lost revenues from DSM programs. We interview staff at regulatory agencies in all these states and utility staff in four states. These interviews focus on the status of NLRA, implementation issues, DSM measurement issues, and NLRA results. We also analyze regulatory agency orders on NLRA, as well as associated testimony, reports, and utility lost revenue recovery filings. Finally, we use qualitative and quantitative indicators to assess NLRA`s effectiveness. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach to the lost-revenue disincentive.

  15. Preliminary nuclear safety assessment of the NEPST (Topaz II) space reactor program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (US) Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary nuclear safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary nuclear safety assessment included a number of deterministic analyses, such as; neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, an analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment to date, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the US with a modification to preclude water flooded criticality. A full scale safety program is now underway.

  16. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/California recycling programs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrons, Ralph Jordan; Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management Department between May 2006 and March 2007, to evaluate the current site-wide recycling program for potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the program. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM Pollution Prevention (P2) staff worked with the SNL/CA P2 Staff to arrive at these options.

  17. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steindler, M J; Ader, M; Barletta, R E

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing methods (PDPM) for nuclear fuel, tungsten crucibles were successfully spun for use in laboratory-scale experiments. Corrosion testing of refractory metals and alloys in PDPM environments was done. Ceramic substrates were successfully coated with tungsten. Solubility measurements were made to determine Cd/Mg alloy composition and temperature at which dissolved Th will precipitate. Experiments were started to study the reduction of high-fired ThO/sub 2/ with Ca in a molten metal-molten salt system. Work on the fused salt electrolysis of CaO was started. Equipment for determining phase diagrams for U-Cu-Mg system was set up. The reaction of UO/sub 2/ with molten equimolar NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ was studied as part of a project to identify chemically feasible nonaqueous fuel reprocessing methods. Work was continued on development of a flowsheet for reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting actinides into ammonium chloro-aluminate (and alternative salts) from a bismuth solution. Preparation of Th, U, and Pu nitrides after dissolution of spent fuel elements in molten tin is being studied. Leach rates of glass beads, pulverized beads, and beads encapsulated in a lead matrix with no protective envelope were studied. A method (employing no pressure or vacuum systems) of encapsulating various solid wastes in a lead metal matrix was developed and tested. A preliminary integration was made of earlier data on effects of impacts on metal-matrix waste forms.Leach migration experiments were compared with conventional infiltration experiments as methods of evaluating geologic formations as barriers to nuclide migration. The effect of the streaming potential on the rates of transport of radioactive I/sup -/ and Na/sup +/ through kaolinite columns was measured, as well as adsorption of iodide and iodate by several compounds; implications of the results upon the disposal of radioactive iodine are discussed.

  18. The Chemical Hazards Assessments Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FITCH, L.R.; HOPKINS, A.M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All Hanford facilities, including the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) were evaluated for chemical hazards in 1997, 1998 and 2000. The hazard evaluation, known as the PFP Facility Vulnerability Assessment (FVA), was prompted when chemicals in Tank A-109 in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) exploded in May 1997. Actions were undertaken to eliminate or reduce what were thought to be the worst hazards following that evaluation. In 2001, a new PFP team was organized to review the progress to date in reducing hazards and to reassess hazards that might still remain within the facility. This reassessment continued into 2002 and is referred to as the 2002 PFP Residual Chemical Hazards Reassessment (RCHR). This report explains the results of the 2001/2002 reassessment of the chemical hazards at PFP. This reassessment effort forms the basis of the RCHR. The RCHR relied on previous assessments as the starting point for the 2001/2002 evaluation and used ranking criteria very similar to previous efforts. The RCHR team was composed of professionals representing Industrial Hygiene, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Hazardous Materials Handling Specialists, Solid Waste Management Specialists and Environmental Specialists. All areas of concern that could be accessed were physically examined and photographed where possible. Information from processing records, facility drawings and documents, design engineers, process engineers and work packages were compiled. The PFP vessel inventory was examined and expanded where required. New items listed in the vessel inventory were investigated. All items investigated were ranked using the hazard ranking criteria developed. This information was put on data sheets and compiled in a database.

  19. Assessment of chemical vulnerabilities in the Hanford high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E. [and others

    1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of relevant data (tank farm and laboratory) and analysis related to potential chemical vulnerabilities of the Hanford Site waste tanks. Potential chemical safety vulnerabilities examined include spontaneous runaway reactions, condensed phase waste combustibility, and tank headspace flammability. The major conclusions of the report are the following: Spontaneous runaway reactions are not credible; condensed phase combustion is not likely; and periodic releases of flammable gas can be mitigated by interim stabilization.

  20. Waste isolation safety assessment program. Task 4. Third contractor information meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contractor Information Meeting (October 14 to 17, 1979) was part of the FY-1979 effort of Task 4 of the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP): Sorption/Desorption Analysis. The objectives of this task are to: evaluate sorption/desorption measurement methods and develop a standardized measurement procedure; produce a generic data bank of nuclide-geologic interactions using a wide variety of geologic media and groundwaters; perform statistical analysis and synthesis of these data; perform validation studies to compare short-term laboratory studies to long-term in situ behavior; develop a fundamental understanding of sorption/desorption processes; produce x-ray and gamma-emitting isotopes suitable for the study of actinides at tracer concentrations; disseminate resulting information to the international technical community; and provide input data support for repository safety assessment. Conference participants included those subcontracted to WISAP Task 4, representatives and independent subcontractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, representatives from other waste disposal programs, and experts in the area of waste/geologic media interaction. Since the meeting, WISAP has been divided into two programs: Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) (modeling efforts) and Waste/Rock Interactions Technology (WRIT) (experimental work). The WRIT program encompasses the work conducted under Task 4. This report contains the information presented at the Task 4, Third Contractor Information Meeting. Technical Reports from the subcontractors, as well as Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), are provided along with transcripts of the question-and-answer sessions. The agenda and abstracts of the presentations are also included. Appendix A is a list of the participants. Appendix B gives an overview of the WRIT program and details the WRIT work breakdown structure for 1980.

  1. Development and use of site-specific chemical and biological criteria for assessing New Bedford Harbor pilot dredging project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.G.; Hansen, D.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical site-specific chemical and biological criteria were established to assess the impact of a pilot dredging project on water quality at the New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, USA, Superfund site. Because most existing chemical concentrations in the water column and indigenous biota exceeded federal and state water quality limits, the derivation of site-specific criteria was required. Prior to any operational phases of the project (i.e., dike construction, dredging), criteria values were developed from background concentrations of PCBs and metals in water and biota, as well as for the toxic effects of water quality on the biota. During each operational phase of the project, water samples were collected, analyzed within 16 h, and the data supplied to a management committee in order to assess the environmental impact of the previous days operation. The ambient unfiltered water concentration of PCBs and metals were the only chemical or biological criteria exceeded. Modification of the next days' operations resulted in a return of these concentrations to background levels. The combined use of site-specific criteria and a real-time decision making management process allowed for successful completion of the project with a minimal effect on water quality.

  2. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  3. Deer Park Chemical Plant Received ACC Award for Energy Efficiency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, S.; Heyman, E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on sour gas processing facilities, has developed methods and programs to identify opportunities for energy conservation and GHG reductions. The program outlined in this paper consists of four interrelated phases that are used to identify and track...

  4. Structural aging program to assess the adequacy of critical concrete components in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Oland, C.B.; Arndt, E.G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program is carried out by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). The Program has evolved from preliminary studies conducted to evaluate the long-term environmental challenges to light-water reactor safety-related concrete civil structures. An important conclusion of these studies was that a damage methodology, which can provide a quantitative measure of a concrete structure's durability with respect to potential future requirements, needs to be developed. Under the SAG Program, this issue is being addressed through: establishment of a structural materials information center, evaluation of structural component assessment and repair technologies, and development of a quantitative methodology for structural aging determinations. Progress to date of each of these activities is presented as well as future plans. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  6. Seventeenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the Seventeenth Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. Session titles include Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing; Applied Biological Research; Bioprocessing Research; Special Topics Discussion Groups; Process Economics and Commercialization; and Environmental Biotechnology.

  7. Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Facility, Installation 25255, Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Rehoboth National Guard Facility (RNGF) in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for ftirther action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the RNGF property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities under the control of the MAARNG and the past activities contained within that area.

  8. Organic chemical aging mechanisms: An annotated bibliography. Waste Tank Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Nelson, D.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An annotated bibliography has been compiled of the potential chemical and radiological aging mechanisms of the organic constituents (non-ferrocyanide) that would likely be found in the UST at Hanford. The majority of the work that has been conducted on the aging of organic chemicals used for extraction and processing of nuclear materials has been in conjunction with the acid or PUREX type processes. At Hanford the waste being stored in the UST has been stabilized with caustic. The aging factors that were used in this work were radiolysis, hydrolysis and nitrite/nitrate oxidation. The purpose of this work was two-fold: to determine whether or not research had been or is currently being conducted on the species associated with the Hanford UST waste, either as a mixture or as individual chemicals or chemical functionalities, and to determine what areas of chemical aging need to be addressed by further research.

  9. Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated facility life of WTP.

  10. Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Eighteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume provides the proceedings for the Eighteenth Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals held May 5-9, 1996 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The proceedings contains abstracts for oral and poster presentations.

  12. Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    terephthalate (PET) bottles: A source of controversy reviewed Cristina Bach a,b, *, Xavier Dauchy a , Marie to restrictions and/or specifications according to their toxicological data. Despite this, the analysis of PET and additives. Genotoxic and estrogenic activities in PET-bottled water have been reported. Chemical mixtures

  13. Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation on the Bioavailability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    mechanisms of contaminant reactions on soil minerals and in soils, it is necessary to couple macroscopic on the Bioavailability of Contaminants in the Terrestrial Environment Donald L. Sparks Department ofPlant and Soil of contaminants in the terrestrial environment is greatly affected by a number of chemical factors and processes

  14. Integrating Chemical Hazard Assessment into the Design of Inherently Safer Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yuan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics and Hazard Evaluation CART Calculated Adiabatic Reaction Temperature NFPA National Fire Protection Association EP Explosion Potential TMR Time to maximum rate ix ix SADT Self Accelerating Decomposition Temperature CSB U......................................................................................... 18 2.3 Computational quantum chemistry simulation ................................................ 20 2.4 Classification systems for reactive chemicals .................................................. 21 2.4.1 Reaction hazard...

  15. Hawaii energy strategy project 3: Renewable energy resource assessment and development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RLA Consulting (RLA) has been retained by the State of Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) to conduct a Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. This three-phase program is part of the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES), which is a multi-faceted program intended to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Phase 1 of the project, Development of a Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Plan, is to better define the most promising potential renewable energy projects and to establish the most suitable locations for project development in the state. In order to accomplish this goal, RLA has identified constraints and requirements for renewable energy projects from six different renewable energy resources: wind, solar, biomass, hydro, wave, and ocean thermal. These criteria were applied to areas with sufficient resource for commercial development and the results of Phase 1 are lists of projects with the most promising development potential for each of the technologies under consideration. Consideration of geothermal energy was added to this investigation under a separate contract with DBEDT. In addition to the project lists, a monitoring plan was developed with recommended locations and a data collection methodology for obtaining additional wind and solar data. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1. 11 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. Energy Assessments under the Top 10,000 Program - A Case Study for a Steel Mill in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Degroot, Matthew [Institute for Sustainable Communitities; Shi, Jun [Shaanxi Province Energy Conservation and Supervision Center, China

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest energy-savings programs for the Chinese industrial sector was the Top-1,000 Program, which targeted the 1,000 largest industrial enterprises in China. This program was launched in 2006, implemented through 2010, and covered 33% of national energy usage. Because of the success of the Top-1000 initiative, the program has now been expanded to the Top-10,000 program in the 12th Five-Year Plan period (2011-2015). The Top-10,000 program covers roughly 15,000 industrial enterprises, or about two-thirds of China s total energy consumption. Implementing energy audit systems and conducting industrial energy efficiency assessments are key requirements of the Top-10,000 program. Previous research done by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has shown that there is a significant potential for improvement in energy assessment practices and applications in China. Issues such as lack of long term policy mechanisms, insufficient motivation for industrial enterprises, limited technical scope of energy assessments, and lack of systematic standardization have been identified. Through the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. State Department (with additional co-funding from the Energy Foundation China), LBNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC), and DOE Energy Experts worked collaboratively with Chinese local organizations and conducted a series of industrial energy efficiency assessment demonstrations in selected Chinese industrial plants. The project aimed to not only introduce standardized methodologies and tools for energy assessments, but also to bring the systems approach for energy system analysis to the Top 10,000 enterprises. Through the project, five energy system assessments were conducted, and more than 300 Chinese experts from local energy conservation centers, universities, research organizations, energy service companies, and plant engineers were trained. This paper begins by introducing China s national energy intensity and carbon intensity reduction targets. Then, this paper explains the development of Top 10,000 program, including program requirements, the method for target allocation, key supporting policies, as well as challenges in implementing the program. By focusing on a process heating energy system assessment conducted in a Chinese steel mill, this paper presents an example of an energy system assessment conducted on steel reheating furnaces, including overall energy efficiency levels, areas of heat loss, and the potential for energy savings. In addition, the paper provides energy-savings recommendations that were identified during the assessment, as well as potential energy and energy costs savings. To conclude, this paper presents key findings that could further improve the Top 10,000 program by implementing a systems approach for energy assessments.

  17. Preliminary assessment report for Fort Custer Training Center, Installation 26035, Augusta, Michigan. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Michigan Army National Guard property near Augusta, Michigan. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Custer Training Center, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations associated with the property are (1) storage of hazardous materials and hazardous waste, (2) storage and dispensing of fuel, (3) washing of vehicles and equipment, and (4) weapons training ranges that may have accumulated lead.

  18. Preliminary assessment report for Fort Jacob F. Wolters, Installation 48555, Mineral Wells, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (TXARNG) property near Mineral Wells, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Wolters property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  19. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Swift Military Reservation, Installation 48070, Bastrop County, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard property in Bastrop County, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Camp Swift property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicated that the activities at Camp Swift include no operations considered to have an adverse impact to the environment. The recommendation, therefore, is that no further IRP action is necessary at this property.

  20. Satellite power system concept development and evaluation program system definition technical assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the system definition studies conducted by NASA as a part of the Department of Energy/National Aeronautics and Space Administration SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program are summarized. The purpose of the system definition efforts was to identify and define candidate SPS concepts and to evaluate the concepts in terms of technical and cost factors. Although the system definition efforts consisted primarily of evaluation and assessment of alternative technical approaches, a reference system was also defined to facilitate economic, environmental, and societal assessments by the Department of Energy. This reference system was designed to deliver 5 GW of electrical power to the utility grid. Topics covered include system definition; energy conversion and power management; power transmission and reception; structures, controls, and materials; construction and operations; and space transportation.

  1. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.; Pan, V.

    1995-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 42st set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLII) that were received on or before June 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

  2. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.; Minick, S.K.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 48th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVIII) that were received on or before June 1, 1998.

  3. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 43rd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIII) that were received on or before December 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

  4. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 47th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVII) that were received on or before December 1, 1997.

  5. Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. The Lifecycle of Bayesian Network Models Developed for Multi-Source Signature Assessment of Nuclear Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sego, Landon H.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Source Signatures for Nuclear Programs project, part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys (PNNL) Signature Discovery Initiative, seeks to computationally capture expert assessment of multi-type information such as text, sensor output, imagery, or audio/video files, to assess nuclear activities through a series of Bayesian network (BN) models. These models incorporate knowledge from a diverse range of information sources in order to help assess a countrys nuclear activities. The models span engineering topic areas, state-level indicators, and facility-specific characteristics. To illustrate the development, calibration, and use of BN models for multi-source assessment, we present a model that predicts a countrys likelihood to participate in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. We validate this model by examining the extent to which the model assists non-experts arrive at conclusions similar to those provided by nuclear proliferation experts. We also describe the PNNL-developed software used throughout the lifecycle of the Bayesian network model development.

