Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Enhancement of Solar Energy Representation in the GCAM Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The representation of solar technologies in a research version of the GCAM (formerly MiniCAM) integrated assessment model have been enhanced to add technologies, improve the underlying data, and improve the interaction with the rest of the model. We find that the largest potential impact from the inclusion of thermal Concentrating Solar Power plants, which supply a substantial portion of electric generation in sunny regions of the world. Drawing on NREL research, domestic Solar Hot Water technologies have also been added in the United States region where this technology competes with conventional electric and gas technologies. PV technologies are as implemented in the CCTP scenarios, drawing on NREL cost curves for the United States, extrapolated to other world regions using a spatial analysis of population and solar resources.

Smith, Steven J.; Volke, April C.; Delgado Arias, Sabrina

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

US Renewable Futures in the GCAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project examines renewable energy deployment in the United States using a version of the GCAM integrated assessment model with detailed a representation of renewables, the GCAM-RE. Electricity generation was modeled in four generation segments and 12-subregions. This level of regional and sectoral detail allows a more explicit representation of renewable energy generation. Wind, solar thermal power, and central solar PV plants are implemented in explicit resource classes with new intermittency parameterizations appropriate for each technology. A scenario analysis examines a range of assumptions for technology characteristics, climate policy, and long-distance transmission. We find that renewable generation levels grow over the century in all scenarios. As expected, renewable generation increases with lower renewable technology costs, more stringent climate policy, and if alternative low-carbon technology are not available. The availability of long distance transmission lowers policy costs and changes the renewable generation mix.

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.; Karas, Joseph F.; Nathan, Mayda

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

5

Global Deployment of Geothermal Energy Using a New Characterization in GCAM 1.0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents modeling of geothermal energy in GCAM 1.0 (formerly MiniCAM) from FY2008 to FY2009, from the inputs to the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program report (Clarke et al., 2008a) to the present representation, which will be used in future work. To demonstrate the newest representation, we describe the procedure and outcome of six model runs that illustrate the potential role of geothermal energy in the U.S. and global regions through different futures climate policy, development and deployment of engineered, or enhanced, geothermal systems (EGS), and availability of other low-cost, low-carbon electricity generation technologies such as nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage (CCS).

Hannam, Phil; Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Explicitly Accounting for Protected Lands within the GCAM 3.0  

SciTech Connect

The Global Change Assessment Model Version 3.0 defines three different levels of “Protected Lands” within the agricultural and landuse component. These three different scenarios effectively cordon off 3.5% (5.0 million km2) of the Earth’s terrestrial lands in the de minimus Protected Land Scenario, 5.0% (7.20 million km2) in the Core Protected Land Scenario, and 8.2% (11.8 million km2) in the Expanded Protected Land Scenario. None of these scenarios represents the “right” level of Protected Lands for the planet today or tomorrow. Rather, the goal is to create a range of scenarios that can be used in modeling human responses to climate change and the impact those would have on managed and unmanaged terrestrial lands. These scenarios harness the wealth of information in the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre’s World Database on Protected Areas and its categories of explicit degrees of protection.

Dooley, James J.; Zhou, Yuyu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Integrated Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Environmental Design Space model assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Environmental Design Space (EDS) is a multi-disciplinary design tool used to explore trade-offs among aircraft fuel burn, emissions, and noise. This thesis uses multiple metrics to assess an EDS model of a Boeing 777 ...

Spindler, Phillip Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessment of Water Balance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generating plants perform water balance studies for a variety of reasons, and they use a range of different modeling approaches and tools to accomplish their specific objectives. This EPRI report presents the results of a project conducted with the objective of providing the industry and the interested public with an assessment of the value of water balance models to conserve and manage water. The report provides an overview of the state-of-the-art water balance models and identifies ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

TEPP Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Products Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-13.p65 1 Model Needs Assessment R E V 8 - 0 7 / 2 0 1 2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s P r o g r a m PURPOSE The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local officials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. 1.0 INTRODUCTION This Model Needs Assessment was developed by the Department of Energy's Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) as a planning and assessment tool for state, tribal, or local government officials. To implement this Model Needs Assessment, a designated official

11

Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Preliminary Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Preliminary Assessment draft report will present the results of a literature search and preliminary assessment of the body of research, analysis methods, models and data deemed to be relevant to the Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment research. This report will provide: 1) a description of the problem space and the kinds of information pertinent to the problem space, 2) a discussion of key relevant or representative literature, 3) a discussion of models and modeling approaches judged to be potentially useful to the research, and 4) the next steps of this research that will be pursued based on this preliminary assessment. This draft report represents a technical deliverable for the NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling (SAM) program. Specifically this draft report is the Task 1 deliverable for project PL09-UtilSocial-PD06, Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment. This project investigates non-traditional use of social and cultural information to improve nuclear proliferation assessment, including nonproliferation assessment, proliferation resistance assessments, safeguards assessments and other related studies. These assessments often use and create technical information about the State’s posture towards proliferation, the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system to an undesired event, and the effectiveness of safeguards. This project will find and fuse social and technical information by explicitly considering the role of cultural, social and behavioral factors relevant to proliferation. The aim of this research is to describe and demonstrate if and how social science modeling has utility in proliferation assessment.

Coles, Garill A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Brothers, Alan J.; Thompson, Sandra E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hydropower Resource Assessment Modeling Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydropower Evaluation Software uses the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission?s Hydroelectric Power Resource Assessment database to identify sites with undeveloped hydropower capacity and the estimated megawatts of undeveloped capacity at each site. The software integrates this information with environmental values from the National Park Service?s National Rivers Inventory database. Other constraints to development that are modeled include Federal and state legislative protection for river segments that have been identified as being wild and scenic river segments. River segments containing threatened and/or endangered wildlife and fish are also modeled for their influence on hydropower development. The amount that each attribute affects the likelihood of development is dependent on the prior development of a site.

A. M. Conner; J. E. Francfort

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China’s building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China’s building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China’s building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China’s building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Space, time and nesting Integrated Assessment Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment Modelling in the field of air pollution has advanced greatly since the 1985 Helsinki Protocol on the reduction of Sulphur emissions and their transboundary fluxes. With subsequent protocols and increased understanding of the inter-relationships ... Keywords: CLRTAP, Integrated Assessment Modelling, Scale, Science-policy interaction, Space, Time

T. Oxley; H. M. ApSimon

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

None

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or state regulatory compliance requirements are being met during the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Dose modeling is an important step in the...

18

Introduction to Simplified Generation Risk Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life cycle management (LCM) and risk-informed asset management of nuclear power plants can benefit from improved prediction of the effect of equipment failures or degradation on plant productivity. The Generation Risk Assessment (GRA) model described in this report provides a systematic approach to estimating how equipment reliability relates to the risk of future lost generation from trips and derates and to prioritizing components and systems based on their importance to productivity.

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

19

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Agency/Company /Organization: DG Joint Research Centre, European Commission, University of Heidelberg Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/docs/ecol_econ_2006.pdf Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Screenshot References: Computable general equilibrium models[1] Abstract "Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) of economic, environmental, and

20

TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Needs Assessment Document Model Needs Assessment Document TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local officials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. This Model Needs Assessment was developed by the Department of Energy's Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) as a planning and assessment tool for state, tribal, or local government officials. To implement this Model Needs Assessment, a designated official from the jurisdiction will conduct a self-assessment by answering various questions. By doing so, the official will determine strengths and identify improvement areas. To support the assessment process, and any proposed recommendations for improvement, this document includes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Topics: Finance, Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: tech-action.org/models.htm Cost: Free Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Screenshot References: FICAM[1] "The Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) evaluates the contribution of technologies and practices towards mitigation of greenhouse gases, and carries a comprehensive financial analysis." References ↑ "FICAM" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Financial_and_Cost_Assessment_Model_(FICAM)&oldid=383091"

23

An Assessment Model on Green Degree of Biodegradable Packaging Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment model of green degree of biodegradable packaging materials is built. The first-order assessment indexes are composed of environmental properties, energy properties, resource properties and economy and the second order assessment index are ... Keywords: packaging materials, analytic hierarchy process, life cycle assessment

Xiaoming Zuo; Zhaomei Xu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Defining assessment projects and scenarios for policy support: Use of ontology in Integrated Assessment and Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment and Modelling (IAM) provides an interdisciplinary approach to support ex-ante decision-making by combining quantitative models representing different systems and scales into a framework for integrated assessment. Scenarios in IAM ... Keywords: Collaborative approach, Integration, Knowledge management, Multi-disciplinary teams, Policy assessment

S. Janssen; F. Ewert; Hongtao Li; I. N. Athanasiadis; J. J. F. Wien; O. Thérond; M. J. R. Knapen; I. Bezlepkina; J. Alkan-Olsson; A. E. Rizzoli; H. Belhouchette; M. Svensson; M. K. van Ittersum

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Petri net modeling of fault analysis for probabilistic risk assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fault trees and event trees have been widely accepted as the modeling strategy to perform Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). However, there are several limitations associated… (more)

Lee, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling X. Mao, D.J. Tylavsky and G.A. McCulla Abstract: Improving the utilisation of transformers requires that the hot-spot and top. An alternative method for assessing transformer model reliability is provided. 1 Introduction The maximally

27

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wind resource assessment with a mesoscale non-hydrostatic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind resource assessment with a mesoscale non- hydrostatic model Vincent Guénard, Center for Energy is developed for assessing the wind resource and its uncertainty. The work focuses on an existing wind farm mast measurements. The wind speed and turbulence fields are discussed. It is shown that the k

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

29

Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement. Large photovoltaic systems are typically developed as projects which supply electricity to a utility and are owned by independent power producers. Obtaining financing at favorable rates and attracting investors requires confidence in the projected energy yield from the plant. In this paper, various performance models for projecting annual energy yield from Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems are assessed by comparing measured system output to model predictions based on measured weather and irradiance data. The results are statistically analyzed to identify systematic error sources.

Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert. (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); Sahm, Aaron (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Crawford, Clark (Amonix, Inc., Seal Beach, CA); King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S. (Emcore, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

31

Modeling of Molten Salt Mixtures: Thermodynamic Assessment of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Modeling of Molten Salt Mixtures: Thermodynamic Assessment of CeBr3 and MBr-CeBr3 Systems (M=Li, Na, K, Rb). Author(s), Yue Wu, ...

32

Software reliability assessment via fuzzy logic model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently in software engineering it became of great importance to be able to reason about non functional characteristics of software. This holds for a large variety of application areas like embedded and safety-critical software systems as well as service-oriented ... Keywords: fuzzy logic, fuzzy models, service oriented software systems, software reliability

Olga Georgieva; Aleksandar Dimov

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Simulink models are also software: modularity assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In automotive industry, more and more complex electronics and software systems are being developed to enable the innovation and to decrease costs. Besides the complex multimedia, comfort, and safety systems of conventional vehicles, automotive companies ... Keywords: automotive architectural quality, modularity, quality metrics, simulink model

Yanja Dajsuren; Mark G.J. van den Brand; Alexander Serebrenik; Serguei Roubtsov

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Preliminary Findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Often the methodologies for assessing proliferation risk are focused around the inherent vulnerability of nuclear energy systems and associated safeguards. For example an accepted approach involves ways to measure the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to potential proliferation. This paper describes preliminary investigation into non-traditional use of social and cultural information to improve proliferation assessment and advance the approach to assessing nuclear material diversion. Proliferation resistance assessment, safeguard assessments and related studies typically create technical information about the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system to diversion of nuclear material. The purpose of this research project is to find ways to integrate social information with technical information by explicitly considering the role of culture, groups and/or individuals to factors that impact the possibility of proliferation. When final, this work is expected to describe and demonstrate the utility of social science modeling in proliferation and proliferation risk assessments.

Coles, Garill A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Brothers, Alan J.; Thompson, Sandra E.

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Conceptual adsorption models and open issues pertaining to performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

Recently several articles have been published that question the appropriateness of the distribution coefficient, Rd, concept to quantify radionuclide migration. Several distinct issues are raised by various critics. In this paper I provide some perspective on issues surrounding the modeling of nuclide retardation. The first section defines adsorption terminology and discusses various adsorption processes. The next section describes five commonly used adsorption conceptual models, specifically emphasizing what attributes that affect adsorption are explicitly accommodated in each model. I also review efforts to incorporate each adsorption model into performance assessment transport computer codes. The five adsorption conceptual models are (1) the constant Rd model, (2) the parametric Rd model, (3) isotherm adsorption models, (4) mass-action adsorption models, and (5) surface-complexation with electrostatics models. The final section discusses the adequacy of the distribution ratio concept, the adequacy of transport calculations that rely on constant retardation factors and the status of incorporating sophisticated adsorption models into transport codes.

Serne, R.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Modeling and Integrated Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling and Integrated Modeling and Integrated Assessment Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Economic Assessments * Engineering analysis of CO 2 separation and capture * Economic modeling/ integrated assessment of carbon capture and sequestration * Comparison on equal basis of the major sequestration options Economic Modeling Motivation * When might carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) become competitive? * What is its potential scale? * Which technologies look most promising? . . . . And when? * How to see the potential in a general market context? Detailed Reference *Sean Biggs Thesis: S Biggs, S. D., "Sequestering Carbon from Power Plants: The Jury is Still Out," M.I.T. Masters Thesis, (2000). S http://sequestration.mit.edu/pdf/SeanBiggs.pdf What Determines Competitiveness?

37

Fire models for assessment of nuclear power plant fires  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in available fire models for the assessment of nuclear power plants fires. The advantages and disadvantages of three basic types of fire models (zone, field, and control volume) and Sandia's experience with these models will be discussed. It is shown that the type of fire model selected to solve a particular problem should be based on the information that is required. Areas of concern which relate to all nuclear power plant fire models are identified. 17 refs., 6 figs.

Nicolette, V.F.; Nowlen, S.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Model and Analytic Processes for Export License Assessments  

SciTech Connect

This paper represents the Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Simulations, Algorithms and Modeling (SAM) Program's first effort to identify and frame analytical methods and tools to aid export control professionals in effectively predicting proliferation intent; a complex, multi-step and multi-agency process. The report focuses on analytical modeling methodologies that alone, or combined, may improve the proliferation export control license approval process. It is a follow-up to an earlier paper describing information sources and environments related to international nuclear technology transfer. This report describes the decision criteria used to evaluate modeling techniques and tools to determine which approaches will be investigated during the final 2 years of the project. The report also details the motivation for why new modeling techniques and tools are needed. The analytical modeling methodologies will enable analysts to evaluate the information environment for relevance to detecting proliferation intent, with specific focus on assessing risks associated with transferring dual-use technologies. Dual-use technologies can be used in both weapons and commercial enterprises. A decision-framework was developed to evaluate which of the different analytical modeling methodologies would be most appropriate conditional on the uniqueness of the approach, data availability, laboratory capabilities, relevance to NA-22 and Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NA-24) research needs and the impact if successful. Modeling methodologies were divided into whether they could help micro-level assessments (e.g., help improve individual license assessments) or macro-level assessment. Macro-level assessment focuses on suppliers, technology, consumers, economies, and proliferation context. Macro-level assessment technologies scored higher in the area of uniqueness because less work has been done at the macro level. An approach to developing testable hypotheses for the macro-level assessment methodologies is provided. The outcome of this works suggests that we should develop a Bayes Net for micro-level analysis and continue to focus on Bayes Net, System Dynamics and Economic Input/Output models for assessing macro-level problems. Simultaneously, we need to develop metrics for assessing intent in export control, including the risks and consequences associated with all aspects of export control.

Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Daly, Don S.; Brothers, Alan J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessing the RELAPS-3D Heat Conduction Enclosure Model  

SciTech Connect

Three heat conduction problems that have exact solutions are modeled with RELAP5-3D using the conduction enclosure model. These comparisons are designed to be used in the RELAP5-3D development assessment scheduled to be completed in 2009. It is shown that with proper input choices and adequate model detail the exact solutions can be matched. In addition, this analysis identified an error and the required correction in the cylindrical and spherical heat conductor models in RELAP5-3D which will be corrected in a future version of RELAP5-3D.

McCann, Larry D.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Probabilistic Risk Assessment Compendium of Candidate Consensus Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a compendium of candidate consensus models in use in current probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). The ASME PRA Standard, as modified and endorsed by Regulatory Guide 1.200, establishes that the identification, sensitivity analysis, and documentation of key sources of uncertainties and key assumptions may be reduced in scope if the PRA makes use of consensus models to implement the supporting requirements. As part of the process of treating the uncertainties associated with a risk-...

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biosphere Modeling and Dose Assessment for Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a biosphere model appropriate for use in calculating doses to hypothetical individuals living in the far future in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Doses are assumed to arise from potential releases from a spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal facility located beneath Yucca Mountain. The model provides guidance on approaches to dealing with the biosphere appropriate for site suitability and licensing assessments.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Bootstrapping to Assess and Improve Atmospheric Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bootstrapping is a simple technique typically used to assess accuracy of estimates of model parameters by using simple plug-in principles and replacing sometimes unwieldy theory by computer simulation. Common uses include variance estimation and confidence ... Keywords: CART, bootstrap, classification, hurricanes, instability, supervised learning, weather data

J. Sunil Rao

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Integrated science model for assessment of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment models are intended to represent processes that govern physical, ecological, economic and social systems. This report describes a scientific model relating emissions to global temperature and sea level. This model is intended to be one component of an integrated assessment model which is, of course, much more comprehensive. The model is able to reproduce past changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, global temperature, and sea level. The model is used to estimate the emissions rates required to lead to stabilization of CO{sub 2} at various levels. The model is also used to estimate global temperature rise, the rate of temperature change, and sea level rise driven by IPCC emissions scenarios. The emission of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} is modeled to have the largest long term effect on climate. Results do show the importance of expected changes of trace greenhouse gases other than CO{sub 2} in the near future. Because of the importance of these other trace gases, further work is recommended to more accurately estimate their effects.

Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kheshgi, H.S. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fuel cycle assessment: A compendium of models, methodologies, and approaches  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to profile analytical tools and methods which could be used in a total fuel cycle analysis. The information in this document provides a significant step towards: (1) Characterizing the stages of the fuel cycle. (2) Identifying relevant impacts which can feasibly be evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively. (3) Identifying and reviewing other activities that have been conducted to perform a fuel cycle assessment or some component thereof. (4) Reviewing the successes/deficiencies and opportunities/constraints of previous activities. (5) Identifying methods and modeling techniques/tools that are available, tested and could be used for a fuel cycle assessment.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

47

Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool: Benchmarking Radiological Assessment and Dose Models using Fukushima Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing the Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool (FRAT), a comprehensive database and software application for accessing, analyzing, and interpreting data related to radiological releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). This report documents the development of the FRAT to support the benchmarking of emergency response and dose modeling codes used by nuclear power plants, using radiological data from the Fukushima ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Modeling issues associated with production reactor safety assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes several Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) modeling issues that are related to the unique design and operation of the production reactors. The identification of initiating events and determination of a set of success criteria for the production reactors is of concern because of their unique design. The modeling of accident recovery must take into account the unique operation of these reactors. Finally, a more thorough search and evaluation of common-cause events is required to account for combinations of unique design features and operation that might otherwise not be included in the PSA. It is expected that most of these modeling issues also would be encountered when modeling some of the other more unique reactor and nonreactor facilities that are part of the DOE nuclear materials production complex. 9 refs., 2 figs.

Stack, D.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Thomas, W.R. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solar Resource Assessment: Databases, Measurements, Models, and Information Sources (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet for Solar Resource Assessment Workshop, Denver CO, Oct 29, 2008: ?Solar Resource Assessment Databases, Measurements, Models, and Information Sources

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, goat’s milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

2003-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Pollutant Plume Dispersion Models is widespread in the evaluation of point sources of air pollution. These models provide valuable insight into the concentration and dispersion of hazardous materials throughout the atmosphere. Traditional methods of dispersion modeling for the permitting of new sources and the monitoring of existing sources have allowed much room for error in terms of the effect of the pollutants on nearby populations (Hardikar, 1995). The capabilities of GIS technology offer an improved method of conducting air quality modeling for permitting, remediation studies, and environmental monitoring. GIS has the ability to develop and manage a comprehensive database of model output, map layers, and demographic data that can prove extremely valuable in the modeling process. This data can serve to extend the capabilities of air pollution dispersion modeling from mere estimation of concentrations to comprehensive exposure assessment of neighboring populations (Lowry, et al. 1995, Maslia, et al. 1994). A study of the Monticello power plant in northeast Texas was conducted using the SCREEN3 mathematical plume dispersion model, US Census Bureau demographic data, and a GIS to examine the effects of the plant output on the people living in the seven county area surrounding the plant.

Archer, Jeffrey Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An integrated multi-model approach for air quality assessment: Development and evaluation of the OSCAR Air Quality Assessment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a new modelling system for studying air quality on local scales. A multi-model approach has been adopted to develop the OSCAR Air Quality Modelling System to conduct assessments at different levels ... Keywords: Air quality, Model evaluation, Modelling system, Nitrogen oxides, OSCAR, Particulate matter

Ranjeet S. Sokhi; Hongjun Mao; Srinivas T. G. Srimath; Shiyuan Fan; Nutthida Kitwiroon; Lakhumal Luhana; Jaakko Kukkonen; Mervi Haakana; Ari Karppinen; K. Dick van den Hout; Paul Boulter; Ian S. McCrae; Steinar Larssen; Karl I. Gjerstad; Roberto San José; John Bartzis; Panagiotis Neofytou; Peter van den Breemer; Steve Neville; Anu Kousa; Blanca M. Cortes; Ingrid Myrtveit

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) forecast, which is produced annually in the Annual Energy Outlook and periodically in support of DOE policy formulation and analysis. The models are multinominal logit models that have been estimated using EIA`s 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Three models were estimated: space heating share, water heating share, and cooking share. These models are used to allocate total end-use service consumption over different technologies defined by fuel type characteristics. For each of the end-use service categories, consumption shares are estimated for a subset of six fuel types: natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas, fuel oil/kerosene, wood, and other fuel.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.; Bonner, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

56

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound PAHs and binary mixtures of PAHs in order to bridge the gap between component assessment and mixture assessment. Seven pure parent compound PAHs and four binary mixtures of PAHs were examined in the Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity Assay, a Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) assay and the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay (EROD). These assays were chosen for their ability to measure specific toxic endpoints related to the carcinogenic process (i.e. initiation, promotion, progression). Data from these assays was used in further studies to build Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) to estimate toxic endpoints and to test the additive assumption in PAH mixtures. These QSAR models will allow for the development of bioassay based potential potencies (PPB) or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) that are derived not only from bioassay data, but also from structure, activity, and physical/chemical properties. These models can be extended to any environmental media to evaluate risk to human health from exposures to PAHs.

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

USING COPULAS TO MODEL DEPENDENCE IN SIMULATION RISK ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

Typical engineering systems in applications with high failure consequences such as nuclear reactor plants often employ redundancy and diversity of equipment in an effort to lower the probability of failure and therefore risk. However, it has long been recognized that dependencies exist in these redundant and diverse systems. Some dependencies, such as common sources of electrical power, are typically captured in the logic structure of the risk model. Others, usually referred to as intercomponent dependencies, are treated implicitly by introducing one or more statistical parameters into the model. Such common-cause failure models have limitations in a simulation environment. In addition, substantial subjectivity is associated with parameter estimation for these models. This paper describes an approach in which system performance is simulated by drawing samples from the joint distributions of dependent variables. The approach relies on the notion of a copula distribution, a notion which has been employed by the actuarial community for ten years or more, but which has seen only limited application in technological risk assessment. The paper also illustrates how equipment failure data can be used in a Bayesian framework to estimate the parameter values in the copula model. This approach avoids much of the subjectivity required to estimate parameters in traditional common-cause failure models. Simulation examples are presented for failures in time. The open-source software package R is used to perform the simulations. The open-source software package WinBUGS is used to perform the Bayesian inference via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling.

Dana L. Kelly

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

An Assessment of Models which use Satellite Data to Estimate Solar Irradiance at the Earth's Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performances of three models which use satellite data to estimate solar irradiance at the Earth's surface are assessed using measured radiation data from a midlatitude location. Assessment of the models is made possible through the accurate ...

Clifford Raphael; John E. Hay

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

An Inspector's Assessment of the New Model Safeguards Approach for Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

This conference paper assesses the changes that are being made to the Model Safeguards Approach for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants.