  7. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: chiu.weihsueh@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on augmentation of weight of evidence using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards integration of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for expansion of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual reorientation of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  8. The Development of Dynamic Operational Risk Assessment in Oil/Gas and Chemical Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaole

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    by regulations for the use and execution of risk analysis in 1991[16]. QRA became an official requirement for offshore after the Piper Alpha platform disaster that took place in 1988. Lord Cullen in his report recommended QRA as a technique to provide a... than 500,000 people to MIC and other chemicals. It killed at least 3,800 people and caused significant morbidity and premature death for many thousands more. An explosion and resulting fire in the Piper Alpha disaster[4] destroyed the oil production...

  9. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

  10. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment program at the 216-U-12 crib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, B.A.; Chou, C.J.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 216-U-12 crib has been in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) interim-status groundwater quality assessment program since the first quarter of 1993. Specific conductance measured in downgradient wells 299-W22-41 and 299-W22-42 exceeds its critical mean. This report presents the results and findings of Phases I and II of the assessment monitoring program, as required by 40 CFR 265.93. The elevated levels of specific conductance in the downgradient {open_quotes}triggering{close_quotes} wells are attributed to nitrate, the mobile anion released when nitric acid is diluted in water, and calcium which is released from the sediments as acid is neutralized. Technetium-99 levels have been elevated in these same downgradient wells since 1991. The source of these constituents is the 216-U-12 crib. Downward migration of nitrate and technetium-99 from the vadose zone (and continued elevated specific conductance in the two downgradient wells) is still occurring because the driving force is still present.

  11. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 consists of 19 reports describing technical effort performed by Government Contractors in the area of LNG Safety and Environmental Control. Report topics are: simulation of LNG vapor spread and dispersion by finite element methods; modeling of negatively buoyant vapor cloud dispersion; effect of humidity on the energy budget of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapor cloud; LNG fire and explosion phenomena research evaluation; modeling of laminar flames in mixtures of vaporized liquefied natural gas (LNG) and air; chemical kinetics in LNG detonations; effects of cellular structure on the behavior of gaseous detonation waves under transient conditions; computer simulation of combustion and fluid dynamics in two and three dimensions; LNG release prevention and control; the feasibility of methods and systems for reducing LNG tanker fire hazards; safety assessment of gelled LNG; and a four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors.

  12. Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, James R.

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

  13. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  14. Adventures in supercomputing, a K-12 program in computational science: An assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, C.E.; Hicks, H.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Iles-Brechak, K.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Honey, M.; McMillan, K. [Education Development Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors describe only those elements of the Department of Energy Adventures in Supercomputing (AiS) program for high school teachers, such as school selection, which have a direct bearing on assessment. Schools submit an application to participate in the AiS program. They propose a team of at least two teachers to implement the AiS curriculum. The applications are evaluated by selection committees in each of the five participating states to determine which schools are the most qualified to carry out the program and reach a significant number of women, minorities, and economically disadvantaged students, all of whom have historically been underrepresented in the sciences. Typically, selected schools either have a large disadvantaged student population, or the applying teachers propose specific means to attract these segments of their student body into AiS classes. Some areas with AiS schools have significant numbers of minority students, some have economically disadvantaged, usually rural, students, and all areas have the potential to reach a higher proportion of women than technical classes usually attract. This report presents preliminary findings based on three types of data: demographic, student journals, and contextual. Demographic information is obtained for both students and teachers. Students have been asked to maintain journals which include replies to specific questions that are posed each month. An analysis of the answers to these questions helps to form a picture of how students progress through the course of the school year. Onsite visits by assessment professionals conducting student and teacher interviews, provide a more in depth, qualitative basis for understanding student motivations.

  15. Chemical contamination of harbor-seal pups in Puget Sound. Puget Sound Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calambokidis, J.; Steiger, G.H.; Lowenstine, L.J.; Becker, D.S.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dead newborn harbor seals were collected from Smith Island in the Strait of Juan de Fuca and from Gertrude Island in southern Puget Sound. A variety of chemical contaminants were measured in different kinds of tissue from seven harbor seal pups from each location. In addition to measurements of chemical concentrations, various tissues were also evaluated microscopically for histopathological abnormalities. Finally, two methods for determining the concentrations of PCBs and DDE in blubber tissues were compared. Concentrations of PCBs, lead and silver were significantly higher in the seals from Gertrude Island than those from Smith Island. However, the concentrations of PCBs in seal pups from both locations have declined significantly since testing began in 1972.

  16. Citizen-State Interaction and Technical Controversy: The U.S. Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Futrell, Robert

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rochford, Jr., Steven K. Worden, and Robert D. Benford. 1986. "Frame Alignment Processes, Micromobilization, and Movement Participation." American SociologicaL Review 51:464-481. Snow, David A. , Louis A. Zurcher, and Sheldon Ekland-Olson. 1980 "Social...'s .announcement in 1984 of their proposal to incinerate chemical weapons in Madison County, Kentucky and seven other sites aro~nd the country" came in the midst of Reagan's devolution of environmental policy development and enforcement. Institutionalized...

  17. CRADA No. NFE-10-02715 Assessment of AFA Stainless Steels for Tube Products in Chemical Processing and Energy Production Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Epler, Mario [Carpenter Technology Corporation; Magee, John H [Carpenter Technology Corporation

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (Carpenter) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to assess material properties of several potential AFA family grades and explore the feasibility of producing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels in tubular form needed for many power generation and chemical process applications. Carpenter's Research Laboratory successfully vacuum melted 30 lb heats of seven candidate AFA alloy compositions representing a wide range of alloy content and intended application temperatures. These compositions were evaluated by ORNL and Carpenter R&D for microstructure, tensile properties, creep properties, and oxidation resistance. In parallel, additional work was directed toward an initial tube manufacture demonstration of a baseline AFA alloy. Carpenter successfully manufactured a 10,000 lb production heat and delivered appropriate billets to a partner for extrusion evaluation. Tube product was successfully manufactured from the baseline AFA alloy, indicating good potential for commercially produced AFA tubular form material.

  18. Environmental Assessment of the US Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.K.; Bernard, M.J. III; Walsh, R.F

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) focuses on the long-term (1985-2000) impacts of the US Department of Energy (DOE) electric and hybrid vehicle (EHV) program. This program has been designed to accelerate the development of EHVs and to demonstrate their commercial feasibility as required by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-413), as amended (P.L. 95-238). The overall goal of the program is the commercialization of: (1) electric vehicles (EVs) acceptable to broad segments of the personal and commercial vehicle markets, (2) hybrid vehicles (HVs) with range capabilities comparable to those of conventional vehicles (CVs), and (3) advanced EHVs completely competitive with CVs with respect to both cost and performance. Five major EHV projects have been established by DOE: market demonstration, vehicle evaluation and improvement, electric vehicle commercialization, hybrid vehicle commercialization, and advanced vehicle development. Conclusions are made as to the effects of EV and HV commercialization on the: consumption and importation of raw materials; petroleum and total energy consumption; ecosystems impact from the time of obtaining raw material through vehicle use and materials recycling; environmental impacts on air and water quality, land use, and noise; health and safety aspects; and socio-economic factors. (LCL)

  19. Impact assessment of draft DOE Order 5820.2B. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a revision to DOE Order 5820.2A, entitled ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` DOE issued DOE Order 5820.2A in September 1988 and, as the title implies, it covered only radioactive waste forms. The proposed draft order, entitled ``Waste Management,`` addresses the management of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste forms. It also includes spent nuclear fuel, which DOE does not consider a waste. Waste forms covered include hazardous waste, high-level waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level radioactive waste, uranium and thorium mill tailings, mixed waste, and sanitary waste. The Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) of Leached Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) is facilitating the revision of this order. The EM Regulatory Compliance Division (EM-331) has requested that TSP estimate the impacts and costs of compliance with the revised order. TSP requested Dames & Moore to aid in this assessment by comparing requirements in Draft Order 5820.2B to ones in DOE Order 5820.2A and other DOE orders and Federal regulations. The assessment started with a draft version of 5820.2B dated January 14, 1994. DOE has released three updated versions of the draft order since then (dated May 20, 1994; August 26, 1994; and January 23, 1995). Each time DOE revised the order, Dames and Moore updated the assessment work to reflect the text changes. This report reflects the January 23, 1995 version of the draft order.

  20. DOE/EA-1760 Final Environmental Assessment for FutureFuel Chemical Company

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0Program Final45 FINAL60

  1. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  2. Lessons Learned: Using Low Cost, Uncooled Infrared Cameras for the Rapid Liquid Level Assessment of Chemical UXO and Storage Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Kevin Larry

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the fall of 2001, the U.S. Army used low-cost infrared cameras provided by the INEEL to image 3190 aging ton shipping containers to determine if any contained liquid, possibly trace amounts of hazardous mustard agent. The purpose of the scan was to provide quick, "hands-off" assessment of the water-heater-sized containers before moving them with a crane. If the thermal images indicated a possible liquid level, extra safety precautions would be taken prior to moving the container. The technique of using infrared cameras to determine liquid levels in large storage tanks is well documented, but the application of this technique to ton shipping containers (45 to 1036 liters) and even smaller individual chemical munitions (2 to 4 liters) is unique and presents some interesting challenges. This paper describes the lessons learned, problems encountered and success rates associated with using low-cost infrared cameras to look for liquid levels within ton shipping containers and individual chemical munitions.

  3. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE`s Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  4. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE's Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  5. Assessment of the Impacts of Standards and Labeling Programs inMexico (four products).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Itha; Pulido, Henry; McNeil, Michael A.; Turiel, Isaac; della Cava, Mirka

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes impacts from energy efficiency standards and labeling in Mexico from 1994 through 2005 for four major products: household refrigerators, room air conditioners, three-phase (squirrel cage) induction motors, and clothes washers. It is a retrospective analysis, seeking to assess verified impacts on product efficiency in the Mexican market in the first ten years after standards were implemented. Such an analysis allows the Mexican government to compare actual to originally forecast program benefits. In addition, it provides an extremely valuable benchmark for other countries considering standards, and to the energy policy community as a whole. The methodology for evaluation begins with historical test data taken for a large number of models of each product type between 1994 and 2005. The pre-standard efficiency of models in 1994 is taken as a baseline throughout the analysis. Model efficiency data were provided by an independent certification laboratory (ANCE), which tested products as part of the certification and enforcement mechanism defined by the standards program. Using this data, together with economic and market data provided by both government and private sector sources, the analysis considers several types of national level program impacts. These include: Energy savings; Environmental (emissions) impacts, and Net financial impacts to consumers, manufacturers and utilities. Energy savings impacts are calculated using the same methodology as the original projections, allowing a comparison. Other impacts are calculated using a robust and sophisticated methodology developed by the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in a collaboration supported by the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP).

  6. An Assessment of ORNL PIE Capabilities for the AGR Program Capsule Post Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL has facilities and experienced staff that can execute +the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) task. While the specific PIE breakdown needs to be more formally defined, the basic outline is clear and the existing capabilities can be assessed within the needs of the tasks defined in the program plan. A one-to-one correspondence between the program plan tasks and the current ORNL PIE status was conducted and while some shortcomings were identified, the general capability is available. Specific upgrade needs were identified and reviewed. A path forward was formulated. Building 3525 is available for this work and this building is currently receiving renewed attention from management so that it will be in good working order prior to the expected PIE start date. This building is equipped with the tools necessary for PIEs of this nature, but the long hiatus in coated particle fuel work has left it with aging analysis tools. This report identified several of these tools and rough estimates of what would be required to update and replace them. In addition, other ORNL buildings are available to support Building 3525 in specialized tasks along with the normal laboratory infrastructure. Before the AGR management embarks on any equipment development effort, the PIE tasks should be updated against current program (modeling and data) needs and better defined so that the items to be measured, their measurement uncertainties, and thru-put needs can be reviewed. A Data Task Matrix (DTM) should be prepared so that the program data needs can be compared against the identified PIE tasks and what is practical in the hot cell environment to make sure nothing is overlooked. Finally, thought should be given to the development of standardized equipment designs between sites to avoid redundant design efforts and different measurement techniques. This is a potentially cost saving effort that can also avoid data inconsistencies.

  7. PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics and Generator Efficiency): a computer program for the calculation of partial chemical equilibrium/partial chemical rate controlled composition of multiphased mixtures under one dimensional steady flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.H.; Haimes, R.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NASA CEC Code was the starting point for PACKAGE, whose function is to evaluate the composition of a multiphase combustion product mixture under the following chemical conditions: (1) total equilibrium with pure condensed species; (2) total equilibrium with ideal liquid solution; (3) partial equilibrium/partial finite rate chemistry; and (4) fully finite rate chemistry. The last three conditions were developed to treat the evolution of complex mixtures such as coal combustion products. The thermodynamic variable pairs considered are either pressure (P) and enthalpy, P and entropy, at P and temperature. Minimization of Gibbs free energy is used. This report gives detailed discussions of formulation and input/output information used in the code. Sample problems are given. The code development, description, and current programming constraints are discussed. (DLC)

  8. Integrated Baseline System (IBS), Version 1.03. User guide: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, B.M.; Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Matsumoto, S.W.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.; Winters, C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planing and analysis. This document is the user guide for the IBS and explains how to operate the IBS system. The fundamental function of the IBS is to provide tools that civilian emergency management personnel can use in developing emergency plans and in supporting emergency management activities to cope with a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. Emergency management planners can evaluate concepts and ideas using the IBS system. The results of that experience can then be factored into refining requirements and plans. This document provides information for the general system user, and is the primary reference for the system features of the IBS. It is designed for persons who are familiar with general emergency management concepts, operations, and vocabulary. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other LBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary. IBS is a dynamic system. Its capabilities are in a state of continuing expansion and enhancement.

  9. Integrated Baseline System (IBS), Version 1. 03. [Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, B.M.; Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Matsumoto, S.W.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.; Winters, C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Baseline System (IBS), operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is a system of computerized tools for emergency planing and analysis. This document is the user guide for the IBS and explains how to operate the IBS system. The fundamental function of the IBS is to provide tools that civilian emergency management personnel can use in developing emergency plans and in supporting emergency management activities to cope with a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. Emergency management planners can evaluate concepts and ideas using the IBS system. The results of that experience can then be factored into refining requirements and plans. This document provides information for the general system user, and is the primary reference for the system features of the IBS. It is designed for persons who are familiar with general emergency management concepts, operations, and vocabulary. Although the IBS manual set covers basic and advanced operations, it is not a complete reference document set. Emergency situation modeling software in the IBS is supported by additional technical documents. Some of the other LBS software is commercial software for which more complete documentation is available. The IBS manuals reference such documentation where necessary. IBS is a dynamic system. Its capabilities are in a state of continuing expansion and enhancement.

  10. Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program, a small-scale production initiative designed to increase numbers of a weak but potentially recoverable population of spring chinook salmon in the Tucannon River in the State of Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-l326) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  11. Use of hazard assessments to achieve risk reduction in the USDOE Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Bott, T.; Eisenhawer, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DeYoung, L.; Hockert, J. [Odgen Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship Demonstration Project SS-21, better known as the ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex has dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The entire Seamless Safety design and development process is verified by a concurrent hazard assessment (HA). The primary purpose of the SS-21 Demonstration Project HA was to demonstrate the feasibility of performing concurrent HAs as part of an engineering design and development effort and then to evaluate the use of the HA to provide an indication in the risk reduction or gain in safety achieved. To accomplish this objective, HAs were performed on both baseline (i.e., old) and new (i.e. SS-21) B61-0 Center Case Section disassembly processes. These HAs were used to support the identification and documentation of weapon- and process-specific hazards and safety-critical operating steps. Both HAs focused on identifying accidents that had the potential for worker injury, public health effects, facility damage, toxic gas release, and dispersal of radioactive materials. A comparison of the baseline and SS-21 process risks provided a semi-quantitative estimate of the risk reduction gained via the Seamless Safety process.

  12. XCHEM-1D: A Heat Transfer/Chemical Kinetics Computer Program for multilayered reactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, R.J.; Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An eXplosive CHEMical kinetics code, XCHEM, has been developed to solve the reactive diffusion equations associated with thermal ignition of energetic materials. This method-of-lines code uses stiff numerical methods and adaptive meshing to resolve relevant combustion physics. Solution accuracy is maintained between multilayered materials consisting of blends of reactive components and/or inert materials. Phase change and variable properties are included in one-dimensional slab, cylindrical and spherical geometries. Temperature-dependent thermal properties have been incorporated and the modification of thermal conductivities to include decomposition effects are estimated using solid/gas volume fractions determined by species fractions. Gas transport properties, including high pressure corrections, have also been included. Time varying temperature, heat flux, convective and thermal radiation boundary conditions, and layer to layer contact resistances have also been implemented.

  13. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

  14. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work should focus on lab and field-scale testing of ex situ MEOR using Bacillus licheniformis as well as the biosurfactant-producing strains we have newly isolated from the Milne Point reservoir and the EVOS environment.

  15. Preliminary assessment report for Olney Military Reservation, Installation 24175, Olney, Maryland. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J.; Rose, C.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Maryland Army National Guard property near Olney, Maryland. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies Phase I of the US Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program for Olney Military Reservation property. Olney Military Reservation is an 8-acre site located in the southwestern portion of Maryland, about six miles northwest of Washington, DC, in Montgomery County. The major facilities included in this PA comprise the administration building, barracks, and motor repair shops. The environmentally significant operations associated with the property are underground and aboveground storage tanks, a vehicle wash rack, a flammable materials storage area (a lean-to structure), and a hazardous materials storage building. The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicates that Olney Military Reservation property poses no immediate threat to human health or the environment. Argonne`s reviewers noted several historical potential threats to the environment that have occurred at the property that installation personnel have corrected or eliminated.

  16. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

  17. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation.

  18. Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

  19. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

  20. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 2, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the months of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Radioactive contamination, aging, medical ethics, and environmental risk analysis.

  1. ENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering Biomedical engineering chemical engineering civil and environmental engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ENGINEERING GRaduatE PRoGRams Biological SyStemS engineering § Biomedical engineering § chemical engineering § civil and environmental engineering computer Science § electrical and computer engineering § materialS Science and engineering mechanical and aeronautical engineering § tranSportation technology

  2. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cycle work included hydraulic performance and extraction efficiency of eight-stage centrifugal contactors, flowsheet for the Aralex process, Ru and Zr extraction in a miniature centrifugal contactor, study of Zr aging in the organic phase and its effect on Zr extraction and hydraulic testing of the 9-cm-ID contactor. Work for predicting accident consequences in LWR fuel processing covered the relation between energy input (to subdivide a solid) and the modes of particle size frequency distribution. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program corrosion-testing materials for containment vessels and equipment for studying carbide reactions in bismuth is under way. Analytical studies have been made of salt-transport processes; efforts to spin tungsten crucibles 13 cm dia continue, and other information on tungsten fabrication is being assembled; the process steps of the chloride volatility process have been demonstrated and the thoria powder product used to produce oxide pellets; solubility of UO/sub 2/, PuO/sub 2/, and fission products in molten alkali nitrates is being investigated; work was continued on reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting the actinides into ammonium chloroaluminate from bismuth; the preparation of thorium-uranium carbide from the oxide is being studied as a means of improving the oxide reactivity; studies are in progress on producing uranium metal and decontaminated ThO/sub 2/ by the reaction of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in molten salts containing ThCl/sub 4/ and thorium metal chips. In the molten tin process, no basic thermodynamic or kinetic factors have been found that may limit process development.

  3. Indirect Assessment: Sport management candidates are required to complete a graduating senior survey, which is based on the program's learning outcomes. The results of this survey are analyzed by program faculty and used to make curricular changes as nece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asaithambi, Asai

    Indirect Assessment: Sport management candidates are required to complete a graduating senior survey, which is based on the program's learning outcomes. The results of this survey are analyzed by program faculty and used to make curricular changes as necessary. Direct Assessment: Sport Management

  4. Decision making technical support study for the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.L.; Dobson, J.E.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the adequacy of current command and control systems designed to make timely decisions that would enable sufficient warning and protective response to an accident at the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, and at Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA), Arkansas. Institutional procedures designed to facilitate rapid accident assessment, characterization, warning, notification, and response after the onset of an emergency and computer-assisted decision-making aids designed to provide salient information to on- and-off-post emergency responders are examined. The character of emergency decision making at APG and PBA, as well as potential needs for improvements to decision-making practices, procedures, and automated decision-support systems (ADSSs), are described and recommendations are offered to guide equipment acquisition and improve on- and off-post command and control relationships. We recommend that (1) a continued effort be made to integrate on- and off-post command control, and decision-making procedures to permit rapid decision making; (2) the pathways for alert and notification among on- and off-post officials be improved and that responsibilities and chain of command among off-post agencies be clarified; (3) greater attention be given to organizational and social context factors that affect the adequacy of response and the likelihood that decision-making systems will work as intended; and (4) faster improvements be made to on-post ADSSs being developed at APG and PBA, which hold considerable promise for depicting vast amounts of information. Phased development and procurement of computer-assisted decision-making tools should be undertaken to balance immediate needs against available resources and to ensure flexibility, equity among sites, and compatibility among on- and off-post systems. 112 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steindler, M J; Ader, M; Barletta, R E

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing methods (PDPM) for nuclear fuel, corrosion testing of refractory metals and alloys, graphite, and SiC in PDPM environments was done. A tungsten-metallized Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-3% Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ crucible was successfully fabricated. Tungsten microstructure of a plasma-sprayed tungsten crucible was stabilized by nickel infiltration and heat treatment. Solubility measurements of Th in Cd and Cd-Mg alloys were continued, as were experiments to study the reduction of high-fired ThO/sub 2/. Work on the fused salt electrolysis of CaO also was continued. The method of coprocessing of U and Pu by a salt transport process was modified. Tungsten-coated molybdenum crucibles were fabricated. The proliferation resistance of chloride volatility processing of thorium-based fuels is being evaluated by studying the behavior of fission product elements during chlorination of U and Th. Thermodynamic analysis of the phase relationships in the U-Pu-Zn system was initiated. The Pyro-Civex reprocessing method is being reviewed. Reactivity of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/ with molten equimolar NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ is being studied along with the behavior of selected fission product elements. Work was continued on the reprocessing of actinide oxides by extracting the actinides from a bismuth solution. Rate of dissolution of UO/sub 2/ microspheres in LiCl/AlCl/sub 3/ was measured. Nitriding rates of Th and U dissolved in molten tin were measured. In work on the encapsulation of radioactive waste in metal, leach rates of a simulated waste glass were studied. Rates of dissolution of metals (potential barrier materials) in aqueous media are being studied. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, the adsorption of iodate by hematite as a function of pH and iodate concentration was measured. The migration behavior of cesium in limestone was studied in relation to the cesium concentration and pH of simulated groundwater solutions.

  6. Waste package performance assessment: Deterministic system model, program scope and specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connell, W.J.; Drach, R.S.

    1986-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessments of the performance of nuclear waste package designs must be made in order to qualify waste package designs with respect to containment time and release-rate requirements. PANDORA is a computer-based model of the waste package and of the processes affecting it over the long terms, specific to conditions at the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site. The processes PANDORA models include: changes in inventories due to radioactive decay, gamma radiation dose rate in and near the package, heat transfer, mechanical behavior, groundwater contact, corrosion, waste form alteration, and radionuclide release. The model tracks the development and coupling of these processes over time. The process models are simplified ones that focus on major effects and on coupling. This report documents our conceptual model development and provides a specification for the computer program. The current model is the first in a series. Succeeding models will use guidance from results of preceding models in the PANDORA series and will incorporate results of recently completed experiments and calculations on processes affecting performance. 22 refs., 21 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada test site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D. (Field Test Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. In particular we have assumed that the program goal will be to certify a full engine system design as flight test ready. All nuclear and non-nuclear components will be individually certified as ready for such a test at sites remote from the NRDA facilities, the components transported to NRDA, and the engine assembled. We also assume that engines of 25,000--100,000 lb thrust levels will be tested with burn times of 1 hour or longer. After a test, the engine will be disassembled, time critical inspections will be executed, and a selection of components will be transported to remote inspection sites. The majority of the components will be stored for future inspection at Jackass Flats. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad.

  8. Long-term effects of dredging operations program: Assessing bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms exposed to contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, J.U.; McFarland, V.A.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper synthesizes previous work on bioaccumulation to provide a working document for the environmental impact on the aquatic environment due to bioaccumulation of sediment contaminants resulting from dredging operations and dredged material placement. Emphasis is placed on explanation of basic concepts concerning, and factors influencing, sediment contaminant bioaccumulation and bioavailability. The paper presents several numerical methods for assessing bioaccumulation, including a simple method for estimating theoretical bioaccumulation potential (TBP) from sediment chemistry for neutral organic chemicals. Methods are also given for projecting contaminant concentrations in organism tissues when steady state is achieved, based on laboratory or field exposures to contaminated sediments. These assessments are presented in the context of the US Environmental Protection Agency's tiered testing approach for dredged material evaluation. The various numerical methods for bioaccumulation assessment are illustrated and compared using step-by-step example calculations with hypothetical and actual data.

  9. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, Industrial Technologies Program, DRAFT Summary...

  10. Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

  11. The Texas Master Gardener program: an assessment of curriculum delivery and contribution to community development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Chyrel Ann

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Extension programs across the nation have been given the task of education and outreach to citizens of their respective states. Master Gardener programs have been seen as a way to provide horticultural education, while ...

  12. Waste Management Recommendations in the Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggebrecht, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

    The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) was one of the four Energy Analysis & Diagnostic Centers (EADC) that began providing waste management, in addition to energy and demand conservation, assessments in January, 1994. Over 30...

  13. Fire Protection Program Assessment, Building 9116- Y12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This assessment is intended to evaluate the fire hazards, life safety and fire protection features inherent in Building 9116.

  14. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Oak Ridge Office- 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This assessment, using criteria referred to in DOE O 426.1, Federal Technical Capability, is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of the FTCP and the TQP at ORO. The purpose of this report is to document the results of ORO's self-assessment. The remaining sections of this report include the assessment scope and methodology, the results of the assessment, and supporting information.

  15. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Idaho Operations Office- 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This TQP self-assessment was performed by a review team with extensive assessment experience. The assessment approach consisted of interviewing Managers, Division Directors, Team Leads, Qualifying Officials, and a representative sample of TQP participants, reviewing applicable records, reports, and IDMS documents, and observing continuing training activities.

  16. Assessment of a Food for Work Program and the Drought Survival Needs of Ethiopian Communities in the Northern Tigray Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, Ryan

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Piya Abeygunawardena Theresa Pesl Murphrey Head of Department, Jack Elliot December 2011 Major Subject: Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications iii ABSTRACT Assessment of a Food for Work Program and the Drought Survival..., friendship, and wonderful country. Dr. Theresa Murphrey, thank you for your positive energy and insight. Dr. Kim Dooley, you are a teacher in the best sense of the word. Thank you for showing me the art and science of qualitative research. To my chair, Dr...

  17. Date: 14 Oct 2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    No Chemical apron Yes Safety cabinet Yes Gloves Yes Local exhaust ventilation No Eye Protection Yes Other or uncontrolled release: Clean up spills immediately, isolate area and deny entry. Provide ventilation

  18. Chemical Cleaning Program Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment. Cash 6-1 CHAPTER 6 CASH 1.0:21

  19. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  20. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Medicine and the Pew Health Profession Commission have advocated that physicians broaden their participation in the envirorunental aspects of medical care. Accordingly, both organizations recommend training of future primary care physicians for greater competencies and appreciation of this area of medicine. The extent to which family practice educators are receptive to incorporating this topic into the residency curriculum is not known. A national survey of directors of family practice programs was conducted to assess their attitudes about environmental health education in family practice residency training. The ultimate goal of this study was to provide information that will guide the development of an environmental health curriculum for family practice residency programs. Videotapes supporting this program have been indexed individually.

  1. Characterization and assessment of novel bulk storage technologies : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Georgianne; Tong, Nellie (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA); Fioravanti, Richard (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA); Gordon, Paul (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Markel, Larry (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Agrawal, Poonum (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Nourai, Ali (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the results of a high-level study to assess the technological readiness and technical and economic feasibility of 17 novel bulk energy storage technologies. The novel technologies assessed were variations of either pumped storage hydropower (PSH) or compressed air energy storage (CAES). The report also identifies major technological gaps and barriers to the commercialization of each technology. Recommendations as to where future R&D efforts for the various technologies are also provided based on each technology's technological readiness and the expected time to commercialization (short, medium, or long term). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned this assessment of novel concepts in large-scale energy storage to aid in future program planning of its Energy Storage Program. The intent of the study is to determine if any new but still unproven bulk energy storage concepts merit government support to investigate their technical and economic feasibility or to speed their commercialization. The study focuses on compressed air energy storage (CAES) and pumped storage hydropower (PSH). It identifies relevant applications for bulk storage, defines the associated technical requirements, characterizes and assesses the feasibility of the proposed new concepts to address these requirements, identifies gaps and barriers, and recommends the type of government support and research and development (R&D) needed to accelerate the commercialization of these technologies.

  2. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

  3. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  4. assess pozzolanic activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: 1 UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO STUDENT PROGRAMS ASSESSMENT Program Review and Assessment Activities......

  5. U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Technology Delivery Plant-Wide Assessment at PPG Industries, Natrium, WV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, Stephen R.; Wiethe, Jeff; Green, Russell; Guice, Christina; Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran; Turton, Richard

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PPG and West Virginia University performed a plantwide energy assessment at the PPGs Natrium, WV chemical plant, an energy-intensive manufacturing facility producing chlor-alkali and related products. Implementation of all the assessment recommendations contained in this report could reduce plant energy consumption by 8.7%, saving an estimated 10,023,192 kWh/yr in electricity, 6,113 MM Btu/yr in Natural Gas, 401,156 M lb/yr in steam and 23,494 tons/yr in coal and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 241 mm lb/yr. The total cost savings would amount to approximately $2.9 mm/yr. Projects being actively implemented will save $1.7 mm/yr; the remainder are undergoing more detailed engineering study.

  6. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Los Alamos Field Office- 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This self-assessment for the Verification of the Closure of Federal Training & Qualification Deficiencies was conducted to provide Los Alamos Field Office (NA-LA) management specific information related to effectiveness of the closure actions for Federal Training and Qualification (T &Q) deficiencies identified by a recent self-assessment and by a CDNS Biennial review. The conclusion of this assessment is that most deficiencies have corrective actions assigned that are effectively completed and adequately documented.

  7. Assessment of the feasibility of a rehabilitation intervention program for breast cancer survivors with cognitive complaints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    complaints after breast cancer treatments: examining the2012). Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 135 Wefel, J.STUDIES OF CANCER AND CANCER TREATMENT Assessment of the

  8. Fire Protection Program Assessment, Building 9203 & 9203A Complex- Y12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This assessment is intended to evaluate the fire hazards, life safety and fire protection features inherent in the Building 9203 and 9203A complex.