Curtis, Michael M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

HVAC Modeling for Cost of Ownership Assessment in Biotechnology & Drugs Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000 Broomes, Peter. , “HVAC Modeling for Cost of Ownership2000 Broomes, Peter. , “HVAC Results Comparison”, April,HVAC Modeling for Cost of Ownership Assessment in

Broomes, Peter; Dornfeld, David A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

G. Saulnier and W. Statham

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Spatially Informed Plant PRA Models for Security Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Traditional risk models can be adapted to evaluate plant response for situations where plant systems and structures are intentionally damaged, such as from sabotage or terrorism. This paper describes a process by which traditional risk models can be spatially informed to analyze the effects of compound and widespread harsh environments through the use of 'damage footprints'. A 'damage footprint' is a spatial map of regions of the plant (zones) where equipment could be physically destroyed or disabled as a direct consequence of an intentional act. The use of 'damage footprints' requires that the basic events from the traditional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) be spatially transformed so that the failure of individual components can be linked to the destruction of or damage to specific spatial zones within the plant. Given the nature of intentional acts, extensive modifications must be made to the risk models to account for the special nature of the 'initiating events' associated with deliberate adversary actions. Intentional acts might produce harsh environments that in turn could subject components and structures to one or more insults, such as structural, fire, flood, and/or vibration and shock damage. Furthermore, the potential for widespread damage from some of these insults requires an approach that addresses the impacts of these potentially severe insults even when they occur in locations distant from the actual physical location of a component or structure modeled in the traditional PRA. (authors)

Wheeler, Timothy A. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Thomas, Willard [Omicron Safety and Risk Technologies, Inc., 2500 Louisiana Boulevard, Suite 410. Albuquerque, NM 87110 (United States); Thornsbury, Eric [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Bootstrap Method for Software Reliability Assessment Based on a Discretized NHPP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss a bootstrap method for software reliability assessment based on a discretized no homogeneous Poisson process (NHPP) model. Ordinarily, model parameters of the discretized NHPP model are estimated by using the regression analysis based on the ... Keywords: Software reliability assessment, Discretized NHPP model, Regression analysis, Bootstrap method

Shinji Inoue; Shigeru Yamada

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Development and illustrative outputs of the Community Integrated Assessment System (CIAS), a multi-institutional modular integrated assessment approach for modelling climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and first results of the ''Community Integrated Assessment System'' (CIAS), a unique multi-institutional modular and flexible integrated assessment system for modelling climate change. Key to this development is the ... Keywords: Bespoke Framework Generator, Carbon tax, Climate change, Community Integrated Assessment System, Coupled modelling, Integrated assessment model, SoftIAM, Software engineering

R. Warren; S. de la Nava Santos; N. W. Arnell; M. Bane; T. Barker; C. Barton; R. Ford; H. -M. Füssel; Robin K. S. Hankin; Rupert Klein; C. Linstead; J. Kohler; T. D. Mitchell; T. J. Osborn; H. Pan; S. C. B. Raper; G. Riley; H. J. Schellnhüber; S. Winne; D. Anderson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Watershed modeling using large-scale distributed computing in Condor and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models are increasingly being used to quantify the effects of best management practices (BMPs) on water quality. While these models offer the ability to study multiple BMP scenarios, and to analyze impacts of various management decisions on watershed ... Keywords: Condor, Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Program, Lincoln Lake, Soil and Water Assessment Tool Model, TeraGrid, best management practices

Margaret W Gitau; Li-Chi Chiang; Mohamed Sayeed; Indrajeet Chaubey

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geothermal-district-heating assessment model for decision making  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology developed to assess the economic feasibility of district heating for any community in the United States is described. The overall philosophy which has guided its development is the conviction that district heating must be examined on a site-by-site basis. To support this approach, a set of extensive, in-house supporting data bases has been created and useful external data bases with national coverage have been identified. These data bases provide information at a sufficient level of detail to permit a first-cut examination of the district heating potential of a community without requiring outside data collection (allowing a substantial cost and time savings). The results of this blind look at a community permit a rapid, yet adequate estimate of district heating potential, costs, and energy savings. The data utilized in the initial examination can be supplemented or replaced by more detailed information obtained from on-site data collection, if the first results are promising. The fact that the data and methodology are computerized allows many locations within the community, alternate heat sources, ownership options, pipe technologies, etc. to be examined in a short period of time. The structure of the District Heating Model (DHM) (the methodology in computerized form) is described followed by a discussion of the application of the model to Provo, UT.

Reisman, A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of widespread availability, low cost, sustainability, and potential supply far greater than that of food crops, lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most promising feedstocks for producing biofuels through fermentation processes. Among lignocellulose choices, poplar wood is appealing because of high energy potential, above-average carbon mitigation potential, fast growth, and high yields. Lignocellulose structural features limit accessibility of enzymes or microorganisms. To overcome these limitations, pretreatment is required. Among several choices of pretreatment, lime pretreatment is preferred because lime is the cheapest alkali, safest to handle, easy to recover, and compatible with oxidants. The main effect of lime pretreatment is to degrade lignin, which occurs with good carbohydrate preservation and is enhanced with oxidants. Among several choices of oxidant, oxygen and air are preferred because of low cost and widespread availability. This study systematically assesses the effects of lime pretreatment on poplar wood using four different modes: long-term oxidative, long-term non-oxidative, short-term constant pressure, and short-term varying pressure. Long-term pretreatments use temperatures between 25 and 65° C, air if oxidant is used, and last several weeks. Short-term pretreatments use temperatures between 110 and 180° C, pressurized oxygen, and last several minutes to hours. Pretreatment was assessed on the basis of 3-day enzymatic digestibility using enzyme loadings of 15 FPU/g glucan in raw biomass. The results were used to recommend pretreatment conditions based on highest overall yield of glucan (after combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis) for each pretreatment mode. For each pretreatment mode, kinetic models for delignification and carbohydrates degradation were obtained and used to determine the conditions (temperature, pressure, and time) that maximize glucan preservation subjected to a target lignin yield. This study led to conclude that the most robust, and selective mode of lime pretreatment is varying pressure.

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modeling and visualization of lifecycle building performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lifecycle building performance assessment (LBPA) ensures that buildings perform and operate as intended during building lifecycle. Such assessment activities are typically multi-phase and multi-disciplinary, and generate large amounts of information ...

Ipek Gursel; Sevil Sariyildiz; Ömer Akin; Rudi Stouffs

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluating quantitative and qualitative models: An application for nationwide water erosion assessment in Ethiopia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper tests the candidacy of one qualitative response model and two quantitative models for a nationwide water erosion hazard assessment in Ethiopia. After a descriptive comparison of model characteristics the study conducts a statistical comparison ... Keywords: Model comparison, Qualitative response models, Quantitative models

B. G. J. S. Sonneveld; M. A. Keyzer; L. Stroosnijder

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategic assessment of bioenergy development in the west:modeled the variation in bioenergy crop yields. Yield dataof biobased polymers and bioenergy: an analysis and system

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Lawrence Livermore National Security Cost Model Functional Management Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Functional Management Assessment of the cost model included a review of the plan and progress of the Cost Model Review Team. The review focused on processes in place to ensure simplicity, compliance with cost accounting standards and indirect cost allocation methodology, and the change management plan. This was intended to be a high-level initial review in order to provide recommendations for a subsequent more comprehensive review. The single document reviewed by the team during the assessment was the Indirect Cost Recovery Model Review, which describes how the indirect rate restructure and new organizational structure have resulted in streamlined charging practices to better understand and strategically manage costs. ISSUE 1: The cost model focuses heavily on rate structure but not on cost management. Significant progress has been made to simplify the rate structure. The number of indirect rates has been reduced from 67 different indirect rates used under the prior contract to 32 rates in the first year of the LLNS contract, with a goal of further reduction to 16 for FY09. The reductions are being recommended by a broad-based Working Group driven by Lab leadership desiring a simplified rate structure that would make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead, be viewed as equitable, and ensure appropriate use of Service, i.e., operations, Centers. This has been a real challenge due to the significant change in approach from one that previously involved a very complex rate structure. Under this prior approach, the goal was to manage the rates, and rates were established at very detailed levels that would 'shine the light' on pools of overhead costs. As long as rates stayed constant or declined, not as much attention tended to be given to them, particularly with so many pools to review (184 indirect rate pools in FY05). However, as difficult and important as simplifying the rate structure has been, the fundamental reason for the simplification is to make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead so the costs can be effectively managed. For the current year, the overall the goal of keeping the total cost of an FTE to FY07 levels. This approach reflects the past practice of managing to rates rather than focusing on costs, although streamlined with the more simplified rate structure. Given all the challenges being faced with the contract transition, this was a reasonable interim tactic for dealing with the known cost increases such as fees and taxes. Nonetheless, in order to take full advantage of the opportunities that exist for making sound decisions for further reducing the rates themselves, the Laboratory needs to implement an ongoing and disciplined approach to understanding and managing overhead cost. ISSUE 2: The NIF has a significantly different rate structure than other Laboratory work. Because of its significant size and unique organizational structure as a major construction project, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has indirect charges that vary from the norm. These variations were reviewed and approved by and disclosed to the NNSA in the Laboratory's past annual Disclosure Statements. In mid-FY 09, NIF will begin transition from a construction line item to an operational center. The reallocation of costs when this occurs could significantly impact the Laboratory's rates and rate structure planning for that transition from a cost- and rate- impact standpoint should begin soon. ISSUE 3: The new rate model must be finalized shortly in order to implement the model beginning in FY 09. As noted in Issue No.1, a Working Group has developed a simplified rate structure for the Lab to use for FY09. The Working Group has evaluated the cost impacts of the simplified rate structure at the major program level and identified a disparate impact in the Safeguards and Security area where a substantial increase in overhead cost allocation may need to be mitigated. The simplified rate structure will need to be approved by the Laboratory Director and issued within the Laboratory to formulate detailed bu

Tevis, J; Hirahara, J; Thomas, B; Mendez, M

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Computation Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler waterwalls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for Ultrasupercritical (USC) application to mitigate corrosion since these boilers will operate at a much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical (565 C {at} 24 MPa) boilers. Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potential Fe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline coatings that form a protective, continuous scale of either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The computational modeling results identified a new series of Fe-25Cr-40Ni with or without 10 wt.% Al nanocrystalline coatings that maintain long-term stability by forming a diffusion barrier layer at the coating/substrate interface. The computational modeling predictions of microstructure, formation of continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. Advanced coatings, such as MCrAl (where M is Fe, Ni, or Co) nanocrystalline coatings, have been processed using different magnetron sputtering deposition techniques. Several coating trials were performed and among the processing methods evaluated, the DC pulsed magnetron sputtering technique produced the best quality coating with a minimum number of shallow defects and the results of multiple deposition trials showed that the process is repeatable. scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. The cyclic oxidation test results revealed that the nanocrystalline coatings offer better oxidation resistance, in terms of weight loss, localized oxidation, and formation of mixed oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, than widely used MCrAlY coatings. However, the ultra-fine grain structure in these coatings, consistent with the computational model predictions, resulted in accelerated Al diffusion from the coating into the substrate. An effective diffusion barrier interlayer coating was developed to prevent inward Al diffusion. The fire-side corrosion test results showed that the nanocrystalline coatings with a minimum number of defects have a great potential in providing corrosion protection. The coating tested in the most aggressive environment showed no evidence of coating spallation and/or corrosion attack after 1050 hours exposure. In contrast, evidence of coating spallation in isolated areas and corrosion attack of the base metal in the spalled areas were observed after 500 hours. These contrasting results after 500 and 1050 hours exposure suggest that the premature coating spallation in isolated areas may be related to the variation of defects in the coating between the samples. It is suspected that the cauliflower-type defects in the coating were presumably responsible for coating spallation in isolated areas. Thus, a defect free good quality coating is the key for the long-term durability of nanocrystalline coatings in corrosive environments. Thus, additional process optimization work is required to produce defect-free coatings prior to development of a coating application method for production parts.

J. Shingledecker; D. Gandy; N. Cheruvu; R. Wei; K. Chan

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

center in Nevada with REA250. State Nevada Objectives Develop and apply: (1) a Geologic Heat Exchanger (GHE) model, (2) a life-cycle model, and (3) a total system model. The GHE...

76

Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Council (NRC). 2007. Models in Environmentallimited or not available (NRC, 2007). The use of models hasthe late 19th century (NRC, 2007). In the area of transport

Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic of multi-megawatt turbines requires a new generation of modeling capability to assess individual turbine performance as well as detailed turbine- turbine and turbine-atmosphere interactions. Scientists

78

Position paper: Selecting among five common modelling approaches for integrated environmental assessment and management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and implementation of effective environmental policies need to be informed by a holistic understanding of the system processes (biophysical, social and economic), their complex interactions, and how they respond to various changes. Models, ... Keywords: Agent-based model, Bayesian network, Coupled component model, Integrated assessment, Knowledge-based model, System dynamics

Rebecca A. Kelly (Letcher), Anthony J. Jakeman, Olivier Barreteau, Mark E. Borsuk, Sondoss Elsawah, Serena H. Hamilton, Hans JøRgen Henriksen, Sakari Kuikka, Holger R. Maier, Andrea Emilio Rizzoli, Hedwig Van Delden, Alexey A. Voinov

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Informatic Tools for Assessment of Data Completeness for Model ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials ... of Lithium Battery Materials LiMPO4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni): A Comparative ... Forming-Crush Simulation Optimization Using Internal State Variable Model.

80

Assessment of Solution Uncertainties in Single-Column Modeling Frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-column models (SCMs) have been extensively promoted in recent years as an effective means to develop and test physical parameterizations targeted for more complex three-dimensional climate models. Although there are some clear advantages ...

James J. Hack; John A. Pedretti

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessment of reduced mechanisms using One Dimensional Stochastic Turbulence model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermochemical information Semi-empirical methods Chemical kinetics information Detail chemical kinetics mechanism Transport model Transport parameters Computational simulation

Chien, Li-Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Agency/Company /Organization: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Maryland, Joint Global Change Research Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry, Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application

84

IMAGE: An integrated model to assess the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book is the result of a research project entitled Reference Function for Global Air Pollution CO{sub 2}. It deals with the description of a computer simulation model of the greenhouse effect. This model, IMAGE, tries to capture the fundamentals of the complex problem of climate change in a simplified way. The model is a multidisciplinary product and is based on knowledge from disciplines as economics, atmospheric chemistry, marine and terrestrial biogeochemistry, ecology, climatology, and glaciology. This book might be of interest to any one working in the broad field of climate change. Furthermore, it can be useful for model builders, simulation experts, and mathematicians.

Rotmans, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integration of agricultural and energy system models for biofuel assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a coupled modeling framework to capture the dynamic linkages between agricultural and energy markets that have been enhanced through the expansion of biofuel production, as well as the environmental impacts resulting from this expansion. ... Keywords: Agricultural markets, Biofuels, Energy systems, Environment, Modeling

A. Elobeid, S. Tokgoz, R. Dodder, T. Johnson, O. Kaplan, L. Kurkalova, S. Secchi

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Model for Assessment and Remediation of Sediments (MARS): Four Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model for the Assessment and Remediation of Sediments (MARS) provides a new tool for modeling contaminated surface water sediments. With quantitative screening level analysis capabilities, the model is tailored for application to contaminated sediment sites and is applicable to tidal and non-tidal rivers. MARS consists of three interconnected hydrodynamic, sediment, and chemical fate and transport models. Together, these models simulate the fate and transport of organic compounds, while allowing eval...

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Conceptual design of an integrated technology model for carbon policy assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the conceptual design of a technology choice model for understanding strategies to reduce carbon intensity in the electricity sector. The report considers the major modeling issues affecting technology policy assessment and defines an implementable model construct. Further, the report delineates the basis causal structure of such a model and attempts to establish the technical/algorithmic viability of pursuing model development along with the associated analyses.

Backus, George A.; Dimotakes, Paul E. (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Treatment of Parameter and Modeling Uncertainty for Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both the industry and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) incorporate risk concepts and techniques into activities for effective risk management. The NRC is using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in its regulatory activities in a manner that promotes consistency, predictability, and efficiency in the performance of the NRCs roles of risk manager and protector of public health and safety. The nuclear industry uses PRA to identify and manage risks, as a tool to promote efficient regulatory inte...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Implementing and assessing computational modeling in introductory mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Students taking introductory physics are rarely exposed to computational modeling. In a one-semester large lecture introductory calculus-based mechanics course at Georgia Tech, students learned to solve physics problems using the VPython programming environment. During the term 1357 students in this course solved a suite of fourteen computational modeling homework questions delivered using an online commercial course management system. Their proficiency with computational modeling was evaluated in a proctored environment using a novel central force problem. The majority of students (60.4%) successfully completed the evaluation. Analysis of erroneous student-submitted programs indicated that a small set of student errors explained why most programs failed. We discuss the design and implementation of the computational modeling homework and evaluation, the results from the evaluation and the implications for instruction in computational modeling in introductory STEM courses.

Caballero, Marcos D; Schatz, Michael F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Experiences with early life-cycle performance modeling for architecture assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe our preliminary experiences of a performance modeling "Blending" approach for early life-cycle architecture assessment and risk mitigation in a large enterprise integration project. The goal was to use performance modeling to ... Keywords: blended performance modeling, early life-cycle risk mitigation

Paul C. Brebner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Assessment of reduced mechanisms using One Dimensional Stochastic Turbulence model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbulence model for a syngas jet flame. Proceeding of FallKerstein 2002), a turbulent syngas (CO/H2/NO) jet flame wasand DNS results of the syngas jet flame was recently done

Chien, Li-Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model for critical facilities in combating the terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical facility vulnerability assessment is a highly complex strategic activity in combating the terrorism and necessitates a structured quantified methodology to support the decision-making process in defense planning. In the system perspective, the ... Keywords: Airport, Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM), Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model (FIVAM), Fuzzy set theory, Interdependency, Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART), Terrorism

Ilker Akgun; Ahmet Kandakoglu; Ahmet Fahri Ozok

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery; published 30 January 2004. [1] Solar radiation assessment by satellite is constrained by physical.4 and 1.3 MJ mÃ?2 for daily irradiation). A comparison with monthly means from about 80 automatic weather

94

The Development and Assessment of a Model-, Grid-, and Basin-Independent Tropical Cyclone Detection Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach to tropical cyclone (TC) detection in coarse-resolution numerical model data is introduced and assessed. This approach differs from traditional detectors in two main ways. First, it was developed and tuned using 20 yr of ECMWF ...

K. J. Tory; S. S. Chand; R. A. Dare; J. L. McBride

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Parameterization of PBL Processes in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model: Description and Preliminary Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the basic features of a newly developed planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization, and the performance assessment of a version of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Atmospheric General Circulation Model (...

Celal S. Konor; Gabriel Cazes Boezio; Carlos R. Mechoso; Akio Arakawa

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Assessing 1D Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to assess the performance of 1D solar radiative transfer codes that are used currently both for research and in weather and climate models. Emphasis is on interpretation and handling of unresolved clouds. ...

H. W. Barker; G. L. Stephens; P. T. Partain; J. W. Bergman; B. Bonnel; K. Campana; E. E. Clothiaux; S. Clough; S. Cusack; J. Delamere; J. Edwards; K. F. Evans; Y. Fouquart; S. Freidenreich; V. Galin; Y. Hou; S. Kato; J. Li; E. Mlawer; J.-J. Morcrette; W. O'Hirok; P. Räisänen; V. Ramaswamy; B. Ritter; E. Rozanov; M. Schlesinger; K. Shibata; P. Sporyshev; Z. Sun; M. Wendisch; N. Wood; F. Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

An investigation into the use of biokinetic models when assessing intakes of plutonium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of internal dosimetry is to assess the dose to an individual from an intake of a radionuclide. This usually encompasses assessing the intake amount based on some form of bioassay measurement used with a biokinetic model. There are many published biokinetic models that describe the transfer of radionuclides throughout the body. It would be beneficial at times if one could interchange certain biokinetic models with another to assess an intake based on bioassay data to save time and make calculations simpler. This research compared the daily excretion rates by interchanging widely used biokinetic models in different combinations. These model combinations were then used to assess an unknown intake of a case study. It was shown that the ICRP-30 and ICRP-66 respiratory tract models can only be interchanged at specific times post intake to give similar excretion results from an inhalation intake. It is feasible to interchange the ICRP-67 plutonium systemic model or the newer Luciani and Polig plutonium systemic model to assess an intake based on fecal bioassay data, but not urine bioassay data for ingestion intakes. It is not feasible to interchange the systemic models when assessing intakes from a wound or injection. Using different combinations of biokinetic models predicted intakes within 30% for a case study which included a relatively long inhalation chronic intake followed by a much shorter chronic inhalation intake. It was shown that the predicted initial chronic intake for each combination of models gave fecal excretion values which deviated the most from the worker's fecal bioassay data. This could mean that the biokinetic models yield inaccurate excretion rates for long chronic intakes.

Hrycushko, Brian Andrew

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessing Future Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon Using CMIP3 Models: Results from the Best Model Ensemble  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future changes in the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have been estimated from the six best-performing models in phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) included in the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental ...

Kyong-Hwan Seo; Jung Ok

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An Assessment of Radiation Damage Models and Methods  

SciTech Connect

The current state of development of the primary models used for investigating and simulating irradiation effects in structural alloys of interest to the U.S. DOE's Generation-IV reactor program are discussed. The underlying theory that supports model development is also described where appropriate. First, the key processes that underlie radiation-induced changes in material properties are summarized, and the types of radiation effects that subsequently arise are described. Future development work needed in order for theory, modeling, and computational materials science to support and add value to the Gen IV reactor materials program are then outlined. The expected specific outcomes and overall benefits of the required effort are: the knowledge to extrapolate material behavior to conditions for which there are no experimental data; systematic understanding of mechanisms and processes to enable confident interpolation between point-by-point experimental observations; acceleration of the development, selection, and qualification of materials for reactor service; and prediction of material response to real-world operating load histories which often involve a complicated superposition of time, temperature, radiation dose rate, and mechanical loading conditions. Opportunities for international collaboration to accelerate progress in all of the required research areas are briefly discussed, particularly in the context of two well coordinated, broad-based research projects on modeling and simulation of radiation effects on materials that are currently funded in Europe. In addition to providing the opportunity for substantial leveraging of the DOE-funded activities in this area, these projects may serve as models for future development within the Gen-IV program. The larger of these two projects, which involves 12 European research laboratories and 16 universities, is called PERFECT and is funded by the European Union. A smaller effort focusing on developing predictive models for fusion reactor materials is funded within the United Kingdom. Increased formal collaboration with these projects by DOE-funded materials scientists would be of substantial benefit to the Gen-IV program.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Climate Coalitions in an IntegratedAssessment Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytically tractable approximation of a numerical model is used to investigate coalition formation between nine major world regions with regard to their policies for greenhouse gas emission reduction. Full cooperation is not individually rational. ... Keywords: LQ games, climate change, coalition formation, optimal emission control

Richard S. J. Tol

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic conditions with turbine models covering the range of scales important for wind plant dynamics to help address the impacts that upwind turbines have on turbines in their wake and give greater insight into overall wind

104

The Lifecycle of Bayesian Network Models Developed for Multi-Source Signature Assessment of Nuclear Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multi-Source Signatures for Nuclear Programs project, part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Signature Discovery Initiative, seeks to computationally capture expert assessment of multi-type information such as text, sensor output, imagery, or audio/video files, to assess nuclear activities through a series of Bayesian network (BN) models. These models incorporate knowledge from a diverse range of information sources in order to help assess a country’s nuclear activities. The models span engineering topic areas, state-level indicators, and facility-specific characteristics. To illustrate the development, calibration, and use of BN models for multi-source assessment, we present a model that predicts a country’s likelihood to participate in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime. We validate this model by examining the extent to which the model assists non-experts arrive at conclusions similar to those provided by nuclear proliferation experts. We also describe the PNNL-developed software used throughout the lifecycle of the Bayesian network model development.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; White, Amanda M.; Whitney, Paul D.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sego, Landon H.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM-FR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM is required to maintain water supplies while water is essential to produce energy. However, the models and energy generally dealt with them separately, the two resources are highly interconnected. Energy

106

Probabilistic versus possibilistic risk assessment models for optimal service level agreements in grid computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a probabilistic and a possibilistic model for assessing the risk of a service level agreement for a computing task in a cluster/grid environment. These models can also be applied to cloud computing. Using the predictive probabilistic approach ... Keywords: Grid and cloud computing, Predictive possibilities, Predictive probabilities, Service level agreement (SLA)

Christer Carlsson; Robert Fullér

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

High-performance computing tools for the integrated assessment and modelling of social-ecological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated spatio-temporal assessment and modelling of complex social-ecological systems is required to address global environmental challenges. However, the computational demands of this modelling are unlikely to be met by traditional Geographic Information ... Keywords: AML, CPU, Cluster, Concurrency, Environmental, GIS, GPU, Global challenges, Graphics processing unit (GPU), Grid, HPC, Multi-core, NPV, Parallel programming

Brett A. Bryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Preliminary assessment of an oil-spill trajectory model using satellite-tracked, oil-spill-simulating drifters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ninety-seven oil-spill-simulating drifters were deployed over the continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico during five hydrographic surveys conducted from 1997 through 1999. Earlier, comparisons with spilled crude petroleum on the ocean surface ... Keywords: Model assessment, Model verification, Oil-spill model, Oil-spill model assessment, Oil-spill model verification, Statistical oil-spill model, Trajectory model

James M. Price; Mark Reed; Matthew K. Howard; Walter R. Johnson; Zhen-Gang Ji; Charles F. Marshall; Norman L. Guinasso, Jr.; Gail B. Rainey

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of advanced nanocrystalline coating systems and development of diffusion barrier interlayer coatings. Among the diffusion interlayer coatings evaluated, the TiN interlayer coating was found to be the optimum one. This report describes the research conducted under the Task 3 workscope.

David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Modeling of Digital Instrumentation and Control in Nuclear Power Plant Probabilistic Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) typically models hardware components in terms of their failure probability and the effects that any given component failure has on the system it resides in. Digital systems, which include both hardware and software, bring new modeling challenges: determination of the appropriate level of detail to use in the logic models, and estimation of failure rates for software components. Failure probabilities for hardware are typically based on operating experience with componen...