  9. Aeronautical System Center's environmental compliance assessment and management program's cost-saving initiatives support the Air Force's acquisition reform initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meanor, T.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Management directorate of ASC (ASC/EM) has the responsibility of providing government oversight for the Government Owned Contractor Operated Aircraft and Missile plants (GOCOs). This oversight is manifested as a landlord role where Air Force provides the funding required to maintain the plant facilities including buildings and utilities as well as environmental systems. By agreement the companies operating the plants are required to operate them in accordance with environmental law. Presently the GOCOs include Air Force Plant (AFP) 6 in Marietta Ga., AFP 4 in Fort Worth, Tx., AFP 44 in Tucson, Az., AFP 42 in Palmdale, Ca., and AFP PJKS in Denver, Co. Lockheed Martin corporation operates AFPs 4,6, PJKS and a portion of AFP 42 while AFP 44 is operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. Other GOCOs at AFP 42 are Northrup-Grumman, Boeing, and Cabaco, the facilities engineer. Since 1992 the Environmental Management division has conducted its Environmental Compliance Assessment and Management Program assessments (ECAMP) annually at each of the plants. Using DOD's ECAMP Team Guide and teams comprised of both Air Force and consultant engineering personnel, each plant is assessed for its environmental compliance well being. In the face of rising operational costs and diminishing budgets ASC/EM performed a comprehensive review of its ECAMP. As a result, the basic ECAMP program was improved to reduce costs without compromising on quality of the effort. The program retained its emphasis in providing a snap-shot evaluation of each Air Force plant's environmental compliance health supported by complete but tailored protocol assessments.

  10. LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 6.3: Codes and Standards Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Deliverable 6.3.5a Prioritized Codes Connections Architectural Energy Corporation PIER Lighting Research: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program ConsultantReport Arnold Schwarzenegger Lighting Research Program ii 500-01-041 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Prepared By: Heschong Mahone Group

  11. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltse, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

  12. Date:09-01-2013 Review Date: Assessment Reference: Chemical Hazard Risk Assessment Form HSD 030C University of Cambridge Revised July 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    : Fume cupboard Yes Lab coat / overalls Yes Glove box / isolator No Chemical apron Yes Safety cabinet Yes-products and washings) Small amount down the skin with plenty of running water. Large amount of Nitric acid require. Remove spillage using diatomaceous earth/dry sand or dilute with water and neutralise with calcium

  13. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  15. Assessment of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Scramble Heifer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Merrideth M.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    By tradition, the scramble heifer program has been portrayed as a strong animal project for which youth participate. These projects are yearlong; require a time commitment, monetary support, and dedication from the students. ...

  16. Assessing the Effects of a Program to Promote Energy-Efficiency Upgrades in Existing Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, A.; Larkin, J.; Gobris, M. K.; Boughen, S.; Staples, J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficient mortgages (EEMs) are intended to mitigate some of the financial barriers to upgrading the energy efficiency of existing (and sometimes new) houses. The Time of Sale Energy Renovation Program (TOSER) is designed to overcome key...

  17. High Burnup Effects Program A State-of-the-Technology Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rising, K. H.; Bradley, E. R.; Williford, R. E.; Freshley, M D.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various analytical models and empirical correlations describing the fission gas release phenomenon were examined. An evaluation was made of the current pertinent experimental data on the subject of high burnup fission gas release. Data reported by individual investigators were compared and evaluated in relation to their applicability to the content and scope of the High Burnup Effects Program. These evaluations then form the bases for defining the data needs, and the selection of variables to be studied in this program.

  18. Unit Plan for Assessing and Improving Student Learning in Degree Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    and the Environment) and GEOL 280 (Environmental Geology) covered similar material except that GEOL 280 was at a more (municipal, hazardous chemical and nuclear). Because both GEOL 118 and GEOL 280 were required for one of our (thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, and hurricanes) and meteorite impacts. In addition, we changed the content

  19. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management quality assessment program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the soil inorganic analysis of the 45th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLV) that were received on or before December 2, 1996.

  20. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  1. Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. Program overview of fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project is to provide essential information about the solar radiation resource to users and planners of solar technologies so that they can make informed and timely decisions concerning applications of those technologies. The project team accomplishes this by producing and disseminating relevant and reliable information about solar radiation. Topics include: Variability of solar radiation, measurements of solar radiation, spectral distribution of solar radiation, and assessment of the solar resource. FY 1993 accomplishments are detailed.

  2. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  3. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

  4. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  5. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  6. Public health assessment for Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump, Ashland, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Region 1. Cerclis No. MAD990685422. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nyanza site is located in Ashland, Massachusetts, approximately 22 miles west of Boston. More than 100 different chemicals (mainly dyes, but additionally a number of semi-volatiles including benzidine, dianisidine, o-tolidine, and 2-napthylamine) have been detected at the site, which encompasses a 35-acre area. Liquid wastes from Nyanza have been discharged into the environment in several different ways including into the underground vault, unlined lagoons, and nearby brooks and wetlands. Surface water and soil on-site are known to have been contaminated. Groundwater beneath and downgradient of the site is known to be contaminated. Releases into the ambient air are known to have occurred historically. These releases have included oleum, bromine, and nitric acid. Opportunity for human exposure in the past was high and included exposures to children playing in the soils and lagoons on-site as well as in the Chemical Brook.

  7. Assessing the Feasibility of An Energy Savings Incentive Program for Williams College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    budgets have been cut 15% campus wide,2 behavioral changes require only modest investment.3 Up until $5,838,229 on utilities (electricity, natural gas, #2 fuel oil, water).4 If utility use could incentive program) would require some investment. However, the electric and steam meters are already

  8. ?Muestreme el dinero!: assessing the linkage between Latino school superintendents and English language learner program resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theobald, Nick Andrew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ?MU?STREME EL DINERO!: ASESING THE LINKAGE BETWEN LATINO SCHOL SUPERINTENDENTS AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER PROGRAM RESOURCES A Disertation by NICK ANDREW THEOBALD Submited to the Ofice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degre of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2007 Major Subject: Political Science ? 2007 NICK ANDREW...

  9. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- Savannah River Operations Office- 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A set of disciplined Criteria, Review, and Approach Documents (CRADs) were developed by the Team Leader utilizing criteria and objectives provided on the FTCP website. Specific "lines of inquiry" were tailored to the organization and assessment processes of the DOE-SR.

  10. Assessment of the high temperature fission chamber technology for the French fast reactor program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Geslot, B.; Domenech, T.; Normand, S. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CEA (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature fission chambers are key instruments for the control and protection of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. First, the developments of those neutron detectors, which are carried out either in France or abroad are reviewed. Second, the French realizations are assessed with the use of the technology readiness levels in order to identify tracks of improvement. (authors)

  11. Defense Transuranic Waste Program. Transuranic waste transportation assessment and guidance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Assessment and Guidance Report (TAGR) is designed to provide DOE-managed defense sites with guidance and citable analyses addressing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements for qualifying and transporting transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico.

  12. Environmental assessment of a BOF steel slag used in road construction: The ECLAIR research program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Abstract Steel production generates great amounts of by-products as steel slag. Unlike blast furnace slag silicates. No real toxicity effect of seepage waters has been revealed from eco-toxicological tests carried, environmental assessment. Introduction Steelmaking slag includes blast furnace iron slag, and electric arc

  13. A multi-objective programming model for assessment the GHG emissions in MSW management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavrotas, George, E-mail: mavrotas@chemeng.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Zografou, Athens, 15780 (Greece); Skoulaxinou, Sotiria [EPEM SA, 141 B Acharnon Str., Athens, 10446 (Greece); Gakis, Nikos [FACETS SA, Agiou Isidorou Str., Athens, 11471 (Greece); Katsouros, Vassilis [Athena Research and Innovation Center, Artemidos 6 and Epidavrou Str., Maroussi, 15125 (Greece); Georgopoulou, Elena [National Observatory of Athens, Thisio, Athens, 11810 (Greece)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: The multi-objective multi-period optimization model. The solution approach for the generation of the Pareto front with mathematical programming. The very detailed description of the model (decision variables, parameters, equations). The use of IPCC 2006 guidelines for landfill emissions (first order decay model) in the mathematical programming formulation. - Abstract: In this study a multi-objective mathematical programming model is developed for taking into account GHG emissions for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management. Mathematical programming models are often used for structure, design and operational optimization of various systems (energy, supply chain, processes, etc.). The last twenty years they are used all the more often in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management in order to provide optimal solutions with the cost objective being the usual driver of the optimization. In our work we consider the GHG emissions as an additional criterion, aiming at a multi-objective approach. The Pareto front (Cost vs. GHG emissions) of the system is generated using an appropriate multi-objective method. This information is essential to the decision maker because he can explore the trade-offs in the Pareto curve and select his most preferred among the Pareto optimal solutions. In the present work a detailed multi-objective, multi-period mathematical programming model is developed in order to describe the waste management problem. Apart from the bi-objective approach, the major innovations of the model are (1) the detailed modeling considering 34 materials and 42 technologies, (2) the detailed calculation of the energy content of the various streams based on the detailed material balances, and (3) the incorporation of the IPCC guidelines for the CH{sub 4} generated in the landfills (first order decay model). The equations of the model are described in full detail. Finally, the whole approach is illustrated with a case study referring to the application of the model in a Greek region.

  14. ASSESSMENT FOR THE SOUTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    SERVICE CLIMATE CHANGE & CULTURAL RESOURCE PLANNING PROGRAM 17 EARTH SYSTEM MODELS 18 CLIMATE ASSESSMENTS

  15. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

  16. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intend to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofit particularly heat supply system reform lags the stated goal by a large amount.

  17. ORISE: Hazard Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assesses both chemical and radiation exposures, and conducts both internal and external radiation dose assessments. Our capabililities include: Linkage of exposure data to site...

  18. Status of Net Metering: Assessing the Potential to Reach Program Caps (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.; Gelman, R.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several states are addressing the issue of net metering program caps, which limit the total amount of net metered generating capacity that can be installed in a state or utility service territory. In this analysis, we examine net metering caps to gain perspective on how long net metering will be available in various jurisdictions under current policies. We also surveyed state practices and experience to understand important policy design considerations.

  19. Status of Net Metering: Assessing the Potential to Reach Program Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Gelman, R.; Bird, L.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several states are addressing the issue of net metering program caps, which limit the total amount of net metered generating capacity that can be installed in a state or utility service territory. In this analysis, we examine net metering caps to gain perspective on how long net metering will be available in various jurisdictions under current policies. We also surveyed state practices and experience to understand important policy design considerations.

  20. Impact-assessment report: Chalk Point Steam Electric Station aquatic-monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chalk Point Steam Electric Station (SES), owned and operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO), is located in the estuarine portion of the Patuxent River just above the Benedict Bridge near Aquasco, Maryland. The plant's two coal-fired units use once-through cooling systems and pursuant to the Code of Maryland Regulations 10.50.01.13, which governs water-quality impact assessments for thermal discharges, PEPCO is required to: assess compliance with mixing-zone specifications that relate discharge flows and thermal-plume size to advective and diffusive properties of the receiving-water body; determine the magnitude and consequences of plant impacts on spawning and nursery areas for organisms that are representative of and important to the receiving body; and determine the magnitude and dollar value of impingement losses.

  1. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 44th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIV) that were received on or before June 3, 1996. The QAP is designed to test the quality of environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by it`s contractors. Since 1976, samples have been prepared and analyzed by the Environmental measurements Laboratory.

  2. Assessing the use of NMR chemical shifts for prediction of VLE in non-ideal binary liquid mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Q.; Moggridge, G. D.; Dalton, T.; Cooper, T.; Mantle, M. D.; Gladden, L. F.; DAgostino, C.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Agostino Department of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology University of Cambridge Pembroke Street Cambridge CB2 3RA, UK Email: cd419@cam.ac.uk Tel: +44(0)1223-761629 2 Abstract A method of estimating vapour liquid equilibrium (VLE... - 337. Hansen, H. K., Rasmussen, P., Fredenslund, A., Schiller, M., Gmehling, J., 1991. Vapor-liquid equilibria by UNIFAC group contribution. 5. Revision and extension. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 30, 2352-2355. Hu, J., Haynes, C.A., Wu, A.H.Y., Cheung, C...

  3. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  4. Assessing the economic revitalization impact of urban design improvements: the Texas Main Street Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozdil, Taner Recep

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................116 Table 5.8 Average Active Texas Main Street City Archival Economic Indicators ....118 Table 5.9 Main Street City Summary Results: Economic Restructuring....................122 Table 5.10 Average Main Street City Managers Response Summary..., and the Texas Main Street Program city managers for sharing their records and helping me to conduct my research. I would like to show my appreciation to my uncle Y?lmaz zdil for fully supporting the decision of making this dream come true. I would also...

  5. DOE/EA-1535; Uranium Leasing Program Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0Program Final Programmatic

  6. Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Department Code 1 CODE of the Department of Chemical of Chemical & Biological Engineering. For clarity of presentation, some passages are copied directly from shall offer an undergraduate chemical and biological engineering program of technological, scientific

  7. Water for Texas: Applicant Capacity Assessment Tool for the Economically Distressed Areas Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Jason; Dascaliuc, Svetlana; Grossman, Nick; Hunt, Michael; Kenesson, Laura; Madden, Tara; McWilliams, Austin; Scott, Whitney; Stubbs, Megan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distressed areas This project was a partnership between the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University and the Texas Water Development Board II Executive Summary Since 1989, the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB... and over budget. To help address this problem, TWDB asked a team of graduate students at the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University to develop an evaluation tool to assess the capacity of applicants to complete...

  8. Waste Management Recommendations in the Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggebrecht, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that result from our assessments very seldom involve "rocket science." In fact, most of them come from the advantage of having, or keeping, a fresh outlook on the practices in the plant. This fresh outlook involves asking the question "Where in the entire... by the plant personnel that it is a considerable help to them to have a fresh set of eyes looking at what they do to discover where it can be improved. This fresh outlook is difficult to maintain when the major concerns of plant personnel are to keep...

  9. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Characterizing residential thermal performance from high resolution end-use data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.E.; Williamson, M.A.; Bailey, S.A.; Pratt, R.G.; Stokes, G.M.; Sandusky, W.F.; Pearson, E.W.; Roberts, J.S.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is part of a two-volume set describing a series of thermal analyses of the residential buildings monitored under the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program. Volume 1 describes in detail the thermal analysis methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the results of applying the methodology in a series of four distinct analyses: (1) an analysis of the first monitored heating season, 1985--1986; (2) an analysis of the second monitored heating season, (3) a comparison of first- and second-year analyses showing changes in residential consumption with changes in weather and evaluating the ability of the analytical technique to discriminate those changes; and (4) a continuation of the previous analyses evaluating the effects of foundation type and heating system type on the results.

  10. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VIII. Advanced concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program has been to provide recommendations for the development and deployment of more proliferation-resistant civilian nuclear-power systems without jeopardizing the development of nuclear energy. In principle, new concepts for nuclear-power systems could be designed so that materials and facilities would be inherently more proliferation-resistant. Such advanced, i.e., less-developed systems, are the subject of this volume. Accordingly, from a number of advanced concepts that were proposed for evaluation, six representative concepts were selected: the fast mixed-spectrum reactor; the denatured molten-salt reactor; the mixed-flow gaseous-core reactor; the linear-accelerator fuel-regenerator reactor; the ternary metal-fueled electronuclear fuel-producer reactor; and the tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor.

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

  12. Vicinity Property Assessments at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Project Sites in the New York District - 13420

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewy, Ann; Hays, David [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) has addressed sites across the nation for almost 4 decades. Multiple stake holder pressures, multiple regulations, and process changes occur over such long time periods. These result in many challenges to the FUSRAP project teams. Initial FUSRAP work was not performed under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Records of Decision (ROD). The ROD identifies the remedy decision and ultimately the criteria to be used to release a site. Early FUSRAP projects used DOE Orders or the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) standards. Under current RODs, regulations may differ, resulting in different cleanup criteria than that used in prior Vicinity Property (VP) remediation. The USACE, in preparation for closeout of Sites, conducts reviews to evaluate whether prior actions were sufficient to meet the cleanup criteria specified in the current ROD. On the basis of these reviews, USACE has conducted additional sampling, determined that prior actions were sufficient, or conducted additional remediation consistent with the selected remedy in the ROD. As the public pressures, regulations, and processes that the FUSRAP encounters continue to change, the program itself continues to evolve. Assessment of VPs at FUSRAP sites is a necessary step in the life cycle of our site management. (authors)

  13. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; LLoyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the analysis details and summary of analyses conducted to evaluate the environmental impacts for the Resumption of Transient Fuel and Materials Testing Program. It provides an assessment of the impacts for the two action alternatives being evaluated in the environmental assessment. These alternatives are (1) resumption of transient testing using the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and (2) conducting transient testing using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL/NM). Analyses are provided for radiologic emissions, other air emissions, soil contamination, and groundwater contamination that could occur (1) during normal operations, (2) as a result of accidents in one of the facilities, and (3) during transport. It does not include an assessment of the biotic, cultural resources, waste generation, or other impacts that could result from the resumption of transient testing. Analyses were conducted by technical professionals at INL and SNL/NM as noted throughout this report. The analyses are based on bounding radionuclide inventories, with the same inventories used for test materials by both alternatives and different inventories for the TREAT Reactor and ACRR. An upper value on the number of tests was assumed, with a test frequency determined by the realistic turn-around times required between experiments. The estimates provided for impacts during normal operations are based on historical emission rates and projected usage rates; therefore, they are bounding. Estimated doses for members of the public, collocated workers, and facility workers that could be incurred as a result of an accident are very conservative. They do not credit safety systems or administrative procedures (such as evacuation plans or use of personal protective equipment) that could be used to limit worker doses. Doses estimated for transportation are conservative and are based on transport of the bounding radiologic inventory that will be contained in any given test. The transportation analysis assumes all transports will contain the bounding inventory.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems. These efforts have produced a generic PA methodology for the evaluation of waste management systems that has gained wide acceptance within the international community. This report documents how this methodology has been used as an effective management tool to evaluate different disposal designs and sites; inform development of regulatory requirements; identify, prioritize, and guide research aimed at reducing uncertainties for objective estimations of risk; and support safety assessments.

  15. Outlook for renewable energy technologies: Assessment of international programs and policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branstetter, L.J.; Vidal, R.C.; Bruch, V.L.; Zurn, R.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents an evaluation of worldwide research efforts in three specific renewable energy technologies, with a view towards future United States (US) energy security, environmental factors, and industrial competitiveness. The overall energy technology priorities of foreign governments and industry leaders, as well as the motivating factors for these priorities, are identified and evaluated from both technological and policy perspectives. The specific technologies of interest are wind, solar thermal, and solar photovoltaics (PV). These program areas, as well as the overall energy policies of Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom (UK), Japan, Russia, and the European Community as a whole are described. The present and likely future picture for worldwide technological leadership in these technologies-is portrayed. The report is meant to help in forecasting challenges to US preeminence in the various technology areas, particularly over the next ten years, and to help guide US policy-makers as they try to identify specific actions which would help to retain and/or expand the US leadership position.

  16. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m{sup 3} of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  17. Assessment of capital requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure under the PNGV program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stork, K.; Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an assessment of the capital requirements of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a new Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels include two petroleum-based fuels (reformulated gasoline and low-sulfur diesel) and four alternative fuels (methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen). This study develops estimates of cumulative capital needs for establishing fuels production and distribution infrastructure to accommodate 3X vehicle fuel needs. Two levels of fuel volume-70,000 barrels per day and 1.6 million barrels per day-were established for meeting 3X-vehicle fuel demand. As expected, infrastructure capital needs for the high fuel demand level are much higher than for the low fuel demand level. Between fuel production infrastructure and distribution infrastructure, capital needs for the former far exceed those for the latter. Among the four alternative fuels, hydrogen bears the largest capital needs for production and distribution infrastructure.

  18. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program Direction and Analysis DeputyStructure

  19. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Evaluation and assessment of containment technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Containment technology refers to a broad range of methods that are used to contain waste or contaminated groundwater and to keep uncontaminated water from entering a waste site. The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development has instituted the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) to advance the state-of-the-art of innovative technologies that contain or treat, in situ, contaminated media such as soil and groundwater, to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. The information provided here is an overview of the state-of-the-art of containment technology and includes a discussion of ongoing development projects; identifies the technical gaps; discusses the priorities for resolution of the technical gaps; and identifies the site parameters affecting the application of a specific containment method. The containment technology described in this document cover surface caps; vertical barriers such as slurry walls, grout curtains, sheet pilings, frozen soil barriers, and vitrified barriers; horizontal barriers; sorbent barriers; and gravel layers/curtains. Within DOE, containment technology could be used to prevent water infiltration into buried waste; to provide for long-term containment of pits, trenches, and buried waste sites; for the interim containment of leaking underground storage tanks and piping; for the removal of contaminants from groundwater to prevent contamination from migrating off-site; and as an interim measure to prevent the further migration of contamination during the application of an in situ treatment technology such as soil flushing. The ultimate goal is the implementation of containment technology at DOE sites as a cost-effective, efficient, and safe choice for environmental remediation and restoration activities.

  20. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A. [and others] [and others

    1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation.

  1. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A. [and others] [and others

    1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation. These Appendices contain the Federal Register Notice, comments on evaluation factors, independent technical reviewers resumes, independent technical reviewers manual, and technology information packages.

  2. Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

  3. Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

  4. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WAC/DQO AND UNIT OPERATIONS FOR THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D.; Adamson, D.; Bannochie, C.; Cozzi, A.; Eibling, R.; Hay, M.; Hansen, E.; Herman, D.; Martino, C.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.; Poirier, M.; Reboul, S.; Stone, M.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; White, T.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently transitioning its emphasis from a design and construction phase toward start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements related to actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program to be implemented to support the WTP. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS), based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested the utilization of subject matter experts from SRNL to support a technology exchange to perform a review of the WTP waste qualification program, discuss the general qualification approach at SRS, and to identify critical lessons learned through the support of DWPF's sludge batch qualification efforts. As part of Phase 1, SRNL subject matter experts in critical technical and/or process areas reviewed specific WTP waste qualification information. The Phase 1 review was a collaborative, interactive, and iterative process between the two organizations. WTP provided specific analytical procedures, descriptions of equipment, and general documentation as baseline review material. SRNL subject matter experts reviewed the information and, as appropriate, requested follow-up information or clarification to specific areas of interest. This process resulted in multiple teleconferences with key technical contacts from both organizations resolving technical issues that lead to the results presented in this report. This report provides the results of SRNL's Phase 1 review of the WAC-DQO waste acceptance criteria and processability parameters, and the specific unit operations which are required to support WTP waste qualification efforts. The review resulted in SRNL providing concurrence, alternative methods, or gap identification for the proposed WTP analytical methods or approaches. For the unit operations, the SRNL subject matter experts reviewed WTP concepts compared to what is used at SRS and provided thoughts on the outlined tasks with respect to waste qualification. Also documented in this report are recommendations and an outline on what would be required for the next phase to further mature the WTP waste qualification program.

  5. ITP Chemicals: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Chemical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    profilefull.pdf More Documents & Publications Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries ITP Chemicals:...

  6. Program of technical assistance to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons - lessons learned from the U.S. program of technical assistance to IAEA safeguards. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Nuclear Agency is sponsoring a technical study of the requirements of a vehicle to meet the OPCW`s future needs for enhanced chemical weapons verification capabilities. This report provides information about the proven mechanisms by which the U.S. provided both short- and long-term assistance to the IAEA to enhance its verification capabilities. Much of the technical assistance has generic application to international organizations verifying compliance with disarmament treaties or conventions. In addition, some of the equipment developed by the U.S. under the existing arrangements can be applied in the verification of other disarmament treaties or conventions. U.S. technical assistance to IAEA safeguards outside of the IAEA`s regular budget proved to be necessary. The U.S. technical assistance was successful in improving the effectiveness of IAEA safeguards for its most urgent responsibilities and in providing the technical elements for increased IAEA {open_quotes}readiness{close_quotes} for the postponed responsibilities deemed important for U.S. policy objectives. Much of the technical assistance was directed to generic subjects and helped to achieve a system of international verification. It is expected that the capabilities of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to verify a state`s compliance with the {open_quotes}Chemical Weapons Convention{close_quotes} will require improvements. This report presents 18 important lessons learned from the experience of the IAEA and the U.S. Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), organized into three tiers. Each lesson is presented in the report in the context of the difficulty, need and history in which the lesson was learned. Only the most important points are recapitulated in this executive summary.

  7. Master of Engineering (ME), Major: Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Master of Engineering (ME), Major: Chemical Engineering Apply Now The Chemical Engineering Program to the following degrees: Master of Engineering, major Chemical Engineering The ME program will be open to students with a Bachelor of Engineering (BE) in Chemical Engineering, or other related disciplines

  8. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Characterizing residential thermal performance from high resolution end-use data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.E.; Pearson, E.W.; Stokes, G.M.; Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983. Prior to beginning the ELCAP, there was an abundance of information regarding total power consumption for residential structures in the Pacific Northwest and limited information regarding power consumption by various end uses. The purpose of ELCAP is to collect actual end-use load data from both residential and commercial buildings in the region. This report presents the methodology used in several statistical modeling studies carried out on the ELCAP data between 1986 and 1989. These studies involve the thermal characterization of homes and comparisons of building techniques and conservation measures by residential and commercial consumers within the Bonneville service area of the Pacific Northwest. Each data gathering technique was successful in extracting a specific set of consumer-related energy use information. The analytical techniques used in these studies are compiled in this methodology report and are to be used in conjunction with Volume 2 -- Analysis. This should facilitate ease of reference use during future analyses. It is anticipated that the data gathered on participating consumers could potentially be used to aid in decisions regarding the management of the Northwest's electrical energy resources. 7 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Programs for Increasing the Engagement of Underrepresented Ethnic Groups and People with Disabilities in HPC. Final assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Valerie

    2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the significant impact of computing on society, it is important that all cultures, especially underrepresented cultures, are fully engaged in the field of computing to ensure that everyone benefits from the advances in computing. This proposal is focused on the field of high performance computing. The lack of cultural diversity in computing, in particular high performance computing, is especially evident with respect to the following ethnic groups African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans as well as People with Disabilities. The goal of this proposal is to organize and coordinate a National Laboratory Career Development Workshop focused on underrepresented cultures (ethnic cultures and disability cultures) in high performance computing. It is expected that the proposed workshop will increase the engagement of underrepresented cultures in HPC through increased exposure to the excellent work at the national laboratories. The National Laboratory Workshops are focused on the recruitment of senior graduate students and the retention of junior lab staff through the various panels and discussions at the workshop. Further, the workshop will include a community building component that extends beyond the workshop. The workshop was held was held at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory campus in Livermore, CA. from June 14 - 15, 2012. The grant provided funding for 25 participants from underrepresented groups. The workshop also included another 25 local participants in the summer programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Below are some key results from the assessment of the workshops: 86% of the participants indicated strongly agree or agree to the statement "I am more likely to consider/continue a career at a national laboratory as a result of participating in this workshop." 77% indicated strongly agree or agree to the statement "I plan to pursue a summer internship at a national laboratory." 100% of the participants indicated strongly agree or agree to the statement "The CMD-IT NLPDEV workshop was a valuable experience."

  10. Quality characterization of western Cretaceous coal from the Colorado Plateau as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Colorado Plateau Coal Assessment program is to provide an overview of the geologic setting, distribution, resources, and quality of Cretaceous coal in the Colorado Plateau. This assessment, which is part of the US Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment Program, is different from previous coal assessments in that the major emphasis is placed on coals that are most likely to provide energy over the next few decades. The data is also being collected and stored in digital format that can be updated as new information becomes available. Environmental factors may eventually control how coal will be mined, and determine to what extent measures will be implemented to reduce trace element emissions. In the future, increased emphasis will also be placed on coal combustion products and the challenges of waste product disposal or utilization. Therefore, coal quality characterization is an important aspect of the coal assessment program in that it provides important data that will influence future utilization of this resource. The Colorado Plateau study is being completed in cooperation with the US Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, Arizona Geological Survey, Colorado Geological Survey, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, and the Utah Geological Survey. Restrictions on coal thickness and overburden will be applied to the resource calculations and the resources will be categorized by land ownership. In some areas these studies will also delineate areas where coal mining may be restricted because of land use, industrial, social, or environmental factors. Emphasis is being placed on areas where the coal is controlled by the Federal Government.

  11. High Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0831, for the construction and operation of the High-Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement (HLWTFR) Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The HLWTFR Project as originally proposed by the DOE and as analyzed in this EA included: (1) replacement of five high-level liquid waste storage tanks with four new tanks and (2) the upgrading of existing tank relief piping and high-level liquid waste transfer systems. As a result of the April 1992 decision to discontinue the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at INEL, DOE believes that it is unlikely that the tank replacement aspect of the project will be needed in the near term. Therefore, DOE is not proposing to proceed with the replacement of the tanks as described in this-EA. The DOE`s instant decision involves only the proposed upgrades aspect of the project described in this EA. The upgrades are needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act requirements, and the Department`s obligations pursuant to the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement and Consent Order among the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Idaho. The environmental impacts of the proposed upgrades are adequately covered and are bounded by the analysis in this EA. If DOE later proposes to proceed with the tank replacement aspect of the project as described in the EA or as modified, it will undertake appropriate further review pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act.

  12. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadanaciva, Sashi [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Aleo, Michael D. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Strock, Christopher J. [Cyprotex US, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States); Stedman, Donald B. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Wang, Huijun [Computational Sciences, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Will, Yvonne, E-mail: yvonne.will@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify toxic and non-toxic drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary.

  13. Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

  14. An Integer Programming Approach for Linear Programs with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear programs with joint probabilistic constraints (PCLP) are dif- ficult to solve ...... Stochastic optimization for operating chemical processes under uncertainty.

  15. Master of Science (MS), Major: Chemical Engineering Apply Now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Master of Science (MS), Major: Chemical Engineering Apply Now The Chemical Engineering Program to the following degrees: Master of Science, major Chemical Engineering The MS program will be open to students with a Bachelor of Science (BS) in Chemical Engineering, or other related disciplines. The MS program will also

  16. assessment study plan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medicine Websites Summary: 1 Biomedical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Biomedical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives 1. Students should be able...

  17. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    reaction engineering in wood pulping and pulp bleaching, char bed modeling, black liquor gasification

  18. Cotton Harvest-Aid Chemicals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzer, Robert B.; Supak, James

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Application Managing Harvest-Aid Program Secondary Growth Insect Control Care of Equipment Safety with Chemicals Guide for Using Cotton Harvest Aids Defoliants Desiccants Mixtures Plant Regulators-Conditioners 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 6 7 7 COTTON... HARVEST-AID CHEMICALS Robert B. Metzer and James Supak* As the name implies, harvest-aid chemicals pre pare the cotton crop for harvest by reducing foliage and plant moisture that interfere with harvesting operations. Harvest-aid chemicals...