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

APPENDIX: TUNED MODELS OF PEER ASSESSMENT IN MOOCS CHRIS PIECH, JONATHAN HUANG, ZHENGHAO CHEN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in our paper. 1. Gibbs sampling for Model PG1 Model PG1 is given as follows: (Reliability) v G(0, 0APPENDIX: TUNED MODELS OF PEER ASSESSMENT IN MOOCS CHRIS PIECH, JONATHAN HUANG, ZHENGHAO CHEN: P(Z|{su}uU ,{bv}vG, {v}vG) = u P(su|µ0, 0) · v P(bv|0) · P(v|0, 0) zv u P(zv u|su, bv, v

Pratt, Vaughan

113

Environmental radiation dose criteria and assessment: pathway modeling and surveillance  

SciTech Connect

From nuclear science symposium; San Francisco, California, USA (14 Nov 1973). The controversy in recent years over the extent of the risk to the public from environmental radioactivity attributable to nuclear facilities (in particular nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing facilities) has resulted in a lowering of previously acceptable environmental radiation levels. The proposal by the AEC to limit effluents from light-water-cooled nuclear reactors so that the exposure of any individual in the public would not exceed 5 mR/yr, and the pronouncement by the BEIR Committee that the current environmental radiation protection guides are unnecessarily high, are illustrative. In turn the AEC has issued a Safety Guide calling for considerable refinement in the measuring and reporting of effluents from nuclear power plants, and has only recently issued a counterpart dealing with the measuring and reporting of radioactivity in the environs of nuclear power plants. The EPA has also recently issued a guide for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity. Currently, power reactor operators are being required by the AEC Regulatory Staff to conduct detailed, sensitive environmental surveillance. Much of this appears to be based on extremely conservative assumptions throughout, including doseeffect relationships, exposure situations, pathway models, reconcentration factors and intakes, which cannot be substantiated when examined in the light of current experience in the vicinity of existing power reactors. The expenditures occasioned by the required additional in-plant features necessary to meet the currently proposed effluent release criteria appear difficult to justify on a reasonable basis. Environmental monitoring at the proposed concentration limits appear even more excessive in terms of dollars per man-rem of potential dose commitment. (auth)

Hull, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SOCIAL MODELING IN ASSESSEMENT OF A STATE’S PROPENSITY FOR NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents approach for assessing a State’s propensity for nuclear weapons proliferation using social modeling. We supported this modeling by first reviewing primarily literature by social scientists on factors related to the propensity of a State to proliferation and by leveraging existing relevant data compiled by social scientists. We performed a number of validation tests on our model including one that incorporates use of benchmark data defining the proliferation status of countries in the years between 1945 and 2000. We exercise the BN model against a number of country cases representing different perceived levels of proliferation risk. We also describe how the BN model could be further refined to be a proliferation assessment tool for decision making.

Dalton, Angela C.; Whitney, Paul D.; Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Assessing the Performance of Multiple Regional Climate Model Simulations for Seasonal Mountain Snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the performance of the regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) for the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB), U.S. Rocky Mountains. The UCRB is a major ...

Nadine Salzmann; Linda O. Mearns

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Assessment of RANS-based turbulent combustion models for prediction of gas turbine emissions: turbulence model and reaction mechanism effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to assess current, commonly applied turbulence and combustion models with respect to their performance in gas-turbine combustion (GTC). Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-based turbulence and chemistry models are two primary factors influencing the uncertainty in predicting turbulent combustion characteristics, especially for GTC. RANS-based methods are the design tools of choice in the gas turbine industry due to the high computational costs of LES (Large Eddy Simulation). In this study, lean premixed combustion of methane was simulated using two different reduced mechanisms (ARM9 and ARM19) along with the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) turbulent chemistry interaction model to calculate the CO and NOx emissions. The effect of turbulence models was assessed by considering two different models. Both of the models tested performed well in the prediction of temperature and major species profiles. Predicted values of NO emission profiles showed an average difference of ±5 ppm compared to experimental values. Computed intermediate species profiles showed large qualitative and quantitative errors when compared with the experimental data. These discrepancies, especially the intermediate species hydrogen, indicate the challenges these reduced mechanisms and turbulence models can present when modeling pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors.

Nanduri, J.R.; Celik, I.B.; Strakey, P.A.; Parsons, D.R.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A three-story prototype commercial building model for energy standard development and assessment  

SciTech Connect

Annual hourly simulation programs are generally used in the development and assessment of the impacts of building energy standards. These simulation programs require the specification of a building model as input to the simulation. Results of the simulations are sensitive to the building model, so care must be taken in the choice of the model to ensure representative results. A three-story prototype commercial building model is being used in developing requirements for the revision of ASHRAE Standard 90.1. The prototype is generic but has the capability to represent a broad range of commercial building types, sizes, orientations, and aspect ratios.

Jarnagin, R.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

119

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LTR-2012/390 LTR-2012/390 Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment R. E. Stoller, A. V. Barashev, and S. I. Golubov Materials Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Prepared for: Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy September 2012 ORNL/LTR-2012/390 1 Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment Abstract Recent experimental observations have made it clear that cavity formation can occur in light-water reactor internal components fabricated from austenitic stainless during the course of their service life. In order to assess the potential for cavity swelling

120

Assessment of PWR Steam Generator modelling in RELAP5/MOD2. International Agreement Report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of Steam Generator (SG) modelling in the PWR thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD2 is presented. The assessment is based on a review of code assessment calculations performed in the UK and elsewhere, detailed calculations against a series of commissioning tests carried out on the Wolf Creek PWR and analytical investigations of the phenomena involved in normal and abnormal SG operation. A number of modelling deficiencies are identified and their implications for PWR safety analysis are discussed -- including methods for compensating for the deficiencies through changes to the input deck. Consideration is also given as to whether the deficiencies will still be present in the successor code RELAP5/MOD3.

Putney, J.M.; Preece, R.J. [National Power, Leatherhead (GB). Technology and Environment Centre

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

122

Assessment of seismic resistance of a basilica-type church under earthquake loading: Modelling and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a finite element methodology for the static and dynamic non-linear analysis of historical masonry structures is described and applied to a case study. A basilica-type masonry church is analysed in order to assess its structural behaviour ... Keywords: Earthquake loading, FE modeling seismic vulnerability, Historical masonry building, Non-linear analysis, Strengthening techniques

Michele Betti; Andrea Vignoli

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

An AHP-Based assessment model for clinical diagnosis and decision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many scholars trying to diagnose the disease using intelligent computers and computer networks, in order to meet the growing needs of patients. Most of them diagnose disease based on the patients' symptoms, the collected medical data and some ... Keywords: analytic hierarchy process, assessment model, clinical decision support system (CDSS)

Qingshan Li; Lihang Zhang; Hua Chu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hybrid Kansei-SOM model using risk management and company assessment for stock trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk management and stock assessment are key methods for stock trading decisions. In this paper, we present a new stock trading method using Kansei evaluation integrated with a Self-Organizing Map model for improvement of a stock trading system. The ... Keywords: Hybrid intelligent trading system, Investment risk, Kansei evaluation, Risk management, Self-Organizing Map, Stock trading system

Hai V. Pham, Eric W. Cooper, Thang Cao, Katsuari Kamei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Solving the problem of inadequate scoring rules for assessing probabilistic football forecast models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solving the problem of inadequate scoring rules for assessing probabilistic football forecast forecasting models, and the relative simplicity of the outcome of such forecasts (they require only three their forecast accuracy. Moreover, the various scoring rules used for validation in previous studies

Fenton, Norman

126

Regional residual plots for assessing the fit of linear regression models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intuitively appealing lack-of-fit test to assess the adequacy of a regression model is introduced together with a graphical diagnostic tool. The graphical method itself includes a formal testing procedure, and, it is particularly useful to detect ... Keywords: Diagnostic tool, Graphical method, Lack-of-fit, Multiple regression

E. Deschepper; O. Thas; J. P. Ottoy

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Assessment of Value Added for Surface Marine Wind Speed Obtained from Two Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hindcasts with reanalysis-driven regional climate models (RCMs) are a common tool to assess weather statistics (i.e., climate) and recent changes and trends. The capability of different state-of-the-art RCMs (with and without spectral nudging ...

Jörg Winterfeldt; Ralf Weisse

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

GROW1: a crop growth model for assessing impacts of gaseous pollutants from geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary model of photosynthesis and growth of field crops was developed to assess the effects of gaseous pollutants, particularly airborne sulfur compounds, resulting from energy production from geothermal resources. The model simulates photosynthesis as a function of such variables as irradiance, CO/sub 2/ diffusion resistances, and internal biochemical processes. The model allocates the products of photosynthesis to structural (leaf, stem, root, and fruit) and storage compartments of the plant. The simulations encompass the entire growing season from germination to senescence. The model is described conceptually and mathematically and examples of model output are provided for various levels of pollutant stress. Also, future developments that would improve this preliminary model are outlined and its applications are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Preliminary assessment of PWR Steam Generator modelling in RELAP5/MOD3. International Agreeement Report  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary assessment of Steam Generator (SG) modelling in the PWR thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD3 is presented. The study is based on calculations against a series of steady-state commissioning tests carried out on the Wolf Creek PWR over a range of load conditions. Data from the tests are used to assess the modelling of primary to secondary side heat transfer and, in particular, to examine the effect of reverting to the standard form of the Chen heat transfer correlation in place of the modified form applied in RELAP5/MOD2. Comparisons between the two versions of the code are also used to show how the new interphase drag model in RELAP5/MOD3 affects the calculation of SG liquid inventory and the void fraction profile in the riser.

Preece, R.J.; Putney, J.M. [National Power, Leatherhead (United Kingdom). Technology and Environment Centre

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Development of Standardized Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Shutdown Operations Integrated in SPAR Level 1 Model  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear plant operating experience and several studies show that the risk from shutdown operation during Modes 4, 5, and 6 at pressurized water reactors and Modes 4 and 5 at boiling water reactors can be significant. This paper describes using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s full-power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development of risk evaluation models for commercial nuclear power plants. The shutdown models are integrated with their respective internal event at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the SPAR full-power model with shutdown event tree logic. Preliminary human reliability analysis results indicate that risk is dominated by the operator’s ability to correctly diagnose events and initiate systems.

S. T. Khericha; J. Mitman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An Integrated Assessment of Measured and Modeled Integrated Water Vapor in Switzerland for the Period 2001–03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper an integrated assessment of the vertically integrated water vapor (IWV) measured by radiosonde, microwave radiometer (MWR), and GPS and modeled by the limited-area mesoscale model of MeteoSwiss is presented. The different IWV ...

G. Guerova; E. Brockmann; F. Schubiger; J. Morland; C. Mätzler

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Meteorological Model BOLAM at the National Observatory of Athens: Assessment of Two-Year Operational Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since November 1999, the hydrostatic meteorological Bologna Limited-Area Model (BOLAM) has been running operationally at the National Observatory of Athens. The assessment of the model forecast skill during the 2-yr period included (a) ...

K. Lagouvardos; V. Kotroni; A. Koussis; H. Feidas; A. Buzzi; P. Malguzzi

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints near an injection well have potential to divert a large percentage of an injected CO{sub 2} stream away from a target coal seam. However, the strata-bound nature of Pottsville fracture systems is a natural factor that mitigates the risk of long-range leakage and surface seepage. Flow models indicate that cross-formational flow in strata-bound joint networks is low and is dissipated by about an order of magnitude at each successive bedding contact. These models help confirm that strata-bound joint networks are self-compartmentalizing and that the thick successions of interbedded shale and sandstone separating the Pottsville coal zones are confining units that protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. DFN models are powerful tools for the simulation and analysis of fracture networks and can play an important role in the assessment of risks associated with carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Importantly, the stochastic nature DFN models dictates that they cannot be used to precisely reproduce reservoir conditions in a specific field area. Rather, these models are most useful for simulating the fundamental geometric and statistical properties of fracture networks. Because the specifics of fracture architecture in a given area can be uncertain, multiple realizations of DFN models and DFN-based flow models can help define variability that may be encountered during field operations. Using this type of approach, modelers can inform the risk assessment process by characterizing the types and variability of fracture architecture that may exist in geologic carbon sinks containing natural fractures.

Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Statistical Model to Assess Indirect CO2 Emissions of the UAE Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a regional bottom-up model for assessing space cooling energy and related greenhouse gas emissions. The model was developed with the aim of improving the quality and quantity of cooling energy and emission data, especially for the benefit of local decision making. Based on a benchmarking study, a representative archetype was developed, simulation software used and linear statistical model constructed. This model explores the way in which CO2 emission levels are affected by different energy efficiency measures to reduce cooling energy consumption in buildings. The analysis showed that improving building energy efficiency could generate considerable carbon emissions reduction credits with competitive benefit. The developed model was found to be capable in selecting cost-effective, environmentally-preferred building efficiency measures and evaluating the future trend of CO2 emissions in the residential building of Al-Ain city.

Radhi, H.; Fikry, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Advances in bayesian modelling and computation: spatio-temporal processes, model assessment and adaptive mcmc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modelling and analysis of complex stochastic systems with increasingly large data sets, state-spaces and parameters provides major stimulus to research in Bayesian nonparametric methods and Bayesian computation. This dissertation presents ...

Chunlin Ji / Mike West

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling Project Description The University of Nevada - Reno (UNR), proposes to develop a new, integrated solution technique for simulating the Thermal, Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical (THMC) processes relevant to thermal energy extraction from an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). UNR defines the great challenges in numerical modeling as to (1) dealing with flows and transport in the stimulated fractures of the EGS of largely unknown geometry and characteristics; and (2) discovering the best possible cooling fluid circulation solution in the EGS by trial-and-error numerical simulations. The new THMC will have an adaptive, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) component, integrated with the THMC rockmass model in order to match field test signatures, or desired outcomes in design hypothesis test. The project's main hypothesis is that there are new solutions to heat extraction from an as-created, enhanced fracture system of EGS. The project will develop a new THMC simulation model with new capabilities and prove the main hypothesis by and applying it to various EGS designs including emerging concepts, two-phase (steam-gas-liquid) coolant flows in the fracture network, and dynamic, huff-puff operations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.  

SciTech Connect

Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

Silva, Consuelo Juanita

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Modeling s-t Path Availability to Support Disaster Vulnerability Assessment of Network Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The maintenance of system flow is critical for effective network operation. Any type of disruption to network facilities (arcs/nodes) potentially risks loss of service, leaving users without access to important resources. It is therefore an important goal of planners to assess infrastructures for vulnerabilities, identifying those vital nodes/arcs whose debilitation would compromise the most source-sink (s-t) interaction or system flow. Due to the budgetary limitations of disaster management agencies, protection/fortification and planning for the recovery of these vital infrastructure facilities is a logical and efficient proactive approach to reducing worst-case risk of service disruption. Given damage to a network, evaluating the potential for flow between s-t pairs requires assessing the availability of an operational s-t path. Recent models proposed for identifying infrastructure vital to system flow have relied on enumeration of all s-t paths to support this task. This paper proposes an alternative model...

Matisziw, Timothy C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Computational Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra-Supercritical Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler water walls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for ultra-supercritical application to mitigate corrosion because these boilers will operate at much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical boilers.Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potentialFe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Program on Technology Innovation: Cumulative Risk Assessment of Urban Air Toxics: Pilot Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative risk modeling for estimating the burden of exposure to urban air toxics requires consideration of a range of factors influencing population health. These factors include multiple toxic compounds, a variety of pollutant sources, background levels of air pollutants, and non-chemical stressors not historically considered in regulatory risk assessments. To date, quantitative methods to account for all these factors remain sporadic and relatively untested. However, the United States ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

Technical Basis and Benchmarking of the Crud Deposition Risk Assessment Model (CORAL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. To facilitate improved management of any crud-related fuel performance risk, EPRI has developed the Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL (CORAL). CORAL incorporates a modified version of the Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors ...

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

An application of probabilistic safety assessment methods to model aircraft systems and accidents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A case study modeling the thrust reverser system (TRS) in the context of the fatal accident of a Boeing 767 is presented to illustrate the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment methods. A simplified risk model consisting of an event tree with supporting fault trees was developed to represent the progression of the accident, taking into account the interaction between the TRS and the operating crew during the accident, and the findings of the accident investigation. A feasible sequence of events leading to the fatal accident was identified. Several insights about the TRS and the accident were obtained by applying PSA methods. Changes proposed for the TRS also are discussed.

Martinez-Guridi, G.; Hall, R.E.; Fullwood, R.R.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development of hydrogeological modelling approaches for assessment of consequences of hazardous accidents at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces some modeling approaches for predicting the influence of hazardous accidents at nuclear reactors on groundwater quality. Possible pathways for radioactive releases from nuclear power plants were considered to conceptualize boundary conditions for solving the subsurface radionuclides transport problems. Some approaches to incorporate physical-and-chemical interactions into transport simulators have been developed. The hydrogeological forecasts were based on numerical and semi-analytical scale-dependent models. They have been applied to assess the possible impact of the nuclear power plants designed in Russia on groundwater reservoirs.

Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pereverzeva, S.A. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling Spectral Dissipation in the Evolution of Wind Waves. Part I: Assessment of Existing Model Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the performance of a state-of-the-art spectral wind wave model that uses a full solution to the nonlinear interaction source term. The situation investigated here is fetch-limited wind wave evolution, for which a significant ...

M. L. Banner; I. R. Young

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Using Van Manen's model to assess levels of reflectivity among preservice physical education teachers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intent of this study was two-fold. The first purpose was to apply Van Manen's model to specific strategies (i.e., written assignments) and supervisory practices (i.e., interviews) to examine levels of reflectivity demonstrated and if there were any changes in the reflectivity of student teachers throughout a student teaching period. The second purpose was to assess the applicability of Van Manen's model to a preservice physical education setting. Five physical education majors enrolled in a student teaching experience volunteered to participate. Five weekly web-based written assignments were selected and analyzed using Van Manen's model of reflection. In addition, two interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and subjected to thematic analysis techniques. Using Naturalistic Inquiry as a method of analysis suggests that utilizing supervisory approaches, written assignments, and reflective teaching can foster important changes in reflectivity levels which encourage reflective thinking in physical education student teachers. Increased levels of sophistication among the participants as the semester progressed were noted and may be attributed to a developmental effect similar to Fuller's Concerns Theory. The results also support Pultorak's (1993) assertion that students can increase reflective thinking when fostered and encouraged in preservice programs. This study combines available resources (i.e., technology, supervisors) with Van Manen's model to assess reflectivity levels in a physical education setting. Findings indicate that Van Manen's model can be used objectively in a physical education setting and can be utilized in applying a quantitative measure to qualitative responses.

Ballard, Kristy Kay

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for BWR Shutdown Modes 4 and 5 Integrated in SPAR Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear plant operating experience and several studies show that the risk from shutdown operation during modes 4, 5, and 6 can be significant This paper describes development of the standard template risk evaluation models for shutdown modes 4, and 5 for commercial boiling water nuclear power plants (BWR). The shutdown probabilistic risk assessment model uses full power Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The shutdown PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from SPAR full power model with shutdown event tree logic. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheet, including the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate HEP of interest. The preliminary results indicate the risk is dominated by the operator’s ability to diagnose the events and provide long term cooling.

S. T. Khericha; S. Sancakter; J. Mitman; J. Wood

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the study’s results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by radionuclide releases) of waste disposal facilities and decommissioning sites.

Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Review of uncertainty estimates associated with models for assessing the impact of breeder reactor radioactivity releases  

SciTech Connect

The purpose is to summarize estimates based on currently available data of the uncertainty associated with radiological assessment models. The models being examined herein are those recommended previously for use in breeder reactor assessments. Uncertainty estimates are presented for models of atmospheric and hydrologic transport, terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and internal and external dosimetry. Both long-term and short-term release conditions are discussed. The uncertainty estimates presented in this report indicate that, for many sites, generic models and representative parameter values may be used to calculate doses from annual average radionuclide releases when these calculated doses are on the order of one-tenth or less of a relevant dose limit. For short-term, accidental releases, especially those from breeder reactors located in sites dominated by complex terrain and/or coastal meteorology, the uncertainty in the dose calculations may be much larger than an order of magnitude. As a result, it may be necessary to incorporate site-specific information into the dose calculation under these circumstances to reduce this uncertainty. However, even using site-specific information, natural variability and the uncertainties in the dose conversion factor will likely result in an overall uncertainty of greater than an order of magnitude for predictions of dose or concentration in environmental media following shortterm releases.

Miller, C.; Little, C.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Modelling steam explosions for the Savannah River Site reactor probabilistic risk assessment. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors, a theoretical model has been used to evaluate the magnitude of steam explosions that could occur during postulated severe accidents at the plant. The model predicts pressure, steam generation and mechanical work during the explosion phase of the interaction. The model is applied to two hypothetical events illustrating typical small-scale and large-scale explosions found in the PRA. These two examples show that yield predictions may range from megajoules to gigajoules for kinetic energy, 10 to 1000 kg for steam generated, and 10 to 1000 atm for peak explosion-zone pressures. A brief study is made to characterize the sensitivity of kinetic energy yield to initial fuel mass and fuel temperature. Explosion kinetic energy increases linearly in proportion to fuel mass, but displays a non-linear dependence on fuel temperature over parameter values of interest.

Vonderfecht, B.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, D.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modelling steam explosions for the Savannah River Site reactor probabilistic risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors, a theoretical model has been used to evaluate the magnitude of steam explosions that could occur during postulated severe accidents at the plant. The model predicts pressure, steam generation and mechanical work during the explosion phase of the interaction. The model is applied to two hypothetical events illustrating typical small-scale and large-scale explosions found in the PRA. These two examples show that yield predictions may range from megajoules to gigajoules for kinetic energy, 10 to 1000 kg for steam generated, and 10 to 1000 atm for peak explosion-zone pressures. A brief study is made to characterize the sensitivity of kinetic energy yield to initial fuel mass and fuel temperature. Explosion kinetic energy increases linearly in proportion to fuel mass, but displays a non-linear dependence on fuel temperature over parameter values of interest.

Vonderfecht, B.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Smith, D.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Multi-State Physics Models of Aging Passive Components in Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Multi-state Markov modeling has proved to be a promising approach to estimating the reliability of passive components - particularly metallic pipe components - in the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). These models consider the progressive degradation of a component through a series of observable discrete states, such as detectable flaw, leak and rupture. Service data then generally provides the basis for estimating the state transition rates. Research in materials science is producing a growing understanding of the physical phenomena that govern the aging degradation of passive pipe components. As a result, there is an emerging opportunity to incorporate these insights into PRA. This paper describes research conducted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Pathway of the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. A state transition model is described that addresses aging behavior associated with stress corrosion cracking in ASME Class 1 dissimilar metal welds – a component type relevant to LOCA analysis. The state transition rate estimates are based on physics models of weld degradation rather than service data. The resultant model is found to be non-Markov in that the transition rates are time-inhomogeneous and stochastic. Numerical solutions to the model provide insight into the effect of aging on component reliability.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

157

Assessment of the Regional Climate Model Version 3 over the Maritime Continent Using Different Cumulus Parameterization and Land Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an assessment of the Regional Climate Model, version 3 (RegCM3), coupled to two land surface schemes: the Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer System, version 1e (BATS1e), and the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS). The model’s ...

Rebecca L. Gianotti; Dongfeng Zhang; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A New User-Friendly Model to Reduce Cost for Headwater Benefits Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Headwater benefits at a downstream hydropower project are energy gains that are derived from the installation of upstream reservoirs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is required by law to assess charges of such energy gains to downstream owners of non-federal hydropower projects. The high costs of determining headwater benefits prohibit the use of a complicated model in basins where the magnitude of the benefits is expected to be small. This paper presents a new user-friendly computer model, EFDAM (Enhanced Flow Duration Analysis Method), that not only improves the accuracy of the standard flow duration method but also reduces costs for determining headwater benefits. The EFDAM model includes a MS Windows-based interface module to provide tools for automating input data file preparation, linking and executing of a generic program, editing/viewing of input/output files, and application guidance. The EDFAM was applied to various river basins. An example was given to illustrate the main features of EFDAM application for creating input files and assessing headwater benefits at the Tulloch Hydropower Plant on the Stanislaus River Basin, California.

Bao, Y.S.; Cover, C.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.; Sarma, V.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

Assessing a Cloud Optical Depth Retrieval Algorithm with Model-Generated Data and the Frozen Turbulence Assumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud optical depth retrieval algorithm that utilizes time series of solar irradiance and zenith downwelling radiance data collected at a fixed surface site is assessed using model-generated cloud fields and simulated radiation measurements. To ...

H. W. Barker; C. F. Pavloski; M. Ovtchinnikov; E. E. Clothiaux

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

An Assessment of Possible Climate Change in the Australian Region Based on an Intercomparison of General Circulation Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The ...

P. H. Whetton; A. B. Pittock; M. R. Haylock; P. J. Rayner

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

Shott, G. J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Climate mitigation and the future of tropical landscapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use change to meet 21st Century demands for food, fuel, and fiber will occur in the context of both a changing climate as well as societal efforts to mitigate climate change. This changing natural and human environment will have large consequences for forest resources, terrestrial carbon storage and emissions, and food and energy crop production over the next century. Any climate change mitigation policies enacted will change the environment under which land-use decisions are made and alter global land use change patterns. Here we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to explore how climate mitigation policies that achieve a climate stabilization at 4.5 W m-2 radiative forcing in 2100 and value carbon in terrestrial ecosystems interact with future agricultural productivity and food and energy demands to influence land use in the tropics. The regional land use results are downscaled from GCAM regions to produce gridded maps of tropical land use change. We find that tropical forests are preserved only in cases where a climate mitigation policy that values terrestrial carbon is in place, and crop productivity growth continues throughout the century. Crop productivity growth is also necessary to avoid large scale deforestation globally and enable the production of bioenergy crops. The terrestrial carbon pricing assumptions in GCAM are effective at avoiding deforestation even when cropland must expand to meet future food demand.

Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Chini, Louise Parsons; Hurtt, George; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Frolking, Steve; Wise, Marshall A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Assessment of the feasibility of developing a Hanford Site weld modeling program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding on the Hanford Site is an everyday occurrence, and most of the weldments made on site are relatively straightforward. Groove geometries, fillers, and wleding techniques and parameters are normally decided by experience or handbook advice. However, there are other weldments that might employ new materials, as well as one-of-a-kind welding situations. Implementation of a verified analytical weld assessment method would allow optimization of weld metal and heat-affected zone microstructure, and of variables that affect structural deformation and residual stresses. Realistic prediction of weldment thermal and strain history will require the use of a finite element model. Microstructure and resultant properties can be predicted using complex computer-based microstructure evolution models, literature-based empirical equations, or experimentally established behaviors. This report examines the feasibility of developing analytical methods for establishing weld parameter envelopes in new, complex welded configurations.

Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Klein, R.F.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Use of whole building simulation in on-line performance assessment: Modeling and implementation issues  

SciTech Connect

The application of model-based performance assessment at the whole building level is explored. The information requirements for a simulation to predict the actual performance of a particular real building, as opposed to estimating the impact of design options, are addressed with particular attention to common sources of input error and important deficiencies in most simulation models. The role of calibrated simulations is discussed. The communication requirements for passive monitoring and active testing are identified and the possibilities for using control system communications protocols to link on-line simulation and energy management and control systems are discussed. The potential of simulation programs to act as ''plug-and-play'' components on building control networks is discussed.

Haves, Philip; Salsbury, Tim; Claridge, David; Liu, Mingsheng

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of whole building simulation in on-line performance assessment: Modeling and implementation issues  

SciTech Connect

The application of model-based performance assessment at the whole building level is explored. The information requirements for a simulation to predict the actual performance of a particular real building, as opposed to estimating the impact of design options, are addressed with particular attention to common sources of input error and important deficiencies in most simulation models. The role of calibrated simulations is discussed. The communication requirements for passive monitoring and active testing are identified and the possibilities for using control system communications protocols to link on-line simulation and energy management and control systems are discussed. The potential of simulation programs to act as ''plug-and-play'' components on building control networks is discussed.

Haves, Philip; Salsbury, Tim; Claridge, David; Liu, Mingsheng

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

Not Available

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

167

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS MODELING FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS OF SHALLOW LAND BURIAL OF LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 9243  

SciTech Connect

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was created to develop predictive capabilities for the aging of cementitious barriers over long timeframes. The CBP is a multi-agency, multi-national consortium working under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-21) funded Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as the lead laboratory. Members of the CBP are SRNL, Vanderbilt University, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (Canada), and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). A first step in developing advanced tools is to determine the current state-of-the-art. A review has been undertaken to assess the treatment of cementitious barriers in Performance Assessments (PA). Representatives of US DOE sites which have PAs for their low level waste disposal facilities were contacted. These sites are the Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada Test Site, and Hanford. Several of the more arid sites did not employ cementitious barriers. Of those sites which do employ cementitious barriers, a wide range of treatment of the barriers in a PA was present. Some sites used conservative, simplistic models that even though conservative still showed compliance with disposal limits. Other sites used much more detailed models to demonstrate compliance. These more detailed models tend to be correlation-based rather than mechanistically-based. With the US DOE's Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group (LFRG) moving towards embracing a risk-based, best estimate with an uncertainties type of analysis, the conservative treatment of the cementitious barriers seems to be obviated. The CBP is creating a tool that adheres to the LFRG chairman's paradigm of continuous improvement.

Taylor, G

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion the bioreactor. This provides the dimension of K. The method is applied to data from an anaerobic digestion can be obtained with 2 biomasses. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; Bioreactors; Modelling; Nonlinear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

Linear modeling and simulation of low-voltage electric system for single-point vulnerability assessment of military installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the formulation and development of a linear model to support the single-point vulnerability assessment of electric distribution systems at existing and future U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) military sites. The model uses flow sensitivity ...

Edgar C. Portante; Thomas N. Taxon; James A. Kavicky; Tarek Abdallah; Timothy K. Perkins

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of a Water Runoff Model for Pakistan: A tool for Identifying and Assessing Micro-hydro Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrologic model for basins draining through Pakistan is developed with the specific intent of identifying micro-hydro sites and assessing their quality. The model outputs runoff which is used to estimate flow rate through each geographic cell. These ... Keywords: Power Infrastructure, Renewable, Sustainable Energy

Thomas M. Mosier; Kendra V. Sharp; David F. Hill

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Extended defense systems :I. adversary-defender modeling grammar for vulnerability analysis and threat assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Vulnerability analysis and threat assessment require systematic treatments of adversary and defender characteristics. This work addresses the need for a formal grammar for the modeling and analysis of adversary and defender engagements of interest to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Analytical methods treating both linguistic and numerical information should ensure that neither aspect has disproportionate influence on assessment outcomes. The adversary-defender modeling (ADM) grammar employs classical set theory and notation. It is designed to incorporate contributions from subject matter experts in all relevant disciplines, without bias. The Attack Scenario Space U{sub S} is the set universe of all scenarios possible under physical laws. An attack scenario is a postulated event consisting of the active engagement of at least one adversary with at least one defended target. Target Information Space I{sub S} is the universe of information about targets and defenders. Adversary and defender groups are described by their respective Character super-sets, (A){sub P} and (D){sub F}. Each super-set contains six elements: Objectives, Knowledge, Veracity, Plans, Resources, and Skills. The Objectives are the desired end-state outcomes. Knowledge is comprised of empirical and theoretical a priori knowledge and emergent knowledge (learned during an attack), while Veracity is the correspondence of Knowledge with fact or outcome. Plans are ordered activity-task sequences (tuples) with logical contingencies. Resources are the a priori and opportunistic physical assets and intangible attributes applied to the execution of associated Plans elements. Skills for both adversary and defender include the assumed general and task competencies for the associated plan set, the realized value of competence in execution or exercise, and the opponent's planning assumption of the task competence.

Merkle, Peter Benedict

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Use of GIS and 3D Modeling for Development and Conceptualization of a Performance Assessment Model for Decommissioning of a Complex Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and 3D geo-spatial modeling were employed to facilitate development and conceptualization of a performance assessment (PA) model that will be used to evaluate the health impacts of residual radioactivity at a former nuclear materials processing facility site in New York. Previous operations have resulted in a number of different sources of radiological contamination that must be assessed during site decommissioning. A performance assessment model is being developed to estimate radiological dose to potential receptors through the simulation of the release and transport of radionuclides, and exposure to residual contamination for hundreds to thousands of years in the future. A variety of inputs are required to parameterize the performance assessment model, such as: distance from the waste to surface water bodies, thickness of geologic units for saturated transport, saturated thickness of the geologic units, and spatial and temporal average of percent of waste that is saturated. GIS and 3D modeling are used to analyze and abstract aleatory uncertainty associated with the dimensionality of the geologic system into epistemic uncertainty for one- and two-dimensional process models for flow and transport of radionuclides. Three-dimensional geo-spatial modeling was used to develop the geologic framework and the geometrical representation of the residual contamination within the geologic framework. GIS was used in the initial development and parameterization of the transport pathways, to provide spatial context to the PA model, and to link it to the 3D geologic framework and contamination geometry models. Both the GIS and 3-D modeling were used to interpret the results of runs of the PA model. (authors)

Esh, D. W.; Gross, A. J.; Thaggard, M. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Two White Flint North, MS T7J8, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Markov Model for Assessing the Reliability of a Digital Feedwater Control System  

SciTech Connect

A Markov approach has been selected to represent and quantify the reliability model of a digital feedwater control system (DFWCS). The system state, i.e., whether a system fails or not, is determined by the status of the components that can be characterized by component failure modes. Starting from the system state that has no component failure, possible transitions out of it are all failure modes of all components in the system. Each additional component failure mode will formulate a different system state that may or may not be a system failure state. The Markov transition diagram is developed by strictly following the sequences of component failures (i.e., failure sequences) because the different orders of the same set of failures may affect the system in completely different ways. The formulation and quantification of the Markov model, together with the proposed FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) approach, and the development of the supporting automated FMEA tool are considered the three major elements of a generic conceptual framework under which the reliability of digital systems can be assessed.

Chu,T.L.; Yue, M.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Lehner, J.

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

175

Assessment of CCFL model of RELAP5/MOD3 against simple vertical tubes and rod bundle tests. International Agreement Report  

SciTech Connect

The CCFL model used in RELAP5/MOD3 version 5m5 has been assessed against simple vertical tubes and bundle tests performed at a facility of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The effect of changes in tube diameter and nodalization of tube section were investigated. The roles of interfacial drags on the flooding characteristics are discussed. Differences between the calculation and the experiment are also discussed. A comparison between model assessment results and the test data showed that the calculated value lay well on the experimental flooding curve specified by user, but the pressure jump before onset of flooding was not calculated.

Cho, S.; Arne, N. [Korea Electric Power Corp., Taejon (KR). Research Center; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (KR)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Internal cycle modeling and environmental assessment of multiple cycle consumer products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic flow models are presented for remanufactured, reused or recycled products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early loss and stochastic return are included for fast and slow cycling products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reuse-to-input flow ratio (Internal Cycle Factor, ICF) is determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cycle rate, which is increasing with the ICF, monitors eco-performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early internal cycle losses diminish the ICF, the cycle rate and performance. - Abstract: Dynamic annual flow models incorporating consumer discard and usage loss and featuring deterministic and stochastic end-of-cycle (EOC) return by the consumer are developed for reused or remanufactured products (multiple cycle products, MCPs), including fast and slow cycling, short and long-lived products. It is shown that internal flows (reuse and overall consumption) increase proportionally to the dimensionless internal cycle factor (ICF) which is related to environmental impact reduction factors. The combined reuse/recycle (or cycle) rate is shown capable for shortcut, albeit effective, monitoring of environmental performance in terms of waste production, virgin material extraction and manufacturing impacts of all MCPs, a task, which physical variables (lifetime, cycling frequency, mean or total number of return trips) and conventional rates, via which environmental policy has been officially implemented (e.g. recycling rate) cannot accomplish. The cycle rate is shown to be an increasing (hyperbolic) function of ICF. The impact of the stochastic EOC return characteristics on total reuse and consumption flows, as well as on eco-performance, is assessed: symmetric EOC return has a small, positive effect on performance compared to deterministic, while early shifted EOC return is more beneficial. In order to be efficient, environmental policy should set higher minimum reuse targets for higher trippage MCPs. The results may serve for monitoring, flow accounting and comparative eco-assessment of MCPs. They may be useful in identifying reachable and efficient reuse/recycle targets for consumer products and in planning return via appropriate labelling and digital coding for enhancing environmental performance, while satisfying consumer demand.

Tsiliyannis, C.A., E-mail: anion@otenet.gr [ANION Environmental Ltd., 26 Lykoudi Str., Athens 11141 (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Final Report: Climate Variability, Stochasticity and Learning in Integrated Assessment Models, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1999  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the work has been on climate variability and learning within computational climate-economy models (integrated assessment models--IAM's). The primary objective of the research is to improve the representation of learning in IAM's. This include's both endogenous and exogenous learning. A particular focus is on Bayesian learning about climate damage. A secondary objective is to improve the representation of climate variability within IAM's.

Kolstad, Charles D.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

An Improved Model for Assessing the Effectiveness of Hydrogen Water Chemistry in Boiling Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly two decades, hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) has been used as a remedial measure to protect boiling water reactor (BWR) structural components against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In this paper, computer modeling is used to evaluate the effectiveness of HWC for BWRs. The DEMACE computer code, equipped with an updated chemical reaction set, G values, and a Sherwood number, is adopted to predict the chemical species concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) responses to HWC in the primary heat transport circuit of a typical BWR. In addition, plant-specific neutron and gamma dose rate profiles are reported. DEMACE is calibrated against the data of oxygen concentration variation as a function of feedwater hydrogen concentration in the recirculation system of the Chinshan Unit 2 BWR.The determinant result for assessing the effectiveness of HWC is the ECP. For a typical BWR/4-type reactor such as Chinshan Unit 2, it is found that protecting the core channel and the lower plenum outlet is quite difficult even though the feedwater hydrogen concentration is as high as 2 ppm, based on the predicted species concentration and ECP data. However, for regions other than those mentioned earlier, a moderate amount of hydrogen added to the feedwater (0.9 ppm) is enough to achieve the desired protection against IGSCC.

Yeh, T.-K. [National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China); Chu Fang [Taiwan Power Company (China)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Research utilization in the building industry: decision model and preliminary assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Research Utilization Program was conceived as a far-reaching means for managing the interactions of the private sector and the federal research sector as they deal with energy conservation in buildings. The program emphasizes a private-public partnership in planning a research agenda and in applying the results of ongoing and completed research. The results of this task support the hypothesis that the transfer of R and D results to the buildings industry can be accomplished more efficiently and quickly by a systematic approach to technology transfer. This systematic approach involves targeting decision makers, assessing research and information needs, properly formating information, and then transmitting the information through trusted channels. The purpose of this report is to introduce elements of a market-oriented knowledge base, which would be useful to the Building Systems Division, the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and their associated laboratories in managing a private-public research partnership on a rational systematic basis. This report presents conceptual models and data bases that can be used in formulating a technology transfer strategy and in planning technology transfer programs.

Watts, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Smith, S.A.; Westergard, E.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Performance Assessment Transport Modeling of Uranium at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

Following is a brief summary of the assumptions that are pertinent to the radioactive isotope transport in the GoldSim Performance Assessment model of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, with special emphasis on the water-phase reactive transport of uranium, which includes depleted uranium products.

NSTec Radioactive Waste

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of the Langmuir model in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool for a high soil phosphorus condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphorus adsorption by a water treatment residual was tested through Langmuir and linear sorption isotherms and applied in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). This study uses laboratory and greenhouse experimental Phosphorus data to evaluate ... Keywords: Langmuir model, Phosphorus, SWAT, Water treatment residual

C. G. Rossi; D. M. Heil; N. B. Bonumí; J. R. Williams

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Preliminary Review of Models, Assumptions, and Key Data used in Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document is in response to a request by Ming Zhu, DOE-EM to provide a preliminary review of existing models and data used in completed or soon to be completed Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses (PA/CA) documents, to identify codes, methodologies, main assumptions, and key data sets used.

Arthur S. Rood; Swen O. Magnuson

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Modeling Tsunami Inundation and Assessing Tsunami Hazards for the U. S. East Coast NTHMP Semi-Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://chinacat.coastal.udel.edu/nthmp.html BACKGROUND Tsunami hazard assessment along the US East Coast (USEC) is still in its infancy, in part due in the literature (ten Brink et al., 2007, 2008), and model the corresponding tsunami inundation in affected USEC

Kirby, James T.

186

The Development and Psychometric Modeling of an Embedded Assessment for a Data Modeling and Statistical Reasoning Learning Progression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PV Reliabilities by Construct18 Conceptions of Statistics ModelPV reliability is the explained variance according to the estimated model

Schwartz, Robert Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development of a Physics of Failure Model and Quantitative Assessment of the Fire Fatality Risk of Compressed Natural Gas Bus Cylinders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Title of Dissertation: DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSICS OF FAILURE MODEL AND QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE FIRE FATALITY RISKS OF COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS BUS CYLINDERS The… (more)

Chamberlain, Samuel Seamore

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Modeling object identification and tracking errors on automated spatial safety assessment of earthmoving operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent research studies have been conducted for automating the safety assessment process in order to identify risks and safety hazards on a job site without… (more)

Chi, Seok Ho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT OF FLAWS IN PRESSURE TUBES OF CANDU REACTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Probabilistic assessment and life cycle management of engineering components and systems in a nuclear power plant is intended to ensure safe and efficient operation of… (more)

Sahoo, Anup Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Global Renewable Resource Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a recursive-dynamic IAM of economy, energy, and land-use from the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL). GCAM explicitly models markets in the energy and industrial system...

193

Beyond validation: alternative uses and associated assessments of goodness for computational social models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This discussion challenges classic notions of validation, suggesting that ‘validity' is not just an attribute of a model. It is a function of the relationship of a particular characteristic of the model (the probability that the model will produce ... Keywords: computational models, social modeling, validation

Jessica Glicken Turnley; Peter A. Chew; Aaron S. Perls

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Assessment of Physical Parameterizations Using a Global Climate Model with Stretchable Grid and Nudging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique atmospheric general circulation model with zooming capability (LMDZ) has been used in a nudged mode to enable comparison of model outputs with routine observations and evaluate the model physical ...

O. Coindreau; F. Hourdin; M. Haeffelin; A. Mathieu; C. Rio

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Groundwater modeling: Application of a multiphase fluid flow model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating installation restoration program sites. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research examined a two-dimensional numerical model, VALOR, which can simulate multiphase fluid flow in soils and groundwater, and evaluated the applicability of the model as a decision-making tool for assessing and remediating IRP sites. Model sensitivity analyses were conducted to study the influence of grid sizes, soil types, and organic release rates on the simulated migration of both light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The VALOR model was applied to a case study of a JP-4 release at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The finer grid sizes provide the most accurate definition of NAPL distribution. The soil type and release rate sensitivity analyses demonstrate that NAPL migrates quicker through coarse sands than fine sand and clay. The light NAPL ponds at the water table and spreads laterally. The dense NAPL migrates through the subsurface and ponds at the aquifer bottom. The fast organic release simulations predict wider vertical pathways of migration. The slow organic release simulations predict higher light NAPL saturation at the water table. The case study indicates that within limits, VALOR may be useful for assessing NAPL distribution, estimating contaminated soil volumes, and evaluating remediation alternatives.... Groundwater modeling, Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: NAPL, Multiphase fluid flow model, Installation Restoration Program, IRP.

Scott, D.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modeling mining economics and materials markets to inform criticality assessment and mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional criticality-assessment methods drawn from the existing literature are often limited to evaluations of scarcity risks, or rely on price as an indicator of criticality. Such approaches, however, are ill-suited ...

Poulizac, Claire Marie Franc?oise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A cost allocation model for assessing the impact of energy storage technologies upon electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assist the Division of Energy Storage Systems in the U.S. Department of Energy in prioritizing, developing, and commercializing storage technologies a computer simulation code has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to assess the ...

R. Giese; L. Holt; R. Scheithauer

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Towards Assessing NARCCAP Regional Climate Model Credibility for the North American Monsoon: Current Climate Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine 17 dynamically downscaled simulations produced as part of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) for their skill in reproducing the North American Monsoon system. We focus on precipitation and the ...

Melissa S. Bukovsky; David J. Gochis; Linda O. Mearns

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development and assessment of a soot emissions model for aircraft gas turbine engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing candidate policies designed to address the impact of aviation on the environment requires a simplified method to estimate pollutant emissions for current and future aircraft gas turbine engines under different ...

Martini, Bastien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Assessment of the ECMWF Model Cloudiness and Surface Radiation Fields at the ARM SGP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud and radiation fields produced by the operational ECMWF forecasts are assessed using observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site over the April–May 1999 period. Over the first 36 ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Further Assessment of Treatment Effects in the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment through Guided Linear Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Florida Area Cumulus Experiment (FACE) was a two-stage program dedicated to assessing the potential of “dynamic seeding” for enhancing convective rainfall in a fixed target area. FACE-1 (1970–76) was an exploratory cloud seeding experiment ...

J. A. Flueck; W. L. Woodley; A. G. Barnston; T. J. Brown

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Data-to-model: a mixed initiative approach for rapid ethnographic assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid ethnographic assessment is used when there is a need to quickly create a socio-cultural profile of a group or region. While there are many forms such an assessment can take, we view it as providing insight into who are the key actors, what are ... Keywords: Agent-based simulation, Data analysis, Meta-network, Network-analysis, Newspaper data, Social-networks, Text-mining

Kathleen M. Carley; Michael W. Bigrigg; Boubacar Diallo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of the research project on "Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics". The overall objective of this project was to improve projections of energy demand and associated greenhouse gas emissions by taking into account demographic factors currently not incorporated in Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) of global climate change. We proposed to examine the potential magnitude of effects on energy demand of changes in the composition of populations by household characteristics for three countries: the U.S., China, and Indonesia. For each country, we planned to analyze household energy use survey data to estimate relationships between household characteristics and energy use; develop a new set of detailed household projections for each country; and combine these analyses to produce new projections of energy demand illustrating the potential importance of consideration of households.

Brian C. O'Neill

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

The potential use of Chernobyl fallout data to test and evaluate the predictions of environmental radiological assessment models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the Model Validation Committee were to collaborate with US and foreign scientists to collect, manage, and evaluate data for identifying critical research issues and data needs to support an integrated assessment of the Chernobyl nuclear accident; test environmental transport, human dosimetric, and health effects models against measured data to determine their efficacy in guiding decisions on protective actions and in estimating exposures to populations and individuals following a nuclear accident; and apply Chernobyl data to quantifications of key processes governing the environmental transport, fate and effects of radionuclides and other trace substances. 55 refs.

Richmond, C.R.; Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Lesslie, P.A.; Miller, C.W.; Ng, Y.C.; Till, J.E.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessment of Wind Power Potential for Two Contrasting Coastlines of South Africa Using a Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional numerical model is used to predict near surface wind velocities, and consequently wind power, for five distinct synoptic regimes for contrasting east and west coasts of South Africa. The model results suggest that no one ...

R. D. Diab; M. Garstang

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

An Initial Assessment of Antarctic Sea Ice Extent in the CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the annual cycle and trends in Antarctic sea ice extent (SIE) for 18 models used in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) that were run with historical forcing for the 1850s to 2005. Many of the models ...

John Turner; Thomas J. Bracegirdle; Tony Phillips; Gareth J. Marshall; J. Scott Hosking

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Assessment of GPU computational enhancement to a 2D flood model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of the computational enhancement of a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) enabled 2D flood model. The objectives are to demonstrate the significant speedup of a new GPU-enabled full dynamic wave flood model and to present the effect ... Keywords: 2D flood model, CUDA, Flood simulation, GPU programming

Alfred J. Kalyanapu; Siddharth Shankar; Eric R. Pardyjak; David R. Judi; Steven J. Burian

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

USING EXPERT MODELS IN HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS A DEPENDENCE ASSESSMENT METHOD BASED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) scenario in a nuclear Boiling Water Reactor (BWR the computerized diagnostic aids used in nuclear p ower plants, e.g. Chang et al. (1995), and clinical decision for nuclear power plants applications, human failure dependence assessment is an important part of the HRA

214

A generalized multistage optimization modeling framework for life cycle assessment-based integrated solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is an integral component of civil infrastructure and the global economy, and is a growing concern due to increases in population, urbanization, and economic development. In 2011, 1.3 billion metric tons of municipal solid ... Keywords: Decision support, Life cycle assessment, Multi-stage, Optimization, Solid waste

James W. Levis, Morton A. Barlaz, Joseph F. Decarolis, S. Ranji Ranjithan

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Circular Economy Assessment for Coal-fired Power Plants Based on Supper-Efficiency DEA Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants are the main pollution source in most areas of China. The implementation of circular economy in coal-fired power plants is necessary for environmental protection and also an effective way of energy saving and emission reduction. ... Keywords: circular economy assessment, circular economy improvement, coal-fired power plant, super-efficiency data envelopment analysis

Shao-lun Zeng; Hong Hu; Wei Wang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Assessment of emissions prediction capability of RANS based PDF models for lean premixed combustion of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high computational cost of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) makes Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods the current standard for turbulent combustion modeling. Empirical models for turbulence, turbulence-combustion interaction and chemical kinetics are, however, a major source of uncertainty in RANS based combustion simulation. While Probability Density Function (PDF) based models overcome some of these issues, most commercial codes do not take full advantage of these models. In this study, lean premixed combustion of methane in a bluff-body combustor is simulated using two different reduced chemical mechanisms (ARM9 and ARM19) combined with the composition PDF transport combustion model in the commercial code FLUENT. Two different turbulence models, namely the RNG k-? model and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) are used and the results of the simulations are compared to experimental data. For all the models tested, the prediction of temperature and major species (CH4, O2, CO2, CO, H2, and H2O) was good when compared to experiments. While all of the model predictions for the intermediate species OH showed an order magnitude difference (compared to the experiments) close to the bluff body surface; downstream axial locations showed good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the experiments. In a trend similar to the previous study (Nanduri et al., 2007) using the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) model, predicted values for NO emission radial profiles showed an average difference of ±5 ppm when compared to experimental values. The results were also compared to the results of a velocity-composition joint PDF model developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. In terms of emissions (NO and CO) predictions the relatively expensive composition PDF model in FLUENT did not give significant improvement when compared to the computationally cheaper EDC models. However, the velocity-composition joint PFD model used by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh did show significant improvement over EDC models in the prediction of NO. Both of the PDF models resulted in better qualitative and quantitative agreement in H2 prediction, thus showing the promise of PDF based models in simulating lean premixed combustion of fuel blends like hydrogen enriched natural gas.

Parsons, D.R.; Nanduri, J.R.; Celik, Ismail; Strakey, P.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid wastes: Development of the WASTED model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of the Waste Analysis Software Tool for Environmental Decisions (WASTED) model. This model provides a comprehensive view of the environmental impacts of municipal solid waste management systems. The model consists of a number of separate submodels that describe a typical waste management process: waste collection, material recovery, composting, energy recovery from waste and landfilling. These submodels are combined to represent a complete waste management system. WASTED uses compensatory systems to account for the avoided environmental impacts derived from energy recovery and material recycling. The model is designed to provide solid waste decision-makers and environmental researchers with a tool to evaluate waste management plans and to improve the environmental performance of solid waste management strategies. The model is user-friendly and compares favourably with other earlier models.

Diaz, R. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada); Warith, M. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada)]. E-mail: mwarith@ryerson.ca

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Dose Modeling and Statistical Assessment of Hot Spots for Decommissioning Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A primary goal of this research was to develop a technically defensible approach for modeling the receptor dose due to smaller "hot spots" of residual… (more)

Abelquist, Eric Warner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ASSESSING THE MINIMUM INSTRUMENTATION TO WELL TUNE EXISTING MEDIUM SIZED OFFICE BUILDING ENERGY MODELS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dynamic whole building energy models (BEMs) are created for various reasons: to evaluate alternative design strategies; compliance checks with energy codes; apply certifications at the… (more)

Xu, Ke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Simulation Technology Research Division assessment of the IBM RISC SYSTEM/6000 Model 530 workstation  

SciTech Connect

A workstation manufactured by International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) was loaned to the Simulation Technology Research Division for evaluation. We have found that these new UNIX workstations from IBM have superior cost to performance ratios compared to the CRAY supercomputers and Digital's VAX machines. Our appraisal of this workstation included floating-point performance, system and environment functionality, and cost effectiveness. Our assessment was based on a suite of radiation transport codes developed at Sandia that constitute the bulk of our division's computing workload. In this report, we also discuss our experience with features that are unique to this machine such as the AIX operating system and the XLF Fortran Compiler. The interoperability of the RS/6000 workstation with Sandia's network of CRAYs and VAXs was also assessed.

Valdez, G.D. (Applied Methods, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Halbleib, J.A.; Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Assessment of Existing Carbon Dioxide Equation of State Models and Experimental Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information that increases the knowledge base and strengthens the understanding of existing equation of state EOS models, as well as how closely the results of these models compare to available experimental databases for CO2 mixtures. The primary interest is in CO2 mixtures that result from coal combustion processes and carbon capture and storage CCS applications for electric power generation.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Assessing spatial uncertainty in predictive geomorphological mapping: A multi-modelling approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maps of earth surface processes and the potential distribution of landforms make an important contribution to theoretical and applied geomorphology. Because decision making often depends on information based on spatial models, there is a great need to ... Keywords: Accuracy, Modelling, Patterned ground, Periglacial, Uncertainty

Miska Luoto; Mathieu Marmion; Jan Hjort

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Computer analysis of the sensitivity of the integrated assessment model MERGE-5I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an application of a large-scale non-linear optimization model to the analysis of environmental problems. The authors present first results of the initial stage of the study, a sensitivity analysis of the model's input parameters. ...

Vyacheslav Maksimov; Leo Schrattenholzer; Yaroslav Minullin

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Review of air quality modeling techniques. Volume 8. [Assessment of environmental effects of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air transport and diffusion models which are applicable to the assessment of the environmental effects of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation are reviewed. The general classification of models and model inputs are discussed. A detailed examination of the statistical, Gaussian plume, Gaussian puff, one-box and species-conservation-of-mass models is given. Representative models are discussed with attention given to the assumptions, input data requirement, advantages, disadvantages and applicability of each.

Rosen, L.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A method for the assessment of specific energy distribution in a model tumor system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the calculation of dose from internally deposited alpha emitters requires a detailed analysis of the microscopic distribution of the radionuclide in order to determine the spatial distribution of energy emission events and, from this, the spatial distribution of dose. In the present study, the authors used quantitative autoradiography (QAR) to assess the microdistribution of a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment in human glioma xenografts in mice.

Noska, M.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for “Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model”. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Impact of an Updated Carbon Bond Mechanism on Predictions from the CMAQ Modeling System: Preliminary Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An updated and expanded version of the Carbon Bond mechanism (CB05) has been incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to more accurately simulate wintertime, pristine, and high-altitude situations. The CB05 ...

Golam Sarwar; Deborah Luecken; Greg Yarwood; Gary Z. Whitten; William P. L. Carter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Flexible Power System Operations Simulation Model for Assessing Wind Integration: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a model was developed to mimic operator behavior using a combination of security-constrained unit commitment, security-constrained economic dispatch, and automatic generation control programs.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; O' Malley, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

FIERAsystem: A Fire Risk Assessment Model for Light Industrial Building Fire Safety Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report. The current report describes the framework for the new model, individual submodels used for calculations, and the information that the model provides to the design engineer or building official. The framework that FIERAsystem uses to conduct a hazard analysis and the process used to perform a risk analysis are also discussed in the report. 2. FRAMEWORK OF FIERAsystemMODEL The FIERAsystem model allows the user to perform a number of fire protection engineering calculations in order to evaluate fire protection systems in industrial buildings. At start-up, FIERAsystem provides several calculation options, which allow the user to: use standard engineering correlations, run individual submodels, conduct a hazard analysis, or conduct a risk analysis

N. Kashef; A. Torvi; G. Reid; Noureddine Benichou; Ahmed Kashef; David Torvi; George Hadjisophocleous; Irene Reid

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Assessment of the Performance of CORDEX Regional Climate Models in Simulating Eastern Africa Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the ability of ten Regional Climate Models (RCMs) from the COordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) in simulating the characteristics of rainfall patterns over Eastern Africa region. The seasonal ...

Hussen Seid Endris; Philip Omondi; Suman Jain; Christopher Lennard; Bruce Hewitson; Ladislaus Chang’a; J. L. Awange; Alessandro Dosio; Patrick Ketiem; Grigory Nikulin; Hans-Jürgen Panitz; Matthias Büchner; Frode Stordal; Lukiya Tazalika

233

Statistical Assessment of Tropical Convection-Permitting Model Simulations Using a Cell-Tracking Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a method for comparing convection-permitting model simulations to radar observations using an innovative object-based approach. The method uses the automated cell-tracking algorithm, Thunderstorm Identification Tracking ...

Simon Caine; Todd P. Lane; Peter T. May; Christian Jakob; Steven T. Siems; Michael J. Manton; James Pinto

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Single-Station Approach to Model Output Statistics Temperature Forecast Error Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Error characteristics of model output statistics (MOS) temperature forecasts are calculated for over 200 locations around the continental United States. The forecasts are verified on a station-by-station basis for the year 2001. Error measures ...

Andrew A. Taylor; Lance M. Leslie

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Assessing the impact of hierarchy on model understandability --- a cognitive perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modularity is a widely advocated strategy for handling complexity in conceptual models. Nevertheless, a systematic literature review revealed that it is not yet entirely clear under which circumstances modularity is most beneficial. Quite the contrary, ...

Stefan Zugal; Jakob Pinggera; Barbara Weber; Jan Mendling; Hajo A. Reijers

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Uncertainty Propagation of Regional Climate Model Precipitation Forecasts to Hydrologic Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo framework is adopted for propagating uncertainty in dynamically downscaled seasonal forecasts of area-averaged daily precipitation to associated streamflow response calculations. Daily precipitation is modeled as a mixture of two ...

Phaedon C. Kyriakidis; Norman L. Miller; Jinwon Kim

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of Roughness Length Schemes Implemented within the Noah Land Surface Model for High Altitude Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current land surface models still have difficulties with producing reliable surface heat fluxes and skin temperature (Tsfc) estimates for high altitude regions, which may be addressed via adequate parameterization of the roughness lengths for ...

Donghai Zheng; Rogier Van Der Velde; Zhongbo Su; Martijn J. Booij; Arjen Y. Hoekstra

238

Assessing Future Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon Using CMIP5 Coupled Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future changes in the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) are estimated from historical and Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6) experiments of the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). The historical runs show ...

Kyong-Hwan Seo; Jung Ok; Jun-Hyeok Son; Dong-Hyun Cha

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Multimodel Combination by a Bayesian Hierarchical Model: Assessment of Ice Accumulation over the Oceanic Arctic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of general circulation models (GCMs) varies across regions and periods. When projecting into the future, it is therefore not obvious whether to reject or to prefer a certain GCM. Combining the outputs of several GCMs may enhance ...

Malaak Kallache; Elena Maksimovich; Paul-Antoine Michelangeli; Philippe Naveau

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Seismic Performance, Modeling, and Failure Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Structural Engineering, ASCE, V. 117, No. 5, pp. 1514-J. P. , (2007). Update to ASCE/SEI 41 Concrete Provisions.Model for Confined Concrete", ASCE Journal of Structural

Tuna, Zeynep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ALINET: a model for assessing energy conservation opportunities in food processing  

SciTech Connect

ALINET, a network model of the US food processing and distribution sector, has been designed as a tool for analyzing energy use and for evaluating specific energy conserving technologies. The model is operational and has been used in the analysis of wheat processing. The results of a pilot study in which an alternative technology - microwave drying - is introduced in the pasta making process are described, and the impact on energy and on specific fuel use is analyzed.

Levis, A.H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge); Ducot, E.R.; Webster, T.F.; Levis, I.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Importance of emergency response actions to reactor accidents within a probabilistic consequence assessment model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early health consequences of severe accidents at nuclear power plants as a function of the emergency response parameters has been performed using a probabilistic consequence assessment code. The importance of various emergency response parameters in predicting the consequences for a range of accident source terms was determined through training a neural network algorithm which relates the sensitivity of the output to various choices of the input. Extensions of this approach should be helpful to planners in prioritizing the emergency responses at nuclear power plants.

Mubayi, V.; Neymotin, L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluation of the Surface Climatology over the Conterminous United States in the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program Hindcast Experiment Using a Regional Climate Model Evaluation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface air temperature, precipitation, and insolation over the conterminous United States region from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) regional climate model (RCM) hindcast study are evaluated using the Jet ...

Jinwon Kim; Duane E. Waliser; Chris A. Mattmann; Linda O. Mearns; Cameron E. Goodale; Andrew F. Hart; Dan J. Crichton; Seth McGinnis; Huikyo Lee; Paul C. Loikith; Maziyar Boustani

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Vulnerability assessment of groundwater resources: A modelling-based approach to the Mancha Occidental aquifer, Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The semiarid Mancha Occidental aquifer represents a paradigmatic case of intensive groundwater use for agriculture. Irrigation has proven a catalyst for welfare in the area over the last three decades, if at a significant environmental cost and while ... Keywords: Aquifer, Groundwater, Mancha Occidental, Participatory modelling, Vulnerability, Water Framework Directive

Pedro Martínez-Santos; M. Ramón Llamas; Pedro E. Martínez-Alfaro

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Assessment of Twentieth-Century Regional Surface Temperature Trends Using the GFDL CM2 Coupled Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical climate simulations of the period 1861–2000 using two new Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) global climate models (CM2.0 and CM2.1) are compared with observed surface temperatures. All-forcing runs include the effects of ...

T. R. Knutson; T. L. Delworth; K. W. Dixon; I. M. Held; J. Lu; V. Ramaswamy; M. D. Schwarzkopf; G. Stenchikov; R. J. Stouffer

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

An integrated model for assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal limits for bioenergy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion ... Keywords: Agricultural residues, Bioenergy, Model integration, Soil erosion, Soil organic carbon

D. J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

An Organisational Culture Model for Comparative Studies and Assessment of IT Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research supports the notion that values affect work practices. It develops a comparatively simple organisational cultural model based on four work practices: support orientation, innovation orientation, co-ordination orientation, and rules orientation. ... Keywords: Coordination, IT Professionals, Innovation, Organisational Culture, Rules

Abel Usoro; Grzegorz Majewski; Imran U. Khan

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Assessment of the reflood oxidation models in SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reflooding of a hot damaged core following the start of a severe accident can lead to significant increases in the heating, melting, and oxidation of the core prior to the termination of the accident. These effects have been observed in bundle heating and melting experiments terminated by the addition of water and are postulated to have had a major impact on the accident progression in the TMI-2 accident. Although the detailed mechanisms for the processes are not completely understood, new SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1e models, describing the cracking /spalling of oxidized fuel rod cladding during reflood, and the resulting oxidation of the underlying Zircaloy and relocating liquefied U-Zr-O, provide a reasonable estimate of the experimentally-observed bundle temperatures, hydrogen production, and changes in bundle geometry. This paper provides a brief description of the new models, selected highlights from code-to-data comparisons, and selected results from a recent set of calculations fro TMI-2 using the new models. The potential impact of these new models on other plant calculations is discussed in the concluding portion of this paper.

Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Impact of Proposed Disturbed Rock Zone Conceptual Model Modifications to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have recently proposed a set of updates that integrate data from recent site characterization studies to two conceptual models for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Performance Assessment (WIPP PA) program. This paper discusses the changes to the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ) model, which describes the macroscopic manifestation of grain-scale microcracks and larger macro-cracks that are created by induced stresses in the salt surrounding excavations. The DRZ, as modeled in WIPP PA, is an important component of the repository system because its properties affect the quantity of available brine and its ability to enter the waste areas as well as the connectivity of panels after closure. The DOE and SNL have proposed decreasing the region that represents the DRZ in WIPP PA. Additionally, it has been proposed to make the permeability of DRZ a time-dependent quantity to reflect the long-term behavior. In this paper, the implementation of the proposed DRZ model changes is outlined, and the impact of the DRZ modifications on the long-term performance of the WIPP is discussed. The DRZ modifications generally reduced the amount of brine that entered into the repository, as well as reduced the pressure in the repository, except for scenarios in which a pressurized brine pocket was encountered. Overall, the saturation and pressure changes affected the frequency and magnitude of the direct brine and spalling volumes. (authors)

Clayton, D.J.; Ismail, A.E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

MELCOR 1.8.5 modeling aspects of fission product release, transport and deposition an assessment with recommendations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phebus and VERCORS data have played an important role in contemporary understanding and modeling of fission product release and transport from damaged light water reactor fuel. The data from these test programs have allowed improvement of MELCOR modeling of release and transport processes for both low enrichment uranium fuel as well as high burnup and mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. This paper discusses the synthesis of these findings in the MELCOR severe accident code. Based on recent assessments of MELCOR 1.8.5 fission product release modeling against the Phebus FPT-1 test and on observations from the ISP-46 exercise, modifications to the default MELCOR 1.8.5 release models are recommended. The assessments identified an alternative set of Booth diffusion parameters recommended by ORNL (ORNL-Booth), which produced significantly improved release predictions for cesium and other fission product groups. Some adjustments to the scaling factors in the ORNL-Booth model were made for selected fission product groups, including UO{sub 2}, Mo and Ru in order to obtain better comparisons with the FPT-1 data. The adjusted model, referred to as 'Modified ORNL-Booth,' was subsequently compared to original ORNL VI fission product release experiments and to more recently performed French VERCORS tests, and the comparisons was as favorable or better than the original CORSOR-M MELCOR default release model. These modified ORNL-Booth parameters, input to MELCOR 1.8.5 as 'sensitivity coefficients' (i.e. user input that over-rides the code defaults) are recommended for the interim period until improved release models can be implemented into MELCOR. For the case of ruthenium release in air-oxidizing conditions, some additional modifications to the Ru class vapor pressure are recommended based on estimates of the RuO{sub 2} vapor pressure over mildly hyperstoichiometric UO{sub 2}. The increased vapor pressure for this class significantly increases the net transport of Ru from the fuel to the gas stream. A formal model is needed. Deposition patterns in the Phebus FPT-1 circuit were also significantly improved by using the modified ORNL-Booth parameters, where retention of lower volatile Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is now predicted in the heated exit regions of the FPT-1 test, bringing down depositions in the FPT-1 steam generator tube to be in closer alignment with the experimental data. This improvement in 'RCS' deposition behavior preserves the overall correct release of cesium to the containment that was observed even with the default CORSOR-M model. Not correctly treated however is the release and transport of Ag to the FPT-1 containment. A model for Ag release from control rods is presently not available in MELCOR. Lack of this model is thought to be responsible for the underprediction by a factor of two of the total aerosol mass to the FPT-1 containment. It is suggested that this underprediction of airborne mass led to an underprediction of the aerosol agglomeration rate. Underprediction of the agglomeration rate leads to low predictions of the aerosol particle size in comparison to experimentally measured ones. Small particle size leads low predictions of the gravitational settling rate relative to the experimental data. This error, however, is a conservative one in that too-low settling rate would result in a larger source term to the environment. Implementation of an interim Ag release model is currently under study. In the course of this assessment, a review of MELCOR release models was performed and led to the identification of several areas for future improvements to MELCOR. These include upgrading the Booth release model to account for changes in local oxidizing/reducing conditions and including a fuel oxidation model to accommodate effects of fuel stoichiometry. Models such as implemented in the French ELSA code and described by Lewis are considered appropriate for MELCOR. A model for ruthenium release under air oxidizing conditions is also needed and should be included as part of a fuel oxidation model since fuel stoichiometry is a fundamen

Gauntt, Randall O.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessing the Vulnerability of Large Critical Infrastructure Using Fully-Coupled Blast Effects Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural failures, such as the MacArthur Maze I-880 overpass in Oakland, California and the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are recent examples of our national infrastructure's fragility and serve as an important reminder of such infrastructure in our everyday lives. These two failures, as well as the World Trade Center's collapse and the levee failures in New Orleans, highlight the national importance of protecting our infrastructure as much as possible against acts of terrorism and natural hazards. This paper describes a process for evaluating the vulnerability of critical infrastructure to large blast loads using a fully-coupled finite element approach. A description of the finite element software and modeling technique is discussed along with the experimental validation of the numerical tools. We discuss how such an approach can be used for specific problems such as modeling the progressive collapse of a building.

McMichael, L D; Noble, C R; Margraf, J D; Glascoe, L G

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

Leiby, P.N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development of analytical and numerical models for the assessment and interpretation of hydrogeological field tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical models of the flow and tracer tests in fractured aquifers are being developed for the further study of radioactive wastes migration in round water at the Lake Area, which is associated with one of the waste disposal site in Russia. The choice of testing methods, tracer types (chemical or thermal) and the appropriate models are determined by the nature of the ongoing ground-water pollution processes and the hydrogeological features of the site under consideration. Special importance is attached to the increased density of wastes as well as to the possible redistribution of solutes both in the liquid phase and in the absorbed state (largely, on fracture surfaces). This allows for studying physical-and-chemical (hydrogeochemical) interaction parameters which are hard to obtain (considering a fractured structure of the rock mass) in laboratory. Moreover, a theoretical substantiation is being given to the field methods of studying the properties of a fractured stratum aimed at the further construction of the drainage system or the subsurface flow barrier (cutoff wall), as well as the monitoring system that will evaluate the reliability of these ground-water protection measures. The proposed mathematical models are based on a tight combination of analytical and numerical methods, the former being preferred in solving the principal (2D axisymmetrical) class of the problems. The choice of appropriate problems is based on the close feedback with subsequent field tests in the Lake Area. 63 refs.

Mironenko, V.A.; Rumynin, V.G.; Konosavsky, P.K. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation); Pozdniakov, S.P.; Shestakov, V.M. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Roshal, A.A. [Geosoft-Eastlink, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Development of models for use in the assessment of waste repository performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Any repository suitable for the disposal of radioactive waste comprises a combination of various man-made and natural barriers which aim to prevent transfer of the radionuclides from the canister to the external environment. Our group has developed the techniques needed to model the equilibrium chemistry of complex multicomponent rock/water systems over a range of ionic strengths and temperatures. These models, show remarkable agreement with field measurements when applied to natural systems. They have been applied successfully to interpret a variety of geochemical processes: studies of ancient and modern marine evaporite systems, studies of the solar evaporation of seawater studies of mineral formation in lakes and in fluid inclusions. At present our models are limited to the components of the seawater system (Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, H{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, CO{sub 2}), together with the borate species and SiO{sub 2}. 2 tabs.

Dickson, A.G. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (USA). Marine Physical Lab.); Weare, J.H. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

Lackmann, Gary

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Assessment of methods for creating a national building statistics database for atmospheric dispersion modeling  

SciTech Connect

Mesoscale meteorological codes and transport and dispersion models are increasingly being applied in urban areas. Representing urban terrain characteristics in these models is critical for accurate predictions of air flow, heating and cooling, and airborne contaminant concentrations in cities. A key component of urban terrain characterization is the description of building morphology (e.g., height, plan area, frontal area) and derived properties (e.g., roughness length). Methods to determine building morphological statistics range from manual field surveys to automated processing of digital building databases. In order to improve the quality and consistency of mesoscale meteorological and atmospheric dispersion modeling, a national dataset of building morphological statistics is needed. Currently, due to the expense and logistics of conducting detailed field surveys, building statistics have been derived for only small sections of a few cities. In most other cities, modeling projects rely on building statistics estimated using intuition and best guesses. There has been increasing emphasis in recent years to derive building statistics using digital building data or other data sources as a proxy for those data. Although there is a current expansion in public and private sector development of digital building data, at present there is insufficient data to derive a national building statistics database using automated analysis tools. Too many cities lack digital data on building footprints and heights and many of the cities having such data do so for only small areas. Due to the lack of sufficient digital building data, other datasets are used to estimate building statistics. Land use often serves as means to provide building statistics for a model domain, but the strength and consistency of the relationship between land use and building morphology is largely uncertain. In this paper, we investigate whether building statistics can be correlated to the underlying land use. If a reasonable correlation exists, then a national building statistics database could be created since land use is available for the entire U.S. Digital datasets of building footprint and height information have been obtained, validated and analyzed for eight western U.S. cities covering areas ranging from 6 km{sup 2} to 1653 km{sup 2}. Building morphological statistics (including mean and standard deviation of building height, plan area fraction and density, rooftop area density, frontal area index and density, building-to-plan area ratio, complete aspect ratio, height-to-width ratio, roughness length, displacement height, and sky view factor) have been computed for each city at 250-m resolution and are being correlated to underlying land use type. This paper will summarize the building statistics from the eight cites focusing on the variability within each city and between cities as a function of land use.

Velugubantla, S. P. (Srinivas, P.); Burian, S. J. (Steven J.); Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); McKinnon, A. T. (Andrew T.); McPherson, T. N. (Timothy N.); Han, W. S. (Woo Suk)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Facilities management: the development of a model for building condition assessment surveys conducted at Fort Riley, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the research and design of a condition assessment system for buildings by utilizing case study methods for the facilities located at Fort Riley, Kansas, an Army military installation. The design of the assessment or auditing system incorporates the following procedures: (1) identification of building components, (2) identification of building sub-components, (3) utilization of decision-tree logic diagrams to manage the information, and (4) production of inspection condition criteria and scoring for each sub-component (by visual inspection techniques) . The system was used by multiple inspectors to assess the buildings at Fort Riley. The inspectors received training in the system scoring and methodology. To verify the system's accuracy, ten percent (10%) of the buildings were re-inspected by the developers of the system (quality control) . The analysis of the system included a random sample of 20 buildings from the data collected. The data were analyzed for accuracy and consistency on the component and sub-component recognition and the inspection condition score (as compared to the quality control results) The actual inspection time was monitored to record the inspection efficiency. Statistical testing was conducted which did the following: (1) analyzed the data pair means for any significant differences, and (2) analyzed the strength of the pair relationships. From the data analysis the following was found: (1) the components and sub-components were recognized accurately and consistently, (2) the actual scores seemed to be accurate and consistent (after conducting the statistical test (T-Test) some of the means did indicate that there were some significant differences, while others indicated there were no significant differences) , (3) the data indicated that there was correlation between the data pairs. Also, it was found that this system provides reasonable inspection time and cost restraints. The building assessments are incorporated into an information system that assists the user in establishing priorities. The cost factors for each sub-component are based on building models that relate the quantities of the different sub-components to the actual floor area of the buildings. From these building models conceptual estimates can be generated and used as a tool to budget, justify, and anticipate maintenance and repair costs.

Riblett, Carl Olin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessing the Potential of Developing a Tool for Residential Facility Management Using Building Information Modeling Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM) has changed the ways buildings are designed and constructed. Along with design and construction, operation and maintenance of the built facility is also gaining importance in the Architecture-Engineering-Construction industry. Facility management (FM) is widely adopted by industrial, healthcare and other types of commercial facilities for better maintenance and management of assets. BIM is being adopted in the field of Facility management and has become one of the most important tools for better application of operation and maintenance. Facility management is performed by professionals with training and experience in the related fields of building operation, maintenance, upgrade and repair. BIM is a professional tool which requires intense training and knowledge. This tool cannot be used and is hard to understand for non-professionals and people who do not have training to use it. Management of residences is as important as management of commercial, industrial and healthcare facilities for the life and smooth running of such facilities. Residential facilities are properties with one or more residential units or buildings. These buildings could be low rise, high rise or individual units. This thesis will help in analyzing the scope of using BIM and Application Programming Interface (API) for management of maintenance in residences by the owner who are not professionally trained. The research analyzes a single, basic function of a BIM tool to determine the potential for such a tool to help non-expert, first time user to be able to understand their residential facilities maintenance requirements. It is an attempt to propose a system which provides alerts to the owners regarding required maintenance and which shows the location of the work in a 3D model. The system was designed and tested in Microsoft Windows 7 operating system by using Autodesk® Revit building information software to make the 3D model, a Revit API plug-in to craft the alerts and show the location of work and Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) to export the model to a web browser. The system worked through Revit program, but the concept of applying the system to work through web browser failed.