  19. The National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program (NHAAP) is an integrated energy, water, and ecosystem research effort for sustainable hydroelectricity generation and water management. The NHAAP conducts research on new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program (NHAAP) is an integrated energy, water conducts research on new development opportunities and provides a comprehensive hydropower database integrating information about existing hydropower plants. Research Summary and Resources Example: Existing

  20. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our findings and APICD Gen II subsystems for automated collection, deposition and detection of ambient particulate matter. Key findings from the APTA Program include: Ambient biological PM taxonomy; Demonstration of key subsystems needed for autonomous bioaerosol detection; System design; Efficient electrostatic collection; Automated bioagent recognition; Raman analysis performance validating Td<9 sec; Efficient collection surface regeneration; and Development of a quantitative bioaerosol defection model. The objective of the APTA program was to advance the state of our knowledge of ambient background PM composition. Operation of an automated aerosol detection system was enhanced by a more accurate assessment of background variability, especially for sensitive and specific sensing strategies like Raman detection that are background-limited in performance. Based on this improved knowledge of background, the overall threat detection performance of Raman sensors was improved.

  1. Community Readiness Assessments | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Community Readiness Assessments Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Community Readiness Assessments, Call Slides and...

  2. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  3. Use of hazard assessments to support risk-based decision making in the US Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Rainbolt, M.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Integrated Safety or ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/ fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The cornerstone of the SS-21 design process is the hazard assessment, which is performed concurrently with process and tooling design. The hazard assessment is used as the key management tool to guide overall risk management associated with the nuclear explosive activity through supporting risk-based decisions made with respect to process design.

  4. Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

  5. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers' Association, Canadian Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers' Association, Canadian Data: Canadian Iron and Steel and Ferro-Alloy Manufacturing Industries, published by CIEEDAC annually

  6. Assessing Youth Perceptions and Knowledge of Agriculture: The Impact of Participating in an AgVenture Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luckey, Alisa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture touches the lives of individuals every day, and some do not even realize it. As a means to educate society, agricultural education programs, such as "AgVenture," have been established to educate youth about the importance of agriculture...

  7. Preliminary assessment report for Grubbs/Kyle Training Center, Smyrna/Rutherford County Regional Airport, Installation 47340, Smyrna, Tennessee. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.; Stefano, J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Tennessee Army National Guard (TNARNG) property near Smyrna, Tennessee. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Grubbs/Kyle Training Center property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  8. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program. QAP 49 summary of evaluations of 3217 reported analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 49th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIX) that were received on or before December 1, 1998.

  9. Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

  10. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

  11. Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Assessing Revenue Streams: What is Right for Your Program? Call Slides and Summary, January 10, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation:in the U.S. by6Energy Program FYPeer

  12. Alternative Energy Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Alternative Energy Department of Chemical Engineering Graduate Handbook 2014-2015 Victoria Heberling, Graduate Program Coordinator Professor Matthew Yates, Director of Alternative Energy #12;University of Rochester Graduate Handbook Alternative Energy updated August, 2013 Department of Chemical

  13. Alternative Energy Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Alternative Energy Department of Chemical Engineering Graduate Handbook 2013-2014 Gina Eagan, Graduate Program Coordinator Professor Matthew Yates, Director of Alternative Energy #12;University of Rochester Graduate Handbook Alternative Energy updated August, 2013 Department of Chemical Engineering Page

  14. Impact assessment of the Nevada 4-H program: an examination of public school students' perceptions and behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Steven Richard

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................. 92 63 Summated Construct Index Scores for Age Groups ................................. 93 64 Summated Construct Scale Scores for Age Groups.................................. 94 65 Summated Construct Index Scores for Gender... does involvement in 4-H programming influence youth? 5 CHAPTER II REVIEW OF LITERATURE Youth development is a process that includes support and opportunities that promote positive outcomes for young people (National Research Council...

  15. Fossil energy program. Progress report, July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeese, L. E.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report - the seventy-second of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component development and process evaluation, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process and program analysis, fossil energy environmental analysis, coal preparation and waste utilization, coal preparation plant automation, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, technical support to the TVA fluidized bed combustion demonstration plant program, fossil energy applications assessments, performance assurance system support for fossil energy projects, international assessment of atmospheric fluidized bed combustion technology, and PFBC systems analysis.

  16. ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL OF OTEC ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Division of Solar Energy, Environmental and Resource1978. Solar Program Assessment: Environmental Factors -

  17. Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

  18. Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underkoffler, V.S.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

  19. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  20. Technical and Political Assessment of Peaceful Nuclear Power Program Prospects in North Africa and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windsor, Lindsay K.; Kessler, Carol E.

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An exceptional number of Middle Eastern and North African nations have recently expressed interest in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Many of these countries have explored nuclear research in limited ways in the past, but the current focused interest and application of resources towards developing nuclear-generated electricity and nuclear-powered desalination plants is unprecedented. Consequently, questions arise in response to this emerging trend: What instigated this interest? To what end(s) will a nuclear program be applied? Does the country have adequate technical, political, legislative, nonproliferation, and safety infrastructure required for the capability desired? If so, what are the next steps for a country in preparation for a future nuclear program? And if not, what collaboration efforts are possible with the United States or others? This report provides information on the capabilities and interests of 13 countries in the region in nuclear energy programs in light of safety, nonproliferation and security concerns. It also provides information useful for determining potential for offering technical collaboration, financial aid, and/or political support.

  1. Statement of Work (SOW) for FY 2001 to FY 2006 for the Hanford Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PUIGH, R.J.

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the tasks included in the Hanford Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment activity though the close of the project in 2028. Near-term (2001-2006) tasks are described in detail, while tasks further in the future are simply grouped by year. The major tasks are displayed in the table provided. The major goals of the performance assessment activity are to provide the technical basis for the Department of Energy to continue to authorize the construction of disposal facilities, the onsite disposal of immobilized low-activity Hanford tank waste in those facilities, and the closure of the disposal facilities. Other significant goals are to provide the technical basis for the setting of the specifications of the immobilized waste and to support permitting of the disposal facilities.

  2. Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

  3. Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

  4. GOMA 6.0 : a full-Newton finite element program for free and moving boundary problems with coupled fluid/solid momentum, energy, mass, and chemical species transport : user%3CU%2B2019%3Es guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Chen, Ken Shuang; Labreche, Duane A.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Moffat, Harry K.; Roach, Robert Allen; Hopkins, Polly L.; Notz, Patrick K.; Roberts, Scott Alan; Sackinger, Philip A.; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Baer, Thomas A.; Noble, David R.; Secor, Robert B. [3M Engineering Systems and Technology, St. Paul, MN] [3M Engineering Systems and Technology, St. Paul, MN

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goma 6.0 is a finite element program which excels in analyses of multiphysical processes, particularly those involving the major branches of mechanics (viz. fluid/solid mechanics, energy transport and chemical species transport). Goma is based on a full-Newton-coupled algorithm which allows for simultaneous solution of the governing principles, making the code ideally suited for problems involving closely coupled bulk mechanics and interfacial phenomena. Example applications include, but are not limited to, coating and polymer processing flows, super-alloy processing, welding/soldering, electrochemical processes, and solid-network or solution film drying. This document serves as a user's guide and reference.

  5. Economic Assessment of the NIST Thermocouple Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    97-1 Planning Report Economic Assessment of the NIST Thermocouple Calibration Program U of Standards and Technology #12;ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF THE NIST THERMOCOUPLE CALIBRATION PROGRAM July 11, 1997 ............................................................................................................... 4 1.2 NIST Thermocouple Calibration Program

  6. Long-Term Climate Change Assessment Task for the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program: Status through FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US); Chatters, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program (Barrier Development Program) was organized (Adams and Wing 1986) to develop the technology needed to provide an in-place disposal capability for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The goals of the Barrier Development Program are to provide defensible evidence that final barrier design(s) will adequately control water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion for a minimum of 1,000 years; to isolate wastes from the accessible environment; and to use markers to warn inadvertent human intruders. Evidence for barrier performance will be obtained by conducting laboratory experiments, field tests, computer modeling, and other studies that establish confidence in the barrier`s ability to meet its 1,000-year design life. The performance and stability of natural barrier analogs that have existed for several millennia and the reconstruction of climate changes during the past 10,000 to 125,000 years also will provide insight into bounding conditions of possible future changes and increase confidence in the barriers design. In the following discussion the term {open_quotes}long-term{close_quotes} references periods of time up to 1000`s of years, distinguishing it from {open_quotes}short-term{close_quotes} weather patterns covering a decade or less. Specific activities focus on planning and conducting a series of studies and tests required to confirm key aspects of the barrier design. The effort is a collaborative one between scientists and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to design barriers to limit movement of radionuclides and other contaminants to the accessible environment for at least 1,000 years. These activities have been divided into 14 groups of tasks that aid in the complete development of protective barrier and warning marker system.

  7. An assessment of the usefulness of 5 new synthetic pyrethroids in IPM programs for tobacco budworm control in cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakulendran, Sinnappu Victor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Synthetic Pyrethroids in IPM Programs for Tobacco Budworm Control in Cotton. (Mlay 1981) Sinnappu Victor Rajakulendran, B. Sc. (Agri. ) University of Sri Lanka Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. F. W. Plapp, Jr. Toxicity measurements were...-methyl ethyl) benzene acetate) and fluvalinate. Toxicity was de- termined to larvae of the tobacco budworm Heliothis (P. ), t d lt 1 *f 't p 't, ~tl t' sonorensis (Carlson), and to larvae of its predator, C~t * ddt pl ). Al*, ll d' f t t d as a...

  8. An assessment of the usefulness of 5 new synthetic pyrethroids in IPM programs for tobacco budworm control in cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakulendran, Sinnappu Victor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Synthetic Pyrethroids in IPM Programs for Tobacco Budworm Control in Cotton. (Mlay 1981) Sinnappu Victor Rajakulendran, B. Sc. (Agri. ) University of Sri Lanka Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. F. W. Plapp, Jr. Toxicity measurements were...-methyl ethyl) benzene acetate) and fluvalinate. Toxicity was de- termined to larvae of the tobacco budworm Heliothis (P. ), t d lt 1 *f 't p 't, ~tl t' sonorensis (Carlson), and to larvae of its predator, C~t * ddt pl ). Al*, ll d' f t t d as a...

  9. Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underkoffler, V.S.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Optimum operating parameters for zinc ferrite such as temperatures, gas compositions, and space velocities are discussed. From the test results, salient features of zinc ferrite were derived and discussed in regard to system implications, issues raised, and technical requirements. 47 refs., 53 figs., 41 tabs.

  10. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility 2, Installation 25075, Westover Air Force Base, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Army Aviation Support Facility 2 (AASF 2) near Chicopee, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF 2 is a 10-acre site located in the western portion of Massachusetts, in the town of Chicopee, in the county of Hampden. The facilities included in this PA are Building 7400, adjacent paved areas, grassy areas, and the hazardous waste drum storage buildings. The environmentally significant operations (ESOS) associated with the property are (1) the waste drum storage area, (2) abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs), and (3) refueling activities.

  11. Taking Risk Assessment and Management to the Next Level: Program-Level Risk Analysis to Enable Solid Decision-Making on Priorities and Funding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J. G.; Morton, R. L.; Castillo, C.; Dyer, G.; Johnson, N.; McSwain, J. T.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-level (facility and programmatic) risk assessment was conducted for the facilities in the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) Program and results were included in a new Risk Management Plan (RMP), which was incorporated into the fiscal year (FY) 2010 Integrated Plans. Risks, risk events, probability, consequence(s), and mitigation strategies were identified and captured, for most scope areas (i.e., risk categories) during the facilitated risk workshops. Risk mitigations (i.e., efforts in addition to existing controls) were identified during the facilitated risk workshops when the risk event was identified. Risk mitigation strategies fell into two broad categories: threats or opportunities. Improvement projects were identified and linked to specific risks they mitigate, making the connection of risk reduction through investments for the annual Site Execution Plan. Due to the amount of that was collected, analysis to be performed, and reports to be generated, a Risk Assessment/ Management Tool (RAMtool) database was developed to analyze the risks in real-time, at multiple levels, which reinforced the site-level risk management process and procedures. The RAMtool database was developed and designed to assist in the capturing and analysis of the key elements of risk: probability, consequence, and impact. The RAMtool calculates the facility-level and programmatic-level risk factors to enable a side-by-side comparison to see where the facility manager and program manager should focus their risk reduction efforts and funding. This enables them to make solid decisions on priorities and funding to maximize the risk reduction. A more active risk management process was developed where risks and opportunities are actively managed, monitored, and controlled by each facility more aggressively and frequently. risk owners have the responsibility and accountability to manage their assigned risk in real-time, using the RAMtool database.

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Bee Caves Armory (former Nike BG-80 Fire Control Facility), Installation 48055, Austin, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (ARNG) property in Austin, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing, preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining, site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Bee Caves Armory property, the requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. Of concern is the potential for hazardous waste to be present on the property as a result of the former Nike Missile Base operations or in the form of original construction materials. Environmentally sensitive operations associated with the property from that period include (1) underground fuel storage, (2) hazardous materials storage/use, (3) disposal of hazardous waste and (4) release of hazardous waste water.

  13. HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM The______________________________ Department has developed a Hazard Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM The______________________________ Department has developed a Hazard about chemical hazards and other hazardous substances via our comprehensive Hazard Communication Program. The Hazard Communication Program will include: WORKPLACE CHEMICAL LIST MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS CONTAINER

  14. Mobile munitions assessment system design, testing, operational experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, K.D.; Snyder, A.M. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rowe, L.C. [Army PM CML DEMIL, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remnants of America`s chemical weapons program exist at more than 200 sites in the United States. The U.S. Army`s Project Manager for Non-stockpile Chemical Material (PMNSCM) has the responsibility for the remediation of non-stockpile chemical warfare material (CWM). PMNSCM must respond to a variety of situations involving discovered, recovered or buried material. This response requires unique hardware capabilities to characterize, assess, and provide information to develop plans for disposing of the material. PMNSCM sponsored the development of a Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet the need to characterize and assess non-stockpile chemical warfare material. The MMAS equipment is capable of distinguishing CWM from conventional munitions, identifying the agent fill and level, and assessing the status of the firing train. The MMAS has a data processing, collection, and storage subsystem and a communications link to a Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) database. A typical data package includes X-rays, elemental spectra, weather data, physical descriptions, photographs, video, etc. The MMAS data will be used by the Army`s Munition Assessment and Review Board (MARB) to help determine the appropriate methods and safeguards necessary to store, transport, and dispose of non-stockpile CWM.

  15. Dow Chemical Company: Assessment Leads to Steam System Energy Savings in a Petrochemical Plant; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now Case Study (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFTJanuaryDominionDow St. Charles Operations in

  16. Historical trends in the accumulation of chemicals in Puget Sound. National status and trends program for marine environmental quality: Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefkovitz, L.F.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study is to: (1) continue monitoring historical trends in the concentration of contaminants in Puget Sound sediments, and (2) quantify recent trends in the recovery of contaminated sediments. Results from this study can be compared with those obtained in the 1982 study to determine whether sediment quality is still improving and to estimate the rate of recovery. A statistically significant reduction in sediment contamination over the past 20 years would provide empirical evidence that environmental regulation has had a positive impact on the water quality in Puget Sound. Chemical trends were evaluated from six age-dated sediment cores collected from the main basin of Puget Sound. Chemical analyses included metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs and chlorinated pesticides, nutrients (total nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P)), butyl tins, and total organic carbon (TOC). Sedimentation (cm/yr) and deposition rates (g/sq cm/yr) were estimated using a steady-state Pb-210 dating technique.