Madhani, Himanshu 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assessment of erosion hotspots in a watershed: Integrating the WEPP model and GIS in a case study in the Peruvian Andes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study in assessment of erosion hotspots in an Andean watershed. To do this, we made use of an interface called Geospatial Modelling of Soil Erosion (GEMSE): a tool that integrates Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with ... Keywords: Andes, GIS, Geospatial modeling, Runoff, Soil loss, WEPP

Guillermo A. Baigorria; Consuelo C. Romero

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Chronological Reliability Model Incorporating Wind Forecasts to Assess Wind Plant Reserve Allocation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past several years, there has been considerable development and application of wind forecasting models. The main purpose of these models is to provide grid operators with the best information available so that conventional power generators can be scheduled as efficiently and as cost-effectively as possible. One of the important ancillary services is reserves, which involves scheduling additional capacity to guard against shortfalls. In a recent paper, Strbac and Kirschen[1] proposed a method to allocate the reserve burden to generators. Although Milligan adapted this technique to wind plants[2], neither of these papers accounts for the wind forecast in the reliability calculation. That omission is rectified here. For the system studied in this paper, we found that a reserve allocation scheme using 1-hour forecasts results in a small allocation of system reserve relative to the rated capacity of the wind power plant. This reserve allocation is even smaller when geographically dispersed wind sites are used instead of a large single site.

Milligan, M. R.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

SciTech Connect

This special issue has highlighted recent and innovative methods and results that integrate observations and AQ3 modelling analyses of regional to global aspect of biophysical and biogeochemical interactions of land-cover change with the climate system. Both the Earth System and the Integrated Assessment modeling communities recognize the importance of an accurate representation of land use and land-cover change to understand and quantify the interactions and feedbacks with the climate and socio-economic systems, respectively. To date, cooperation between these communities has been limited. Based on common interests, this work discusses research priorities in representing land use and land-cover change for improved collaboration across modelling, observing and measurement communities. Major research topics in land use and land-cover change are those that help us better understand (1) the interaction of land use and land cover with the climate system (e.g. carbon cycle feedbacks), (2) the provision of goods and ecosystem services by terrestrial (natural and anthropogenic) land-cover types (e.g. food production), (3) land use and management decisions and (4) opportunities and limitations for managing climate change (for both mitigation and adaptation strategies).

Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Pongratz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Measurement and model assessment of fluorescence lifetime sensing in multiply scattering media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The generation and propagation of fluorescence light within biological tissue offers the potential for biomedical diagnostics and analyte sensing. Arising from an exogenous fluorescent dye injected as a contrast agent or immobilized in a polymer implant, the fluorescent decay kinetics can be sensitive to the tissue??s biochemical environment, providing quantitative in vivo information of the confined tissue site. The impact of light propagation and decay kinetics upon the measured signals is important for consideration, simply because tissue scatters light, giving rise to nanosecond photon time-of-flights that are comparable to fluorescence relaxation kinetics. The goal of this study is to develop a time-dependent model describing (i) the generation of fluorescence from dyes exhibiting multi-exponential or more complex kinetics and (ii) its propagation in scattering media. In the preliminary study, fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy is investigated in tissue-like scattering solution. Two fluorescent dyes, 3,3-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) and Indocynanine Green (ICG), which exhibit distinctly different lifetimes and each exhibits single-exponential decay kinetics, were employed. Measurements of phase-modulation as a function of modulation frequency were made at varying concentration ratios of the two dyes to experimentally simulate fluorescence multi-exponential decay kinetics in non-scattering and scattering solutions. The results suggest that frequency-domain measurements of fluorescent decay kinetics along with models of light propagation may be enhanced by scatter in order to probe kinetics more sensitively than in non-scattering solutions. The next study involved fluorescence lifetime sensing in scattering and non-scattering solutions with a pH sensitive dye, Carboxy Seminaphthofluorescein-1 (C-SNAFL-1), which is known to exhibit multi-exponential decay kinetics. The results demonstrate accurate pH sensing in scattering solution via fluorescence kinetics using a simplified propagation model incorporating an average lifetime. Finally, fluorescence lifetime sensing in immobilized systems were investigated. C-SNAFL-1 was immobilized in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles that were immersed in buffered polystyrene solutions. The results demonstrate the ability to perform pH sensing with fluorescence lifetime without the confounding effect of fluorophore loading or the use of 'reference' measurement within multiply scattering systems. In addition, the stability of the immobilized fluorescence sensor and the reliability of fluorescence lifetime measurement verify the prospect of this technology for implantable purposes.

Kuwana, Eddy

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

McKone, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Heat Pump Water Heater Technology Assessment Based on Laboratory Research and Energy Simulation Models: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the laboratory performance of five integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters (HPWHs) across a wide range of operating conditions representative of US climate regions. Laboratory results demonstrate the efficiency of this technology under most of the conditions tested and show that differences in control schemes and design features impact the performance of the individual units. These results were used to understand current model limitations, and then to bracket the energy savings potential for HPWH technology in various US climate regions. Simulation results show that HPWHs are expected to provide significant energy savings in many climate zones when compared to other types of water heaters (up to 64%, including impact on HVAC systems).

Hudon, K.; Sparn, B.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Multi-Methods Approach to HRA and Human Performance Modeling: A Field Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a research reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory is primarily designed and used to test materials to be used in other, larger-scale and prototype reactors. The reactor offers various specialized systems and allows certain experiments to be run at their own temperature and pressure. The ATR Canal temporarily stores completed experiments and used fuel. It also has facilities to conduct underwater operations such as experiment examination or removal. In reviewing the ATR safety basis, a number of concerns were identified involving the ATR canal. A brief study identified ergonomic issues involving the manual handling of fuel elements in the canal that may increase the probability of human error and possible unwanted acute physical outcomes to the operator. In response to this concern, that refined the previous HRA scoping analysis by determining the probability of the inadvertent exposure of a fuel element to the air during fuel movement and inspection was conducted. The HRA analysis employed the SPAR-H method and was supplemented by information gained from a detailed analysis of the fuel inspection and transfer tasks. This latter analysis included ergonomics, work cycles, task duration, and workload imposed by tool and workplace characteristics, personal protective clothing, and operational practices that have the potential to increase physical and mental workload. Part of this analysis consisted of NASA-TLX analyses, combined with operational sequence analysis, computational human performance analysis (CHPA), and 3D graphical modeling to determine task failures and precursors to such failures that have safety implications. Experience in applying multiple analysis techniques in support of HRA methods is discussed.

Jacques Hugo; David I Gertman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies  

SciTech Connect

Disruptive technologies are scientific discoveries that break through the usual product technology capabilities and provide a basis for a new competitive paradigm as described by Anderson and Tushman [1990], Tushman and Rosenkopf [1992], and Bower and Christensen [1995]. Discontinuous innovations are products/processes/services that provide exponential improvements in the value received by the customer much in the same vein as Walsh [1996], Lynn, Morone and Paulson [1996], and Veryzer [1998]. For more on definitions of disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations, see Walsh and Linton [1999] who provide a number of definitions for disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations. Disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations present a unique challenge and opportunity for R and D organizations seeking to build their commercialization efforts and to reinvent the corporation. These technologies do not have a proven path from scientific discovery to mass production and therefore require novel approaches. These critically important technologies are the wellspring of wealth creation and new competency generation but are not readily accepted by the corporate community. They are alternatively embraced and eschewed by the commercial community. They are finally accepted when the technology has already affected the industry or when the technological horse has already flown out of the hanger. Many firms, especially larger firms, seem reluctant to familiarize themselves with these technologies quickly. The trend seems to be that these firms prefer to react to a proven disruptive technology that has changed the product market paradigm. If true, then there is cause for concern. This paper will review the literature on disruptive technologies presenting a model of the progression from scientific idea to mass production for disruptive technologies contrasted to the more copious incremental technologies. The paper will then describe Sandia National Laboratories' involvement in one of the disruptive technology areas, namely micro-electromechanical systems (sometimes referred to as Microsystems or MEMS) and will survey a number of companies that have investigated Sandia's technological discoveries for potential use in an industrial capacity. The survey will focus on the movement of the research findings from the laboratory into the marketplace and all of the problem areas that disruptive technologies face in this arena. The paper will then state several hypotheses that will be tested. The data will be described with results and conclusions reported.

KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K.; WALSH, STEVE; MCWHORTER,PAUL J.; CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C.; WILLIAMS,W. DAVID; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

RCP4.5: A Pathway for Stabilization of Radiative Forcing by 2100  

SciTech Connect

Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 is a scenario that stabilizes radiative forcing at 4.5 W m{sup -2} in the year 2100 without ever exceeding that value. Simulated with the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), RCP4.5 includes long-term, global emissions of greenhouse gases, short-lived species, and land-use-land-cover in a global economic framework. RCP4.5 was updated from earlier GCAM scenarios to incorporate historical emissions and land cover information common to the RCP process and follows a cost-minimizing pathway to reach the target radiative forcing. The imperative to limit emissions in order to reach this target drives changes in the energy system, including shifts to electricity, to lower emissions energy technologies and to the deployment of carbon capture and geologic storage technology. In addition, the RCP4.5 emissions price also applies to land use emissions; as a result, forest lands expand from their present day extent. The simulated future emissions and land use were downscaled from the regional simulation to a grid to facilitate transfer to climate models. While there are many alternative pathways to achieve a radiative forcing level of 4.5 W m{sup -2}, the application of the RCP4.5 provides a common platform for climate models to explore the climate system response to stabilizing the anthropogenic components of radiative forcing.

Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Volke, April C.; Patel, Pralit L.; Delgado Arias, Sabrina; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Total Environment Assessment Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that factors other than molyb- denum concentrations in the macroenvironment may be im- portant in determining in the macroenvironment (4, 36). As such, we were able to isolate strains with Mo-independent nitroge- nases using in macroenvironments that have suf- ficient Mo concentrations for Mo-dependent nitrogen fixation. The fact

Vellend, Mark

271

Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US  

SciTech Connect

To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricityAn Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

274

Solar Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

TNAssess | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TNAssess TNAssess Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: TNAssess Agency/Company /Organization: Joint Implementation Network (JIN) Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.jiqweb.org/index.php/projects/tna-hanbdbook/tna-handbook Cost: Free Related Tools Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) ENV-Linkages-KEI Model ... further results An Excel-based tool that assesses the climate change mitigation, adaptation and development benefits of various technology options using a

276

Influence of climate model biases and daily-scale temperature and precipitation events on hydrological impacts assessment: A case study of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report concludes that climate change is now unequivocal, and associated increases in evaporation and atmospheric water content could intensify the hydrological cycle. However, the biases and coarse spatial resolution of global climate models limit their usefulness in hydrological impact assessment. In order to reduce these limitations, we use a high-resolution regional climate model (RegCM3) to drive a hydrological model (variable infiltration capacity) for the full contiguous United States. The simulations cover 1961-1990 in the historic period and 2071-2100 in the future (A2) period. A quantile-based bias correction technique is applied to the times series of RegCM3-simulated precipitation and temperature. Our results show that biases in the RegCM3 fields not only affect the magnitude of hydrometeorological variables in the baseline hydrological simulation, but they also affect the response of hydrological variables to projected future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. Further, we find that changes in the intensity and occurrence of severe wet and hot events are critical in determining the sign of hydrologic change. These results have important implications for the assessment of potential future hydrologic changes, as well as for developing approaches for quantitative impacts assessment.

Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Bowling, Laura C. [Purdue University; Cherkauer, Keith [Purdue University; Pal, Jeremy [Loyola University; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A system dynamics model for the screening-level long-term assessment of human health risks at contaminated sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the design of sustainable and cost-effective management strategies for contaminated sites, decision makers need appropriate tools, i.e. environmental decision support systems to assist them in the planning, assessment, selection and optimisation ... Keywords: Contaminated sites, EDSS, Human health risk assessment, Monitored natural attenuation, Risk-based land management, System dynamics, Uncertainty, Vensim

Ursula S. Mcknight; Michael Finkel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assessing the Skill of an All-Season Statistical Forecast Model for the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by an attempt to augment dynamical models in predicting the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), and to provide a realistic benchmark to those models, the predictive skill of a multivariate lag-regression statistical model has been ...

Xianan Jiang; Duane E. Waliser; Matthew C. Wheeler; Charles Jones; Myong-In Lee; Siegfried D. Schubert

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A multi-model assessment of future projections of North Atlantic and European extratropical cyclones in the CMIP5 climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of North Atlantic and European extratropical cyclones to climate change is investigated in the climate models participating in CMIP5 (Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project). In contrast to previous multi–model studies, a feature ...

Giuseppe Zappa; Len C. Shaffrey; Kevin I. Hodges; Phil G. Sansom; David B. Stephenson

280

Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources are then addressed. Differences in required analyses and data are captured as outstanding data needs.

A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment Code (IMARC) Version 8: Model Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the total system performance of the candidate spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, since 1989. EPRI's total system performance assessment (TSPA) code is formally known as IMARC, or Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code. Descriptions of the current version of IMARC are found in numerous EPRI reports. The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct summary of all components of IMARC...

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

International Review Team Report: A Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain IMARC Total System Performance Assessment EPRI Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, EPRI has been conducting independent assessments of the proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. EPRI pioneered application of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) approach for evaluating performance of geologic repository systems on a probabilistic basis. Along the way, EPRI developed the Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC) as its primary analytical tool for TSPA-based e...

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110  

SciTech Connect

Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data on an actual power plant transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood forecasting based on model-predicted rainfall. Extreme precipitation and flooding events are a significant concern in central Texas, due to both the high occurrence and ...

Marla R. Knebl Lowrey; Zong-Liang Yang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Multimodel Assessment of Future Projections of North Atlantic and European Extratropical Cyclones in the CMIP5 Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of North Atlantic and European extratropical cyclones to climate change is investigated in the climate models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In contrast to previous multimodel studies, a ...

Giuseppe Zappa; Len C. Shaffrey; Kevin I. Hodges; Phil G. Sansom; David B. Stephenson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Using Analytical and Numerical Modeling to Assess the Utility of Groundwater Monitoring Parameters at Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.gettysburg.edu/academics/physics/clea/CLEAhome.html 4) Inner solar system orbital model http://donald.phast

Texas at Austin, University of

288

An Assessment of a Model-, Grid-, and Basin-Independent Tropical Cyclone Detection Scheme in Selected CMIP3 Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel tropical cyclone (TC) detection technique designed for coarse-resolution models is tested and evaluated. The detector, based on the Okubo–Weiss–Zeta parameter (OWZP), is applied to a selection of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, ...

K. J. Tory; S. S. Chand; R. A. Dare; J. L. McBride

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A phenomenological model of the thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles: Part 2, Assessment of the model with steady-state and transient post-CHF data  

SciTech Connect

After completing the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, we performed assessment calculations of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. Among the four Winfrith runs selected to assess the hot-patch model, the average deviation in hot-patch power predictions was 15.4%, indicating reasonable predictions of the amount of energy transferred to the fluid by the hot patch. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly under-predict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor superheats was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall superheats were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%. The effects of pressure, test section power, and flow rate on the axial variation of tube wall temperature are predicted reasonably well for a large range of operating parameters. A comparison of the predicted and measured local wall. The thermal-hydraulic model in TRAC/PF1-MOD2 was used to predict the axial variation of void fraction as measured in Winfrith post-CHF tests. The predictions for reflood calculations were reasonable. The model correctly predicted the trends in void fraction as a result of the effect of pressure and power, with the effect of pressure being more apparent than that of power. 13 refs.

Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A phenomenological model of the thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles: Part 2, Assessment of the model with steady-state and transient post-CHF data  

SciTech Connect

After completing the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, we performed assessment calculations of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. Among the four Winfrith runs selected to assess the hot-patch model, the average deviation in hot-patch power predictions was 15.4%, indicating reasonable predictions of the amount of energy transferred to the fluid by the hot patch. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly under-predict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor superheats was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall superheats were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%. The effects of pressure, test section power, and flow rate on the axial variation of tube wall temperature are predicted reasonably well for a large range of operating parameters. A comparison of the predicted and measured local wall. The thermal-hydraulic model in TRAC/PF1-MOD2 was used to predict the axial variation of void fraction as measured in Winfrith post-CHF tests. The predictions for reflood calculations were reasonable. The model correctly predicted the trends in void fraction as a result of the effect of pressure and power, with the effect of pressure being more apparent than that of power. 13 refs.

Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling Tsunami Inundation and Assessing Tsunami Hazards for the U. S. East Coast NTHMP Semi-Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://chinacat.coastal.udel.edu/nthmp.html BACKGROUND Tsunami hazard assessment along the US East Coast (USEC) is still in its infancy, in part due inundation in affected USEC communities. Based on our past experience with a variety of tsunami sources

Kirby, James T.

292

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/ak213e/ak213e00.pdf‎ Cost: Free Related Tools CDM Sustainable Development Tool Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS The Socio-economic and Gender Analysis (SEAGA) handbook of concepts, tools and guidelines for mainstreaming gender into development planning and policy implementation. Approach SEAGA, for Socio-economic and Gender Analysis, is an approach to

294

Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF THE SOLAR CORONA FOR ACTIVE REGION 10953  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are thought to be viable tools for investigating the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the coronae of solar active regions. In a series of NLFFF modeling studies, we have found that NLFFF models are successful in application to analytic test cases, and relatively successful when applied to numerically constructed Sun-like test cases, but they are less successful in application to real solar data. Different NLFFF models have been found to have markedly different field line configurations and to provide widely varying estimates of the magnetic free energy in the coronal volume, when applied to solar data. NLFFF models require consistent, force-free vector magnetic boundary data. However, vector magnetogram observations sampling the photosphere, which is dynamic and contains significant Lorentz and buoyancy forces, do not satisfy this requirement, thus creating several major problems for force-free coronal modeling efforts. In this paper, we discuss NLFFF modeling of NOAA Active Region 10953 using Hinode/SOT-SP, Hinode/XRT, STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI, and SOHO/MDI observations, and in the process illustrate three such issues we judge to be critical to the success of NLFFF modeling: (1) vector magnetic field data covering larger areas are needed so that more electric currents associated with the full active regions of interest are measured, (2) the modeling algorithms need a way to accommodate the various uncertainties in the boundary data, and (3) a more realistic physical model is needed to approximate the photosphere-to-corona interface in order to better transform the forced photospheric magnetograms into adequate approximations of nearly force-free fields at the base of the corona. We make recommendations for future modeling efforts to overcome these as yet unsolved problems.

DeRosa, Marc L.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Cheung, Mark C. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover St. B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Barnes, Graham; Leka, K. D. [North West Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates Division, 3380 Mitchell Ln., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Lites, Bruce W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research , P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Amari, Tahar; Canou, Aurelien [CNRS, Centre de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); McTiernan, James M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Regnier, Stephane [Mathematics Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Thalmann, Julia K.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Tadesse, Tilaye [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Valori, Gherardo [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Wheatland, Michael S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Conlon, Paul A. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Fuhrmann, Marcel [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, 14469 Potsdam (Germany)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ocean forecasting in terrain-following coordinates: Formulation and skill assessment of the Regional Ocean Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic improvements in algorithmic design of regional ocean circulation models have led to significant enhancement in simulation ability across a wide range of space/time scales and marine system types. As an example, we briefly review the Regional ... Keywords: Biogeochemical cycles, Incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, Regional ocean prediction, Sea ice modeling, Split-explicit time stepping

D. B. Haidvogel; H. Arango; W. P. Budgell; B. D. Cornuelle; E. Curchitser; E. Di Lorenzo; K. Fennel; W. R. Geyer; A. J. Hermann; L. Lanerolle; J. Levin; J. C. McWilliams; A. J. Miller; A. M. Moore; T. M. Powell; A. F. Shchepetkin; C. R. Sherwood; R. P. Signell; J. C. Warner; J. Wilkin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Comment on “Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop”  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the authors comment on several mistakes made in a journal paper "Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop" published on Environmental Scienece & Technology, based on field measurements from Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems, and published literature. Our comment has led to the development of another version of SWAT to include better process based description of radiation use efficiency and root-shoot growth.

Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, J. G.; Sammons, N. B.; Manowitz, David H.; Thomson, Allison M.; Williams, J.R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Quantitative Assessment of Diurnal Variation of Tropical Convection Simulated by a Global Nonhydrostatic Model without Cumulus Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the resolution dependence of diurnal variation in tropical convective systems represented by a global nonhydrostatic model without cumulus parameterization. This paper describes the detailed characteristics of diurnal ...

Akira T. Noda; Kazuyoshi Oouchi; Masaki Satoh; Hirofumi Tomita

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

An Assessment of the Primary Sources of Spread of Global Warming Estimates from Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate feedback analysis constitutes a useful framework for comparing the global mean surface temperature responses to an external forcing predicted by general circulation models (GCMs). Nevertheless, the contributions of the different radiative ...

Jean-Louis Dufresne; Sandrine Bony

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An Assessment of the Sea Surface Temperature Influence on Surface Wind Stress in Numerical Weather Prediction and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of six climate models to capture the observed coupling between SST and surface wind stress in the vicinity of strong midlatitude SST fronts is analyzed. The analysis emphasizes air–sea interactions associated with ocean meanders in ...

Eric D. Maloney; Dudley B. Chelton

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessing the Benefits of Convection-Permitting Models by Neighborhood Verification: Examples from MAP D-PHASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) models produce more detailed precipitation structures but the real benefit is probably the more realistic statistics gained with the higher resolution and not the information on the specific grid ...

Tanja Weusthoff; Felix Ament; Marco Arpagaus; Mathias W. Rotach

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Statistical models of crop production to assess the impacts of a CO/sub 2/ induced climate change: Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the use of mathematical models to forecast the effects of increased CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere. These models were created to predict crop yields under different climatic conditions. The authors have adapted them to consider climatic changes caused by the ''greenhouse effect.'' Principal climatic variables include monthly precipitation and temperature range. 26 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (TEM)

Decker, W.L.; Achutuni, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Assessment of the Land Surface and Boundary Layer Models in Two Operational Versions of the NCEP Eta Model Using FIFE Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the 1987 summer FIFE experiment for four pairs of days are compared with corresponding 48-h forecasts from two different versions of the Eta Model, both initialized from the NCEP–NCAR (National Centers for Environmental Prediction–...

Alan K. Betts; Fei Chen; Kenneth E. Mitchell; Zaviša I. Janji?

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessing the Importance of Nonlinearities in the Development of a Substructure Model for the Wind Turbine CAE Tool FAST: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design and analysis of wind turbines are performed using aero-servo-elastic tools that account for the nonlinear coupling between aerodynamics, controls, and structural response. The NREL-developed computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool FAST also resolves the hydrodynamics of fixed-bottom structures and floating platforms for offshore wind applications. This paper outlines the implementation of a structural-dynamics module (SubDyn) for offshore wind turbines with space-frame substructures into the current FAST framework, and focuses on the initial assessment of the importance of structural nonlinearities. Nonlinear effects include: large displacements, axial shortening due to bending, cross-sectional transverse shear effects, etc.

Damiani, R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Song, H.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Statistical model for assessing the risk of hail damage to any ground installation. Technical report, June 1978-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a statistical model which has been developed to determine the risk of damage by large hail to any ground installation (such as a solar flat plate collector). The model is based on data for the number of haildays per year, hailstone size distribution, and storm severity (expressed in number of hailstones per square meter per storm). Other than parameters derived from the raw meteorological data available, the parameters of the model are the number of years of surface exposure and the exposure area size. The end result is the probability of a hailstone of a given size striking a given surface area in a given number of years. The maximum probable hailstone size is used as a convenient index of hail risk. The data upon which to base a prediction model are sparse at this time, covering few geographic locations; much of the information available is deficient in sampling consistency and/or sample size. For this reason, this report fully documents the derivation and use of the model for future applications, when more and better data are collected. The FORTRAN source code to calculate the risk model digitally is included in APPENDIX D. This model improves on previous work in: (1) the use of more thorough statistical procedures and a more rigorous accounting of storm severity; (2) a more thorough investigation into the two probability density distributions commonly used (Poisson and negative binomial) to describe hailday frequencies, and (3) an attempt to define more rigorously the distribution of hailstone sizes. A sensitivity analysis was performed and conclusions are drawn from the results.

Cox, M; Armstrong, P R

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Coordination studies with PNNL's global change assessment model: integrated science modeling and applications to the human dimensions. Final technical report for period October 1996 - March 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) supported by the DOE Program on Health and Environmental Research: Environmental Sciences Program under Grant No. DOE DFGO2-96ER62284. As part of this research proposal, we designed the model that better represent spatial variations and treat the process relevant towards evaluating the biogeochemical cycles important to determining atmospheric composition and resulting climatic effects at the regional scale. The process level understanding of regional impacts into the Integrated Assessment (IA) model will help to improve the understanding of climate change impacts and extend the range of issues, which can be addressed in an IA framework. On the application front, the newly developed model has been applied to a selected set of studies to address policy related questions on climate change, in particular, the role of forestry, and land-use for historical greenhouse gas emissions; projections of future methane emissions; a research study related to energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; and radiative forcing and estimation of a number of important greenhouse gases. In the following, the significant findings from the DOE supported study are outlined.

Wuebbles, Donald J.; Jain Atul

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Implementation and assessment of turbine wake models in the Weather Research and Forecasting model for both mesoscale and large-eddy simulation  

SciTech Connect

Flow dynamics in large wind projects are influenced by the turbines located within. The turbine wakes, regions characterized by lower wind speeds and higher levels of turbulence than the surrounding free stream flow, can extend several rotor diameters downstream, and may meander and widen with increasing distance from the turbine. Turbine wakes can also reduce the power generated by downstream turbines and accelerate fatigue and damage to turbine components. An improved understanding of wake formation and transport within wind parks is essential for maximizing power output and increasing turbine lifespan. Moreover, the influence of wakes from large wind projects on neighboring wind farms, agricultural activities, and local climate are all areas of concern that can likewise be addressed by wake modeling. This work describes the formulation and application of an actuator disk model for studying flow dynamics of both individual turbines and arrays of turbines within wind projects. The actuator disk model is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is an open-source atmospheric simulation code applicable to a wide range of scales, from mesoscale to large-eddy simulation. Preliminary results demonstrate the applicability of the actuator disk model within WRF to a moderately high-resolution large-eddy simulation study of a small array of turbines.

Singer, M; Mirocha, J; Lundquist, J; Cleve, J

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling and assessment of flow and transport in the Hueco Bolson, a transboundary groundwater system: the El Paso / Cuidad Juarez case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential contamination from hazardous and solid waste landfills stemming from population increase, rapid industrialization, and the proliferation of assembly plants known as the maquiladoras, are of major concern in the U.S.-Mexican border area. Additionally, historical, current, and future stresses on the Hueco Bolson alluvial aquifer in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez area due to excessive groundwater withdrawal can affect contaminant migration in the area. In the current study, an updated and improved threedimensional numerical groundwater flow and transport model is developed using a current Hueco Bolson groundwater availability model as its basis. The model with contaminant transport is required to access and characterize the extent of vulnerability of the aquifer to potential contamination from landfills in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez border area. The model developed in this study is very capable of serving as the basis of future studies for water availability, water quality, and contamination assessments in the Hueco Bolson. The implementation of fate and transport modeling and the incorporation of the Visual MODFLOW® pre and post processor, requiring MODFLOW 2000 data conversion, enabled significant enhancements to the numerical modeling and computing capabilities for the Hueco Bolson. The model in the current research was also developed by employing MT3DMS©, ZONEBUDGET, and Visual PEST® for automated calibrations. Simulation results found that the Hueco Bolson released more water from storage than the aquifer was being recharged in response to increased pumping to supply the growing border area population. Hence, significant head drops and high levels of drawdown were observed in the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez area. Predictive simulations were completed representing scenarios of potential contamination from the border area sites. Fate and transport results were most sensitive to hydraulic conductivities, flow velocities, and directions at the sites. Sites that were located within the vicinity of the El Paso Valley and the Rio Grande River, where head differences and permeabilities were significant, exhibited the highest potentials for contaminant migration.

Nwaneshiudu, Okechukwu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capabilities/vat/assess/ capabilities/vat/assess/ ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, Nuclear Engineering Division, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments Argonne Vulnerability Assessment Team Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP , 630-252-6168 1. There are a number of conventional tools for finding security vulnerabilities. These include security surveys, risk management, design basis threat, CARVER Method, Delphi Method, software vulnerability assessment tools, infrastructure modeling, etc. 2. These tools have some value, and indeed we have used them all. 3. Experience has shown, however, that these methods do not usually result in dramatic improvements to security, nor do they reliably predict catastrophic security incidents that

310

A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect

A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

A reduced-form approach to characterizing sulfate aerosol effects on climate in integrated assessment models. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to devise a methodology for estimating the spatial patterns of future climate change accounting for the effects of both greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols under a wide range of emissions scenarios, using the results of General Circulation Models.

Wigley, T.M.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume V. SOLSTEP: a computer model for solar plant system simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The simulation code, SOLSTEP, was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to facilitate the evaluation of proposed designs for solar thermal power plants. It allows the user to analyze the thermodynamic and economic performance of a conceptual design for several field size-storage capacity configurations. This feature makes it possible to study the levelized energy cost of a proposed concept over a range of plant capacity factors. The thermodynamic performance is analyzed on a time step basis using actual recorded meteorological and insolation data for specific geographic locations. The flexibility of the model enables the user to analyze both central and distributed generation concepts using either thermal or electric storage systems. The thermodynamic and economic analyses view the plant in a macroscopic manner as a combination of component subsystems. In the thermodynamic simulation, concentrator optical performance is modeled as a function of solar position; other aspects of collector performance can optionally be treated as functions of ambient air temperature, wind speed, and component power level. The power conversion model accounts for the effects of ambient air temperature, partial load operation, auxiliary power demands, and plant standby and startup energy requirements. The code was designed in a modular fashion to provide efficient evaluations of the collector system, total plant, and system economics. SOLSTEP has been used to analyze a variety of solar thermal generic concepts involving several collector types and energy conversion and storage subsystems. The code's straightforward models and modular nature facilitated simple and inexpensive parametric studies of solar thermal power plant performance.

Bird, S.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

An assessment of a partial pit ventilation system to reduce emission under slatted floor - Part 1: Scale model study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases from naturally ventilated livestock houses cause contamination of the surrounding atmospheric environment. Requests to reduce ammonia emissions from livestock farms are growing in Denmark. It is assumed that ... Keywords: Livestock, Pit ventilation, Scale model, Slatted floor, Tracer gas, Wind tunnel

Wentao Wu; Peter Kai; Guoqiang Zhang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A two-level computable equilibrium model to assess the strategic allocation of emission allowances within the European union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the modeling of the strategic allocation of greenhouse gases emission allowances in the EU-wide trading market that results from Kyoto agreement implementation. An M-matrix game is formulated where the players are countries or groups ...

Laurent Viguier; Marc Vielle; Alain Haurie; Alain Bernard

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Agni: Coupling Model Analysis Tools and High-Performance Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulators for Risk and Performance Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agni is open source /community /multi platform framework for model-based analyses (SA, UQ, PE, RA, DS). Agni can be applied independently from other Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) modules. Agni will be available as Mercurial repository (hg clone https://akuna.labworks.org/hg/Platform) including source code, manual, test and verification examples.

Vesselinov, Velimir V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pau, George [LBNL; Finsterle, Stefan [LBNL

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

A simple model to assess the sensitivity of grassland dairy systems to scenarios of seasonal biomass production variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent decades, dairy herds of the peri-Mediterranean area have coped with high climatic variability, which has contributed to weakening their economic equilibrium. Survey studies highlighted that climatic impact depends on the strategies of farmers, ... Keywords: Biomass production variability, Cattle farming system, Modelling, System sensitivity

A. Lurette; C. Aubron; C. -H. Moulin

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Modelling respirometric tests for the assessment of kinetic and stoichiometric parameters on MBBR biofilm for municipal wastewater treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) technology is a suitable option for up-grading and retro-fitting wastewater treatment plants. Although being introduced in late 80s, design and operational guidelines of MBBR are mainly based on empirical approaches. ... Keywords: MBBR, Modelling, Municipal wastewater, Respirometry, Storage

Martina Ferrai; Giuseppe Guglielmi; Gianni Andreottola

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, March--May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project described in this report was the result of a Memorandum of Cooperation between the US and the former-USSR following the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4. A joint program was established to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. The task of Working Group 7 was ``to develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (Biospheric Model Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (Validation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains. In the future, this project will be considered separately from the Chernobyl Studies Project and the essential activities of former Task 7.1D will be folded within the broader umbrella of the BIOMOVS and VAMP projects. The Working Group Leader of Task 7.1D will continue to provide oversight for this project.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

S. Khericha

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessment of Mercury Emissions, Transport, Fate, and Cycling for the Continental United States: Model Structure and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New findings on mercury emissions, cycling, and fate have allowed the development of improved simulation tools and the assembly of verification data sets for modeling mercury transport and deposition. This report describes new simulations of mercury emissions, transport, and deposition from the atmosphere that form an important first step in for relating mercury concentrations and deposition rates at particular geographic locations to their ultimate source regions.

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Data Analysis, Pre-Ignition Assessment, and Post-Ignition Modeling of the Large-Scale Annular Cookoff Tests  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the implications that cookoff of plastic-bonded explosive-9501 could have on safety assessments, we analyzed the available data from the large-scale annular cookoff (LSAC) assembly series of experiments. In addition, we examined recent data regarding hypotheses about pre-ignition that may be relevant to post-ignition behavior. Based on the post-ignition data from Shot 6, which had the most complete set of data, we developed an approximate equation of state (EOS) for the gaseous products of deflagration. Implementation of this EOS into the multimaterial hydrodynamics computer program PAGOSA yielded good agreement with the inner-liner collapse sequence for Shot 6 and with other data, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector and resistance wires. A metric to establish the degree of symmetry based on the concept of time of arrival to pin locations was used to compare numerical simulations with experimental data. Several simulations were performed to elucidate the mode of ignition in the LSAC and to determine the possible compression levels that the metal assembly could have been subjected to during post-ignition.

G. Terrones; F.J. Souto; R.F. Shea; M.W.Burkett; E.S. Idar

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Bayesian Climate Change Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian fingerprinting methodology for assessing anthropogenic impacts on climate was developed. This analysis considers the effect of increased CO2 on near-surface temperatures. A spatial CO2 fingerprint based on control and forced model ...

L. Mark Berliner; Richard A. Levine; Dennis J. Shea

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Integrated Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Assessment Integrated Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integrated Assessment: Mainstreaming sustainability into policymaking--A guidance manual Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Background analysis Website: www.unep.ch/etb/publications/AI%20guidance%202009/UNEP%20IA%20final.pd Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/times-integrated-assessment-model-0,h Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: Integrated Assessment[1] The Times Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM) comprises several thousand technologies in all sectors of the energy system. It is characterized by several technical and economic parameters and by emission coefficients for

326

Using a Simple Binomial Model to Assess Improvement in Predictive Capability: Sequential Bayesian Inference, Hypothesis Testing, and Power Analysis  

SciTech Connect

We present a Bayesian statistical methodology for identifying improvement in predictive simulations, including an analysis of the number of (presumably expensive) simulations that will need to be made in order to establish with a given level of confidence that an improvement has been observed. Our analysis assumes the ability to predict (or postdict) the same experiments with legacy and new simulation codes and uses a simple binomial model for the probability, {theta}, that, in an experiment chosen at random, the new code will provide a better prediction than the old. This model makes it possible to do statistical analysis with an absolute minimum of assumptions about the statistics of the quantities involved, at the price of discarding some potentially important information in the data. In particular, the analysis depends only on whether or not the new code predicts better than the old in any given experiment, and not on the magnitude of the improvement. We show how the posterior distribution for {theta} may be used, in a kind of Bayesian hypothesis testing, both to decide if an improvement has been observed and to quantify our confidence in that decision. We quantify the predictive probability that should be assigned, prior to taking any data, to the possibility of achieving a given level of confidence, as a function of sample size. We show how this predictive probability depends on the true value of {theta} and, in particular, how there will always be a region around {theta} = 1/2 where it is highly improbable that we will be able to identify an improvement in predictive capability, although the width of this region will shrink to zero as the sample size goes to infinity. We show how the posterior standard deviation may be used, as a kind of 'plan B metric' in the case that the analysis shows that {theta} is close to 1/2 and argue that such a plan B should generally be part of hypothesis testing. All the analysis presented in the paper is done with a general beta-function prior for {theta}, enabling sequential analysis in which a small number of new simulations may be done and the resulting posterior for {theta} used as a prior to inform the next stage of power analysis.

Sigeti, David E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pelak, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

A model for calculation of RCS pressure during reflux boiling under reduced inventory conditions and its assessment against PKL data  

SciTech Connect

There has been recent interest in the United States concerning the loss of residual heat removal system (RHRS) under reduced coolant inventory conditions for pressurized water reactors. This issue is also of interest in the Federal Republic of Germany and an experiment was performed in the integral PKL-HI experimental facility at Siemens-KWU to supply applicable data. Recently, an NRC-sponsored effort has been undertaken at the Idaho-National Engineering Laboratory to identify and analyze the important thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors following the long term loss-of-RHRS during reduced inventory operation. The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed reactor coolant system during such a transient is investigated in this report. Some of the specific processes investigated include: reflux condensation in the steam generators, the corresponding pressure increase in the reactor coolant system, and void fraction distributions on the primary side of the system. Mathematical models of these and other physical processes Experiment B4.5.

Palmrose, D.E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandl, R.M. [Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for a comprehensive, system biology level analysis of a metal-reducing microbial community.

Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Process Management Maturity Assessment Process Management Maturity Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper outlines a Business Process Management implementation approach in a large international company. It introduces a Process Management Maturity Assessment (PMMA) which was developed to assess the implementation of Business Process Management. The maturity model is based on the assessment of nine categories which comprehensively cover all aspects which impact the success of Business Process Management. Some findings of the first assessment round are presented to illustrate the benefits of the PMMA approach.

Michael Rohloff; Michael Rohloff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

OCEAN MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5, pages 1376—1393 CLIVAR is an international research programme dealing with climate variability and predictability on time-scales from months to centuries. CLIVAR is a component of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). WCRP is sponsored by the World

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

333

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. A conceptual simulation model for release scenario analysis of a hypothetical site in Columbia Plateau Basalts  

SciTech Connect

This report is a status report for an evolving methodology for release scenario development for underground nuclear waste repositories. As such, it is intended for use as a reference point and a preliminary description of an evolving geoscience methodology. When completed this methodology will be used as a tool in developing disruptive release scenarios for analyzing the long-term safety of geological nuclear waste repositories. While a basalt environment is used as an example, this report is not intended to reflect an actual site safety assessment for a repository in a media. It is rather intended to present a methodology system framework and to provide discussions of the geological phenomena and parameters that must be addressed in order to develop a methodology for potential release scenarios. It is also important to note that the phenomena, their interrelationships, and their relative importance along with the overall current structure of the model will change as new geological information is gathered through additional peer review, geotechnical input, site specific field work, and related research efforts.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Petrie, G.M.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

• A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f (·) is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. • Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ˆ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t • What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Materials - Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Assessment The staff of the Energy Systems Division has a long history of technical and economic analysis of the production and recycling of materials for transportation...

336

A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Innovative approaches in integrated assessment modelling of European air pollution control strategies - Implications of dealing with multi-pollutant multi-effect problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, crucial aspects of the implications and the complexity of interconnected multi-pollutant multi-effect assessments of both air pollution control strategies and the closely related reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. ... Keywords: Emission control, Integrated assessment, Optimisation

Stefan Reis; Steffen Nitter; Rainer Friedrich

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy  

SciTech Connect

Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

Callaway, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction and Operation of a Proposed Biogas Anaerobic Digestion Facility at an Ethanol Plant Western Plains Energy, LLC Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas U. S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Cooperative Service 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-3225 August 29, 2011 Environmental Assessment Western Plains Energy, LLC Gove County, Kansas ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I. PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND NEED .................................................................... 1 II. PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES .................................. 2 III. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL AREA .............................................................. 2

340

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 DOE/EA-1791 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNVIERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 U.S. Department of Energy University of Minnesota Wind Energy Research Consortium Project Golden Field Office Environmental Assessment March 2011 Page i Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

342

Integrated assessment briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Venetie, Alaska energy assessment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Energy Assessment performed for Venetie, Alaska using the principals of an Energy Surety Microgrid (ESM) The report covers a brief overview of the principals of ESM, a site characterization of Venetie, a review of the consequence modeling, some preliminary recommendations, and a basic cost analysis.

Jensen, Richard Pearson; Baca, Micheal J.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Brainard, James Robert

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT and STABILIZATION' SCENARIOS PARRERSBURG,'W. VA. SITE FEBRUARY 1980 M. CARSON J. COFFMAN N. MANDELTORT, ! Division of Nuclear Service Operations Chem-Nuclear\ Systems, Inc. 240 Stoneridge Dr., Suite 100 Columbia, South Carolina 29210 Prepared for AMAX Specialty Hetals Corporation One Greenwich Plaza Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 During July' 1978, Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. (CNSI) began an assessment program for AMAX Specialty Metals Corp."(AMAX) u to locate, quantify, and evaluate the'extent of environmental radioactive contamination at the AMAX Parkersburg., West Virginia former zirconium/hafnium processing facility. In addition, preliminary ive assessments were to be made to assist AMAX in evaluat ,ing alternat methods for site cleanup.

345

NGFAST: a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U.S. state borders and import points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. ...

Edgar C. Portante; Brian A. Craig; Stephen M. Folga

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Software products for risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For assessing risks in all environments it is often necessary to use a systematic approach of modeling and simulation with the aim to simplify this process in the framework of designing new technological lines, machines, equipment and processes. Also ... Keywords: crisis management, risk assessment, software products

Jozef Ristvej; Tomas Lovecek

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cogeneration Assessment Methodology for Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented that enables electric utilities to assess the cogeneration potential among industrial, commercial, and institutional customers within the utility's service area. The methodology includes a survey design, analytic assessment model, and a data base to track customers over time. A case study is presented describing the background, procedures, and results of a cogeneration investigation for Northeast Utilities.

Sedlik, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Assessment of Dynamical Downscaling in Near-Surface Fields with Different Spectral Nudging Approaches Using the Nested Regional Climate Model (NRCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic downscaling with regional-scale climate models is used widely for increasing the spatial resolution of global-scale climate model projections. One uncertainty in generating these projections is the choice of boundary forcing applied. In ...

Jiali Wang; Veerabhadra R. Kotamarthi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT (EA) ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLM Office: Carlsbad Field Office DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA Serial #: NM-123703 Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (SAR) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action 1.1 The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of re-

350

Rapid Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Assessment of Lignin Content and Structure in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Grown Under Different Environmental Conditions David G. J. Mann & Nicole Labbé & Robert W. Sykes & Kristen Gracom & Lindsey Kline & Isabella M. Swamidoss & Jason N. Burris & Mark Davis & C. Neal Stewart Jr. Published online: 13 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a candi- date feedstock in bioenergy, and plant breeding and molecular genetic strategies are being used to improve germplasm. In order to assess these subsequent modifica- tions, baseline biomass compositional data are needed in a relevant variety of environments. In this study, switch- grass cv. Alamo was grown in the field, greenhouse, and growth chamber and harvested into individual leaf and stem tissue components. These components

351

Sleep Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleep Assessment Sleep Assessment 1 | Thank you for taking the time to complete this extensive form. Sleep disturbances and/or fatigue are most often the result of many factors. In order to best treat your condition we need to understand your symptoms and history. Please bring your completed assessment form to your appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 505 844-HBES (4237). Name: Employee ID#: Date: Male Female Age: Health Plan : United BCBSNM Other: Referred by: Sleep and Health History In general, would you describe your sleep as: Refreshing Not Refreshing How would you rate your sleep? Very Good Good Adequate Poor Very Poor How would you describe your sleep problem? Sleep Problem (indicate all that apply) Duration of problem

352

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

353

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS December 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Building Research and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 3. ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.1 No Action Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.2 Proposed Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.3 Alternative Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-3 3.4 Impacts of Proposed and Alternative Standards

354

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee June 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office This page intentionally left blank. DOE/EA-1779 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date Issued-June 2011 Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC and CDM Federal Services Inc. contributed to the preparation of this document and may not be considered for review of the document U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS FIGURES......................................................................................................................................................

355

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

356

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

682 682 Environmental Assessment Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Conducted Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington Environmental Assessment February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 This page intentionally left blank. 1 February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION..............................................................................1. 1.1 BACKGROUND ......................................................................... 3 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTION ......................... 6 1.3 NEPA REQUIREMENTS............................................................... 6 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVE ....................... 8

357

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well developed asset management implementation. Consequently an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in a risk assessment process. However, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require for their successful application some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well-developed asset management implementation. Consequently, an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in the risk assessment process. However, for their application, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment failure. This re...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Internalizing the externalities of solar technology: Methodologies for incorporating externalities in the assessment of policy options and technology assessments of solar energy initiatives and R and D programs using Brookhaven models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Internalizing the costs for implementing solar energy may never be, the author says. In the meantime, budget allocation decisions must be made. It is the purpose of this paper to identify capabilities currently in existence at BNL that help to provide answers to the value of increasing the contribution of solar energy. This paper presents several alternative approaches. BNL models that are useful for the economic measurement of energy related environmental damage are NEDS/REPS1 NEDS/REPS; ESNS; PRESTO; and optimization models (M-RESOM, BECOM, SOGEPH, BESOM, DESOM/TESOM/MARICAL). The approaches suggested would be much more useful if they were evaluated by certain criteria. This is the goal of most systems research on internalizing externalities. The methods described provide quantitative measures for the following criteria, although no single method provides all of them: the residuals produced with and without solar; the impact of residuals on life, property, ecosystems, and ambience; the intergenerational effects; the effect of oil imports on security; the depletion of non-renewable resources; the quantification (as far as possible) of externalities; and the appropriate level of aggregration. In most cases in this paper, examples are given. The most common criteria is that the energy demands must be driven by an economic model that in turn is driven by an energy model that produces the energy prices and the fuel mix. Solar technology implementation is particularly dependent on relative prices, economic activity, and energy demand. (MCW)

Marcuse, W

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability  

SciTech Connect

The System Assessment Capability is an integrated system of computer models and databases to assess the impact of waste remaining at Hanford. This tool will help decision makers and the public evaluate the cumulative effects of contamination from Hanford. This report describes the results of an initial assessment performed with the System Assessment Capability tools.

Bryce, Robert W.; Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

The feasibility assessment of a U.S. natural gas production reporting system uniform production reporting model. Final report, July 1993--June 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uniform Production Reporting Model (UPRM) project was charged with identifying the best practices and procedures of the natural gas producing states related to the gathering, management, and dissemination of production data. It is recommended that the producing states begin the process of upgrading state systems using the concepts embodied in the UPRM model.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A distributed framework for multi-risk assessment of natural hazards used to model the effects of forest fire on hydrology and sediment yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the European Commission-funded MEDIGRID project, Grid computing technology is used to integrate various natural hazard models and data sets, maintained independently at different centres in Europe, into a single system, accessible to users over ... Keywords: Fire Spread Engine, GRID, Integrated modelling, SHETRAN, Soil erosion

C. Isabella Bovolo; Simon J. Abele; James C. Bathurst; David Caballero; Marek Ciglan; George Eftichidis; Branislav Simo

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Landslide susceptibility assessment and factor effect analysis: backpropagation artificial neural networks and their comparison with frequency ratio and bivariate logistic regression modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data collection for landslide susceptibility modeling is often an inhibitive activity. This is one reason why for quite some time landslides have been described and modelled on the basis of spatially distributed values of landslide-related attributes. ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, GIS, Klang Valley, Landslide, Malaysia, Susceptibility

Biswajeet Pradhan; Saro Lee

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A spatial agent-based model for assessing strategies of adaptation to climate and tourism demand changes in an alpine tourism destination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vast body of literature suggests that the European Alpine Region is amongst the most sensitive socio-ecosystems to climate change impacts. Our model represents the winter tourism socio-ecosystem of Auronzo di Cadore, located in the Dolomites (Italy), ... Keywords: Adaptation strategies, Alpine tourism, Climate change, Social simulation, Spatial agent-based model

Stefano Balbi, Carlo Giupponi, Pascal Perez, Marco Alberti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Assessment of model error in limited-area simulations of shallow water test cases on the C-grid plane and sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A suite of limited-area test cases for the solution of the shallow water (SW) equations on the plane and sphere are collected and evaluated using the Model for Predication Across Scales (MPAS) modeling system. Included are regional simulations of ...

Christopher A. Jeffery

367

Assessment summary, Jan. 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and internal use as focal point) Draft “consideration of use” battery Rewrite paper expanding Research & Network models SQW meeting in Cambridge SIKE/Assessment: 3 to 5 months Lessons learned from Connections - briefings First implementation of IRO at CU... support letters from ONE & Scotland Coordination meeting of Cummings/Horner/Tanner SIKE & KICs: 3 Greitzer meetings planned Innovation Centre: Set BT/CW priorities for March/April events Brief CMI management (What was said to Davies, Aldridge...

368

Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues  

SciTech Connect

Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm{sup 2} with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

Ocana, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A. [Centro Laser UPM. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Campus Sur UPM. Edificio La Arboleda. Ctra. de Valencia, km. 7.3. 28031 Madrid (Spain)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Forecasting Techniques The Use of Hourly Model-Generated Soundings to Forecast Mesoscale Phenomena. Part I: Initial Assessment in Forecasting Warm-Season Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since late 1995, NCEP has made available to forecasters hourly model guidance at selected sites in the form of vertical profiles of various forecast fields. These profiles provide forecasters with increased temporal resolution and greater ...

Robert E. Hart; Gregory S. Forbes; Richard H. Grumm

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Study on Real Options Model of Operating Capital Value of Generator for Spinning Reserve and Risk Assessment Based on Monte Carlo Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity market has complex market rules, and its operation with great uncertainty. In this paper, the real options model of operating capital value of generator for spinning reserve is constructed under uncertainty market conditions including uncertainty ...

Xin Ma

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Application of Gaussian Error Propagation Principles for Theoretical Assessment of Model Uncertainty in Simulated Soil Processes Caused by Thermal and Hydraulic Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical uncertainty in soil temperature and volumetric water content and related moisture and heat fluxes predicted by a state-of-the-art soil module [embedded in a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model] is analyzed by Gaussian error-...

Nicole Mölders; Mihailo Jankov; Gerhard Kramm

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Air–Sea Interaction in the Ligurian Sea: Assessment of a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model Using In Situ Data from LASIE07  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ experimental data and numerical model results are presented for the Ligurian Sea in the northwestern Mediterranean. The Ligurian Sea Air–Sea Interaction Experiment (LASIE07) and LIGURE2007 experiments took place in June 2007. The LASIE07 ...

R. J. Small; T. Campbell; J. Teixeira; S. Carniel; T. A. Smith; J. Dykes; S. Chen; R. Allard

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Assessing the Response of Snow Avalanche Runout Altitudes to Climate Fluctuations Using Hierarchical Modeling: Application to 61 Winters of Data in France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow avalanches are natural hazards strongly controlled by the mountain winter climate, but their recent response to climate change has thus far been poorly documented. In this paper, hierarchical modeling is used to obtain robust indexes of the ...

N. Eckert; H. Baya; M. Deschatres

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Multi-Pathway Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for a Model Coal-Fired Power Plant Using a Revised Arsenic Bioconcentratio n Factor for Edible Fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a multimedia human health and ecosystem risk study of a model coal-fired power plant in a model setting, using data from an actual power plant that have been transposed to a lakeside setting in the same state. Values of arsenic concentrations in similar ecosystem settings were applied to calculate its contributions to risk.BackgroundThere is increased scientific and regulatory interest in the suite of risks to human health and ecosystems ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. The concepts presented are most useful to state and national energy agencies tasked as first responders to such emergencies. Within minutes of the occurrence of a break, NGfast can generate an HTML-formatted report to support briefing materials for state and federal emergency responders. Sample partial results of a simulation of a real system in the United States are presented.

Portante, E. C.; Craig, B. A.; Folga, S.M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

An integrated monitoring/modeling framework for assessing human-nature interactions in urbanizing watersheds: Wappinger and Onondaga Creek watersheds, New York, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In much of the world, rapidly expanding areas of impervious surfaces due to urbanization threaten water resources. Although tools for modeling and projecting land use change and water quantity and quality exist independently, to date it is rare to find ... Keywords: Impervious surface, Remote sensing, Socio-economic factors, Uncertainty, Urbanization, Water resources

Bongghi Hong; Karin E. Limburg; Myrna H. Hall; Giorgos Mountrakis; Peter M. Groffman; Karla Hyde; Li Luo; Victoria R. Kelly; Seth J. Myers

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Assessing the climatic effect of carbon dioxide and other trace gases using an interactive two-dimensional climate-chemistry model. Final report, December 1992--August 1996  

SciTech Connect

In the recent IPCC report, the role of tropospheric aerosols, stratospheric aerosols, and natural solar variability have also been identified as having sizable effects on climate, both by direct perturbation of the radiative balance and indirectly by changing ozone. Although the effect of changing CO{sub 2} is by far the dominant factor on a century time scale, the effects from the other identified factors are important on a decade time scale. It is important to understand the mechanisms that relate these changes to climatic responses. Developing appropriate numerical models with the capability to simulate these mechanisms will enable one to correctly interpret the observed climate changes that have occurred to data, as well as predict future changes in climate. It is presently impractical to run comprehensive 3-D general circulation model simulations of the interactions between atmospheric chemistry and the rest of the climate system on time scales of decades to centuries. Thus, 2-D models and other lower resolution models play an essential role in understanding the complex interactions of the integrated climate system.

Ko, M.K.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

A consensus support model based on linguistic information for the initial-self assessment of the EFQM in health care organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The improvement of the quality of the services is one of the primary sources of competitive advantage in health care organizations. As customers typically search for higher quality of care when choosing treatments, health plans and providers, the health ... Keywords: Consensus, EFQM, Group decision making, Health care organizations, Linguistic modeling

J. M. Moreno-Rodr?Guez; F. J. Cabrerizo; I. J. PéRez; M. A. Mart?Nez

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Performance Assessment of a New Stationarity-based Parameter Estimation Method with a Simplified Land Surface Model Using In-situ and Remotely Sensed Surface States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluate the performance of a new stationarity-based method for parameter estimation of a simple coupled water and energy balance model using in-situ and remotely sensed surface soil moisture (from AMSR-E) and surface temperature (from a ...

Jian Sun; Guido D. Salvucci

380

Extreme Value Statistics of the Total Energy in an Intermediate-Complexity Model of the Midlatitude Atmospheric Jet. Part II: Trend Detection and Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A baroclinic model for the atmospheric jet at middle latitudes is used as a stochastic generator of nonstationary time series of the total energy of the system. A linear time trend is imposed on the parameter TE, descriptive of the forced equator-...

Mara Felici; Valerio Lucarini; Antonio Speranza; Renato Vitolo

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on April 13-14, 2010. The Performance Assessment Community of Practice has been chartered to advise the Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board regarding performance assessments and performance assessment-like analyses, promote consistency in the preparation of performance assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, foster exchange of information among performance assessment practitioners, and develop appropriate guidance for performance assessments such that they are based on sound science and are defensible. The purpose of this technical exchange is to provide a venue for performance assessment and risk assessment practitioners, managers and regulators, and contributors to the Cementitious Barriers Partnership and Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management project to share plans and experiences and share ideas for future performance assessment and risk assessment modeling. The technical exchange will include a combination of plenary presentations and discussions with breakout sessions for specific topics. Discussions will emphasize areas for improved consistency and solicit suggestions for future developments related to modeling tools. A breakout discussion session is also planned to address: DOE Order 435.1 Update, regulatory challenges for performance and risk assessment modeling, and other topical areas. Arrangements have also been made for a GoldSim modeling roundtable at the conclusion of the workshop for participants who are interested in sharing experiences related to the use of GoldSim for their simulations.

382

The importance of parameter variances, correlations lengths, and cross-correlations in reactive transport models: key considerations for assessing the need for microscale information  

SciTech Connect

A process-oriented modeling approach is implemented to examine the importance of parameter variances, correlation lengths, and especially cross-correlations in contaminant transport predictions over large scales. It is shown that the most important consideration is the correlation between flow rates and retardation processes (e.g., sorption, matrix diffusion) in the system. lf flow rates are negatively correlated with retardation factors in systems containing multiple flow pathways, then characterizing these negative correlation(s) may have more impact on reactive transport modeling than microscale information. Such negative correlations are expected in porous-media systems where permeability is negatively correlated with clay content and rock alteration (which are usually associated with increased sorption). Likewise, negative correlations are expected in fractured rocks where permeability is positively correlated with fracture apertures, which in turn are negatively correlated with sorption and matrix diffusion. Parameter variances and correlation lengths are also shown to have important effects on reactive transport predictions, but they are less important than parameter cross-correlations. Microscale information pertaining to contaminant transport has become more readily available as characterization methods and spectroscopic instrumentation have achieved lower detection limits, greater resolution, and better precision. Obtaining detailed mechanistic insights into contaminant-rock-water interactions is becoming a routine practice in characterizing reactive transport processes in groundwater systems (almost necessary for high-profile publications). Unfortunately, a quantitative link between microscale information and flow and transport parameter distributions or cross-correlations has not yet been established. One reason for this is that quantitative microscale information is difficult to obtain in complex, heterogeneous systems. So simple systems that lack the complexity and heterogeneity of real aquifer materials are often studied. Another is that instrumentation used to obtain microscale information often probes only one variable or family of variables at a time, so linkages to other variables must be inferred by indirect means from other lines of evidence. Despite these limitations, microscale information can be useful in the development and validation of reactive transport models. For example, knowledge of mineral phases that have strong affinities for contaminants can help in the development of cross-correlations between flow and sorption parameters via characterization of permeability and mineral distributions in aquifers. Likewise, microscale information on pore structures in low-permeability zones and contaminant penetration distances into these zones from higher-permeability zones (e.g., fractures) can provide valuable constraints on the representation of diffusive mass transfer processes between flowing porosity and secondary porosity. The prioritization of obtaining microscale information in any groundwater system can be informed by modeling exercises such as those conducted for this study.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comprehensive Energy Assessment: EE and RE Project Optimization Modeling for United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study and corresponding model development conducted in support of the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) as part of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA). This research was aimed at developing a mathematical programming framework and accompanying optimization methodology in order to simultaneously evaluate energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) opportunities. Once developed, this research then demonstrated this methodology at a USPACOM installation - Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii. We believe this is the first time such an integrated, joint EE and RE optimization methodology has been constructed and demonstrated.

Brigantic, Robert T.; Papatyi, Anthony F.; Perkins, Casey J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the  

SciTech Connect

Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Sensitivity of North American agriculture to ENSO-based climate scenarios and their socio-economic consequences: Modeling in an integrated assessment framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A group of Canadian, US and Mexican natural resource specialists, organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under its North American Energy, Environment and Economy (NA3E) Program, has applied a simulation modeling approach to estimating the impact of ENSO-driven climatic variations on the productivity of major crops grown in the three countries. Methodological development is described and results of the simulations presented in this report. EPIC (the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) was the agro-ecosystem model selected-for this study. EPIC uses a daily time step to simulate crop growth and yield, water use, runoff and soil erosion among other variables. The model was applied to a set of so-called representative farms parameterized through a specially-assembled Geographic Information System (GIS) to reflect the soils, topography, crop management and weather typical of the regions represented. Fifty one representative farms were developed for Canada, 66 for the US and 23 for Mexico. El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) scenarios for the EPIC simulations were created using the historic record of sea-surface temperature (SST) prevailing in the eastern tropical Pacific for the period October 1--September 30. Each year between 1960 and 1989 was thus assigned to an ENSO category or state. The ENSO states were defined as El Nino (EN, SST warmer than the long-term mean), Strong El Nino (SEN, much warmer), El Viejo (EV, cooler) and Neutral (within {+-}0.5 C of the long-term mean). Monthly means of temperature and precipitation were then calculated at each farm for the period 1960--1989 and the differences (or anomalies) between the means in Neutral years and EN, SEN and EV years determined. The average monthly anomalies for each ENSO state were then used to create new monthly statistics for each farm and ENSO-state combination. The adjusted monthly statistics characteristic of each ENSO state were then used to drive a stochastic-weather simulator that provided 30 years of daily-weather data needed to run EPIC. Maps and tables of the climate anomalies by farm show climatic conditions that differ considerably by region, season and ENSO state.

Rosenberg, N.J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Brown, R.A.; Sands, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Legler, D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Ocean Atmosphere Prediction Studies; Srinivasan, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Blacklands Research Center; Tiscareno-Lopez, M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Minority energy assessment report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy's Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Macro-System Model Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Such a macro-system model is critical to assessing the transition from the existing energy infrastructure to one including hydrogen. Individual models spanning a wide range of...

388

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

A model for calculation of RCS pressure during reflux boiling under reduced inventory conditions and its assessment against PKL data. [Reactor Cooling Systems (RCS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been recent interest in the United States concerning the loss of residual heat removal system (RHRS) under reduced coolant inventory conditions for pressurized water reactors. This issue is also of interest in the Federal Republic of Germany and an experiment was performed in the integral PKL-HI experimental facility at Siemens-KWU to supply applicable data. Recently, an NRC-sponsored effort has been undertaken at the Idaho-National Engineering Laboratory to identify and analyze the important thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors following the long term loss-of-RHRS during reduced inventory operation. The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed reactor coolant system during such a transient is investigated in this report. Some of the specific processes investigated include: reflux condensation in the steam generators, the corresponding pressure increase in the reactor coolant system, and void fraction distributions on the primary side of the system. Mathematical models of these and other physical processes Experiment B4.5.

Palmrose, D.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Mandl, R.M. (Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Resource assessment methodologies and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Resource assessment refers to the estimation and evaluation of mineral materials in the ground, both discovered and undiscovered. In such as an assessment, attention is centered on materials in such form, concentration, and location that they might be extractable under foreseeable economic and technological conditions. In practical terms, there is no such thing as an all-purpose resource assessment. Diverse groups of people interested in such assessments, be they mineral exploration planners, economic analysts, land use planners, or policymakers, will look for aspects that are most pertinent to their own field and time frame of interest. For example, exploration analysts would be most interested in the geological potential for discovering certain types of deposits in a region; mining engineers in the physical and chemical characteristics of deposits already discovered; and economists in the possible mineral-supply stream that might be generated in the future. No single assessment can throw light on all aspects of conceivable interest, and every type of assessment will have its conceptual and analytical limitations. Six major resource assessment methodologies are presented: areal value, crustal abundance, volumetric, deposit modeling, Delphi, and intergrated synthesis. Each methodology has certain strengths and weaknesses and type of resource estimate, factos which must be considered before application of any one technique. Each of these methods is discussed.

Dorian, J.P.; Zwartendyk, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: Exposure Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an Official ISEA Glossary,” Journal of Exposure AnalysisGeneva. IPCS (2001) Glossary of Exposure Assessment-Related

McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling and Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Applying Technical Cost Modeling to the Metals Industry" (Overview), R. Bhatkal and J. Busch, April 1998, pp. 27-28. "Assessing the Affordability of Emerging ...

394

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Assessing tram schedules using a library of simulation components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing tram schedules is important to assure an efficient use of infrastructure and for the provision of a good quality service. Most existing infrastructure modeling tools provide support to assess an individual aspect of rail systems in isolation, ...

Elisangela Mieko Kanacilo; Alexander Verbraeck

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

3D Simulations in Environmental Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase of petrol cost and the failure of Kyoto agreement generated huge investments in renewable energy sources. In recent times a lot of local authorities allowed wind farm location. In many cases, environmental impact assessments do not take ... Keywords: 3D CAD models, 3D GIS analysis, Multimedia techniques, Viewshed, Visual impact assessment, Wind farm

Maria Danese; Giuseppe Las Casas; Beniamino Murgante

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Assessing Forecast Skill through Cross Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explains the method of cross validation for assessing forecast skill of empirical prediction models. Cross validation provides a relatively accurate measure of an empirical procedure's ability to produce a useful prediction rule from a ...

J. B. Elsner; C. P. Schmertmann

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Assessment and Propagation of Model Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

space shuttle Challenger exploded shortly af- ter takeoff, leading to an intensive investigation of the reliability of the shuttle's propulsion

David Draper

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Assessment and Propagation of Model Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1982). Outlook for World Oil Prices. Washington DC: U. S.run. But, in view of the oil price example, which is worse—Case N-2524-RC, of Oil Prices. Santa Monica, CA: RAND.

David Draper

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Web based integrated models for participatory planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper focuses on the development of an integrated assessment model that embeds the web dimension and aims at increasing awareness in society, especially on environmental issues. The model incorporates features that make it capable of promoting ... Keywords: greenhouse gas emissions, increasing awareness, integrated assessment models, web based participatory integrated assessment models

Grammatikogiannis Elias; Maria Giaoutzi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Challenges in Implementing Methodologies for Nonproliferation Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A handful of models for explaining and predicting States’ development of nuclear weapons programs have been proposed since the 1970s. Despite the array of techno-social variables and computational concepts employed in these models, no model has yet been established as an agreed-upon standard. Likewise, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)—one of the main institutions evaluating social, political, and technological information for assessments of States’ current nuclear capabilities—uses only a qualitative framework by which to evaluate such information to assess the correctness and completeness of a State’s declaration. In this paper, analysts familiar with both the development of techno-social modelling and the IAEA’s implementation of a safeguards system that is information driven discuss the challenges faced in the development, implementation, and evaluation of models and methodologies for nonproliferation assessments, based on experiences at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the IAEA.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; Dalton, Angela C.; Coles, Garill A.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both of NREL, lent their expertise in life cycle assessment modeling and Jatropha production, and Dr. Mark Pitterle of Symbiotic Engineering aided in the literature survey...

405

ProgramTopics Resource assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessments + BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas + Bioenergy KDF + Biomass Energy Data Book + Biomass Scenario Model + Building Component Library + CLIMWAT 2.0 + Previous Results...

406

Assessing Thermo-Hydrodynamic-Chemical Processes at the Dixie...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessing Thermo-Hydrodynamic-Chemical Processes at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area- A Reactive Transport Modeling Approach Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

407

The Environment Load Assessment of Iron and Steel Producing BF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The life cycle inventory was compiled and assessment model based on Gabi ... Global Primary Aluminium Industry 2010 Life Cycle Inventory.

408

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling the competition betweenSystems Integrated with Wind Energy Resources in California,Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems, Environmental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

LUser_CompetencyAssessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competency Assessments (Employee) Competency Assessments (Employee) © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Participating in Competency Assessments (Employee) Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users and supervisors through the step-by-step process of participating in a competency assessment by viewing gaps, assigning items, conducting a self- assessment, reviewing completed assessments, and viewing the competency history. View Gaps and Assign Items 6 Steps Task A Employee: Conduct Self Assessment 8 Steps Task B Employee: Review Completed Assessment - 6 Steps Task C Employee: View Competency History 11 Steps Task D SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Participating in Competency Assessments (Employee)

411

A Resilient Condition Assessment Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

An architecture and supporting methods are presented for the implementation of a resilient condition assessment monitoring system that can adaptively accommodate both cyber and physical anomalies to a monitored system under observation. In particular, the architecture includes three layers: information, assessment, and sensor selection. The information layer estimates probability distributions of process variables based on sensor measurements and assessments of the quality of sensor data. Based on these estimates, the assessment layer then employs probabilistic reasoning methods to assess the plant health. The sensor selection layer selects sensors so that assessments of the plant condition can be made within desired time periods. Resilient features of the developed system are then illustrated by simulations of a simplified power plant model, where a large portion of the sensors are under attack.

Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Semyon M. Meerkov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cloud computing and electricity: beyond the utility model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the strengths, weaknesses, and general applicability of the computing-as-utility business model.

Erik Brynjolfsson; Paul Hofmann; John Jordan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Substation Site Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Companies assess environmental conditions at their facilities as part of routine operations and in preparation of property transfers. This report and template provide a simple, efficient guide for assessing substation facilities.

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

Updated Operations Assessment Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Operations Assessment Guideline (OAG) can be used to assess the organization and processes of operations departments. An internal utility team or third party can use this report to guide a team composed of industry experts and members of the assessed utility. This report is an update to EPRI report 1008520, Operations Assessment Guideline, published in March 2005. This improved version includes insights gained after three years of experience with the original report.

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

Software project effort assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software project assessments and postmortem analyses can increase the success of future projects and forthcoming project phases. However, although assessments and analyses are well-presented in the software engineering literature, they are short of descriptions ... Keywords: assessment, effort, final report, postmortem, project management, retrospective

Topi Haapio; Anne Eerola

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

System Assessment Standards: Defining the Market for Industrial Energy Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. “System Assessment Standards: Defining the Market forL ABORATORY System Assessment Standards: Defining the Marketemployer. System Assessment Standards: Defining the Market

Sheaffer, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Name Computable General Equilibrium Models for...

420

Biosystems Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biosystems Modeling Biosystems Modeling Phantoms We are a leader nationally and internationally in the development of models and methods for predicting the behavior of radionuclides and chemicals in the body, assessing the health effects of environmental hazards, and determining the exposure-dose relationships for environmental pollutants. Our work has been a key resource to the medical community in providing the basis for dose estimates in nuclear medicine. Our tools and skills are also applicable to the areas of occupational health and safety, public health and safety, radiation protection, environmental dosimetry, and battlefield effects. Our technology base includes mathematical modeling, bone dosimetry, phantom development, and neutron dosimetry. Please direct any questions concerning the Biosystems Modeling Group to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Liberia Biomass Resource Assessment Name Liberia Biomass Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner U.S. Agency for International Development Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy09o Country Liberia Western Africa References Assessment of Biomass Resources in Liberia [1] Abstract This study was conducted to estimate the biomass resources currently and potentially available in the country and evaluate their contribution for power generation and the production of transportation fuels

422

Understanding the system in risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the assessment of a system, understanding the system is central. Even so, most of the current literature takes a narrow view of understanding, making only the catalog of system ``assets`` explicit, while maintaining the balance of the analyst`s understanding inside the analyst`s head. This can lead to problems with non-repeatability and incompleteness of assessment results. This paper introduces the notion of using explicit system models to document the analyst`s understanding of the system and shows that, from these models, standard assessment products, such as fault trees and event trees, can be automatically derived. This paper also presents five ``views`` of a system that can be used to document the analyst`s understanding of the system. These views go well beyond the standard instruction to identify the system`s assets to show that a much richer understanding of the system can be required for effective assessment.

Craft, R.; Vandewart, R.; Wyss, G.; Funkhouser, D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Puerto Rico wind energy resource assessment project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico Office of Energy initiated a Wind Energy Resource Assessment Project in September 1982 to gather reliable, quantitative data on the wind resource of Puerto Rico for making decisions on the deployment of single, small wind energy conversion systems throughout the Island and on the viability of installing wind turbine clusters and windfarms interconnected with the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority grid. The project consists of four main activities: the collection and analysis of existing wind energy data for the Island, the installation and monitoring of five wind measurement stations, the development of a software model to incorporate and analyze these wind measurement data, simulate wind turbine performance, and assess the cost-benefit of conceptual wind energy conversion systems, and the completion of studies to identify institutional factors and industry financial incentives that would affect the deployment of wind energy conversion systems in Puerto Rico. The Wind Energy System Performance Model consists of three separate models; the Wind Resource Assessment Model, the Wind Turbine Performance Model and the Wind System Cost Model. The turbine performance model and the system cost model are interactive so that data such as turbine output power and a load demand profile can be passed between them to facilitate sensitivity studies. All the individual models are user-friendly to allow easy parameter input. They can be run separately or in sequence.

Scott, R.D.; Borgo, P.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Memorandum , Part II. Screening Level Risk Assessment 92-225-161-49 K-33 Cooling Towers screening risk assessments (2) K-770 sites screening risk assessment (9...

425

Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Review and validation of exposure assessment methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is twofold, to standardize and to validate exposure assessment methods. First, the attempt is made to standardize the manner in which exposure assessment methods are developed. Literature on the subject is reviewed and seven common elements discovered to be common are discussed. The seven elements are causative agents, exposure groups, exposure-modifying parameters, industrial hygiene measurement data, misclassification issues, validation issues, and reliability issues. It is believed that thinking in terms of these elements will yield more consistent and complete exposure assessment models. Three types of exposure estimation methods are reviewed in this form. These methods are selected because they are the most thorough and represent the most frequently used and referenced types of estimation strategies: the statistical model, the deterministic model, and the multiplicative model. Second, the paper reports on an attempt to validate a semiquantitative exposure assessment model against industrial hygiene data collected from employees of one firm in the maritime industry. The set of data contains 440 samples with 75 percent of them censored by the method limit of detection. Methods to calculate an average concentration with nondetectable data are discussed. It is concluded that (1) the model does not predict the data well, (2) the industrial hygiene data does not properly fit the tails of a lognormal distribution, and (3) that average exposure to benzene in the (un)loading of petrochemicals from tankers is decidedly below exposure limits.

Shaw, Eduardo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

428

INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

ASFAW BEYENE

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

429

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

430

ORISE: Hazard Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and collaborators have, for example, conducted an assessment of health outcomes among nuclear technology workers at the RocketdyneAtomics International (AI) Santa Susana Field...

431

PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery #12;2 Louisiana State University Health Sciences CenterDISASTER PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE TOOLKIT (Disaster-PAST) Methods to Enhance

432

Condition and Life Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Regulations and standards on life assessment...to TRD 508 Italy ISPESL (1992). Components of steam generators and

433

Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document has been developed to guide individuals and teams that will be involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the...

434

PARS 3.0 Data Model | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model More Documents & Publications PARS II FAQ Project Assessment and Reporting System (PARS II) Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II)...

435

PGMA Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PGMA Model PGMA Model PM-G1-F1-012802.doc Revised January 28, 2002 Page 1 The PGMA (Policy, Guidance, Metrics, Assessments) was originally conceived as a model to provide the framework for developing the components for DOE Information Technology (IT) related policies. Its specific purpose is to drive the development of the four components and ensure a corresponding element within each component. The model components are: POLICY C A concise statement supporting the Department=s needs for quality business solutions. C Link to existing IT policy statements without redundancy. GUIDANCE C Documentation, templates, references, checklists, training, (using Web and other means) to provide implementation mechanisms and techniques for policy adherence.

436

INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

Modelling geomagnetic activity data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong geomagnetic activity is a hazard to electronics and electric power facilities. Assessment of the actual geomagnetic activity level from local magnetometer monitoring therefore is of importance for risk assessment but also in earth sciences and ... Keywords: geomagnetism, neuro fuzzy modelling, self organizing map, signal processing, wavelets

Ernst D. Schmitter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

DOEEA-1203 Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

203 203 ~ Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 21 8-W-5 Low-Level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR TRENCH 33 WIDENING IN 21 8-W-5 LOW-LEVEL BURIAL GROUND, HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON JULY 1997 U.S. Department o f Energy DOE/ EA- 1203 This page intentionally left blank. Envi ronmental Assessment J u l y 1997 Portions of this document m y be iliegiile i n electronic image prodads. b a g s are pFoduced from the best adhble original dOCUXllent, DOE/EA-1203 U.S. Department o f Energy Preface PREFACE This envi ronmental assessment (EA) has been prepared t o assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department o

439

SPAT 15 - Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Spring of 1997, the Department of Energy's Department Standards Committee (DSC) convened a Standards Process Action Team (SPAT-15) to evaluate assessment processes within the DOE complex. If time and resources permitted, the team was also to evaluate assessment processes used by private industry condu