  17. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

  18. CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

  19. Programmed improvements of the alternating gradient synchrotron complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose and need for DOE to undertake the actions described in this document are to improve the efficiency of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) complex. Benefits would include optimization of the AGS scientific program, increased high-energy and nuclear physics experimentation, improved health and safety conditions for workers and users, reduced impact on the environment and the general public, energy conservation, decreased generation of hazardous and radioactive wastes, and completion of actions required to permit the AGS to be the injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)., Improved efficiency is defined as increasing the AGS`s capabilities to capture and accelerate the proton intensity transferred to the AGS from the AGS booster. Improved capture of beam intensity would reduce the beam losses which equate to lost scientific opportunity for study and increased potential for radiation doses to workers and the general public. The action would also refurbish magnets used in the transfer tunnel which connects the AGS complex to RHIC to permit smooth injection of beam into the RHIC accelerator. These magnets were previously used to direct beam to fixed targets for high energy physics studies but have hot received proper maintenance to be reliable as injectors to RHIC. The document describes alternative actions, the affected environment, and environmental impacts.

  20. Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

  1. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  2. Coupling Hydrological and Geochemical Simulations to Assess Spatial Heterogeneity and Chemical Evolution of Groundwaters at Two Candidate Repository Sites in Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auque, Luis Francisco; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Gomez, Javier B. [Petrologia y Geoquimica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Depto. Ciencias de la Tierra, Facultad de Ciencias, c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, Zaragoza, E-50009 (Spain); Puigdomenech, Ignasi [Safety and Science, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB), Box 5864, Stockholm, SE-102 40 (Sweden)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical composition of groundwater surrounding a high level radioactive waste repository is of importance to many factors that affect repository performance. The geochemical characteristics of Swedish groundwater systems are governed by successive mixing events between several end-member waters during their paleogeographic evolution. An approach is proposed here to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of groundwater geochemical conditions by coupling hydrogeological and geochemical models in a sequential way. The procedure combines hydrogeological results by others [1,2] of a discrete fracture network using CONNECTFLOW with a mixing and reaction-path simulation using PHREEQC. The hydrological results contain mixing proportions of four reference waters (a deep brine, glacial meltwater, marine water, and meteoric infiltration) at each time step and at every node of the 3D model domain. In this work, mixing fractions are fed into PHREEQC using software developed to build formatted input files and to extract the information from output files for subsequent plotting and analysis. The geochemical calculations included both chemical mixing and equilibrium reactions with selected minerals: calcite, chalcedony and an Fe(III) oxyhydroxide. Some results for the Forsmark site, about 170 km north of Stockholm, Sweden, are graphically presented. Cross sections, where each node is color-coded with respect to an important variable (pH, Eh or concentrations of main elements), are used to visualize the future evolution of the site. Sensitivity analyses were made to evaluate the effects of the different reactions and/or assumptions. The proposed methodology has proved useful for evaluating the future geochemical evolution of the repository sites and to increase the confidence in the site descriptions. (authors)

  3. Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, MODIFICATION, AND OPERATION OF THREE OF THE CONSTELLATION PROGRAM, JOHN F. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLORIDA Abstract This Environmental Assessment addresses AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION JOHN F. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM OFFICE KENNEDY SPACE

  4. Light water reactor safety research program, quarterly report, July-September 1980. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report covers research performed during July-September 1980 for the NRC Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program comprised of: (1) The Molten Fuel Concrete Interactions (MFCI) study of experimental and analytical investigations of the chemical and physical phenomena associated with interactions between molten core materials and concrete; (2) Steam Explosion Phenomena program to assess the probability and consequences of steam explosions during postulated meltdown accidents in LWRs; (3) Separate Effects Tests for TRAP Code Development investigating vapor pressures of fission-product species at elevated temperatures, chemical compound formation and reaction rates; (4) Containment Emergency Sump Performance (CESP) program to investigate the reliability of ECCS sumps; (5) Hydrogen Program designed to quantify the threat posed by hydrogen released during LWR accidents; and (6) Combustible Gas in Containment Program to study the generation of H2 from the corrosion of zinc and other materials located within LWR containment buildings.

  5. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Proposal for a new program leading to the Master of Science degree in environmental studies to be offered jointly by the Medical University of South Carolina and the University of Charleston, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the University of Charleston, South Carolina (UCSC) propose to offer the degree of Master of Science in Environmental Studies. The proposed starting date is August 1994. The purpose of this interdisciplinary program is to offer nationally and internationally recognized graduate level training in the areas of environmental policy, science, and health risk assessment. Special emphasis will be placed on human health. Included in this proposal are a needs assessment for environmental science professionals along with employment projections and salary expectations. The Environmental Science program is described and its relationship to other programs within MUSC and UCSC, as well as its relation to similar programs at other institutions are examined. Enrollment is discussed, admission requirements and standards outlined, and the curriculum is described. Academic and physical resources are examined and estimated costs are given.

  6. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krssig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H....

  7. GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLEGE OF LIBERALARTS TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY March 2007 #12;SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT........................................................................................ 4 Brief History of Degree Programs and the Department

  8. Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology to Identify Potential Reductions in Utility and Process Energy Consumption. Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Chemicals BestPractices Plant-Wide Assessment Case Study (Brochure).

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State Lighting Videos On this Technologies

  9. Results of the 2004 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys for the Baseline Knowledge Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Cooper, Christy [U.S. Department of Energy

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program focuses on overcoming critical barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen fuel cell technology. The transition to a new, hydrogen-based energy economy requires an educated human infrastructure. With this in mind, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted statistical surveys to measure and establish baselines for understanding and awareness about hydrogen, fuel cells, and a hydrogen economy. The baseline data will serve as a reference in designing an education program, and it will be used in comparisons with future survey results (2008 and 2011) to measure changes in understanding and awareness. Scientific sampling was used to survey four populations: (1) the general public, ages 18 and over; (2) students, ages 12-17; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen users. It was decided that the survey design should include about 1,000 individuals in each of the general public and student categories, about 250 state and local officials, and almost 100 large-scale end users. The survey questions were designed to accomplish specific objectives. Technical questions measured technical understanding and awareness of hydrogen technology. Opinion questions measured attitudes about safety, cost, the environment, and convenience, as well as the likelihood of future applications of hydrogen technology. For most of the questions, "I don't know" or "I have no opinion" were acceptable answers. Questions about information sources assessed how energy technology information is received. The General Public and Student Survey samples were selected by random digit dialing. Potential large-scale end users were selected by random sampling. The State and Local Government Survey was of the entire targeted population of government officials (not a random sample). All four surveys were administered by computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). For each population, the length of the survey was less than 15 minutes. Design of an education program is beyond the scope of the report, and comparisons of the baseline data with future results will not be made until the survey is fielded again. Nevertheless, a few observations about the data are salient: For every population group, average scores on the technical knowledge questions were lower for the fuel cell questions than for the other technical questions. State and local officials expressed more confidence in hydrogen safety than large-scale end users, and they were much more confident than either the general public or students. State and local officials also scored much higher on the technical questions. Technical understanding appears to influence opinions about safety. For the General Public, Student, and Large-Scale End User Surveys, respondents with above-average scores on the eleven technical questions were more likely to have an opinion about hydrogen technology safety, and for those respondents who expressed an opinion, their opinion was more likely to be positive. These differences were statistically significant. Using criteria of "Sometimes" or "Frequently" to describe usage, respondents rated media sources for obtaining energy information. The general public and students responded that television is the primary media source of energy information. State and local officials and large-scale end users indicated that their primary media sources are newspapers, the Internet, and science and technology journals. In order of importance, the general public values safety, cost, environment, and convenience. The Large-Scale End User Survey suggests that there is presently little penetration of hydrogen technology; nor is there much planning for it.

  10. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program: radiological survey of the former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation Uranium Recovery Pilot Plant, Nichols, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F F; Doane, R W; Goldsmith, W A; Shinpaugh, W H; Crawford, D J; Fox, W F; Leggett, R W; Stone, D R

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a radiological survey conducted at the site of a former uranium recovery pilot plant operated by the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation is presented. All that remains of this operation is a concrete pad situated within the boundary of a phosphate products plant now operated by Conserv, Inc., at the Nichols, Florida site. The survey included measurements designed to characterize the residual radioactivity in the vicinity of this pilot plant and to compare the quantities with federal guidelines for the release of decontaminated property for unrestricted use. The results of this survey indicate that only small quantities of radioactivity exist above normal background levels for that area. Some soil contamination was found in the vicinity of a concrete pad on which the pilot plant stood. Much of this contamination was due to /sup 226/Ra and /sup 238/U. Some beta-gamma dose rates in excess of applicable guidelines were observed in this same area. External gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground range from 20 to 100 ..mu..R/hr. None of the direct measurements of alpha contamination were above guideline levels.

  11. West Virginia University 1 Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia University 1 Department of Chemical Engineering E-mail: Statler-CHE@mail.wvu.edu Degree Offered Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering (B.S.Ch.E.) Nature of Program The chemical engineering curriculum is designed to give graduates a broad background in chemical engineering processes

  12. A cross-cultural mentoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang-Nissen, S.; Myers, R.Y.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarized the results of the pilot Cross-Cultural Mentoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, from the inception of the program idea through its implementation and assessment. It discusses the benefits of mentoring, the origins of the program, program design and implementation, program assessment, and conclusions and recommendations.

  13. Mars Program Independent Assessment Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    Climate Orbiter (MCO) was launched in late 1998, followed by Mars Polar Lander (MPL) and Deep Space 2 launched in early 1999. MCO failed to achieve Mars orbit because of a navigation error, resulting of the Mars Climate Orbiter Mission," dated November 11, 1999, and the "MCO Mishap Investigation Board Phase I

  14. Socioeconomic Assessment and Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, David A.

    2013-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary review and analyses of residential energy consumption surveys' (various) comparing levels of energy expenditures across population categories.

  15. SPIN (Version 3. 83): A Fortran program for modeling one-dimensional rotating-disk/stagnation-flow chemical vapor deposition reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coltrin, M.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Kee, R.J.; Evans, G.H.; Meeks, E.; Rupley, F.M.; Grcar, J.F. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In rotating-disk reactor a heated substrate spins (at typical speeds of 1000 rpm or more) in an enclosure through which the reactants flow. The rotating disk geometry has the important property that in certain operating regimes{sup 1} the species and temperature gradients normal to the disk are equal everywhere on the disk. Thus, such a configuration has great potential for highly uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD),{sup 2--5} and indeed commercial rotating-disk CVD reactors are now available. In certain operating regimes, the equations describing the complex three-dimensional spiral fluid motion can be solved by a separation-of-variables transformation{sup 5,6} that reduces the equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. Strictly speaking, the transformation is only valid for an unconfined infinite-radius disk and buoyancy-free flow. Furthermore, only some boundary conditions are consistent with the transformation (e.g., temperature, gas-phase composition, and approach velocity all specified to be independent of radius at some distances above the disk). Fortunately, however, the transformed equations will provide a very good practical approximation to the flow in a finite-radius reactor over a large fraction of the disk (up to {approximately}90% of the disk radius) when the reactor operating parameters are properly chosen, i.e, high rotation rates. In the limit of zero rotation rate, the rotating disk flow reduces to a stagnation-point flow, for which a similar separation-of-variables transformation is also available. Such flow configurations ( pedestal reactors'') also find use in CVD reactors. In this report we describe a model formulation and mathematical analysis of rotating-disk and stagnation-point CVD reactors. Then we apply the analysis to a compute code called SPIN and describe its implementation and use. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  17. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  18. Office of Security Assessments | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information, personnel security, and foreign visits and assignments. Assesses the information security practices at facilities managing special access programs and...

  19. Articles about Resource Assessment and Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stories about resource assessment and characterization featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

  20. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  1. Chemical Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  2. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  3. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  4. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  5. Organic Rankine Cycles for the Petro-Chemical Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, R. K.; Colosimo, D. D.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a cooperatively funded DOE/MTI program, a packaged organic Rankine power recovery system is being developed specifically to meet the needs of the petroleum refining and chemical industries. Program objectives include an actual in...

  6. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Innovations Small Grant Program: 2003 Independent Assessment Reports is the interim report Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY INNOVATIONS SMALL GRANT PROGRAM: 2003 INDEPENDENT ASSESSMENT REPORTS DECEMBER 2009 CEC5002012004

  7. Chemical analysis quality assurance at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, R.L.; Anselmo, R.W.; Black, D.B.; Jacobson, J.J.; Lewis, L.C.; Marushia, P.C.; Spraktes, F.W.; Zack, N.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is a uranium reprocessing facility operated by Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company for the Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The chemical analysis support required for the plant processes is provided by a chemical analysis staff of 67 chemists, analysts, and support personnel. The documentation and defense of the chemical analysis data at the ICPP has evolved into a complete chemical analysis quality assurance program with training/qualification and requalification, chemical analysis procedures, records management and chemical analysis methods quality control as major elements. The quality assurance procedures are implemented on a central analytical computer system. The individual features provided by the computer system are automatic method selection for process streams, automation of method calculations, automatic assignment of bias and precision estimates at analysis levels to all method results, analyst specific daily requalification or with-method-use requalification, untrained or unqualified analyst method lockout, statistical testing of process stream results for replicate agreement, automatic testing of process results against pre-established operating, safety, or failure limits at varying confidence levels, and automatic transfer and report of analysis data plus the results of all statistical testing to the Production Department.

  8. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Annual Review of PhD Students in HCDE All PhD students in the HCDE program will be reviewed annually to assess each student's progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Review of PhD Students in HCDE All PhD students in the HCDE program will be reviewed review is a process that involves all the department's PhD students and tenure-line faculty. Students. All students who have been admitted to the PhD program but have not yet successfully defended

  10. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES Thematerials | Center forChemical

  11. Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, a...

  12. Air Quality: Reporting Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Reporting Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 The air quality program manager requirements. This table summarizes all air quality program elements and reporting requirements. The NESHAPs

  13. Environmental Health and Safety Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Environmental Health and Safety Assessment Program Manual 7/15/2013 #12;Environmental Health/26/2013. The most recent version of this document is available electronically at: http://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/general-environmental-management/environmental.........................................................................................................................4 #12;Environmental Health and Safety Assessment Program Manual Approved by: (Barb English) Last

  14. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  15. Fossil Energy Program. Progress report for April 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeese, L.E.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report - the sixty-ninth of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component and process evaluation studies, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process analysis and engineering evaluations, fossil energy environmental analysis, coal preparation and waste utilization, coal preparation plant automation, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, technical support to the TVA fluidized bed combustion demonstration plant program, coal cogeneration/district heating plant assessment, performance assurance system support, and international energy technology assessment.

  16. Fossil energy program. Progress report for June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeese, L.E.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report - the seventy-first of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component and process evaluation studies, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process analysis and engineering evaluation, fossil energy environmental analysis, coal preparation and waste utilization, coal preparation plant automation, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, TVA fluidized combustion demonstration plant program technical support, coal cogeneration/district heating plant assessment, performance assurance system support, and international energy technology assessment.

  17. Fossil energy program. Progress report for May 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeese, L.E.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report - the seventieth of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component and process evaluation studies, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process analysis and engineering evaluations, fossil energy environmental analysis, coal preparation and waste utilization, coal preparation plant automation, technical support to the TVA fluidized bed combustion demonstration plant program, coal cogeneration/district heating plant assessment, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, performance assurance system support and international energy technology assessment.

  18. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program Guide to Risk Assessment & Response August 16, 2012 #12; i ...........26 List of Figures Figure 1: The Risk Management Process.......................................................................................................12 #12; 1 Overview The risk management process--of identifying, analyzing, evaluating

  19. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow modeling of coal or related slurries will be carriedconsumption by the coal contained in the slurry. FOOTNOTE9777 (1979), Slurry-Reactor Development for Coal Conversion

  20. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cyclohexane solubles), asphaltenes (incre- mental toluenesubsequent slower conver- sions to asphaltenes and oils.fractionated (into oils, asphaltenes, preasphaltenes, and

  1. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    organic electrolyte, and molten-salt cells will be pursued.such as low- temperature molten-salt mixtures and ionizingcase of batteries with molten salt electrolytes, the purpose

  2. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    material obtained by water extraction) were determined forproduct obtained by extraction with water. About 67% of theExtraction of Phenols from Coal Conversion Process Condensate Waters,"

  3. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most recently, two fractions of bagasse were analyzed in theIt v10uld appear that bagasse pith fraction is well worthFarm By-products (cane bagasse for steam generation)

  4. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the conversion of coal, oil shale and biomass to synfuels,"converting solid fuels (coal, oil shale, biomass) to gaseousfor converting coal, oil shale, or biomass to liquid and/or

  5. Chemical Safety Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock & ProductionChapter 6

  6. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass Liquefaction Process Engineering Unit (PEU) S.from Coal Conversion Process Condensate Waters," Lawrenceand C. J. King, J. Separ. Process Technol. , ! 36 (1979);

  7. Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Tijrn

    2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  8. Alternative Fuels and Chemicals From Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  9. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  10. Assessment Plans College of Nursing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    . Identify clinical and cost outcomes that improve safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, quality 2014 Y Y Y #12;Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree (DNP) Program Learning Outcomes a. Produce a scholarly and defenses c. A statement on the assessment of the DNP degree program indicating if the program outcomes

  11. Assessor Training NVLAP Assessment Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training NVLAP Assessment Forms #12;Assessor Training 2009: NVLAP Assessment Forms 2 Summary Test Method Review Summary ProgramSpecific Checklists Examples #12;Assessor Training 2009: NVLAP are completed Assessor Names, Dates, Lab Code #12;Assessor Training 2009: NVLAP Assessment Forms 4 NIST

  12. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. assess engineered nanoparticle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Biomedical Engineering Program Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives 1. Students should be able to draw upon basic knowledge knowledge of the basic principles of...

  14. Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Programs Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects from FY 2006 to FY 2014.

  15. Fossil Energy Program. Progress report for November 1979. [35 Wt % Illinois No. 6 coal with Wilsonville recycle solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report - the sixty-fourth of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, materials engineering, a coal equipment test program, an atmospheric fluid bed combustor for cogeneration, engineering studies and technical support, process and program analysis, environmental assessment studies, magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, technical support to the TVA fluid bed combustion program, coal cogeneration/district heating plant assessment, chemical research and development, and technical support to major liquefaction projects.

  16. Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Compressed Air Management Program: A Performance Assessment Approach to Improving Industrial Compressed Air System Operation and Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qualmann, R. L.; Zeller, W.; Baker, M.

    equipment: ? AEC MicroDataLogger. Four channel data recorder. ? Veris Hawkeye self-contained split-core kW transducer. Samples voltage and current in a three-phase circuit to produce a 4-20mA output proportional to true RMS power with 1% full scale... Commission 1997 Utility Sales Data. 3. US Bureau of the Census - 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). 4. US DOE Motor Chal1enge Market Assessment Inventory (MAl). 5. US DOE Office of Industrial Technology Industrial Assessment...

  17. EA-1363: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment EA-1363: Final Environmental Assessment California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program The purpose of the "Proposed Action" is to control...

  18. Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Worker Safety and Health Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on occupational safety and health programs and performance....

  19. Office of Emergency Management Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Emergency Management Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on emergency management programs and performance. This...

  20. EA-1807: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment EA-1807: Final Environmental Assessment Heartland Community College Wind Energy Project, Normal, McLean County, Illinois DOE has provided a State Energy Program...

  1. Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer An overview of Commercial PACE programs, featuring an explanation of...

  2. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procedure lists all the items Handbook 150 requires be covered in a management review. The records do and Management Reviews #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... A laboratory;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... A laboratory's management review

  3. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane Ike, was sent to the EPA Region 6 Rapid Needs Assessment and the State of Texas Joint Field Office in Austin, Texas. It appears that though there is considerable damage in Galveston and Texas City, there are fewer chemical leaks than during either hurricanes Katrina or Rita. Specific information gathered from the data was reported out to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Headquarters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and the State of Texas Emergency Management Agency.

  4. Evaluation of beryllium exposure assessment and control programs at AWE, Cardiff Facility, Rocky Flats Plant, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.S.; Foote, K.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Slawski, J.W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Cogbill, G. [Cardiff Facility (United Kingdom). Atomic Weapons Establishment

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Site visits were made to DOE beryllium handling facilities at the Rocky Flats Plant; Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, LLNL; as well as to the AWE Cardiff Facility. Available historical data from each facility describing its beryllium control program were obtained and summarized in this report. The AWE Cardiff Facility computerized Be personal and area air-sampling database was obtained and a preliminary evaluation was conducted. Further validation and documentation of this database will be very useful in estimating worker Be. exposure as well as in identifying the source potential for a variety of Be fabrication activities. Although all of the Be control programs recognized the toxicity of Be and its compounds, their established control procedures differed significantly. The Cardiff Facility, which was designed for only Be work, implemented a very strict Be control program that has essentially remained unchanged, even to today. LLNL and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant also implemented a strict Be control program, but personal sampling was not used until the mid 1980s to evaluate worker exposure. The Rocky Flats plant implemented significantly less controls on beryllium processing than the three previous facilities. In addition, records were less available, management and industrial hygiene staff turned over regularly, and less control was evident from a management perspective.

  5. Systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout history, as new chemical threats arose, strategies for the defense against chemical attacks have also evolved. As a part of an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, a systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios was performed to understand how the chemical threats and attack strategies change over time. For the analysis, the difficulty in executing chemical attack was evaluated within a framework of three major scenario elements. First, historical examples of chemical terrorism were examined to determine how the use of chemical threats, versus other weapons, contributed to the successful execution of the attack. Using the same framework, the future of chemical terrorism was assessed with respect to the impact of globalization and new technologies. Finally, the efficacy of the current defenses against contemporary chemical terrorism was considered briefly. The results of this analysis justify the need for continued diligence in chemical defense.

  6. Save Energy Now (SEN) Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries: Flooring Company Saves $872,000 Annually by Improving Steam System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study describes how the Shaw Industries plant #20 in Dalton, Georgia, achieved annual savings of $872,000 and 93,000 MMBtu after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

  7. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  8. 7 Introduction to Maple Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meade, Douglas B.

    , plastics and drugs. The reactor model developed in this chapter's application is based on the principle195 7 Introduction to Maple Programming Chemical engineers apply principles of chemistry, physics and undergo other chemical changes during the manufacturing process. Reactors and reactor models can be used

  9. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  11. Computational Chemical Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department through processing for improving their performance for engineering applications Use and develop with usable Chemical Electronic Optical Magnetic Transport, thermal and mechanical properties

  12. Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

  13. Flibe assessments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, D. K.; McCarthy, K.; Sawan, M.; Tillack, M.; Ying, A.; Zinkle, S.

    2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the issues on using flibe for fusion applications has been made. It is concluded that sufficient tritium breeding can be achieved for a flibe blanket, especially if a few cm of Be is include in the blanket design. A key issue is the control of the transmutation products such as TF and F{sub 2}. A REDOX (Reducing-Oxidation) reaction has to be demonstrated which is compatible to the blanket design. Also, MHD may have strong impact on heat transfer if the flow is perpendicular to the magnetic field. The issues associated with the REDOX reaction and the MHD issues have to be resolved by both experimental program and numerical solutions.

  14. Program & Project Management For The Acquisition Of Capital Assets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program & Project Management For The Acquisition Of Capital Assets Program & Project Management For The Acquisition Of Capital Assets Project Assessment and Reporting...

  15. PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND WASTE PROGRAMS. Operational Planning and Development (Activity No. AR OS 10 05 K; ONL-WN06)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) has performed an assessment of the waste management operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to review radioactive waste management as practiced at ORNL and to recommend improvements or alternatives for further study. The study involved: 1) an on-site survey of ORNL radioactive waste management operations; 2) a review of radioactive waste source data, records, and regulatory requirements; 3) an assessment of existing and planned treatment, storage, and control facilities; and 4) identification of alternatives for improving waste management operations. Information for this study was obtained from both personal interviews and written reports. The G/C suggestions for improving ORNL waste management operations are summarized. Regulatory requirements governing ORNL waste management operations are discussed. Descriptions and discussions of the radioactive liquid, solid, and gaseous waste systems are presented. The waste operations control complex is discussed.

  16. DOE limited standard: Operations assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

  17. Comparison of the efficiency of a thermo-chemical process to that of a fuel cell process when both involve the same chemical reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulusu, Seshu Periah

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work assesses if a plausible theoretical thermo-chemical scheme can be conceived of, that is capable of extracting work from chemical reactants which can be compared with work produced by a fuel cell, when both processes are supplied...

  18. chemical analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions....

  19. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  20. Air Quality: Asbestos Notification Procedure Department: Chemical and General Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Asbestos Notification Procedure Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 The Bay Area Air Quality) and air quality program manager Determine if the project is classified as a demolition or renovation

  1. Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 ACM asbestos-containing material AHA area hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control

  2. Revisions to US EPA Superfund Risk and Dose Assessment Models and Guidance - 13403

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Stuart A. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. 20460 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. 20460 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program's six Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) and Dose Compliance Concentration (DCC) internet based calculators for risk and dose assessment at Superfund sites are being revised to reflect better science, revisions to existing exposure scenarios and new scenarios, and changes to match up more closely with the EPA chemical regional screening level calculator. A revised version of the 1999 guidance document that provides an overview for the Superfund risk assessment process at radioactively contaminated sites, 'Radiation Risk Assessment At CERCLA Sites: Q and A', is being completed that will reflect Superfund recommended guidance and other technical documents issued over the past 13 years. EPA is also issuing a series of fact sheets in the document 'Superfund Radiation Risk Assessment: A Community Tool-kit'. This presentation would go over those changes that are expected to be finished by this spring. (authors)

  3. Environmental monitoring, restoration and assessment: What have we learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H. (ed.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Twenty-Eighth Hanford Symposium on Health and the Environment was held in Richland, Washington, October 16--19, 1989. The symposium was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The symposium was organized to review and evaluate some of the monitoring and assessment programs that have been conducted or are currently in place. Potential health and environmental effects of energy-related and other industrial activities have been monitored and assessed at various government and private facilities for over three decades. Most monitoring is required under government regulations; some monitoring is implemented because facility operators consider it prudent practice. As a result of these activities, there is now a substantial radiological, physical, and chemical data base for various environmental components, both in the United States and abroad. Symposium participants, both platform and poster presenters, were asked to consider, among other topics, the following: Has the expenditure of millions of dollars for radiological monitoring and assessment activities been worth the effort How do we decide when enough monitoring is enough Can we adequately assess the impacts of nonradiological components -- both inorganic and organic -- of wastes Are current regulatory requirements too restrictive or too lenient Can monitoring and assessment be made more cost effective Papers were solicited in the areas of environmental monitoring; environmental regulations; remediation, restoration, and decommissioning; modeling and dose assessment; uncertainty, design, and data analysis; and data management and quality assurance. Individual reports are processed separately for the databases.

  4. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavarria, D.E.; Davidson, J.R.; Espegren, M.L.; Kearl, P.M.; Knott, R.R.; Pierce, G.A.; Retolaza, C.D.; Smuin, D.R.; Wilson, M.J.; Witt, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Conklin, N.G.; Egidi, P.V.; Ertel, D.B.; Foster, D.S.; Krall, B.J.; Meredith, R.L.; Rice, J.A.; Roemer, E.K. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedures manual combines the existing procedures for radiological and chemical assessment of hazardous wastes used by the Pollutant Assessments Group at the time of manuscript completion (October 1, 1990). These procedures will be revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy and support procedures. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures.

  5. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  6. Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material...

  7. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  8. How much ``weight`` should be assigned to toxicity test results in ecological risk assessment?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, R.N.; Gilron, G.L. [Beak Consultants Ltd., Brampton, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxicity tests are an integral part of ecological assessment activities such as Canada`s Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) programs and the USA`s Superfund program. Both of these types of programs encourage the use of the weight-of-evidence approach for the evaluation of ecological risks. This approach uses data from biological surveys, toxicity tests, and ambient media chemical analyses. Currently, there is no guidance available which identifies the relative importance of these different data types in the risk assessment. The quality of the data generated will necessarily determine the ``weight`` assigned to each line of evidence. Decisions often are made on the basis of toxicity test results. However, routine tests are conducted frequently without consideration of their appropriateness (e.g., species sensitivity, ecological relevance). Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine the relative sensitivities of various test methods used to assess toxicity from various industries. Different industries were selected to represent different classes of contaminants. For example, the pulp and paper industry releases organic compounds and the mining sector primarily releases heavy metals. The comparative sensitivities of toxicity tests will be illustrated for two industrial sector case studies. With a better understanding of toxicity test method sensitivity, the ecological risk assessor is better able to assign the appropriate weight to the toxicity test results in a risk characterization. This will allow toxicity testing programs to be focused and increase the confidence in the entire risk assessment and any resulting decisions.

  9. Software Quality Assurance Plan for GoldSim Models Supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites Performance Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the development and maintenance of GoldSim models supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). Two PA models have been approved by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as of November 2006 for the PA maintenance work undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). NNSA/NSO asked NSTec to assume the custodianship of the models for future development and maintenance. The models were initially developed by Neptune and Company (N&C).

  10. Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing Save Energy Now Assessment; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Save Energy Now Case Study (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGo for theEnergy Now Assessment

  11. Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Emergency Management Program Technical Basis and Emergency Preparedness The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) was established in...

  12. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Idaho National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratory Fire Protection Program as Implemented at the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within the...

  13. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Page 1 of 7 Pre-and/or Co-Requisites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    WK -WINTER Chemical Engineering - Petroleum Engineering Minor Chemical Engineering: Regular ProgramCHEMICAL ENGINEERING Page 1 of 7 1st YEAR Pre- and/or Co-Requisites FALL 1 AMAT 217 Calculus 202 or 205; AMAT 217 9 ENCH 315 Chemical Engineering Process Calculations Pre-req or co-req: ENGG 311

  14. Guidance Document Reactive Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    showers and chillers. Health Hazards: The reactive chemicals are grouped primarily because of the physical

  15. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  16. Proceedings of the 1981 subseabed disposal program. Annual workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1981 Annual Workshop was the twelfth meeting of the principal investigators and program management personnel participating in the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP). The first workshop was held in June 1973, to address the development of a program (initially known as Ocean Basin Floors Program) to assess the deep sea disposal of nuclear wastes. Workshops were held semi-annually until late 1977. Since November 1977, the workshops have been conducted following the end of each fiscal year so that the program participants could review and critique the total scope of work. This volume contains a synopsis, as given by each Technical Program Coordinator, abstracts of each of the talks, and copies of the visual materials, as presented by each of the principal investigators, for each of the technical elements of the SDP for the fiscal year 1981. The talks were grouped under the following categories; general topics; site studies; thermal response studies; emplacement studies; systems analysis; chemical response studies; biological oceanography studies; physical oceanographic studies; instrumentation development; transportation studies; social environment; and international seabed disposal.

  17. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  18. Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy: A Comparative Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Technical Assistance Program (TAP), this webinar, held on Feb. 26, 2015, focused on a comparative analysis of program design elements of existing Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs across the country.

  19. TAP Webinar: Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Technical Assistance Program (TAP), this webinar, held on Feb. 26, 2015, focused on a comparative analysis of program design elements of existing Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs across the country.

  20. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical