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1

Enhancement of Solar Energy Representation in the GCAM Model  

SciTech Connect

The representation of solar technologies in a research version of the GCAM (formerly MiniCAM) integrated assessment model have been enhanced to add technologies, improve the underlying data, and improve the interaction with the rest of the model. We find that the largest potential impact from the inclusion of thermal Concentrating Solar Power plants, which supply a substantial portion of electric generation in sunny regions of the world. Drawing on NREL research, domestic Solar Hot Water technologies have also been added in the United States region where this technology competes with conventional electric and gas technologies. PV technologies are as implemented in the CCTP scenarios, drawing on NREL cost curves for the United States, extrapolated to other world regions using a spatial analysis of population and solar resources.

Smith, Steven J.; Volke, April C.; Delgado Arias, Sabrina

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

3

From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations  

SciTech Connect

Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

5

Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

6

LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change – the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demands—both gross withdrawals and net consumptive use—are assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 – 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 – 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Explicitly Accounting for Protected Lands within the GCAM 3.0  

SciTech Connect

The Global Change Assessment Model Version 3.0 defines three different levels of “Protected Lands” within the agricultural and landuse component. These three different scenarios effectively cordon off 3.5% (5.0 million km2) of the Earth’s terrestrial lands in the de minimus Protected Land Scenario, 5.0% (7.20 million km2) in the Core Protected Land Scenario, and 8.2% (11.8 million km2) in the Expanded Protected Land Scenario. None of these scenarios represents the “right” level of Protected Lands for the planet today or tomorrow. Rather, the goal is to create a range of scenarios that can be used in modeling human responses to climate change and the impact those would have on managed and unmanaged terrestrial lands. These scenarios harness the wealth of information in the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre’s World Database on Protected Areas and its categories of explicit degrees of protection.

Dooley, James J.; Zhou, Yuyu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have participated include: Derivation of DCGLs for the Curtis Bay and Hammond depots Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station dose assessment study Radium timepiece dose modeling...

9

Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options  

SciTech Connect

This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Environmental Design Space model assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Environmental Design Space (EDS) is a multi-disciplinary design tool used to explore trade-offs among aircraft fuel burn, emissions, and noise. This thesis uses multiple metrics to assess an EDS model of a Boeing 777 ...

Spindler, Phillip Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

TEPP Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Products Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-13.p65 1 Model Needs Assessment R E V 8 - 0 7 / 2 0 1 2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s P r o g r a m PURPOSE The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local officials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. 1.0 INTRODUCTION This Model Needs Assessment was developed by the Department of Energy's Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) as a planning and assessment tool for state, tribal, or local government officials. To implement this Model Needs Assessment, a designated official

12

China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

Model Fire Protection Assessment Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Assessment guide covers the implementation of the DOE's responsibility of assuring that DOE and the DOE Contractors have established Fire Protection Programs that are at the level required for the area being assessed.

14

ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF MODEL PREDICTIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASSESSMENT OF ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL THROUGH VARIANCE/CONSTRAINT TUNING advanced process control (APC) strategies to deal with multivariable constrained control problems with an ultimate objective towards economic optimization. Any attempt to evaluate MPC performance should therefore

Huang, Biao

15

Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments  

SciTech Connect

This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

Miller, C W [ed.] [ed.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Model-based safety assessments  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories performs systems analysis of high risk, high consequence systems. In particular, Sandia is responsible for the engineering of nuclear weapons, exclusive of the explosive physics package. In meeting this responsibility, Sandia has developed fundamental approaches to safety and a process for evaluating safety based on modeling and simulation. These approaches provide confidence in the safety of our nuclear weapons. Similar concepts may be applied to improve the safety of other high consequence systems.

Carlson, D.D.; Jones, T.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Agency/Company /Organization: DG Joint Research Centre, European Commission, University of Heidelberg Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/docs/ecol_econ_2006.pdf Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Screenshot References: Computable general equilibrium models[1] Abstract "Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) of economic, environmental, and

18

Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holgate S. 2002. Air pollution and health. Lancet Brunekreef2006. Bayesian modeling of air pollution health effects withExposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Needs Assessment Document Model Needs Assessment Document TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local officials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. This Model Needs Assessment was developed by the Department of Energy's Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) as a planning and assessment tool for state, tribal, or local government officials. To implement this Model Needs Assessment, a designated official from the jurisdiction will conduct a self-assessment by answering various questions. By doing so, the official will determine strengths and identify improvement areas. To support the assessment process, and any proposed recommendations for improvement, this document includes

20

Receptor modeling assessment of particle total exposure assessment methodology data  

SciTech Connect

Data from the 1991 Particle Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (PTEAM) study in Riverside, CA, were analyzed using a new receptor modeling method. In this study, ambient (outdoor), indoor, and personal particulate matter (PM) concentrations and elemental concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} were measured for a number of participants. These measurements made is possible to relate the pollution to which people were exposed throughout their daily activities with the outdoor air conditions. Personal daytime concentrations of the PM{sub 10} and majority of elements were significantly higher than outdoor or indoor concentrations, suggesting that a significant part of personal aerosol exposure is the result of personal daily activities. Possible sources of additional particulate mass include resuspension of particles that penetrate from the outdoors and formation of new particles during cooking, smoking, etc. Positive matrix factorization analysis was performed to describe the sources of personal exposure. To identify relative contribution of different sources, regression of the particulate matter mass against the factor contributions was performed. Major sources of PM{sub 2.5} were oil combustion, nonferrous metal operations, and motor vehicles. The mass contributions of particles from these sources were similar for outdoor air and personal exposure. Personal exposure to particles from these sources can be controlled by changing outdoor sources. The primary source of PM{sub 10} was soil.

Yakovleva, E.; Hopke, P.K.; Wallace, L.

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion Processes in a DI Diesel Engine Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion...

22

Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Topics: Finance, Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: tech-action.org/models.htm Cost: Free Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Screenshot References: FICAM[1] "The Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) evaluates the contribution of technologies and practices towards mitigation of greenhouse gases, and carries a comprehensive financial analysis." References ↑ "FICAM" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Financial_and_Cost_Assessment_Model_(FICAM)&oldid=383091"

23

ESD.864 Modeling and Assessment for Policy, Spring 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESD.864 Modeling and Assessment for Policy explores how scientific information and quantitative models can be used to inform policy decision-making. Students will develop an understanding of quantitative modeling techniques ...

Selin, Noelle

24

Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling X. Mao, D.J. Tylavsky and G.A. McCulla Abstract: Improving the utilisation of transformers requires that the hot-spot and top. An alternative method for assessing transformer model reliability is provided. 1 Introduction The maximally

25

Dioxins in San Francisco Conceptual Model/Impairment Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINAL Dioxins in San Francisco Bay Conceptual Model/Impairment Assessment Prepared by Mike Connor Partnership November 12, 2004 SFEI Contribution #309 #12;Dioxins in San Francisco Bay: Impairment Assessment. This CM/IA report examines dioxins in San Francisco Bay. Dioxins comprise a group of several hundred

26

Learning Usability Assessment Models for Web Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Published books in the field include work by Cooper [Cooper et al. 2007], Dix [Dix 1998], Nielsen [Nielsen 2000], Norman [Norman 2002], Shneiderman [Shneiderman and Plaisant 2010], and Tidwell [Tidwell 2006]. Heuristic Evaluation When evaluating a... Web site for usability issues, usability inspection is an approach for evaluating the usability of user interfaces without those for whom the interface is designed being present [Nielsen 1994]. Usability inspection applies methods to assess...

Davis, Paul

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

27

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

28

MURDAM1.0. Minority Utility Rate Design Assessment Model  

SciTech Connect

Econometric model simulates consumer demand response to various user-supplied, two-part tariff electricity rate designs and assesses their economic welfare impact on black, hispanic, poor and majority households.

Poyer, D.A.; Butler, J.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Appendix MASS: Performance Assessment Modeling Assumptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rock Units MASS-12.2 Historical Context of the Salado Conceptual Model MASS-12.3 The Fracture Model MASS-12.4 Flow in the DRZ MASS-12.5 Actinide Transport in the Salado MASS-13.0...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing local model Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENGINEERING CYBERNETICS AND ROBOTICS, 60 Summary: , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

32

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Modeling and Integrated Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling and Integrated Modeling and Integrated Assessment Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Economic Assessments * Engineering analysis of CO 2 separation and capture * Economic modeling/ integrated assessment of carbon capture and sequestration * Comparison on equal basis of the major sequestration options Economic Modeling Motivation * When might carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) become competitive? * What is its potential scale? * Which technologies look most promising? . . . . And when? * How to see the potential in a general market context? Detailed Reference *Sean Biggs Thesis: S Biggs, S. D., "Sequestering Carbon from Power Plants: The Jury is Still Out," M.I.T. Masters Thesis, (2000). S http://sequestration.mit.edu/pdf/SeanBiggs.pdf What Determines Competitiveness?

33

Model and Analytic Processes for Export License Assessments  

SciTech Connect

This paper represents the Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) Simulations, Algorithms and Modeling (SAM) Program's first effort to identify and frame analytical methods and tools to aid export control professionals in effectively predicting proliferation intent; a complex, multi-step and multi-agency process. The report focuses on analytical modeling methodologies that alone, or combined, may improve the proliferation export control license approval process. It is a follow-up to an earlier paper describing information sources and environments related to international nuclear technology transfer. This report describes the decision criteria used to evaluate modeling techniques and tools to determine which approaches will be investigated during the final 2 years of the project. The report also details the motivation for why new modeling techniques and tools are needed. The analytical modeling methodologies will enable analysts to evaluate the information environment for relevance to detecting proliferation intent, with specific focus on assessing risks associated with transferring dual-use technologies. Dual-use technologies can be used in both weapons and commercial enterprises. A decision-framework was developed to evaluate which of the different analytical modeling methodologies would be most appropriate conditional on the uniqueness of the approach, data availability, laboratory capabilities, relevance to NA-22 and Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NA-24) research needs and the impact if successful. Modeling methodologies were divided into whether they could help micro-level assessments (e.g., help improve individual license assessments) or macro-level assessment. Macro-level assessment focuses on suppliers, technology, consumers, economies, and proliferation context. Macro-level assessment technologies scored higher in the area of uniqueness because less work has been done at the macro level. An approach to developing testable hypotheses for the macro-level assessment methodologies is provided. The outcome of this works suggests that we should develop a Bayes Net for micro-level analysis and continue to focus on Bayes Net, System Dynamics and Economic Input/Output models for assessing macro-level problems. Simultaneously, we need to develop metrics for assessing intent in export control, including the risks and consequences associated with all aspects of export control.

Thompson, Sandra E.; Whitney, Paul D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Wood, Thomas W.; Daly, Don S.; Brothers, Alan J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cook, Diane; Holder, Larry

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke Chris T In the context of the Cardiovascular Health Study, a comprehensive investigation into the risk factors for stroke of assessing who is at high risk for stroke. 1 Introduction Stroke is the third leading cause of death among

Volinsky, Chris

35

Incorporating Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incorporating Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models J. R. Mc climate policy analysis. This paper examines the representation of carbon capture and storage (CCS carbon capture and storage, 2) a natural gas combined cycle technology with carbon capture and storage 1

36

Multi-attribute Model for Assessment of SMEs adoption of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-attribute Model for Assessment of SMEs adoption of High Performance Computing Cloud Services boosters for SMEs, particularly manufacturing. · Huge amount of and $ are currently being spent on simulation experiments through various initiatives. #12;Introduction · Technology adoptance is in its early

Bohanec, Marko

37

Integrated science model for assessment of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment models are intended to represent processes that govern physical, ecological, economic and social systems. This report describes a scientific model relating emissions to global temperature and sea level. This model is intended to be one component of an integrated assessment model which is, of course, much more comprehensive. The model is able to reproduce past changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, global temperature, and sea level. The model is used to estimate the emissions rates required to lead to stabilization of CO{sub 2} at various levels. The model is also used to estimate global temperature rise, the rate of temperature change, and sea level rise driven by IPCC emissions scenarios. The emission of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} is modeled to have the largest long term effect on climate. Results do show the importance of expected changes of trace greenhouse gases other than CO{sub 2} in the near future. Because of the importance of these other trace gases, further work is recommended to more accurately estimate their effects.

Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kheshgi, H.S. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling  

SciTech Connect

In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments.

Curtis, D.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessment of traumatic brain injury degree in animal model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To establish stable and controllable brain injury with accurate degree and good repeatability in rat model. Methods Controlled cortical impact (CCI) device was used to prepare for the rat brain injury model by the impact head of different model (Group A No. 4, Group B No. 5, Group C No. 6) and the impact depth (Group A: 1.5–2.0 mm, Group B: 2.5–3.0 mm, Group C: 3.5–4.0 mm) with impact time of 0.1 s and impact velocity of 2.5 m/s. Twelve rats with three months of age were used in each group (the impact depth of every two rats was added 1 mm respectively). After modeling for 1 h, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was received and brain histopathology was observed to assess degree of injury by model parameters of three groups. Results After modeling of Group A, MRI showed that the cortex structure was damaged with a small amount of bleeding in center and mild edema around, and the total volume of injury was (28.69±4.94) mm3. Pathology revealed the injury was confined to the superficial cortical with mild edema of nerve cell, which was assessed as mild cerebral contusion. While after modeling, MRI of Group B showed that the structure of cortex and medulla were damaged simultaneously and extended to cerebral nuclei zone, with 4 cases of hematoma in the center and larger edema range around, and the total volume of injury was (78.38±9.28) mm3. Pathology revealed the injury range was reached nuclei zone, with swell of nerve cell and mitochondria, which was assessed to moderate cerebral contusion. After modeling of Group C, MRI showed that extensive tissue injury was appeared in cortex and medulla and deep nuclei, with 9 cases of hematoma and large edema signal of surrounding tissue T2WI, while in 5 cases, lateral nucleus of injury signal was increased, and the total volume of injury was (135.89±24.80) mm3. Pathology revealed the deep cerebral nuclei was damaged, with the disappearance of neuronal structure and vacuolization of mitochondria, which was assessed as severe cerebral contusion. MRI changes were consistent with pathological changes in three groups of model, and the injury range was significantly different (Pbrain injury model, which overcomes the randomness in previous injury model and possesses highly unity in iconography and pathology changes. This can provide quantitative modeling reference for clinical research.

Jian-Qiang Chen; Cheng-Cheng Zhang; Hong Lu; Wei Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment modeling productivity Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: models is suggested as a means of improving the impact assessment phase of LCA. Keywords: Life Cycle... assessment methodologies 1. These early inventories would...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar Resource Assessment: Databases, Measurements, Models, and Information Sources (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for Solar Resource Assessment Workshop, Denver CO, Oct 29, 2008: ?Solar Resource Assessment Databases, Measurements, Models, and Information Sources

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

43

A residence-time-based transport approach for the groundwater pathway in performance assessment models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical implementation of a new modeling approach for representing the groundwater pathway in risk assessment or performance assessment model of a contaminant transport system. The model developed ... Keywords: Groundwater pathway, Mixing model, Performance assessment, Residence time distribution

Bruce A. Robinson; Shaoping Chu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling issues associated with production reactor safety assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes several Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) modeling issues that are related to the unique design and operation of the production reactors. The identification of initiating events and determination of a set of success criteria for the production reactors is of concern because of their unique design. The modeling of accident recovery must take into account the unique operation of these reactors. Finally, a more thorough search and evaluation of common-cause events is required to account for combinations of unique design features and operation that might otherwise not be included in the PSA. It is expected that most of these modeling issues also would be encountered when modeling some of the other more unique reactor and nonreactor facilities that are part of the DOE nuclear materials production complex. 9 refs., 2 figs.

Stack, D.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Thomas, W.R. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

47

Methods for Developing Emissions Scenarios for Integrated Assessment Models  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research was to contribute data and methods to support the future development of new emissions scenarios for integrated assessment of climate change. Specifically, this research had two main objectives: 1. Use historical data on economic growth and energy efficiency changes, and develop probability density functions (PDFs) for the appropriate parameters for two or three commonly used integrated assessment models. 2. Using the parameter distributions developed through the first task and previous work, we will develop methods of designing multi-gas emission scenarios that usefully span the joint uncertainty space in a small number of scenarios. Results on the autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) parameter are summarized, an uncertainty analysis of elasticities of substitution is described, and the probabilistic emissions scenario approach is presented.

Prinn, Ronald [MIT; Webster, Mort [MIT

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Inspector's Assessment of the New Model Safeguards Approach for Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

This conference paper assesses the changes that are being made to the Model Safeguards Approach for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants.

Curtis, Michael M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application. It is possible to have confidence in the predictions of many of the existing models because of their fundamental physical and chemical mechanistic underpinnings and the extensive work already done to compare model predictions and empirical observations. The working group recommends that modeling tools be applied for benchmarking PBT/POPs according to exposure-to-emissions relationships, and that modeling tools be used to interpret emissions and monitoring data. The further development of models that couple fate, long-range transport, and bioaccumulation should be fostered, especially models that will allow time trends to be scientifically addressed in the risk profile.

Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Examining emissions policy issues with an integrated assessment model  

SciTech Connect

In the policy analysis process of asking ``What if'' questions, there is considerable advantage in the analyst being able to address the questions directly rather than sending the questions to scientists in particular disciplines and awaiting answers. Obviously the former option is likely to produce speedier results than the latter; in addition, the questions can be easily modified as the issues change or become more focused. The primary potential shortcoming of an analyst addressing questions that may be beyond his or her particular expertise is that the policy analyst may not understand the limitations of the analysis. Here the author briefly describes a peer-reviewed integrated assessment model that can be exercised within minutes in a desktop environment, discuss some of the advantages and limitations of the approach, and exercise portions of the model to compare with observations. Because of the nature of the conference at which this paper is being presented, the discussion focuses on the air pollution modeling components of the integrated assessment.

Shannon, J. D.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.

G. Saulnier and W. Statham

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

53

An integrated environmental modeling framework for performing Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Standardized methods are often used to assess the likelihood of a human-health effect from exposure to a specified hazard, and inform opinions and decisions about risk management and communication. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is specifically ... Keywords: Integrated environmental modeling, Manure, Pathogens, QMRA, Risk assessment, Watershed modeling

Gene Whelan, Keewook Kim, Mitch A. Pelton, Jeffrey A. Soller, Karl J. Castleton, Marirosa Molina, Yakov Pachepsky, Richard Zepp

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Models for source term, flow, transport and dose assessment in NRC`s Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

The core consequence modules for the recently completed Phase 2 Iterative Performance Assessment (IPA) of the Yucca Mountain repository for high-level nuclear waste depend on models for releases from the engineered barrier system (source term), flow of liquid and gas, transport of radionuclides in the geosphere and assessment of dose to target populations. The source term model includes temperature and moisture phenomena in the near-field environment, general, pitting and crevice corrosion, contact of the waste form by water, dissolution and oxidation of the waste form, and transport of dissolved and gaseous radionuclides from the waste package by advection and diffusion. The liquid flow and transport models describe water flow through fractures and matrix in both the unsaturated and saturated zones. Models for flow of gas and transport of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released from the engineered barrier system to the atmosphere take into account repository heat and the geothermal gradient. The dose assessment model calculates doses to a regional population and a farm family for an assumed reference biosphere in the vicinity of the repository. The Phase 2 IPA led to a number of suggestions for model improvement: (1) improve the ability of the models to include spatial and temporal variability in the parameters; (2) improve the coupling among processes, especially the effects of changing environments in the waste packages; (3) develop more mechanistic models, but abstracted for use in total system performance assessment; and (4) use more site specific parameters, especially for the dose assessments.

McCartin, T.; Codell, R.; Neel, R.; Ford, W.; Wescott, R.; Bradbury, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Sagar, B.; Walton, J. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Transportation System Risk Assessment (TSRA) bounding release model  

SciTech Connect

Transportation System Risk Assessments (TSRAs) document the compliance of proposed shipments of nuclear components with applicable federal regulations as well as the associated risks involved. If a relatively simple bounding analysis can show that the consequences resulting from a worst case scenario are acceptably low, a more time intensive and costly risk analysis can be avoided. Therefore, a bounding release FORTRAN model has been developed to determine the consequences of a worst case non-criticality transportation accident. The consequences of three conservative bounding accidents are determined by the model: (1) direct radiation exposure, (2) airborne release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material, and (3) release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material into a waterway and subsequent uptake by an individual through drinking water. Program output includes the direct radiation exposure (mrem), maximum downwind concentration (mg/m{sup 3}), radiation dose (mrem) received as a result of the postulated airborne release of radiological material, intake (mg) due to inhalation, radiation dose (mrem) received by an individual resulting from a release of radiological material into a waterway and uptake into drinking water, and uptake (mg) due to ingestion. This report documents the methodologies and correlations used in the numerical model to perform the bounding consequence calculations.

Anderson, J.C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Predictive Model for Environmental Assessment in Additive Manufacturing Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Additive Manufacturing is an innovative way to produce parts. However its environmental impact is unknown. To ensure the development of additive manufacturing processes it seems important to develop the concept of DFSAM (Design for Sustainable Additive Manufacturing). In fact, one of the objectives of environmental sustainable manufacturing is to minimize the whole flux consumption (electricity, material and fluids) during manufacturing step. To achieve this goal, it is interesting to get a predictive model of consumptions, integrated in the design step, allowing to evaluate the product's environmental impact during the manufacturing step. This paper presents a new methodology for electric, fluids and raw material consumptions assessment for additive manufacturing processes, in particular for a direct metal deposition process. The methodology will help engineers to design parts optimized for additive manufacturing with an environmental point of view.

Florent Le Bourhis; Olivier Kerbrat; Lucas Dembinski; Jean-Yves Hascoet; Pascal Mognol

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,* , Kisup Leeb building, but cannot provide detailed flow information in a room. The zonal model can be useful when a user ventilation systems for buildings requires a suitable model to assess system performance. The performance can

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

58

THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory analysis of the saturated zone water chemistry. The results of the field investigations and laboratory analyses of rock and water samples collected at Nopal I are used to calibrate the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model.

G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

IN SEARCH OF A PROBABILISTIC MODEL OF PETROLEUM RESOURCE ASSESSMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses a probabilistic model of petroleum resource assessment. At present, petroleum provides the major driving energy for national economies. The foreseen worldwide depletion of petroleum resources in a few decades, at a time of transition to new energy technologies, imposes hardships on many nations but enhances opportunities for those having a petroleum potential. The petroleum prospective areas of the world consist of sedimentary basins and geosynclines not too intensely deformed tectonically, including the continental shelves down to 200 m depth, with a total area under national jurisdictions of about 26.1 million sq mi. Certain oceanic areas beyond the continental shelves—continental rise and continental slope—have petroleum prospects, but their eventual development may be some 10 to 20 years away. The traditional geologic environment for petroleum has been the geosynclinal belt. The larger the tract of undrilled prospective area, the greater is the chances that thick sedimentary pods may occur here and there. Even when a few scattered pieces of evidence may indicate a thin sedimentary cover, prospects for generation and primary migration of petroleum may be enhanced by the large size of a prospective area. The examination of the distribution of petroleum occurrences throughout the world in basins with a significant amount of exploratory drilling indicates that roughly one-half of the prospective basins and geosynclines do not yield any or much petroleum.

B.F. Grossling

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Automated Software Engineering Process Assessment: Supporting Diverse Models using an Ontology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ISO 9001). It also provides an in-the-loop automated process assessment capability that can help, ISO 9001), and suitable performance and scalability. The approach can reduce the effort required assessment while simultaneously supporting diverse process assessment reference models (CMMI, ISO/IEC 15504

Ulm, Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organohalogen contaminants (dioxins, PCB, PBDE andInvestigation into levels of dioxins, furans, PCBs and PBDEsfor risk assessment of dioxin-contaminated sites. Ambio 36:

Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe Improving modeling platforms with statistical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe ­ Improving modeling platforms. For regional air quality, seven regional modeling teams combine state-of-the-art atmospheric modeling the ensemble or a unique model. Keywords: Air quality, modeling system, ensemble approach, validation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Assessment of Modes of Interannual Variability of Southern Hemisphere Atmospheric Circulation in CMIP5 Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An assessment is made of the modes of interannual variability in the seasonal mean summer and winter Southern Hemisphere (SH) 500-hPa geopotential height in the twentieth century in models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) ...

Simon Grainger; Carsten S. Frederiksen; Xiaogu Zheng

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Skill assessment of three earth system models with common marine biogeochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have assessed the ability of a common ocean biogeochemical model, PISCES, to match relevant modern data fields across a range of ocean circulation fields from three distinct Earth system models: IPSL-CM4-LOOP,...

Roland Séférian; Laurent Bopp; Marion Gehlen; James C. Orr…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sciences Enhancing the Capability of Computational Earth System Models and Using NASA Data for Operation and Assessment...Science, Decadal and Regional Climate Prediction using Earth System Models program (M.W. and S.J.G.). PNNL is operated...

Yuan Wang; Minghuai Wang; Renyi Zhang; Steven J. Ghan; Yun Lin; Jiaxi Hu; Bowen Pan; Misti Levy; Jonathan H. Jiang; Mario J. Molina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

An Assessment of Converter Modelling Needs for Offshore Wind Power Plants Connected via VSC-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Assessment of Converter Modelling Needs for Offshore Wind Power Plants Connected via VSC- HVDC, especially in case of connection of offshore wind power plants (OWPPs). Modelling challenges are faced

Bak, Claus Leth

68

A phenomenological muscle model to assess history dependent effects in human movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A phenomenological muscle model to assess history dependent effects in human movement C.P. Mc of the history dependent effects. The phenomenological model of stretch-induced force enhancement was dependent

Ben-Yakar, Adela

69

Assessing the Potential of Using Traffic Simulation Model Results for Evaluating Automatic Incident Detection Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the Potential of Using Traffic Simulation Model Results for Evaluating Automatic Incident of such a test-bed would be the ability to incorporate synthetic data produced by a simulation model since

Hellinga, Bruce

70

Reduced-Reference Image Quality Assessment Using A Wavelet-Domain Natural Image Statistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduced-Reference Image Quality Assessment Using A Wavelet-Domain Natural Image Statistic Model information about the reference images. In this paper, we propose an RR image quality assessment method based on a natural image statistic model in the wavelet transform domain. We use the Kullback-Leibler distance

Wang, Zhou

71

Impact Assessment of Abiotic Resources in LCA: Quantitative Comparison of Selected Characterization Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact Assessment of Abiotic Resources in LCA: Quantitative Comparison of Selected Characterization Models ... Resources have received significant attention in recent years resulting in development of a wide range of resource depletion indicators within life cycle assessment (LCA). ... Finally, we classify the existing methods into three groups, according to method focus and modeling approach, to aid method selection within LCA. ...

Jakob T. Rørbech; Carl Vadenbo; Stefanie Hellweg; Thomas F. Astrup

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models and spreader  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models performances. We define 45 sewage sludge spreading scenarios covering a wide range of situations in France. Several models are used to (i) assess nitrogen losses due to sewage sludge spreading and (ii) calculate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Model for a web based medical technology assessment system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will form the backbone of this system. Various queries can be run to produce the desired results. This system will provide a means for assessing the currently available medical technology. Based on the information present in the system clinical engineers...

Prabhu, Gopal

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

[10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

75

The Niobrara River Basin Study: Using Various Models to Assess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seminar Series Brandi Flyr, Ph.D. Integrated Water Management Division Nebraska Department of Natural;#12;Integrated Water Management Identify Management Setting Assess Water Resources Understand & Predict Set effects of various water management strategies in order to develop water management tools #12;Goals

Farritor, Shane

76

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs Predicting Stimulation Response...

77

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) Agency/Company /Organization: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Maryland, Joint Global Change Research Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry, Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application

78

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assessing the protective effect of mountain forests against rockfall using a 3D simulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the protective effect of mountain forests against rockfall using a 3D simulation model and compared the results obtained with the 3D simulation model RockyFor with empirical data on tree impacts; Rockfall; 3D simulation model; Swiss Alps 1. Introduction Many mountain forests effectively protect people

Stoffel, Markus

80

Assessing resilience and state-transition models with historical records of cheatgrass Bromus tectorum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing resilience and state-transition models with historical records of cheatgrass Bromus. Bestelmeyer2 and X. Ben Wu1 1 Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Texas A&M University, 2138 TAMU. This requires management frameworks that can assess ecosystem dynamics, both within and between alternative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sub-AQUA: real-value quality assessment of protein structure models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sub-AQUA: real-value quality assessment of protein structure models Yifeng David Yang1, Preston of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea, 3 Department of Computer Science, College of Science developed quality assessment methods, which predict real value of the global and local quality of protein

Kihara, Daisuke

82

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS, AND NGL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AM-i Chapter AM U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of the oil, gas, and natural-gas liquids (NGL) resources by the USGS in1998 for undiscovered oil, gas, and NGL resources that reside in conventional accumulations

Laughlin, Robert B.

83

On the use of fuzzy inference techniques in assessment models: part II: industrial applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the applicability of the monotone output property and the output resolution property in fuzzy assessment models to two industrial Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) problems. First, t...

Kai Meng Tay; Chee Peng Lim

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Statistical Model to Assess Indirect CO2 Emissions of the UAE Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Determination of household energy using ?fingerprints? from energy billing data. Energy Research 10(4), pp: 393?405. [5] Snakin JPA, 2000. An engineering model for heating energy and emission assessment The case of North Karelia, Finland. Applied Energy...

Radhi, H.; Fikry, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West.J.S. SONNEVELD [1] Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Universitaet Stuttgart, Germany (Roland Conservation University of Bonn, Germany [3] Institute of Landscape Planning and Ecology, University

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

86

A Model for Fuzzy Logic Assessment of Real Estate Investment Risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing the real estate investment risks is a major issue for the responsible management and the sustainable regional development. The paper proposes a fuzzy logic model for complex estimation of the real estate

Plamena Zlateva; Dimiter Velev…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Using Noncompensatory Models in Cognitive Diagnostic Mathematics Assessments: An Evaluation Based on Empirical Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study evaluates the performance of four noncompensatory cognitive diagnostic models -- AHM, DINA, Fusion, and Bayesian Networks -- using both formative and large-scale mathematics assessments (Fraction dataset, ...

Zhao, Fei

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

METHODOLOGY ARTICLE Open Access Quality assessment of protein model-structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

similar to proteins functionally similar to the prediction target. Whereas DALI is used to measure structure similarity, protein functional similarity is quantified using standardized and hierarchical model quality assessment method, the other is its modification, which provides a relative measure

Nebel, Jean-Christophe

89

Models Used to Assess the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization.

90

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.I LALI iE REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L. -77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r...

91

An investigation into the use of biokinetic models when assessing intakes of plutonium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE USE OF BIOKINETIC MODELS WHEN ASSESSING INTAKES OF PLUTONIUM A Thesis by BRIAN ANDREW HRYCUSHKO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Health Physics AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE USE OF BIOKINETIC MODELS WHEN ASSESSING INTAKES OF PLUTONIUM A Thesis by BRIAN ANDREW HRYCUSHKO Submitted...

Hrycushko, Brian Andrew

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Statewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economic models applied to such diverse fields as climate change policy, alternative- fueled vehicles, fuel Economic Research Organization and Affiliate Faculty with the Public Policy Center UHM. Paul Bernstein, Ph....................................................................................................................... 6 2. The Hawaii Computable General Equilibrium Model (H-CGE)............................ 8 2.a. Data

93

Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biological assessment of robust noise models in microarray data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Compatibility with our ANOVA model suggests applying a Kruskal-Wallis permutation test (cf. Lee et al., 2005) and...under KW perm. illustrate the agreements of the Kruskal-Wallis permutation test with the robust parametric method......

A. Posekany; K. Felsenstein; P. Sykacek

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is that there are new solutions to heat extraction from an as-created, enhanced fracture system of EGS. The project will develop a new THMC simulation model with new...

96

GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Traditional methods of dispersion modeling for the permitting of new sources and the monitoring of existing sources have allowed much room for error in terms of the effect of the pollutants on nearby populations (Hardikar, 1995). The capabilities of GIS...

Archer, Jeffrey Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of solution uncertainties in single-column modeling frameworks  

SciTech Connect

Single-column models (SCMs) have been extensively promoted in recent years as an effective means to develop and test physical parameterizations targeted for more complex three-dimensional climate models. Although there are some clear advantages associated with single-column modeling, there are also some significant disadvantages, including the absence of large-scale feedbacks. Basic limitations of an SCM framework can make it difficult to interpret solutions, and at times contribute to rather striking failures to identify even first-order sensitivities as they would be observed in a global climate simulation. This manuscript will focus on one of the basic experimental approaches currently exploited by the single-column modeling community, with an emphasis on establishing the inherent uncertainties in the numerical solutions. The analysis will employ the standard physics package from the NCAR CCM3 and will illustrate the nature of solution uncertainties that arise from nonlinearities in parameterized physics. The results of this study suggest the need to make use of an ensemble methodology when conducting single-column modeling investigations.

Hack, J.J.; Pedretti, J.A.

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections is a challenging problem. While climate models capture many processes governing short-term climate fluctuations, they are not expected to simulate the specific timing of these somewhat random phenomena - the occurrence of which may impact the realized trend. Therefore, to assess model performance, we develop distributions of projected temperature trends from a collection of climate models running the IPCC A1B emissions scenario. We evaluate where observed trends of length 5 to 15 years fall within the distribution of model trends of the same length. We find that current trends lie near the lower limits of the model distributions, with cumulative probability-of-occurrence values typically between 5 percent and 20 percent, and probabilities below 5 percent not uncommon. Our results indicate cause for concern regarding the consistency between climate model projections and observed climate behavior...

Michaels, Patrick J; Christy, John R; Herman, Chad S; Liljegren, Lucia M; Annan, James D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessing security threat scenarios for utility-based reputation model in grids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trust and reputation models play an important role in enabling trusted computations over large-scale distributed grids. Many models have been recently proposed and implemented within trust management systems. Nevertheless, the existing approaches usually assess performance of models in terms of resource management while less attention is paid to the analysis of security threat scenarios for such models. In this paper, we assess the most important and critical security threats for a utility-based reputation model in grids. The existing model is extended to address these threat scenarios. With simulations that were run using data collected from the EGEE Grid-Observatory project, we analyse efficiency of the utility-based reputation model against these threats.

Olga Kussul; Nataliia Kussul; Sergii Skakun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Building a comprehensive quantitative risk assessment model for lung cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Res, Volume 46, 2005 Building a comprehensive quantitative...including identification of multi-collinearities and...and resulted in model multi-collinearities. When...asbestos exposure, family history of LC and years...factors of emphysema, family history of LC, years...

Carol J. Etzel; Qing Zhang; Matthew Schabath; Qiong Dong; Xifeng Wu; Qingyi Wei; Margaret Spitz; and Christopher I. Amos

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessing certainty and uncertainty in riparian habitat suitability models by identifying parameters with extreme outputs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to introduce a computationally efficient uncertainty assessment approach using an index-based habitat suitability model. The approach focuses on uncertainty in ecological knowledge regarding parameters of index curves and weights. ... Keywords: Habitat model, Riparian vegetation, Suitability index, Uncertainty

Baihua Fu, Joseph H. A. Guillaume

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering Brunswick, NJ. 5 Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 6 School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Robock, Alan

103

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

105

Model for quantitative risk assessment on naturally ventilated metering-regulation stations for natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a model for quantitative risk assessment on metering stations and metering-regulation stations for natural gas with natural ventilation. The model enables the assessment of risk for people who live in the vicinity of these stations and complements the existing models for risk assessment on natural gas pipelines. It is based on risk assessment methods suggested in relevant guides, recommendations and standards. Explosion and jet fire are considered as major hazardous events and are modelled according to analytical models and empirical data. Local or other accessible databases are used for modelling of event frequencies and ignition probabilities. A case study on a sample station is carried out. For each hazardous event, fault tree and event tree analysis is performed. Results show influence of each hazardous event on the whole risk relative to the distance from the hazardous source. Ventilation is found to be a significant factor in determination of risk magnitude; its influence on individual risk is presented in a quantitative way. The model should be of use for pipeline operators as well as for environmental- and urban planners.

Tom Bajcar; Franc Cimerman; Brane Širok

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advances in National Capabilities for Consequence Assessment Modeling of Airborne Hazards  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes ongoing advancement of airborne hazard modeling capabilities in support of multiple agencies through the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Atmospheric Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). A suite of software tools developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and collaborating organizations includes simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end user's computers, Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced 3-D flow and atmospheric dispersion modeling tools and expert analysis from the national center at LLNL, and state-of-the-science high-resolution urban models and event reconstruction capabilities.

Nasstrom, J; Sugiyama, G; Foster, K; Larsen, S; Kosovic, B; Eme, B; Walker, H; Goldstein, P; Lundquist, J; Pobanz, B; Fulton, J

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

The development of an integrated model for assessing sustainability of complex systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, there are numerous indicators (single and composite) for measuring impacts in the three pillars, though current thinking emphasises the need for system thinking rather than the reductionist concept of pillars. Most existing indices/methods measure single aspects of sustainability and the more integrated indicators are aimed at national or global level assessments. A review of existing indicators, methods and models within the context of complex system sustainability showed that no single existing index, method or model was able to assess sustainability of complex systems. Most fail to account for complex system characteristics, such as system dynamics, interconnections and interdependencies of system components, a system's ability to learn and remember, emergence of novel behaviours, co-evolution, etc. This paper presents the methodology used to develop a new model for assessing sustainability of complex systems based on risk.

Gayathri Babarenda Gamage; Carol Boyle; Ron McDowall

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LTR-2012/390 LTR-2012/390 Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment R. E. Stoller, A. V. Barashev, and S. I. Golubov Materials Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Prepared for: Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy September 2012 ORNL/LTR-2012/390 1 Low-temperature Swelling in LWR Internal Components: Current Data and Modeling Assessment Abstract Recent experimental observations have made it clear that cavity formation can occur in light-water reactor internal components fabricated from austenitic stainless during the course of their service life. In order to assess the potential for cavity swelling

110

Validation of a Cognitive Diagnostic Model Across Multiple Forms of a Reading Comprehension Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VALIDATION OF A COGNITIVE DIAGNOSTIC MODEL ACROSS MULTIPLE FORMS OF A READING COMPREHENSION ASSESSMENT by Amy K. Clark Submitted to the graduate degree... program in the Department of Psychology and Research in Education and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the...

Clark, Amy K

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using Positive and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 15, 1999 #12;Abstract Much of the evidence for health e ects of particulate air pollution has come. We thus refer to the `air pollution hypothesis' to describe increased risk of health outcomes dueAssessing Seasonal Confounding and Model Selection Bias in Air Pollution Epidemiology Using

Washington at Seattle, University of

112

Ex-plant consequence assessment for NUREG-1150: Models, typical results, uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

The assessment of ex-plant consequences for NUREG-1150 source terms was performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS). This paper will briefly discuss the following elements of MACCS consequence calculations: input data, phenomena modeled, computational framework, typical results, controlling phenomena, and uncertainties. Wherever possible, NUREG-1150 results will be used to illustrate the discussion. 28 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Sprung, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cognitive Assessment Models with Few Assumptions, and Connections with Nonparametric IRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive Assessment Models with Few Assumptions, and Connections with Nonparametric IRT Brian of the monotonicity conditions discussed in Section 4. #12;Abstract In recent years, as cognitive theories of learning" on student achievement relative to theory-driven lists of examinee skills, beliefs and other cognitive

Junker, Brian

114

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

115

Uncertainty Analysis of the Adequacy Assessment Model of a Distributed Generation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of evidence theory, the hybrid propagation approach is introduced. A demonstration is given on a DG system enables end-users to install renewable generators (e.g. solar generators and wind turbines) on1 Uncertainty Analysis of the Adequacy Assessment Model of a Distributed Generation System Yanfu Li

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Annual report, October 1980-September 1981 Multimedia radionuclide exposure assessment modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are jointly developing a methodology for assessing exposures of the air, water, and plants to radionuclides as part of an overall development effort of a radionuclide disposal site evaluation methodology. Work in FY-1981 continued the development of the Multimedia Contaminant Environmental Exposure Assessment (MCEA) methodology and initiated an assessment of radionuclide migration in Los Alamos and Pueblo Canyons, New Mexico, using the methodology. The AIRTRAN model was completed, briefly tested, and documented. In addition, a literature search for existing validation data for AIRTRAN was performed. The feasibility and advisability of including the UNSAT moisture flow model as a submodel of the terrestrial code BIOTRAN was assessed. A preliminary application of the proposed MCEA methodology, as it related to the Mortandad-South Mortandad Canyon site in New Mexico is discussed. This preliminary application represented a scaled-down version of the methodology in which only the terrestrial, overland, and surface water components were used. An update describing the progress in the assessment of radionuclide migration in Los Alamos and Pueblo Canyons is presented. 38 references, 47 figures, 11 tables.

Whelan, G.; Onishi, Y.; Simmons, C.S.; Horst, T.W.; Gupta, S.K.; Orgill, M.M.; Newbill, C.A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Estimation of aerial deposition and foliar uptake of xenobiotics: Assessment of current models  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews existing mathematical and/or computer simulation models that estimate xenobiotic deposition to and transport through (both curricular and stomatal) vegetative surfaces. The report evaluates the potential for coupling the best of those models to the existing Uptake, Translocation, Accumulation, and Biodegradation model to be used for future xenobiotic exposure assessments. Here xenobiotic compounds are defined as airborne contaminants, both organic and gaseous pollutants, that are introduced into the environment by man. Specifically this document provides a detailed review of the state-of-the-art models that addressed aerial deposition of particles and gases to foliage; foliar and cuticular transport, metabolism, and uptake of organic xenobiotics; and stomatal transport of gaseous and volatile organic xenobiotic pollutants. Where detailed information was available, parameters for each model are provided on a chemical by chemical as well as species by species basis. Sufficient detail is provided on each model to assess the potential for adapting or coupling the model to the existing UTAB plant exposure model. 126 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Link, S.O.; Fellows, R.J.; Cataldo, D.A.; Droppo, J.G.; Van Voris, P.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)  

SciTech Connect

The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean wave

Victoria, University of

124

Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal  

SciTech Connect

A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints near an injection well have potential to divert a large percentage of an injected CO{sub 2} stream away from a target coal seam. However, the strata-bound nature of Pottsville fracture systems is a natural factor that mitigates the risk of long-range leakage and surface seepage. Flow models indicate that cross-formational flow in strata-bound joint networks is low and is dissipated by about an order of magnitude at each successive bedding contact. These models help confirm that strata-bound joint networks are self-compartmentalizing and that the thick successions of interbedded shale and sandstone separating the Pottsville coal zones are confining units that protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. DFN models are powerful tools for the simulation and analysis of fracture networks and can play an important role in the assessment of risks associated with carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Importantly, the stochastic nature DFN models dictates that they cannot be used to precisely reproduce reservoir conditions in a specific field area. Rather, these models are most useful for simulating the fundamental geometric and statistical properties of fracture networks. Because the specifics of fracture architecture in a given area can be uncertain, multiple realizations of DFN models and DFN-based flow models can help define variability that may be encountered during field operations. Using this type of approach, modelers can inform the risk assessment process by characterizing the types and variability of fracture architecture that may exist in geologic carbon sinks containing natural fractures.

Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Integrated Chemical, Thermal, Mechanical and Hydrological Modeling Project Description The University of Nevada - Reno (UNR), proposes to develop a new, integrated solution technique for simulating the Thermal, Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical (THMC) processes relevant to thermal energy extraction from an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). UNR defines the great challenges in numerical modeling as to (1) dealing with flows and transport in the stimulated fractures of the EGS of largely unknown geometry and characteristics; and (2) discovering the best possible cooling fluid circulation solution in the EGS by trial-and-error numerical simulations. The new THMC will have an adaptive, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) component, integrated with the THMC rockmass model in order to match field test signatures, or desired outcomes in design hypothesis test. The project's main hypothesis is that there are new solutions to heat extraction from an as-created, enhanced fracture system of EGS. The project will develop a new THMC simulation model with new capabilities and prove the main hypothesis by and applying it to various EGS designs including emerging concepts, two-phase (steam-gas-liquid) coolant flows in the fracture network, and dynamic, huff-puff operations.

126

Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model for critical facilities in combating the terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical facility vulnerability assessment is a highly complex strategic activity in combating the terrorism and necessitates a structured quantified methodology to support the decision-making process in defense planning. In the system perspective, the critical facility, such as airport, dam, governmental facility, harbor, nuclear power plant, oil plant etc., can be defined as a system that relies on a group of different interdependent logical and physical entities as system functions and system components. The aim of this paper is to present a realistic approach to determine the vulnerability of such a system defended against the terrorist attack under multiple criteria which can be both qualitative and quantitative by considering these interdependencies. The proposed approach, called fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model (FIVAM), is based on fuzzy set theory, Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART) and Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM) methodology in a group decision-making environment. The FIVAM approach is presented step-by-step and applied to a simple case study on airport vulnerability assessment. The results of the application are compared to those observed through a classical vulnerability assessment model to illustrate the effectiveness of the FIVAM. Furthermore, FIVAM provides a framework to identify the hidden vulnerabilities caused by the functional interdependencies within the system. The results also show that FIVAM quantifies the vulnerability of the system, system functions and system components, and determines the most critical functions and components by simulating the system behavior.

Ilker Akgun; Ahmet Kandakoglu; Ahmet Fahri Ozok

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Modelling risk and risking models: the diffusive boundary between science and policy in volcanic risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the appreciation that the eruptions may continue for 282 decades and should be regarded as a “chronic” problem for planning purposes (Donovan and 283 Oppenheimer, 2014). Managing this transition has required consistent yet innovative 284 approaches to scientific... to their advice. 524 There is abundant evidence of the political challenges of risk assessment and management on 525 Montserrat, and the complex boundaries and connectivities involved (Aspinall et al., 2002; 526 Haynes et al., 2007; Donovan and Oppenheimer...

Donovan, Amy R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Dispersion models and air quality data for population exposure assessment to air pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluating the extent of exposure to chemicals in absence of continuous measurements of their concentration in air and direct measures of personal exposure is crucial for epidemiological studies. Dispersion models can be a useful tool for reproducing spatio-temporal distribution of contaminants emitted by a specific source. However, they cannot easily be applied to short-term epidemiological studies because they require precise information on daily emission scenarios for a long time, which are generally not available. The aim of this study was to better assess the exposure in the industrial area of Brindisi, which suffers from various critical epidemiological situations, by integrating air pollution concentration data, emissions and model simulations concerning a specific point source. The results suggest that in the absence of direct exposure data and detailed information on specific pollutants associated to an emission, population exposure may be better assessed by taking into account proxy pollutants and the wind (direction and speed) as a potential health effects modifier.

Cristina Mangia; Marco Cervino; Emilio Antonio Luca Gianicolo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.  

SciTech Connect

directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Gardner, William Payton [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Mariner, Paul [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

An application of probabilistic safety assessment methods to model aircraft systems and accidents  

SciTech Connect

A case study modeling the thrust reverser system (TRS) in the context of the fatal accident of a Boeing 767 is presented to illustrate the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment methods. A simplified risk model consisting of an event tree with supporting fault trees was developed to represent the progression of the accident, taking into account the interaction between the TRS and the operating crew during the accident, and the findings of the accident investigation. A feasible sequence of events leading to the fatal accident was identified. Several insights about the TRS and the accident were obtained by applying PSA methods. Changes proposed for the TRS also are discussed.

Martinez-Guridi, G.; Hall, R.E.; Fullwood, R.R.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Progress Report describes the work performed and summarizes some of the key observations to date on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report describes activities undertaken to collect samples of soils from three regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and perform analyses to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Section 3 summarizes information gathered regarding agricultural practices and common and unusual crops grown in each of these three areas. Section 4 describes progress in studying radionuclide uptake in several representative crops from the three soil types in controlled laboratory conditions. Section 5 describes a range of international coordination activities undertaken by Project staff in order to support the underlying data needs of the Project. Section 6 provides a very brief summary of the status of the GENII Version 2 computer program, which is a “client” of the types of data being generated by the Project, and for which the Project will be providing training to the US NRC staff in the coming Fiscal Year. Several appendices provide additional supporting information.

Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Fellows, Robert J.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The microenvironmental modelling approach to assess children's exposure to air pollution – A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exposures to a wide spectrum of air pollutants were associated to several effects on children's health. Exposure assessment can be used to establish where and how air pollutants' exposures occur. However, a realistic estimation of children's exposures to air pollution is usually a great ethics challenge, especially for young children, because they cannot intentionally be exposed to contaminants and according to Helsinki declaration, they are not old enough to make a decision on their participation. Additionally, using adult surrogates introduces bias, since time–space–activity patterns are different from those of children. From all the different available approaches for exposure assessment, the microenvironmental (ME) modelling (indirect approach, where personal exposures are estimated or predicted from microenvironment measurements combined with time–activity data) seemed to be the best to assess children's exposure to air pollution as it takes into account the varying levels of pollution to which an individual is exposed during the course of the day, it is faster and less expensive. Thus, this review aimed to explore the use of the ME modelling approach methodology to assess children's exposure to air pollution. To meet this goal, a total of 152 articles, published since 2002, were identified and titles and abstracts were scanned for relevance. After exclusions, 26 articles were fully reviewed and main characteristics were detailed, namely: (i) study design and outcomes, including location, study population, calendar time, pollutants analysed and purpose; and (ii) data collection, including time–activity patterns (methods of collection, record time and key elements) and pollution measurements (microenvironments, methods of collection and duration and time resolution). The reviewed studies were from different parts of the world, confirming the worldwide application, and mostly cross-sectional. Longitudinal studies were also found enhancing the applicability of this approach. The application of this methodology on children is different from that on adults because of data collection, namely the methods used for collecting time–activity patterns must be different and the time–activity patterns are itself different, which leads to select different microenvironments to the data collection of pollutants' concentrations. The most used methods to gather information on time–activity patterns were questionnaires and diaries, and the main microenvironments considered were home and school (indoors and outdoors). Although the ME modelling approach in studies to assess children’s exposure to air pollution is highly encouraged, a validation process is needed, due to the uncertainties associated with the application of this approach.

P.T.B.S. Branco; M.C.M. Alvim-Ferraz; F.G. Martins; S.I.V. Sousa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Modeling and Quantification of Team Performance in Human Reliability Analysis for Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) are important technical contributors to the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) risk-informed and performance based approach to regulating U.S. commercial nuclear activities. Furthermore, all currently operating commercial NPPs in the U.S. are required by federal regulation to be staffed with crews of operators. Yet, aspects of team performance are underspecified in most HRA methods that are widely used in the nuclear industry. There are a variety of "emergent" team cognition and teamwork errors (e.g., communication errors) that are 1) distinct from individual human errors, and 2) important to understand from a PRA perspective. The lack of robust models or quantification of team performance is an issue that affects the accuracy and validity of HRA methods and models, leading to significant uncertainty in estimating HEPs. This paper describes research that has the objective to model and quantify team dynamics and teamwork within NPP control room crews for risk informed applications, thereby improving the technical basis of HRA, which improves the risk-informed approach the NRC uses to regulate the U.S. commercial nuclear industry.

Jeffrey C. JOe; Ronald L. Boring

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Home Ignition Assessment Model Applied to Structures in the Wildland-Urban Interface  

SciTech Connect

The issue of exterior fire threat to buildings, from either wildfires in the wildland-urban interface or neighboring structure fires, is critically important. To address this, theWildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program was initiated. The WIRHD program developed a tool, theWildFIREWizard, that will allow homeowners to estimate the external fire threat to their homes based on specific features and characteristics of the homes and yards. The software then makes recommendations to reduce the threat. The inputs include the structural and material features of the home and information about any ignition sources or flammable objects in its immediate vicinity, known as the home ignition zone. The tool comprises an ignition assessment model that performs explicit calculations of the radiant and convective heating of the building envelope from the potential ignition sources. This article describes a series of material ignition and flammability tests that were performed to calibrate and/or validate the ignition assessment model. The tests involved exposing test walls with different external siding types to radiant heating and/or direct flame contact.The responses of the test walls were used to determine the conditions leading to melting, ignition, or any other mode of failure of the walls. Temperature data were used to verify the model predictions of temperature rises and ignition times of the test walls.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Werth, David [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC; Gupta, Narendra [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Implementation of Localized Corrosion in the Performance Assessment Model for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

A total system performance assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to analyze the ability of the natural and engineered barriers of the Yucca Mountain repository to isolate nuclear waste over the 10,000-year period following repository closure. The principal features of the engineered barrier system (EBS) are emplacement tunnels (or ''drifts'') containing a two-layer waste package (WP) for waste containment and a titanium drip shield to protect the waste package from seeping water and falling rock, The 20-mm-thick outer shell of the WP is composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The barrier function of the EBS is to isolate the waste from migrating water. The water and its associated chemical conditions eventually lead to degradation of the waste packages and mobilization of the radionuclides within the packages. There are five possible waste package degradation modes of the Alloy 22: general corrosion, microbially influenced corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, early failure due to manufacturing defects, and localized corrosion. This paper specifically examines the incorporation of the Alloy-22 localized corrosion model into the Yucca Mountain TSPA model, particularly the abstraction and modeling methodology, as well as issues dealing with scaling, spatial variability, uncertainty, and coupling to other sub-models that are part of the total system model.

Vivek Jain, S. David Sevougian, Patrick D. Mattie, Kevin G. Mon, and Robert J. Mackinnon

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Utilizing geographic information systems technology in the Wyoming cumulative hydrologic impact assessment modeling process  

SciTech Connect

The coal-permitting process places heavy demands on both permit applicants and regulatory authorities with respect to the management and analysis of hydrologic data. Currently, this correlation is being addressed for the Powder River Basin, Wyoming by the ongoing Cumulative Hydrologic Impact Assessment (CHIA) efforts at the University of Wyoming. One critical component of the CHIA is the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) for support, management, manipulation, pre-analysis, and display of data associated with the chosen groundwater and surface water models. This paper will discuss the methodology in using of GIS technology as an integrated tool with the MODFLOW and HEC-1 hydrologic models. Pre-existing GIS links associated with these two models served as a foundation for this effort. However, due to established standards and site specific factors, substantial modifications were performed on existing tools to obtain adequate results. The groundwater-modeling effort required the use of a refined grid in which cell sizes varied based on the relative locations of ongoing mining activities. Surface water modeling was performed in a semi-arid region with very limited topographic relief and predominantly ephemeral stream channels. These were substantial issues that presented challenges for effective GIS/model integration.

Hamerlinck, J.D.; Oakleaf, J.R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Multi-State Physics Models of Aging Passive Components in Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Multi-state Markov modeling has proved to be a promising approach to estimating the reliability of passive components - particularly metallic pipe components - in the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). These models consider the progressive degradation of a component through a series of observable discrete states, such as detectable flaw, leak and rupture. Service data then generally provides the basis for estimating the state transition rates. Research in materials science is producing a growing understanding of the physical phenomena that govern the aging degradation of passive pipe components. As a result, there is an emerging opportunity to incorporate these insights into PRA. This paper describes research conducted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Pathway of the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. A state transition model is described that addresses aging behavior associated with stress corrosion cracking in ASME Class 1 dissimilar metal welds – a component type relevant to LOCA analysis. The state transition rate estimates are based on physics models of weld degradation rather than service data. The resultant model is found to be non-Markov in that the transition rates are time-inhomogeneous and stochastic. Numerical solutions to the model provide insight into the effect of aging on component reliability.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Economic analysis and assessment of syngas production using a modeling approach  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis and modeling are essential and important issues for the development of current feedstock and process technology for bio-gasification. The objective of this study was to develop an economic model and apply to predict the unit cost of syngas production from a micro-scale bio-gasification facility. An economic model was programmed in C++ computer programming language and developed using a parametric cost approach, which included processes to calculate the total capital costs and the total operating costs. The model used measured economic data from the bio-gasification facility at Mississippi State University. The modeling results showed that the unit cost of syngas production was $1.217 for a 60 Nm-3 h-1 capacity bio-gasifier. The operating cost was the major part of the total production cost. The equipment purchase cost and the labor cost were the largest part of the total capital cost and the total operating cost, respectively. Sensitivity analysis indicated that labor costs rank the top as followed by equipment cost, loan life, feedstock cost, interest rate, utility cost, and waste treatment cost. The unit cost of syngas production increased with the increase of all parameters with exception of loan life. The annual cost regarding equipment, labor, feedstock, waste treatment, and utility cost showed a linear relationship with percent changes, while loan life and annual interest rate showed a non-linear relationship. This study provides the useful information for economic analysis and assessment of the syngas production using a modeling approach.

Kim, Hakkwan; Parajuli, Prem B.; Yu, Fei; Columbus, Eugene P.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Parametric modeling of transitioning cyclone’s wind fields for risk assessment studies in the western North Pacific  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk assessment systems for tropical cyclone hazard rely on large ensembles of model simulations to characterize cyclones tracks, intensities and the extent of the associated damaging winds. Given computational costs the wind field ...

T. Loridan; S. Khare; E. Scherer; M. Dixon; E. Bellone

142

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

Shott, G. J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Improving the assessment of wave energy resources by means of coupled wave-ocean numerical modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sea waves energy represents a renewable and sustainable energy resource, that nevertheless needs to be further investigated to make it more cost-effective and economically appealing. A key step in the process of Wave Energy Converters (WEC) deployment is the energy resource assessment at a sea site either measured or obtained through numerical model analysis. In these kind of studies, some approximations are often introduced, especially in the early stages of the process, viz. waves are assumed propagating in deep waters without underneath ocean currents. These aspects are discussed and evaluated in the Adriatic Sea and its northern part (Gulf of Venice) using locally observed and modeled wave data. In particular, to account for a “state of the art” treatment of the Wave–Current Interaction (WCI) we have implemented the Simulating \\{WAves\\} Nearshore (SWAN) model and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), fully coupled within the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) system. COAWST has been applied to a computational grid covering the whole Adriatic Sea and off-line nested to a high-resolution grid in the Gulf of Venice. A 15-year long wave data set collected at the oceanographic tower “Acqua Alta”, located approximately 15 km off the Venice coast, has also been analyzed with the dual purpose of providing a reference to the model estimates and to locally assess the wave energy resource. By using COAWST, we have quantified for the first time to our best knowledge the importance of the WCI effect on wave power estimation. This can vary up to 30% neglecting the current effect. Results also suggest the Gulf of Venice as a suitable testing site for WECs, since it is characterized by periods of calm (optimal for safe installation and maintenance) alternating with severe storms, whose wave energy potentials are comparable to those ordinarily encountered in the energy production sites.

Francesco Barbariol; Alvise Benetazzo; Sandro Carniel; Mauro Sclavo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Uncertainty analysis of an aviation climate model and an aircraft price model for assessment of environmental effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating, presenting, and assessing uncertainties are important parts in assessment of a complex system. This thesis focuses on the assessment of uncertainty in the price module and the climate module in the Aviation ...

Jun, Mina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ecological-economic assessment of farms using multi-input multi-output models: life cycle assessment with multiple paired comparisons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multi-input multi-output model is developed by extending the life cycle assessment framework for analysing the relationship between agricultural production and environmental impacts. The inputs include farmland and materials such as fertilisers, pesticides and animals. The outputs are of two types: one is agro-economic production, such as crop yields, and the other is environmental impacts, including greenhouse gas emissions. Additive and ratio models are defined for analysing the relationship between management intensity, land productivity and environmental impacts based on the farm model. After the framework of multiple paired comparisons is illustrated, the multi-input multi-output model is applied to rice farming in Japan. The results indicate that the additive and ratio models can be used for detecting the directions of changes. These models can be extended for analysing the land-use competition between food and energy production.

Kiyotada Hayashi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project  

SciTech Connect

This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

Not Available

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus  

SciTech Connect

Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam [Cancer Gene Therapy Section, Metabolism Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, Room 4-5330, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-1457, National Institutes of Health, Maryland (United States); Abu-Asab, Mones S. [Ultrastructural Pathology, Laboratory of Pathology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Maryland (United States); Wildner, Oliver [Department of Molecular and Medical Virology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C. [Virion Systems, Inc., Rockville, Maryland (United States); Ramanan, Vijay [Cancer Gene Therapy Section, Metabolism Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, Room 4-5330, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-1457, National Institutes of Health, Maryland (United States); Prince, Gregory A. [Virion Systems, Inc., Rockville, Maryland (United States); Morris, John C. [Cancer Gene Therapy Section, Metabolism Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, Room 4-5330, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-1457, National Institutes of Health, Maryland (United States)], E-mail: jmorris@mail.nih.gov

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of passenger seats and their impact on different vehicle models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to date has been to evaluate life cycle impacts of different design solutions and materials for a car, its sub-systems and components. Considerable number of publications are available on LCA of automotive components. This research aims to extend the LCA approach by evaluating and comparing the effects of mass reduction of passenger seats for different vehicle models in order to provide strategic support for decision making in the development process and to validate the environmental benefits of design alternatives under investigation. For this purpose, the paper presents a comprehensive LCA of passenger seats with detailed consideration of alternative scenarios for the use phase for different vehicle models.

Aleksandar Subic; Francesco Schiavone; Martin Leary; Jack Manning

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PORFLOW MODELING FOR A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF NEW SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT DESIGNS  

SciTech Connect

At the request of Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRNL has analyzed the expected performance obtained from using seven 32 million gallon Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs) in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) to store future saltstone grout. The analysis was based on preliminary SDU final design specifications. The analysis used PORFLOW modeling to calculate the release of 20 radionuclides from an SDU and transport of the radionuclides and daughters through the vadose zone. Results from this vadose zone analysis were combined with previously calculated releases from existing saltstone vaults and FDCs and a second PORFLOW model run to calculate aquifer transport to assessment points located along a boundary 100 m from the nearest edge of the SDF sources. Peak concentrations within 12 sectors spaced along the 100 m boundary were determined over a period of evaluation extending 20,000 years after SDF closure cap placement. These peak concentrations were provided to SRR to use as input for dose calculations.

Smith, F.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Performance of corrosion inhibiting admixtures for structural concrete -- assessment methods and predictive modeling  

SciTech Connect

During the past fifteen years corrosion inhibiting admixtures (CIAs) have become increasingly popular for protection of reinforced components of highway bridges and other structures from damage induced by chlorides. However, there remains considerable debate about the benefits of CIAs in concrete. A variety of testing methods to assess the performance of CIA have been reported in the literature, ranging from tests in simulated pore solutions to long-term exposures of concrete slabs. The paper reviews the published techniques and recommends the methods which would make up a comprehensive CIA effectiveness testing program. The results of this set of tests would provide the data which can be used to rank the presently commercially available CIA and future candidate formulations utilizing a proposed predictive model. The model is based on relatively short-term laboratory testing and considers several phases of a service life of a structure (corrosion initiation, corrosion propagation without damage, and damage to the structure).

Yunovich, M.; Thompson, N.G. [CC Technologies Labs., Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Improving potato drought simulations: Assessing water stress factors using a coupled model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective water management is important for drought sensitive crops like potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Crop simulation models are well suited for evaluating water limited responses in order to provide management and phenotypic-trait recommendations for more efficient production practice. There is considerable variation in how water stress components are implemented with regards to simulating soil, plant, and atmospheric relationships, thereby influencing the utility of model recommendations. Four water-stress factors were developed and implemented in the potato model SPUDIM in order to assess the contribution each factor provided for improving modeling accuracy. Iterative comparisons versus experimental data consisting of six irrigation treatments were used. Factors included F1, shifts in carbon allocation among shoot and root organs based on soil moisture availability, F2, coupled response of leaf water potential on leaf expansion, F3, and on stomatal conductance, and F4, increased tuber sink strength. F2 and F3 accounted for up to 88% of the improvement in root mean square error for total biomass. However, F1 and F4 were necessary to accurately simulate yield. F4 was also required to reproduce trends of increasing water-use efficiency and harvest index with declines in water availability. When the full 4-factor model was considered, simulated responses for total, leaf, stem, and tuber dry weights were within 11% of observed values. Daily comparisons for whole plant net photosynthesis and evapotranspiration indicated F3 was required to accurately simulate water use, but was too sensitive to very low leaf water potentials. The calibration coefficients used in the model remained stable over all six irrigation treatments, suggesting the full model can be utilized to evaluate water management strategies for potato.

David H. Fleisher; A. Dathe; D.J. Timlin; V.R. Reddy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas MARLA R. KNEBL LOWREY AND ZONG-LIANG YANG Department of Geological 3 March 2008) ABSTRACT A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood

Yang, Zong-Liang

153

A model for assessing the impact of vessel noise on odontocete communication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore industrial noisesources ensonify marine mammal habitat and may mask detection of social signals and important environmental sounds. A probabilistic model of sound detection was developed for assessing the impact of underwater icebreaker noise on signal detection by beluga whales and narwhals. The probability of detecting sample signals in the absence of vessel noise was compared to that of detecting the same signals in ship noise using the MV arctic as a sample noisesource.Analysis of signal detection probabilities showed that loud signals centered on the 5?kHz critical band were more severely masked by ship noise than were quiet 5?kHz signals or loud 2?kHz signals. Thus long?range calls seem to be more susceptible to masking by ship noise than are short?range calls. The model could also be applied to other critical bands of interest. Changes in the probability of detecting vessel noise as estimated by the model were also correlated with changes in beluga and narwhal behavior observed in response to the vessel in operation.

Susan E. Cosens

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

New approach to risk assessment of central neurotoxicity induced by 1-bromopropane using animal models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1-Bromopropane (1-BP) induces central as well as peripheral neurotoxicity in workers. We have reported the dysfunction of feedback inhibition (i.e. disinhibition) in the rat hippocampus following exposure to 1-BP at concentrations of 1500 and 700 ppm. For risk assessment, we studied disinhibition of the CA1 region and the dentate gyrus in hippocampal slices obtained from control and 1-BP-exposed (200 and 400 ppm) rats, and determined the bromide concentration in the brain. Granule cell disinhibition was observed after inhalation exposure to 400 ppm 1-BP for 8 or 12 weeks, suggesting that the dentate gyrus was more sensitive than the CA1 region to 1-BP exposure. The lowest observed adverse effect level and the no observed adverse effect level of 1-BP inhalation for disinhibition were 400 and 200 ppm, respectively. The concentration of bromides in the brain increased from 2.9 ± 1.5 to 85.0 ± 25.4 ?g/g-wet brain at week 4 of 400 ppm inhalation, and no further increase was observed even when the exposure period was extended for up to 12 weeks. The relationship between total dose (ppm-h) and the exposure concentration of 1-BP was investigated at different exposure concentrations. Disinhibition and death by inhalation depended on the total dose, and their occurrence appeared earlier as the exposure concentration increased. The results demonstrated a novel model for risk assessment of central neurotoxicity induced by 1-BP inhalation.

Yukiko Fueta; Toru Ishidao; Susumu Ueno; Yasuhiro Yoshida; Naoki Kunugita; Hajime Hori

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Integrated LCA–LEED sustainability assessment model for structure and envelope systems of school buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In Canada and USA, nearly 80 million students and teachers spend at least eight hours daily in schools that could be unhealthy and restrict their ability to learn. Despite this fact there is lack of adopting sustainability principles in school buildings. Even though life cycle assessment (LCA) and LEED® could serve as sustainability measurement tools, studies show that the integration of sustainability principles to LCA has not become standard practice yet. This paper presents an integrated LCA–LEED model that incorporates LCA into LEED and assigns corresponding LEED scores to achieve a high level of sustainability assessment, for the structure and envelope systems of Canadian school buildings. In this model, the selection of the most sustainable structure and envelope type for school buildings is done through the evaluation of three categories of the LEED rating system: energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and LCA (incorporated under the innovation and design process category of LEED). Various options are tested by considering structures such as concrete, steel, masonry and wood, and envelope types such as precast panels, steel stud, wood stud and cavity wall. Energy simulation is performed by eQUEST® (version 3.64) program and LCA is performed by ATHENA® impact estimator. The results show that concrete and masonry buildings have high energy consumption and global warming potential during certain life cycle stages such as manufacturing, construction and demolition. However they have lower annual energy consumption and environmental impact during the operating stage, as well as for the overall life span. Concrete building with minimum insulation has obtained the highest total LEED score (19) followed by masonry (17), while steel and steel-masonry buildings have the least score (14).

Othman Subhi Alshamrani; Khaled Galal; Sabah Alkass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

An anticipatory integrated assessment of regional acidification: The RAINS-Asia model  

SciTech Connect

Across large parts of Asia, air pollution problems are becoming more and more evident. Rainfall in some areas, including China, Japan, and Thailand, has been measured to be 10 times more acidic than unpolluted rain. Increasing evidence of acidification damage to ecosystems such as surface waters, soils, and economically important crops, is beginning to appear. In addition, urban air quality in many areas of the region continues to decrease. Current economic forecasts predict continued rapid economic growth in the region, which will bring with it increasing emissions of air pollutants, especially sulfur. The total primary energy demand in Asia currently doubles every twelve years (as compared to a world average of every 28 years). Coal is expected to continue to be the dominant energy source, with coal demand projected to increase by 65 percent per year, a rate that outpaces regional economic growth. If current trends in economic development and energy use in Asia continue, emissions of sulfur dioxide, one of the key components in acid rain, will more than triple within the next 30 years. Many ecosystems will be unable to continue to absorb these increased levels of pollution without harmful effects, thus creating a potential danger for irreversible environmental damage in many areas. In view of the potential environmental consequences of projected growth in Asian energy consumption, emissions, and air pollution, the World Bank, together with the Asian Development Bank, have funded a project to develop and implement an integrated assessment model for the acid deposition phenomenon in Asia. The Regional Air Pollution INformation and Simulation model for Asia (RAINS-Asia) is a software tool to help decision makers assess and project future trends in emissions, transport, and deposition of air pollutants, and their potential environmental effects.

Amann, M. [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria); Carmichael, G.R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Foell, W. [Resource Management Associates, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Air quality modelling as a supplementary assessment method in the framework of the European Air Quality Directive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the European Air Quality (AQ) Directive, member states must annually report their AQ to the European Commission (EC). This report can be based on modelling data if the concentration levels do not exceed the established lower assessment thresholds (LAT), or on combined data from modelling and monitoring systems (supplementary assessment methods) if concentrations levels are below the upper assessment threshold (UAT). This work presents and applies a methodology that combines air pollutant concentration values from monitored data and from a numerical modelling system to deliver AQ information for Portugal in 2010. This methodology produces improved information, especially for areas where the amount of fixed monitoring stations is sparse or non-existent, allowing obtaining a better and broader overview of the AQ in Portugal to support AQ reporting to the European Commission.

I. Ribeiro; A. Monteiro; A.P. Fernandes; A.C. Monteiro; M. Lopes; C. Borrego; A.I. Miranda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN APPLICATIONS FOR MODELING AND ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN SALINE AQUIFERS  

SciTech Connect

This project was a computer modeling effort to couple reservoir simulation and ED/RSM using Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Analysis, and Optimization Methods, to assess geologic, geochemical, geomechanical, and rock-fluid effects and factors on CO2 injectivity, capacity, and plume migration. The project objective was to develop proxy models to simplify the highly complex coupled geochemical and geomechanical models in the utilization and storage of CO2 in the subsurface. The goals were to investigate and prove the feasibility of the ED/RSM processes and engineering development, and bridge the gaps regarding the uncertainty and unknowns of the many geochemical and geomechanical interacting parameters in the development and operation of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration and storage sites. The bottleneck in this workflow is the high computational effort of reactive transport simulation models and large number of input variables to optimize with ED/RSM techniques. The project was not to develop the reactive transport, geomechanical, or ED/RSM software, but was to use what was commercially and/or publically available as a proof of concept to generate proxy or surrogate models. A detailed geologic and petrographic mineral assemblage and geologic structure of the doubly plunging anticline was defined using the USDOE RMOTC formations of interest data (e.g., Lower Sundance, Crow Mountain, Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak). The assemblage of 23 minerals was primarily developed from literature data and petrophysical (well log) analysis. The assemblage and structure was input into a commercial reactive transport simulator to predict the effects of CO2 injection and complex reactions with the reservoir rock. Significant impediments were encountered during the execution phase of the project. The only known commercial reactive transport simulator was incapable of simulating complex geochemistry modeled in this project. Significant effort and project funding was expended to determine the limitations of both the commercial simulator and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) R&D simulator, TOUGHREACT available to the project. A simplified layer cake model approximating the volume of the RMOTC targeted reservoirs was defined with 1-3 minerals eventually modeled with limited success. Modeling reactive transport in porous media requires significant computational power. In this project, up to 24 processors were used to model a limited mineral set of 1-3 minerals. In addition, geomechanical aspects of injecting CO2 into closed, semi-open, and open systems in various well completion methods was simulated. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as a storage method was not modeled. A robust and stable simulation dataset or base case was developed and used to create a master dataset with embedded instructions for input to the ED/RSM software. Little success was achieved toward the objective of the project using the commercial simulator or the LBNL simulator versions available during the time of this project. Several hundred realizations were run with the commercial simulator and ED/RSM software, most having convergence problems and terminating prematurely. A proxy model for full field CO2 injection sequestration utilization and storage was not capable of being developed with software available for this project. Though the chemistry is reasonably known and understood, based on the amount of effort and huge computational time required, predicting CO2 sequestration storage capacity in geologic formations to within the program goals of ±30% proved unsuccessful.

Rogers, John

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

467 DOI 10.1007/s11367-010-0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA CouplingGIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use Part 1:while life cycle assessment (LCA) does not conventionally

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Using GIS and numerical modeling to assess subsidence over abandoned mines  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines (USBM) has been developing techniques to assess surface subsidence over abandoned coal mines. One technique has involved estimation of stress acting on every pillar of an abandoned mine then comparing it to pillar strength and floor bearing capacity. This required computations for several thousand pillars for one mine. Mine maps are digitized and saved as a computer drawing file. Then the tributary area loading each pillar was determined graphically and outlined. Geographic Information System (GIS) software was used to compute the ratio of pillar area to tributary area for each pillar and then divide the average overburden stress by this ratio to compute an estimated pillar stress. Numerical modeling was then used to analyze a two-dimensional cross section of the overburden and mine, and provide an independent estimate of stresses. Based on published data for floor bearing capacity and pillar load capacity, GIS was used to perform a mine-wide classification of pillars according to stress level. An example of this analysis and classification is presented in this paper for an abandoned coal mine in the Illinois Basin. The mine had been operated in the Herrin No. 6 Seam at a depth of 60 in with an average overburden stress of 1.4 MPa. It was found that pillars with estimated stresses greater than 5 MPa correlated with historical subsidence events. Due to the greater detail considered in this approach, it provides a fundamental basis for the assessment of subsidence risk since it incorporates the geometry of mine pillars and entries as well as the ultimate strength of the pillars and floor.

O`Connor, K.M. [GeoTDR, Inc., Apple Valley, MN (United States); Siekmeier, J.A. [Braun Intertec Corp., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Stache, J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Jorge L. Sarmiento - Princeton PI, Anand Gnanadesikan - Princeton Co-I, Nicolas Gruber - UCLA PI, Xin Jin - UCLA PostDoc, Robert Armstrong - SUNY /Stony Brook Consultant

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

ASSESSMENT FOR THE SOUTHWEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICE CLIMATE CHANGE & CULTURAL RESOURCE PLANNING PROGRAM 17 EARTH SYSTEM MODELS 18 CLIMATE ASSESSMENTS

Wong, Pak Kin

165

A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable technology (e.g. wind or solar, etc.) whose behavior is described by a binary state, working assessment, multi-state modeling, universal generating function #12;2 Notations Solar irradiance Total number of discretized solar irradiance states Discretized solar irradiance at state i Random variable representing

Boyer, Edmond

166

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 22, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2007 85 A Reinforcement Learning Model to Assess Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 22, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2007 85 A Reinforcement Learning Model to Assess Market Power Under Auction-Based Energy Pricing Vishnuteja Nanduri, Student Member, IEEE, and Tapas K. Das, Member, IEEE Abstract--Auctions serve as a primary pricing mechanism in various market

Tesfatsion, Leigh

167

Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling Miscanthus in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to Simulate Its Water Quality Effects As a Bioenergy Crop ... There is increasing interest in perennial grasses as a renewable source of bioenergy and feedstock for second-generation cellulosic biofuels. ... Due to global warming and energy independence concerns, there is increasing interest in perennial grasses as a renewable source of bioenergy. ...

Tze Ling Ng; J. Wayland Eheart; Ximing Cai; Fernando Miguez

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Wind assessment in complex terrain with the numeric model Aiolos implementation of the influence of roughness changes and stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind assessment in complex terrain with the numeric model Aiolos ­ implementation of the influence of roughness changes and stability Ulrich Focken, Detlef Heinemann, Hans-Peter Waldl Department of Energy (EWA) gives good results for the wind potential estimation in flat areas. But besides many

Heinemann, Detlev

169

Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Study developed a methodology for the evaluation of gasification for MSW treatment. • Study was conducted comparatively for USA, UAE, and Thailand. • Study applies a thermodynamic model (Gibbs free energy minimization) using the Gasify software. • The energy efficiency of the process and the compatibility with different waste streams was studied. - Abstract: Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify®) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration.

Arafat, Hassan A., E-mail: harafat@masdar.ac.ae; Jijakli, Kenan

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Research utilization in the building industry: decision model and preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Research Utilization Program was conceived as a far-reaching means for managing the interactions of the private sector and the federal research sector as they deal with energy conservation in buildings. The program emphasizes a private-public partnership in planning a research agenda and in applying the results of ongoing and completed research. The results of this task support the hypothesis that the transfer of R and D results to the buildings industry can be accomplished more efficiently and quickly by a systematic approach to technology transfer. This systematic approach involves targeting decision makers, assessing research and information needs, properly formating information, and then transmitting the information through trusted channels. The purpose of this report is to introduce elements of a market-oriented knowledge base, which would be useful to the Building Systems Division, the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and their associated laboratories in managing a private-public research partnership on a rational systematic basis. This report presents conceptual models and data bases that can be used in formulating a technology transfer strategy and in planning technology transfer programs.

Watts, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Smith, S.A.; Westergard, E.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment models final Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ment categories... majority of the 164 assessment units in CASP8 ... Source: Richardson, David - Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Collection: Biotechnology ; Biology...

172

SciTech Connect: Using a Simple Binomial Model to Assess Improvement...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Assess Improvement in Predictive Capability: Sequential Bayesian Inference, Hypothesis Testing, and Power Analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Using a Simple...

173

MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT OF FLAWS IN PRESSURE TUBES OF CANDU REACTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Probabilistic assessment and life cycle management of engineering components and systems in a nuclear power plant is intended to ensure safe and efficient operation of… (more)

Sahoo, Anup Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Seismic Performance, Modeling, and Failure Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22 Modeling of Building23 Modeling of Building1.0 GA g 2.2.7. Modeling of Building 2A The 3-D nonlinear

Tuna, Zeynep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

SciTech Connect

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Information on Hydrologic Conceptual Models, Parameters, Uncertainty Analysis, and Data Sources for Dose Assessments at Decommissioning Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses issues related to the analysis of uncertainty in dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The basic conceptual models and mathematical implementations of three dose assessment codes are outlined along with the site-specific conditions under which the codes may provide inaccurate, potentially nonconservative results. In addition, the hydrologic parameters of the codes are identified and compared. A methodology for parameter uncertainty assessment is outlined that considers the potential data limitations and modeling needs of decommissioning analyses. This methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases, sensitivity analysis, probabilistic modeling, and Bayesian updating to incorporate site-specific information. Data sources for best-estimate parameter values and parameter uncertainty information are also reviewed. A follow-on report will illustrate the uncertainty assessment methodology using decommissioning test cases.

Meyer, Philip D.; Gee, Glendon W.; Nicholson, Thomas J.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wind resource assessment using numerical weather prediction models and multi-criteria decision making technique: case study (Masirah Island, Oman)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Authority for Electricity Regulation in Oman has recently announced the implementation of a 500 kW wind farm pilot project in Masirah Island. Detailed wind resource assessment is then required to identify the most suitable location for this project. This paper presents wind resource assessment using nested ensemble numerical weather prediction (NWP) model's approach at 2.8 km resolution and multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) technique. A case study based on the proposed approach is conducted over Masirah Island, Oman. The resource assessment over the island was based on the mean wind speed and wind power distribution over the entire island at different heights. In addition, important criteria such as turbulence intensity and peak hour matching are also considered. The NWP model results were verified against the available 10 m wind data observations from the meteorological station in the northern part of the island. The resource assessment criteria were evaluated using MCDM technique to score the locations over the island based on their suitability for wind energy applications. Two MCDM approaches namely equally weighted and differently weighted criteria were implemented in this paper.

Sultan Al-Yahyai; Yassine Charabi; Abdullah Al-Badi; Adel Gastli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Assessing the impact of marine wind farms on birds through movement modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...post-construction of the Danish Nysted offshore wind farm were used to parameterize competing...Somateria mollissima |Nysted offshore wind farm| 1. Introduction Many countries...post-construction assessment of an offshore wind farm, and to quantitatively describe...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Performance Assessment Modeling for Savannah River Glass HLW Disposal in a Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance assessment (PA) simulates the long-term performance of a conceptual geological repository for nuclear waste or the performance of a subsystem such as the engineered barrier system (drifts, waste pa...

W. J. O’Connell; W. L. Bourcier; J. Gansemer…

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Video quality assessment using a statistical model of human visual speed perception  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motion is one of the most important types of information contained in natural video, but direct use of motion information in the design of video quality assessment algorithms has not...

Wang, Zhou; Li, Qiang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Stability assessment of a slope under a transformer substation using numerical modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the deformation mechanism and stability assessment of a slope in Yunnan Province, China. Field investigations indicated that the deformation of the slope was caused by the co...

H. J. Li; F. C. Dai; W. C. Li; L. Xu; H. Min

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development and assessment of a soot emissions model for aircraft gas turbine engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing candidate policies designed to address the impact of aviation on the environment requires a simplified method to estimate pollutant emissions for current and future aircraft gas turbine engines under different ...

Martini, Bastien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Game-based assessment: an integrated model for capturing evidence of learning in play  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the assessment data aggregator for game environments (ADAGE), a click-stream data framework designed to test whether click-stream data can provide reliable evidence of learning. As digitally-based games become increasingly prevalent ...

Richard Halverson; V. Elizabeth Owen

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A model-based fuzzy set-OWA approach for integrated air pollution risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a fuzzy set—ordered weighted averaging (FSOWA) approach for the integrated health risk assessment associated with multiple air pollution factors and evaluation criteria. A number of ... the sa...

Baozhen Wang; Zhi Chen

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of a new technology product evaluation model for assessing commercialization opportunities using Delphi method and fuzzy AHP approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the number of new products developed by new technologies has increased, the importance of the commercialization of new technology products has become crucial to manufactures in the successful delivery of valuable new products and services. This study classified success factors for commercialization of new products and analyzed which factors should be primarily considered. Based on the literature review and Delphi method, we identified four decision areas and further prioritized the sixteen factors under a hierarchy model structured by fuzzy AHP (analytic hierarchy process) approach. The FAHP is conducted by 111 R&D and business experts working at the world’s major players in machinery industry; using the priorities of success factors derived by FAHP, we devise an example of commercialization assessment model. The paper drives the assessment initiatives of the new product development in manufactures and provides them with practical implications about the commercialization of new technology product.

Jaemin Cho; Jaeho Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ASSESSMENT OF INTERACTION BETWEEN NORTH PACIFIC ALBACORE, THUNNUS ALALUNGA, FISHERIES BY USE OF A SIMULATION MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF A SIMULATION MODEL P. KLEIBER AND B. BAKER1 ABSTRACT Using a simulation model of a typical year in the North

188

Using direct normal irradiance models and utility electrical loading to assess benefit of a concentrating solar power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper was to determine if three different direct normal irradiance (DNI) models were sufficiently accurate to determine if concentrating solar power (CSP) plants could meet the utility electrical load. DNI data were measured at three different laboratories in the United States and compared with DNI calculated by three DNI models. In addition, utility electrical loading data were obtained for all three locations. The DNI models evaluated were: the Direct Insolation Simulation Code (DISC), DIRINT, and DIRINDEX. On an annual solar insolation (e.g. kW h/m2) basis, the accuracy of the DNI models at all three locations was within: 7% (DISC), 5% (DIRINT), and 3% (DIRINDEX). During the three highest electrical loading months at the three locations, the monthly accuracy varied from: 0% to 16% (DISC), 0% to 9% (DIRINT), and 0% to 8% (DIRINDEX). At one location different pyranometers were used to measure GHI, and the most expensive pyranometers did not improve the DNI model monthly accuracy. In lieu of actually measuring DNI, using the DIRINT model was felt to be sufficient for assessing whether to build a CSP plant at one location, but use of either the DIRINT or DIRINDEX models was felt to be marginal for the other two locations due to errors in modeling DNI for utility peak electrical loading days – especially for partly cloudy days.

Brian D. Vick; Daryl R. Myers; William E. Boyson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ESD.864 / ESD.936 Systems Modeling and Assessment for Policy, Spring 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course explores how scientific information can be used to inform policy decision-making processes through the use of quantitative modeling techniques. It incorporates both hands-on analysis and practice using models ...

Selin, Noelle

190

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assessment of Wind Power Potential for Two Contrasting Coastlines of South Africa Using a Numerical Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-dimensional numerical model is used to predict near surface wind velocities, and consequently wind power, for five distinct synoptic regimes for contrasting east and west coasts of South Africa. The model results suggest that no one ...

R. D. Diab; M. Garstang

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA cycle analysis (LCA). However, LCA requires the collection of a large amount of data and is thus time-consuming. Besides, LCA results found in the literature corresponding to the photovoltaic energy pathway show a large

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

D-optimal design for Rapid Assessment Model of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most of major oilfields in China have reached high water cut stage, but still, they contribute to more than 70% of domestic oil production. How to extract more oil from mature oilfields has become a hot topic in petroleum engineering. Carbon dioxide flooding is a win–win strategy because it can enhance oil recovery and simultaneously reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. In order to evaluate the potentials of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs, various 3-D heterogeneous geological models were built based on Guan 104 fault block in Dagang Oilfield to perform reservoir simulations. The D-optimal design was applied to build and verify the Rapid Assessment Model of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs. Five quantitative variables were considered, including average horizontal permeability, permeability variation coefficient, ratio of vertical to horizontal permeability, net thickness of formation and percentage of recoverable reserves by water flooding. The process of weighting emphasized the contributions of linear terms, quadratic terms and first-order interactions of five quantitative parameters to improved recovery factor and Net Present Value of CO2 flooding. Using the Rapid Assessment Model of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs, significant first-order interactions were sorted out and type curves were established and analyzed for the evaluation of technical and economic efficiency of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs. Aimed at oil reservoirs with the similar geological conditions and fluid properties as Guan 104 fault block, the Rapid Assessment Model and type curves of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs can be applied to predict improved recovery factor and Net Present Value of water-alternating-CO2 flooding at different conditions of reservoir parameters and development parameter. The approach could serve as a guide for the application and spread of CO2-EOR projects.

Zhaojie Song; Zhiping Li; Chunsheng Yu; Jirui Hou; Mingzhen Wei; Baojun Bai; Yunpeng Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

numerical models & information Systems, Nice: France (2013)" Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper presents an approach for Environmental Impact Assessment through the use of geolocalized LCA approach, for fixed and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EUsponsored EnerGEO project, aiming at providing a versatile modeling platform for stakeholders allowing calculation, forecasting and monitoring of environmental impacts of different sources of energy. This paper described the geolocalized LCA approach, and its use for the evaluation of environmental impacts of wind energy. The effects of offshore wind farms on global environnemental impacts are evaluated though the LCA approach. It takes into account the type of wind farm, the construction phase, all technical aspects, the operation and maintenance scheme and the decommissioning. It also includes geolocalized information such as wind resources, bathymetry, accessibility … Environmental impact parameters are accessible through a web service helping the decision makers in assessing the environnemental impacts. 1

Catherine Guermont; Lionel Ménard; Isabelle Blanc

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

CCS, Nuclear Power and Biomass An Assessment of Option Triangle under Global Warming Mitigation Policy by an Integrated Assessment Model MARIA-23  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It is well understood that the global climate change caused by the increase of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission would be a serious barrier towards the sustainable development. Nuclear power, CCS and biomass have been regarded as the major options in the GHG mitigation policy. However, since the social acceptance of nuclear power expansion has seriously been changed after the gigantic earthquake on March 11, 2011 followed by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident, the energy policy makers are forced to consider both the global warming and the decline of nuclear power simultaneously. This study attempts to address the following key questions: (1) how much additional costs or decline of production will be needed when nuclear power expansion is limited under the GHG emission control policies and (2) to what extent the potential of the biomass and CCS could compensate for the nuclear power reductions. We expand an integrated assessment model, MARIA-23 (Multiregional Approach for Resource and Industry Allocation) to deal with the CCS options and biomass options taking into account the additional carbon emission by cultivation. The simulation results show the interrelationships of the carbon mitigation contributions of the above three major options under various scenarios.

Shunsuke Mori; Keisuke Miyaji; Kazuhisa Kamegai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

MA3T Model Application at ORNL Assesses the Future of Fuel Cell...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

has developed a model for simulating the market potential of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) and challenges to achieving success over time, including competition with...

198

Progression of performance assessment modeling for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes the evolution of consequence modeling for a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. The discussion includes four early performance assessments (PAs) conducted between 1982 and 1995 to support selection and to evaluate feasibility and three major \\{PAs\\} conducted between 1998 and 2008 to evaluate viability, recommend the site, and assess compliance. Modeling efforts in 1982 estimated dose to individuals 18 km from the site caused by volcanic eruption through the repository. Modeling in 1984 estimated releases via the groundwater pathway because of container corrosion. In combination, this early analysis supported the first environmental assessment. Analysts in 1991 evaluated cumulative release, as specified in the 1985 US radiation protection standards, via the groundwater pathway over 104 yr at a 5-km boundary by modeling waste degradation and flow/transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones. By 1992, however, the US Congress mandated a change to a dose measure. Thus, the 1993 and 1995 performance assessments improved modeling of waste container degradation to provide better estimates of radionuclide release rates out to 106 yr. The 1998 viability assessment was a major step in modeling complexity. Dose at a 20-km boundary from the repository was evaluated through 106 yr for undisturbed conditions using more elaborate modeling of flow and the addition of modules for modeling infiltration, drift seepage, the chemical environment, and biosphere transport. The 2000 assessment for the site recommendation refined the analysis. Seepage modeling was greatly improved and waste form degradation modeling included more chemical dependence. The 2008 compliance assessment for the license application incorporated the influence of the seismicity on waste package performance to evaluate dose at an ~18-km boundary.

Rob P. Rechard; Michael L. Wilson; S. David Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Dynamically Coupled 3D Pollutant Dispersion Model for Assessing Produced Water Discharges in the Canadian Offshore Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamically Coupled 3D Pollutant Dispersion Model for Assessing Produced Water Discharges in the Canadian Offshore Area ... The collected samples of produced water and seawater were analyzed by the COOGER (Centre for Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Research) at the Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environmental Engineering labrotary at the Concordia University, and the Trace Analysis Facility (TAF) at the University of Regina. ... In Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Effects Monitoring Approaches and Technologies; Armsworthy, S. L.; Cranford, P. J.; Lee, K., Eds.; Battelle Memorial Institute: Columbus, OH 2005; pp 319– 342. ...

Lin Zhao; Zhi Chen; Kenneth Lee

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

CFD modeling of two-stage ignition in a rapid compression machine: Assessment of zero-dimensional approach  

SciTech Connect

In modeling rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments, zero-dimensional approach is commonly used along with an associated heat loss model. The adequacy of such approach has not been validated for hydrocarbon fuels. The existence of multi-dimensional effects inside an RCM due to the boundary layer, roll-up vortex, non-uniform heat release, and piston crevice could result in deviation from the zero-dimensional assumption, particularly for hydrocarbons exhibiting two-stage ignition and strong thermokinetic interactions. The objective of this investigation is to assess the adequacy of zero-dimensional approach in modeling RCM experiments under conditions of two-stage ignition and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) response. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are conducted for n-heptane ignition in an RCM and the validity of zero-dimensional approach is assessed through comparisons over the entire NTC region. Results show that the zero-dimensional model based on the approach of 'adiabatic volume expansion' performs very well in adequately predicting the first-stage ignition delays, although quantitative discrepancy for the prediction of the total ignition delays and pressure rise in the first-stage ignition is noted even when the roll-up vortex is suppressed and a well-defined homogeneous core is retained within an RCM. Furthermore, the discrepancy is pressure dependent and decreases as compressed pressure is increased. Also, as ignition response becomes single-stage at higher compressed temperatures, discrepancy from the zero-dimensional simulations reduces. Despite of some quantitative discrepancy, the zero-dimensional modeling approach is deemed satisfactory from the viewpoint of the ignition delay simulation. (author)

Mittal, Gaurav [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Raju, Mandhapati P. [General Motor R and D Tech Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Exploring the potential for using the grid to support health impact assessment modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential use of grid technology in healthcare, from the perspective of a European health authority in a Regional Healthcare Network (RHCN) seeking to model the effects of a proposed hospital closure programme. The paper reviews ... Keywords: grid computing, health, hospital planning, modelling, public health

David Piggott; Conor Teljeur; Alan Kelly

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Assessing the impact of marine wind farms on birds through movement modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bird movements around turbines. The model most closely...electronic supplementary material. Model 1 estimated u...trajectories that responded to turbines only when they were closer...blocks containing 25 turbines with equal spacing...consumer's electricity bill, and allocated to research...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Modelling Framework to Assess Maintenance Policy Performance in Electrical Production Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, scheduled replacement, etc.), the maintenance echelon (repair on site or in workshop), etc. The decisions of stochastic models of the degradation, failure and repair processes; (Valdez-Flores & Feldman, 1989), pipelines (Hong, 1999), cutting tools (Jeang, 1999), etc.). These models can be grouped into two main

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

Projection models for health-effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume II. SPAHR introductory guide  

SciTech Connect

The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of responses, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projects are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the user of the SPAHR program the information required to operate the program when it is up and running on the computer. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment. It contains a brief description of all commands and options available in SPAHR, as well as a user-oriented description of the structure and operation of the control system and language processor.

Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Accretion vs colliding wind models for the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303: an assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LS I +61 303 is a puzzling Be/X-ray binary with variable gamma-ray emission at up TeV energies. The nature of the compact object and the origin of the high-energy emission are unclear. One family of models invokes particle acceleration in shocks from the collision between the B-star wind and a relativistic pulsar wind, while another centers on a relativistic jet powered by accretion. Recent high-resolution radio observations showing a putative "cometary tail" pointing away from the Be star near periastron have been cited as support for the pulsar-wind model. We wish here to carry out a quantitative assessment of these competing models for this extraordinary source. We apply a 3D SPH code for dynamical simulations of both the pulsar-wind-interaction and accretion-jet models. The former yields a description of the shape of the wind-wind interaction surface. The latter provides an estimation of the accretion rate. The results allow critical evaluation of how the two distinct models confront the data in various wavebands under a range of conditions. When one accounts for the 3D dynamical wind interaction under realistic constraints for the relative strength of the B-star and pulsar winds, the resulting form of the interaction front does not match the putative "cometary tail" claimed from radio observations. On the other hand, dynamical simulations of the accretion-jet model indicate that the orbital phase variation of accretion power includes a secondary broad peak well away from periastron, thus providing a plausible way to explain the observed TeV gamma ray emission toward apastron. We conclude that the colliding-wind model is not clearly established for LS I +61 303, while the accretion-jet model can reproduce many key characteristics of the observed TeV gamma-ray emission.

G. E. Romero; A. T. Okazaki; M. Orellana; S. P. Owocki

2007-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is investigating the potential benefits of incorporating interval electricity data into its residential energy end use models. This includes interval smart meter and submeter data from utility assets and systems. It is expected that these data will play a significant role in informing residential energy efficiency policies in the future. Therefore, a long-term strategy for improving the RECS end-use models will not be complete without an investigation of the current state of affairs of submeter data, including their potential for use in the context of residential building energy modeling.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spent nuclear fuel as a waste form for geologic disposal: Assessment and recommendations on data and modeling needs  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the status of knowledge pertinent to evaluating the behavior of spent nuclear fuel as a waste form in geologic disposal systems and provides background information that can be used by the DOE to address the information needs that pertain to compliance with applicable standards and regulations. To achieve this objective, applicable federal regulations were reviewed, expected disposal environments were described, the status of spent-fuel modeling was summarized, and information regarding the characteristics and behavior of spent fuel was compiled. This compiled information was then evaluated from a performance modeling perspective to identify further information needs. A number of recommendations were made concerning information still needed to enhance understanding of spent-fuel behavior as a waste form in geologic repositories. 335 refs., 22 figs., 44 tabs.

Van Luik, A.E.; Apted, M.J.; Bailey, W.J.; Haberman, J.H.; Shade, J.S.; Guenther, R.E.; Serne, R.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Peters, R.; Williford, R.E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A NEW TUNNEL RISK ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE INTEGRATING SMOKE DISPERSION AND EVACUATION MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dispersion, Evacuation, Computer model, Tenability, HVAC INTRODUCTION Because tunnels are complex Systems on harmonisation of minimum safety standards to guarantee a high level of safety for thé users of tunnels

Boyer, Edmond

209

Advanced Technologies in Energy-Economy Models for Climate Change Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerations regarding the roles of advanced technologies are crucial in energy-economic modeling, as these technologies, while usually not yet commercially viable, could substitute for fossil energy when relevant policies ...

Morris, J.F.

210

A Case Study of Higher Education Competency Models Utilizing an Assessment Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

student affairs preparation programs at Colorado State University and Bowling Green State University, which have already created and implemented competency models for their master's level graduate students, I provide guidance and direction for other...

Uden, Jayme Robert

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This project will develop an in depth model of EGS systems that will allow engineers, practitioners, and researchers to more accurately predict how new fluid technologies would work in a reservoir.

212

Assessing Ecosystem Effects of Reservoir Operations Using Food Web–Energy Transfer and Water Quality Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the effects on the reservoir food web of a new temperature control device (TCD) on the dam at Shasta Lake, California. We followed a linked modeling approach that used a specialized reservoir wate...

Laurel Saito; Brett M. Johnson; John Bartholow; R. Blair Hanna

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Models for Consumption of Raw Vegetables Irrigated with Reclaimed Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The practice of adding water to cut surfaces to keep...waxed boxes, wherein water pools. Feeding damage by insects...Agriculture methods Conservation of Natural Resources...Food Contamination Fresh Water virology Models, Biological...

Andrew J. Hamilton; Frank Stagnitti; Robert Premier; Anne-Maree Boland; Glenn Hale

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessing Invariance of Factor Structures and Polytomous Item Response Model Parameter Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.e., identical items, different people) for the homogenous graded response model (Samejima, 1969) and the partial credit model (Masters, 1982)? To evaluate measurement invariance using IRT methods, the item discrimination and item difficulty parameters... obtained from the GRM need to be equivalent across datasets. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item discrimination parameters (slope) correlation was 0.828. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item difficulty parameters (location) correlation was 0...

Reyes, Jennifer McGee

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assessment of One- and Two-Equation Turbulence Models for Hypersonic Transitional Flows  

SciTech Connect

Many Navier-Stokes codes require that the governing equations be written in conservation form with a source term. The Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model was originally developed in substantial derivative form and when rewritten in conservation form, a density gradient term appears in the source term. This density gradient term causes numerical problems and has a small influence on the numerical predictions. Further work has been performed to understand and to justify the neglect of this term. The transition trip term has been included in the one-equation eddy viscosity model of Spalart-Allmaras. Several problems with this model have been discovered when applied to high-speed flows. For the Mach 8 flat plate boundary layer flow with the standard transition method, the Baldwin-Barth and both k-{omega} models gave transition at the specified location. The Spalart-Allmaras and low Reynolds number k-{var_epsilon} models required an increase in the freestream turbulence levels in order to give transition at the desired location. All models predicted the correct skin friction levels in both the laminar and turbulent flow regions. For Mach 8 flat plate case, the transition location could not be controlled with the trip terms as given in the Spalart-Allmaras model. Several other approaches have been investigated to allow the specification of the transition location. The approach that appears most appropriate is to vary the coefficient that multiplies the turbulent production term in the governing partial differential equation for the eddy viscosity (Method 2). When this coefficient is zero, the flow remains laminar. The coefficient is increased to its normal value over a specified distance to crudely model the transition region and obtain fully turbulent flow. While this approach provides a reasonable interim solution, a separate effort should be initiated to address the proper transition procedure associated with the turbulent production term. Also, the transition process might be better modeled with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model with modification of the damping function f{sub v1}. The damping function could be set to zero in the laminar flow region and then turned on through the transition flow region.

ROY,CHRISTOPHER J.; BLOTTNER,FREDERICK G.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

One-way coupling of an integrated assessment model and a water resources model: evaluation and implications of future changes over the US Midwest  

SciTech Connect

An integrated model is being developed to advance our understanding of the interactions between human activities, terrestrial system and water cycle, and how system interactions will be affected by a changing climate at the regional scale. As a first step towards that goal, a global integrated assessment model including a waterdemand model is coupled offline with a land surface hydrology – routing – water resources management model. A spatial and temporal disaggregation approach is developed to project the annual regional water demand simulations into a daily time step and subbasin representation. The model demonstrated reasonable ability to represent the historical flow regulation and water supply over the Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi and Ohio). Implications for the future flow regulation, water supply and supply deficit are investigated using a climate change projection with the B1 emission scenario which affects both natural flow and water demand. Over the Midwest, changes in flow regulation are mostly driven by the change in natural flow due to the limited storage capacity over the Ohio and Upper Mississippi river basins. The changes in flow and demand have a combined effect on the Missouri Summer regulated flow. The supply deficit tends to be driven by the change in flow over the region. Spatial analysis demonstrates the relationship between the supply deficit and the change in demand over urban areas not along a main river or with limited storage, and over areas upstream of groundwater dependent fields with therefore overestimated demand.

Voisin, Nathalie; Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic  

SciTech Connect

We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European and North American sources. At higher levels, model-to-model variations in transport and oxidation are most important. Differences in photochemistry appear to play the largest role in the intermodel variations in Arctic ozone sensitivity, though transport also contributes substantially in the mid-troposphere.

Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

218

Model Developments for Development of Improved Emissions Scenarios: Developing Purchasing-Power Parity Models, Analyzing Uncertainty, and Developing Data Sets for Gridded Integrated Assessment Models  

SciTech Connect

In the duration of this project, we finished the main tasks set up in the initial proposal. These tasks include: setting up the basic platform in GAMS language for the new RICE 2007 model; testing various model structure of RICE 2007; incorporating PPP data set in the new RICE model; developing gridded data set for IA modeling.

Yang, Zili; Nordhaus, William

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

A novel QSAR model of Salmonella mutagenicity and its application in the safety assessment of drug impurities  

SciTech Connect

As indicated in ICH M7 draft guidance, in silico predictive tools including statistically-based QSARs and expert analysis may be used as a computational assessment for bacterial mutagenicity for the qualification of impurities in pharmaceuticals. To address this need, we developed and validated a QSAR model to predict Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of pharmaceutical impurities using Prous Institute's Symmetry?, a new in silico solution for drug discovery and toxicity screening, and the Mold2 molecular descriptor package (FDA/NCTR). Data was sourced from public benchmark databases with known Ames assay mutagenicity outcomes for 7300 chemicals (57% mutagens). Of these data, 90% was used to train the model and the remaining 10% was set aside as a holdout set for validation. The model's applicability to drug impurities was tested using a FDA/CDER database of 951 structures, of which 94% were found within the model's applicability domain. The predictive performance of the model is acceptable for supporting regulatory decision-making with 84 ± 1% sensitivity, 81 ± 1% specificity, 83 ± 1% concordance and 79 ± 1% negative predictivity based on internal cross-validation, while the holdout dataset yielded 83% sensitivity, 77% specificity, 80% concordance and 78% negative predictivity. Given the importance of having confidence in negative predictions, an additional external validation of the model was also carried out, using marketed drugs known to be Ames-negative, and obtained 98% coverage and 81% specificity. Additionally, Ames mutagenicity data from FDA/CFSAN was used to create another data set of 1535 chemicals for external validation of the model, yielding 98% coverage, 73% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 81% concordance and 84% negative predictivity. - Highlights: • A new in silico QSAR model to predict Ames mutagenicity is described. • The model is extensively validated with chemicals from the FDA and the public domain. • Validation tests show desirable high sensitivity and high negative predictivity. • The model predicted 14 reportedly difficult to predict drug impurities with accuracy. • The model is suitable to support risk evaluation of potentially mutagenic compounds.

Valencia, Antoni; Prous, Josep; Mora, Oscar [Prous Institute for Biomedical Research, Rambla de Catalunya, 135, 3-2, Barcelona 08008 (Spain); Sadrieh, Nakissa [Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States); Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov [Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Application of probabilistic safety assessment models to risk-based inspection of piping  

SciTech Connect

From the beginning, one of the most useful applications of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is its use in evaluating the risk importance of changes to plant design, operations, or other plant conditions. Risk importance measures the impact of a change on the risk. Risk is defined as a combination of the likelihood of failure and consequence of the failure. The consequence can be safety system unavailability, core melt frequency, early release, or various other consequence measures. The goal in this PSA application is to evaluate the risk importance of an ISI process, as applied to plant piping systems. Two approaches can be taken in this evaluation: Current PSA Approach or the Blended Approach. Both are discussed here.

Chapman, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Performance assessment modeling of high level nuclear wasteforms from the pyroprocess fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

Several performance assessment (PA) analyses have been completed to estimate the release to the accessible environment of radionuclides from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Probabilistic methods were utilized based on the complexity of the repository system. Recent investigations have been conducted to identify the merits of a pyroprocess fuel cycle. This cycle utilizes high temperature molten salts and metals to partially separate actinides and fission products. In a closed liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel cycle, this allows recycling of nearly all of the actinides. In a once-through cycle, this isolates the actinides for storage into a wasteform which can be specifically tailored for their retention. With appropriate front-end treatment, this Process can also be used to treat LWR spent fuel.

Nutt, W.M.; Hill, R.N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bullen, D.B. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Modeling and controller performance assessment for a switched reluctance motor drive based on setpoint relay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the implementation of a current control method for switched reluctance motors (SRMs) and presents a novel approach to the accurate on-line modeling of an SRM drive. A simple autotuning technique for the SRM drives using a PWM controller is considered. Furthermore, conventional PI control and Internal Model Control (IMC) are considered to validate this method and present corresponding robust control analysis for the process. The control structures are comparatively analyzed using standard robustness measures for stability and performance. The proposed PWM controller is simulated and a hardware prototype is then implemented using digital signal processor control to evaluate the method using a 12/8, three-phase SRM. The experimental results of the SRM drive model validates the performance of the current loop.

L.L.N. dos Reis; A.A.R. Coelho; O.M. Almeida; J.C.T. Campos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

SciTech Connect

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Assessment of length distributions between non-coding and coding sequences amongst two model organisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The availability of genomic DNA and cDNA sequence data has escalated the data mining and genomics era. We aim to investigate the length distributions of the non-coding and coding regions of protein genes of two model organisms, Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster. A non-linear functional relationship model was applied and strong correlation was found between the Coding Sequence (CDS) and non-coding sequence regions, conditional on the 5' UTR data. Significant differences were found between the protein functional classes and each gene region. Examination of the non-coding and coding regions of these organisms has revealed possible correlations.

Rachel Caldwell; Yan-Xia Lin; Ren Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Risk assessment of an oxygen-enhanced combustor using a structural model based on the FMEA and fuzzy fault tree  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oxygen-enhanced combustor has the advantages of high burning efficiency and low emissions. However, it should not be promoted for industrial use until its reliability and safety have been fully recognized. A new methodology is proposed to assess the risk of an oxygen-enhanced combustor using a structural model based on the FMEA and fuzzy fault tree. In addition, it is applied to a selected pilot semi-industrial combustor. To identify the hazard source comprehensively, the pilot is divided into four subsystems: the combustor subsystem, feed subsystem, ignition subsystem and exhaust subsystem. According to the operational parameters of flow (flow rate, temperature and pressure) and the component functions in different subsystems, the cause and effect matrix can be built using the structural model, and the relationship between the operational parameters and the effects of the change for the operational parameters on the system can be presented. Based on the results of cause and effect matrix, the FMEA can be built to describe the failed models and accident scenarios of the pilot. The main accident forms include leakage, injury, fire and explosion. Accordingly, with the severity and probability analysis of different accident forms, the fire and explosion accidents should be further accessed quantitatively using the fuzzy fault tree analysis. The fault trees can be obtained in accordance with the FMEA, and the qualitative assessments of the basic events can be collected by using expert scoring. A hybrid approach for the fuzzy set theory and weight analysis is investigated to quantify the occurrence probability of basic events. Then, the importance analysis of the fault trees, including the hazard importance of basic events and the cut set importance, is performed to help determine the weak links of the fire and explosion trees. Finally, some of the most effective measures are presented to improve the reliability and safety of the combustion system.

Zhen Chen; Xiaona Wu; Jianguo Qin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assembling spatially explicit landscape models of pollen and spore dispersal by wind for risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the direction of the wind, a simplified physical...rise to an inverse power-law with an exponent 3/2 along the wind. Using a more detailed...particles, such as most plant seeds, with a terminal...with mean vertical wind speeds. This model...cut-off and within this power-law behaviour with...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application to Weapon Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Weapon Systems Maxime Monnin, LAMIH, University of Valenciennes Benoit Iung, PhD, CRAN, Nancy University of unavailability. Military weapon systems can become unavailable due to system failures or damage to the system. This paper aims to define principles for weapon systems modeling that integrate both system failure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Interactive 3D landscape assessment models Lewis GILL, Eckart LANGE, Ed MORGAN, Daniela ROMANO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, interactive 3D visualisations are also used as landscape design tools with the Google Sketchup1 software being that this will simplify the enhancement of the mental model of the designer. 1 http://www.sketchup.com #12;L.Gill, E

Romano, Daniela

229

An assessment of advanced mobile services acceptance: Contributions from TAM and diffusion theory models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today, in addition to traditional mobile services, there are new ones already being used, thanks to the advances in 3G-related technologies. Our work contributed to the emerging body of research by integrating TAM and Diffusion Theory. Based on a sample ... Keywords: Advanced mobile services, Diffusion of innovation theory, Perceived benefits, Social influences, TAM model, The Netherlands

Carolina López-Nicolás; Francisco J. Molina-Castillo; Harry Bouwman

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

In Vivo Assessment of Antiangiogenic Activity of SU6668 in an Experimental Colon Carcinoma Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interstitial water equilibrating pools (9 , 11) . In this model...of Gd in both interstitial water and plasma space, Coexp...In our study we found a good conservation of the capsular and extratumoral...for magnetic resonance blood pool imaging: preparation and characterization...

Pasquina Marzola; Anna Degrassi; Laura Calderan; Paolo Farace; Caterina Crescimanno; Elena Nicolato; Anna Giusti; Enrico Pesenti; Andrea Terron; Andrea Sbarbati; Tinya Abrams; Lesley Murray; and Francesco Osculati

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessment of crustal velocity models using seismic refraction and reflection tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......on the method of Hole Zelt (1995). A flat starting model is used and, as with the...over 80 km distance centred beneath the Rocky Mountain Trench in the Foreland Belt...American Cordillera reflection refraction Rocky Mountain Trench seismic methods South America......

Colin A. Zelt; Kalachand Sain; Julia V. Naumenko; Dale S. Sawyer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Environmental Modeling and Assessment 6: 3555, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to help guide air pollution legislation at the European level, harmful air pollution effects. Ozone has been labeled as the most serious of the damaging air pollutants to agriculture, where growth for Denmark. Keywords: air pollution models, AOT40 values for ozone, damaging effects, economical evaluations

Dimov, Ivan

233

Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The first MMF model was built at the Colorado State University, replacing the cloud...microphysics of clouds. As an extension to the Colorado State University MMF, an aerosol version...715 – 737 . 4 Rosenfeld D ( 2008 ) Flood or drought: How do aerosols affect precipitation...

Yuan Wang; Minghuai Wang; Renyi Zhang; Steven J. Ghan; Yun Lin; Jiaxi Hu; Bowen Pan; Misti Levy; Jonathan H. Jiang; Mario J. Molina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

235

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Qualitative Readiness-Requirements Assessment Model for Enterprise Big-Data Infrastructure Investment  

SciTech Connect

In the last three decades, there has been an exponential growth in the area of information technology providing the information processing needs of data-driven businesses in government, science, and private industry in the form of capturing, staging, integrating, conveying, analyzing, and transferring data that will help knowledge workers and decision makers make sound business decisions. Data integration across enterprise warehouses is one of the most challenging steps in the big data analytics strategy. Several levels of data integration have been identified across enterprise warehouses: data accessibility, common data platform, and consolidated data model. Each level of integration has its own set of complexities that requires a certain amount of time, budget, and resources to implement. Such levels of integration are designed to address the technical challenges inherent in consolidating the disparate data sources. In this paper, we present a methodology based on industry best practices to measure the readiness of an organization and its data sets against the different levels of data integration. We introduce a new Integration Level Model (ILM) tool, which is used for quantifying an organization and data system s readiness to share data at a certain level of data integration. It is based largely on the established and accepted framework provided in the Data Management Association (DAMA-DMBOK). It comprises several key data management functions and supporting activities, together with several environmental elements that describe and apply to each function. The proposed model scores the maturity of a system s data governance processes and provides a pragmatic methodology for evaluating integration risks. The higher the computed scores, the better managed the source data system and the greater the likelihood that the data system can be brought in at a higher level of integration.

Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL] [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of ground subsidence using GIS and the weights-of-evidence model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The weights-of-evidence model, one of the Bayesian probability models was applied in evaluating a ground subsidence spatial hazard near abandoned underground coal mines (AUCMs) at Magyori area, Samcheok City in Korea using GIS. Using ground subsidence location and a spatial database containing information such as mining tunnel, borehole, topography, geology, and land use, the weights-of-evidence model was applied to calculate each relevant factor's rating for the Magyori area in Korea. Seven major factors controlling or related to ground subsidence were determined from the probability analysis of the existing ground subsidence area; depth of drift and distance from drift from the mining tunnel map, slope gradient obtained from the topographical map, ground water level and permeability from borehole data, geology and land use. Tests of conditional independence were performed for the selection of factors, allowing 6 combinations of factors to be analyzed. For the analysis of mapping ground subsidence spatial hazard, the contrast values, W+ and W?, of each factor's rating were overlaid spatially. The results of the analysis were validated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) with the previous ground subsidence locations. In the case of all factor used, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) showed 0.9667, which corresponds to an accuracy of 96.67%. In the case of the combinations, the case of distance from drift, depth of ground water and land use used, showed the 90.71% (AUC: 0.9071) accuracy which is the best result produced in this analysis. The results can be used for hazard prevention and land-use planning near AUCM areas.

Hyun-Joo Oh; Saro Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Assessing Passive and Active Solar Energy Resources in Cities Using 3D City Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many cities today are committed to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings and the fraction of renewables. However, quantitative data on urban energy performance are rarely available during the design stage of new towns or for rehabilitation scenarios of existing cities. Three dimensional city models based on the spatio-semantic data format CityGML offer powerful new methods for the quantitative evaluation of urban energy demand and costs, and simultaneously allow the simulation of renewable energy systems. Such a ‘semantically enriched’ models was used in this work for energy demand diagnostics, refurbishment forecast and renewable supply scenarios. A case study was done using this method in an existing urban quarter in Ludwigsburg/Germany. Based on its three dimensional representation, the photovoltaic potential has been calculated and compared with the electricity demand to establish the photovoltaic fraction. On the thermal side, the passive solar gains were simulated for each building in the city quarter to analyse the solar contribution for heating demand reduction. The simulations were validated with measured gas consumptions. Some rehabilitation scenarios have also been simulated. In such a moderately dense post-war district, the calculated energy savings potential reach in total 65%, equally distributed between heat savings following building envelope refurbishment, and electricity savings due to the installation of PV on the roofs.

Ursula Eicker; Romain Nouvel; Eric Duminil; Volker Coors

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Heat Pump Water Heater Technology Assessment Based on Laboratory Research and Energy Simulation Models: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the laboratory performance of five integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters (HPWHs) across a wide range of operating conditions representative of US climate regions. Laboratory results demonstrate the efficiency of this technology under most of the conditions tested and show that differences in control schemes and design features impact the performance of the individual units. These results were used to understand current model limitations, and then to bracket the energy savings potential for HPWH technology in various US climate regions. Simulation results show that HPWHs are expected to provide significant energy savings in many climate zones when compared to other types of water heaters (up to 64%, including impact on HVAC systems).

Hudon, K.; Sparn, B.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Unsaturated flow modeling in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes the progression of modeling efforts of infiltration, percolation, and seepage conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository in the unsaturated zone for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Scientific understanding of infiltration in a desert environment, unsaturated percolation flux in fractures and matrix of the volcanic tuff, and seepage into an open drift in a thermally perturbed environment was initially lacking in 1984. As understanding of the Yucca Mountain disposal system increased through site characterization and in situ testing, modeling of infiltration, percolation, and seepage evolved from simple assumptions in a single model in 1984 to three modeling modules each based on several detailed process models in 2008. Uncertainty in percolation flux through Yucca Mountain was usually important in explaining the observed uncertainty in performance measures:cumulative release in assessments prior to 1995 and individual dose, thereafter.

Rob P. Rechard; Jens T. Birkholzer; Yu-Shu Wu; Joshua S. Stein; James E. Houseworth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solar Resource Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Multi-Methods Approach to HRA and Human Performance Modeling: A Field Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a research reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory is primarily designed and used to test materials to be used in other, larger-scale and prototype reactors. The reactor offers various specialized systems and allows certain experiments to be run at their own temperature and pressure. The ATR Canal temporarily stores completed experiments and used fuel. It also has facilities to conduct underwater operations such as experiment examination or removal. In reviewing the ATR safety basis, a number of concerns were identified involving the ATR canal. A brief study identified ergonomic issues involving the manual handling of fuel elements in the canal that may increase the probability of human error and possible unwanted acute physical outcomes to the operator. In response to this concern, that refined the previous HRA scoping analysis by determining the probability of the inadvertent exposure of a fuel element to the air during fuel movement and inspection was conducted. The HRA analysis employed the SPAR-H method and was supplemented by information gained from a detailed analysis of the fuel inspection and transfer tasks. This latter analysis included ergonomics, work cycles, task duration, and workload imposed by tool and workplace characteristics, personal protective clothing, and operational practices that have the potential to increase physical and mental workload. Part of this analysis consisted of NASA-TLX analyses, combined with operational sequence analysis, computational human performance analysis (CHPA), and 3D graphical modeling to determine task failures and precursors to such failures that have safety implications. Experience in applying multiple analysis techniques in support of HRA methods is discussed.

Jacques Hugo; David I Gertman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Achieving negative emissions with BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage) in the power sector: New insights from the TIAM-FR (TIMES Integrated Assessment Model France) model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It seems increasingly likely that atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration will overshoot the recommended 450 ppm CO2 equivalent target. Therefore, it may become necessary to use BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage) technologies to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. This technique is gaining increasing attention as it offers the dual benefit of providing low-carbon energy products and leading to negative CO2 emissions. This study evaluates the possible deployment of BECCS in the power sector using the bottom-up multiregional optimization model TIAM-FR (TIMES Integrated Assessment Model France). Under two climate scenarios, a regional analysis is conducted to discuss where the technology will be developed. The impact of the unavailability of this technology on the structure of the electricity mix and the cost of the energy system completes the analysis. In line with literature, the results suggest that BECCS technology offers an environmentally and economically viable option to achieve stringent targets. The regional analysis shows that industrialized countries will develop CCS (carbon capture and storage) mainly on biomass power plants while CCS on fossil fuel power plants will be widely deployed in China. With a specific constraint on CCS diffusion, the share of renewables and nuclear energy becomes significant to meet the climate targets.

Sandrine Selosse; Olivia Ricci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Software Quality Assurance Plan for GoldSim Models Supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites Performance Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the development and maintenance of GoldSim models supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). Two PA models have been approved by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as of November 2006 for the PA maintenance work undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). NNSA/NSO asked NSTec to assume the custodianship of the models for future development and maintenance. The models were initially developed by Neptune and Company (N&C).

Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

245

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Analysis of the validity of analytical models used for assessment of forty-five waste site areas: Subsurface flow and chemical transport  

SciTech Connect

Closure actions at 45 waste sites were analyzed using an analytical model. A quality assurance program, which consisted of (1) comparison to analytical solutions with different boundary conditions, (2) comparison of model results to measured concentrations, (3) comparison with layered numerical solutions, and (4) evaluation and sensitivity analysis of input data, suggests that this type of analysis is a reasonable screening tool. Boundary conditions and controlling processes, such as chemical speciation, must be properly identified when defining input parameters; also, transient models that account for unsaturated zone processes predict higher peak concentrations than steady-state models such as the EPA VHS model. Assessment of complex systems that have multiple flow paths, or studies of remedial actions (such as ground water withdrawal and treatment) may require numerical modeling to meet the required objectives. However, the quality assurance analysis for the subject waste sites indicates that analytical approximations are sufficiently accurate to make relative environmental assessments (e.g., prioritizing sites or assessing various closure actions).

Looney, B.B.; Fjeld, R.A.; Merrell, G.B.; Duffield, G.M.; Andrews, C.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

An Assessment of Microwave Absorption Models and Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water Using Clear-Sky Data  

SciTech Connect

Passive microwave radiometers have a long history in the remote sensing of atmospheric liquid and water vapor. Retrievals of these quantities are sensitive to variations in pressure and temperature of the liquid and water vapor. Rather than use a statistical or climatological approach to account for the natural variability in atmospheric pressure and temperature, additional information on the atmospheric profile at the time of the radiometer measurements can be directly incorporated into the retrieval process. Such an approach has been referred to in the literature as a “physical-iterative” solution. This paper presents an assessment of the accuracy of the column liquid water path that can be expected using such an iterative technique as a result of uncertainties in the microwave emissions from oxygen and water vapor. It is shown that the retrieval accuracy is influenced by the accuracy of the instrument measurements and the quality of the atmospheric profiles of temperature and pressure, as one would expect. But also critical is the uncertainty in the absorption coefficients used in the underlying microwave radiative transfer model. The uncertainty in the absorption coefficients is particularly problematic in that it may well bias the liquid water retrieval. The differences between 3 absorption models examined in this paper are equivalent to a bias of 15 to 30 g/m2, depending on the total column water vapor. An examination of typical liquid water paths from the Southern Great Plains region of the United States shows that errors of this magnitude have significant implications for shortwave radiation and retrievals of cloud effective particle size.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Westwater, Ed R.; Clough, Shepard A.; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Liljegren, James C.

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

RCP4.5: A Pathway for Stabilization of Radiative Forcing by 2100  

SciTech Connect

Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 is a scenario that stabilizes radiative forcing at 4.5 W m{sup -2} in the year 2100 without ever exceeding that value. Simulated with the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), RCP4.5 includes long-term, global emissions of greenhouse gases, short-lived species, and land-use-land-cover in a global economic framework. RCP4.5 was updated from earlier GCAM scenarios to incorporate historical emissions and land cover information common to the RCP process and follows a cost-minimizing pathway to reach the target radiative forcing. The imperative to limit emissions in order to reach this target drives changes in the energy system, including shifts to electricity, to lower emissions energy technologies and to the deployment of carbon capture and geologic storage technology. In addition, the RCP4.5 emissions price also applies to land use emissions; as a result, forest lands expand from their present day extent. The simulated future emissions and land use were downscaled from the regional simulation to a grid to facilitate transfer to climate models. While there are many alternative pathways to achieve a radiative forcing level of 4.5 W m{sup -2}, the application of the RCP4.5 provides a common platform for climate models to explore the climate system response to stabilizing the anthropogenic components of radiative forcing.

Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Volke, April C.; Patel, Pralit L.; Delgado Arias, Sabrina; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The application of a mathematical model of sustainability to the results of an environmental impact assessment of the Russeifa landfill, Jordan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The question of whether landfills are or could be sustainable is somewhat unanswered within the sphere of waste management. This is partly due to two key issues: the ambiguities concerning what is sustainability?; and how to effectively assess the potential or actual sustainability of a landfill? It has been argued in the literature that this is a difficult task, however it is not impossible. This paper consequently presents the application of a mathematical model of sustainability to the results obtained for the environmental impact assessment (EIA) of the Russeifa landfill in Jordan using the rapid impact assessment matrix (RIAM) methodology. This paper demonstrates the methodology necessary to apply the model to the RIAM evaluation made at the time of assessment with respect to potential mitigation options. A determination of the level and nature of sustainability (if appropriate) for the project options were obtained for the Russeifa landfill. The results indicated that all of project options evaluated could be considered as unsustainable. This paper concludes by stating that the application of the model to the RIAM analysis offers a potential mechanism in evaluating sustainability through the use of a common and increasingly regarded technique of EIA.

Jason Phillips

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Transport modeling in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes modeling of radionuclide transport in the unsaturated and saturated zone conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One dimensional (1-D) transport for a single porosity media without lateral dispersion was solved in both the saturated zone (SZ) and unsaturated zone (UZ) for the first assessment in 1984 but progressed to a dual-porosity formulation for the UZ in the second assessment in 1991. By the time of the viability assessment, a dual-permeability transport formulation was used in the UZ. With the planned switch to a dose performance measure, individual dose from a drinking water pathway was evaluated for the third assessment in 1993 and from numerous pathways for the viability assessment in 1998 and thereafter. Stream tubes for transport in the SZ were initially developed manually but progressed to particle tracking in 1991. For the viability assessment, particle tracking was used to solve the transport equations in the 3-D UZ and SZ flow fields. To facilitate calculations, the convolution method was also used in the SZ for the viability assessment. For the site recommendation in 2001 and licensing compliance analysis in 2008, the 3-D transport results of the SZ were combined with 1-D transport results, which evaluated decay of radionuclides, in order to evaluate compliance with groundwater protection requirements. Uncertainty in flow within the unsaturated and saturated zone was generally important to explaining the spread in the individual dose performance measure.

Rob P. Rechard; Bill W. Arnold; Bruce A. Robinson; James E. Houseworth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

TNAssess | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TNAssess TNAssess Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: TNAssess Agency/Company /Organization: Joint Implementation Network (JIN) Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Spreadsheet Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.jiqweb.org/index.php/projects/tna-hanbdbook/tna-handbook Cost: Free Related Tools Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) ENV-Linkages-KEI Model ... further results An Excel-based tool that assesses the climate change mitigation, adaptation and development benefits of various technology options using a

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment performance assessment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENGINEERING CYBERNETICS AND ROBOTICS, 60 Summary: , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

254

Coupled simulation of BES-CFD and performance assessment of energy recovery ventilation system for office model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal comfort and indoor air quality as well as the energy efficiency have been recognized as essential parts of sustainable building assessment. This work aims to analyze the energy conservation of the heat re...

Yunqing Fan; T. Hayashi; K. Ito

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Facilities management: the development of a model for building condition assessment surveys conducted at Fort Riley, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of inspection condition criteria and scoring for each sub-component (by visual inspection techniques) . The system was used by multiple inspectors to assess the buildings at Fort Riley. The inspectors received training in the system scoring and methodology...

Riblett, Carl Olin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Assessment of carbon sequestration and timber production of Scots pine across Scotland using the process-based model 3-PGN   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detailed eco-physiological interpretation of the environmental factors affecting Scots pine growth and it provided an assessment of carbon sequestration under the scenario of sustainable, normal production and its effects from the environment. Finally...

Xenakis, Georgios

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling and Assessing Student Activities in On-Line Discussions Jihie Kim Erin Shaw Donghui Feng Carole Beal Eduard Hovy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carole Beal Eduard Hovy Information Sciences Institute University of Southern California Marina del Rey such quantitative measures have been developed to assess on-line discussion activities (Kim and Beal 2006). Here we

Kim, Jihie

258

Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [ed.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis] [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Petri Net Modeling for Probabilistic Safety Assessment and its Application in the Air Lock System of a CANDU Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Historically, fault trees are extensively used in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to model and evaluate the probability and consequence of failures of complex engineering systems, such as nuclear power plants. Scenarios of hypothetical accidents resulting in severe core damage can be developed. Petri net is another modeling technique that offers many advantages when comparing with fault trees, such as is ability to represent the time sequence of the events along with their duration. In this research, Petri net theory is extended to model system failures. The transformations required to model logic gates by Petri nets are explored and examples provided. Methods for qualitative analysis for Petri nets are presented. The application of Petri net in the airlock system of a Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactor is explored. It is further demonstrated that Petri net can be used in both coherent and non-coherent systems.

Andrew Lee; Lixuan Lu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110  

SciTech Connect

Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capabilities/vat/assess/ capabilities/vat/assess/ ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, Nuclear Engineering Division, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments Argonne Vulnerability Assessment Team Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP , 630-252-6168 1. There are a number of conventional tools for finding security vulnerabilities. These include security surveys, risk management, design basis threat, CARVER Method, Delphi Method, software vulnerability assessment tools, infrastructure modeling, etc. 2. These tools have some value, and indeed we have used them all. 3. Experience has shown, however, that these methods do not usually result in dramatic improvements to security, nor do they reliably predict catastrophic security incidents that

262

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood forecasting based on model-predicted rainfall. Extreme precipitation and flooding events are a significant concern in central Texas, due to both the high occurrence and ...

Marla R. Knebl Lowrey; Zong-Liang Yang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A.24 ENHANCING THE CAPABILITY OF COMPUTATIONAL EARTH SYSTEM MODELS AND NASA DATA FOR OPERATION AND ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.24-1 A.24 ENHANCING THE CAPABILITY OF COMPUTATIONAL EARTH SYSTEM MODELS AND NASA DATA) computational support of Earth system modeling. #12;A.24-2 2.1 Acceleration of Operational Use of Research Data

264

A user's guide to the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated software package:a low-level radioactive waste disposal performance assessment model.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory, has over 30 years experience in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal and at the time of this publication is providing assistance internationally in a number of areas relevant to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In countries with small radioactive waste programs, international technology transfer program efforts are often hampered by small budgets, schedule constraints, and a lack of experienced personnel. In an effort to surmount these difficulties, Sandia has developed a system that utilizes a combination of commercially available software codes and existing legacy codes for probabilistic safety assessment modeling that facilitates the technology transfer and maximizes limited available funding. Numerous codes developed and endorsed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and codes developed and maintained by United States Department of Energy are generally available to foreign countries after addressing import/export control and copyright requirements. From a programmatic view, it is easier to utilize existing codes than to develop new codes. From an economic perspective, it is not possible for most countries with small radioactive waste disposal programs to maintain complex software, which meets the rigors of both domestic regulatory requirements and international peer review. Therefore, revitalization of deterministic legacy codes, as well as an adaptation of contemporary deterministic codes, provides a credible and solid computational platform for constructing probabilistic safety assessment models. This document is a reference users guide for the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated modeling software package developed as part of a cooperative technology transfer project between Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) in Taiwan for the preliminary assessment of several candidate low-level waste repository sites. Breach, Leach, and Transport-Multiple Species (BLT-MS) is a U.S. NRC sponsored code which simulates release and transport of contaminants from a subsurface low-level waste disposal facility. GoldSim is commercially available probabilistic software package that has radionuclide transport capabilities. The following report guides a user through the steps necessary to use the integrated model and presents a successful application of the paradigm of renewing legacy codes for contemporary application.

Knowlton, Robert G.; Arnold, Bill Walter; Mattie, Patrick D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Assessment of the Health IT Usability Evaluation Model (Health-ITUEM) for evaluating mobile health (mHealth) technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: Over two decades of research has been conducted using mobile devices for health related behaviors yet many of these studies lack rigor. There are few evaluation frameworks for assessing the usability of mHealth, which is critical as the use ... Keywords: Evaluation framework, Health-ITUEM, Mobile health, Usability

William Brown, III; Po-Yin Yen; Marlene Rojas; Rebecca Schnall

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion Processes in a DI Diesel Engine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Various applied combustion and turbulence models were investigated along with chemical kinetic mechanisms simulating a biodiesel-fueled engine

267

BLT-EC (Breach, Leach Transport, and Equilibrium Chemistry), a finite-element model for assessing the release of radionuclides from low-level waste disposal units: Background, theory, and model description  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment models typically account for the processes of sorption and dissolution-precipitation by using an empirical distribution coefficient, commonly referred to as K{sub d} that combines the effects of all chemical reactions between solid and aqueous phases. In recent years, however, there has been an increasing awareness that performance assessments based solely on empirically based K{sub d} models may be incomplete, particularly for applications involving radionuclides having sorption and solubility properties that are sensitive to variations in the in-situ chemical environment. To accommodate variations in the in-situ chemical environment, and to assess its impact on radionuclide mobility, it is necessary to model radionuclide release, transport, and chemical processes in a coupled fashion. This modeling has been done and incorporated into the two-dimensional, finite-element, computer code BLT-EC (Breach, Leach, Transport, Equilibrium Chemistry). BLT-EC is capable of predicting container degradation, waste-form leaching, and advective-dispersive, multispecies, solute transport. BLT-EC accounts for retardation directly by modeling the chemical processes of complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions. In this report we: (1) present a detailed description of the various physical and chemical processes that control the release and migration of radionuclides from shallow land LLW disposal facilities; (2) formulate the mathematical models that represent these processes; (3) outline how these models are incorporated and implemented in BLT-EC; and (4) demonstrate the application of BLT-EC on a set of example problems.

MacKinnon, R.J.; Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Simonson, S.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Suen, C.J. [California State Univ., Fresno, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financing Financing Structures Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs The property-assessed clean energy (PACE) model is an...

270

Combining empirical and theory-based land-use modelling approaches to assess economic potential of biofuel production avoiding iLUC: Argentina as a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a land-use modelling framework is presented combining empirical and theory-based modelling approaches to determine economic potential of biofuel production avoiding indirect land-use changes (iLUC) resulting from land competition with other functions. The empirical approach explores future developments in food and feed production to determine land availability and technical potential of biofuel production. The theory-based approach assesses the economic performance of biofuel crops on the surplus land in comparison with other production systems and determines the economic potential of biofuel production. The framework is demonstrated for a case study in Argentina to determine the development of biofuel potential from soy and switchgrass up to 2030. Two scenarios were considered regarding future developments of productivity in agriculture and livestock production. It was found that under a scenario reflecting a continuation of current trends, no surplus land is expected to become available. Nevertheless, the potential for soybean biodiesel is expected to keep increasing up to 103 PJ in 2030, due to the existence of a developed agro-industrial sector jointly producing feed and biodiesel. In case large technological developments occur, 32 Mha could become available in 2030, which would allow for a technical potential of 472 PJ soybean biodiesel and 1445 PJ switchgrass bioethanol. According to the economic assessment, an economic potential of 368 PJ of soy biodiesel and 1.1 EJ switchgrass bioethanol could be attained, at a feedstock production cost of 100–155 US$/ton and 20–45 US$/ton, respectively. The region of southwest Buenos Aires and La Pampa provinces appeared to be particularly promising for switchgrass. The ability of jointly assessing future developments in land availability, technical and economic potential of biofuel production avoiding iLUC and spatial distribution of viable locations for growing biofuel crops means that the proposed framework is a step forward in assessing the potential for biofuel production that is both economically viable and sustainably produced.

V. Diogo; F. van der Hilst; J. van Eijck; J.A. Verstegen; J. Hilbert; S. Carballo; J. Volante; A. Faaij

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/ak213e/ak213e00.pdf‎ Cost: Free Related Tools CDM Sustainable Development Tool Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS The Socio-economic and Gender Analysis (SEAGA) handbook of concepts, tools and guidelines for mainstreaming gender into development planning and policy implementation. Approach SEAGA, for Socio-economic and Gender Analysis, is an approach to

272

Assessment of a Product Range Model concept to support design reuse using rule based systems and case based reasoning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge reuse is recognised as a key element to support agile and effective decision-making processes during product development. The provision of information and knowledge for reuse relies on defined information structures and requires computational ... Keywords: Case based reasoning, Design reuse, Extended information models, Product Range Model, Rule based systems

Carlos Alberto Costa; Marcos Alexandre Luciano; Celson Pantoja Lima; Robert I. M. Young

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Integrated Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Assessment Integrated Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integrated Assessment: Mainstreaming sustainability into policymaking--A guidance manual Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Background analysis Website: www.unep.ch/etb/publications/AI%20guidance%202009/UNEP%20IA%20final.pd Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/times-integrated-assessment-model-0,h Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: Integrated Assessment[1] The Times Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM) comprises several thousand technologies in all sectors of the energy system. It is characterized by several technical and economic parameters and by emission coefficients for

274

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developers also market ‘fuzzy logic’ control systems, e.g. ,so- called 'fuzzy logic' or expert control, or rule-basedsystems or fuzzy logic is model-predictive control using

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Potential applications of three-dimensional geoscientific mapping and modeling systems to regional hydrogeological assessments at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional Geoscientific Information Systems (GSIS) are being evaluated for supporting 3-D ground-water modeling activities required to evaluate the paleo-, present, and future hydrology at Yucca Mountain,...

A. Keith Turner; Kenneth E. Kolm

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessment of the ocean circulation in the Azores region as predicted by a numerical model assimilating altimeter data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) on the new perspectives in data assimilation). In the SIMAN project (SIMulation de l'Atlantique Nord Stream area (Blayo et al., 1996). It has been shown that the model is able to reproduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Revised {open_quotes}LEPS{close_quotes} scores for assessing climate model simulations and long-range forecasts  

SciTech Connect

The most commonly used measures for verifying forecasts or simulations of continuous variables are root-mean-squared error (rmse) and anomaly correlation. Some disadvantages of these measures are demonstrated. Existing assessment systems for categorical forecasts are discussed briefly. An alternative unbiased verification measure is developed, known as the linear error in probability space (LEPS) score. The LEPS score may be used to assess forecasts of both continuous and categorical variables and has some advantages over rmse and anomaly correlation. The properties of the version of LEPS discussed here are reviewed and compared with an earlier form of LEPS. A skill-score version of LEPS may be used to obtain an overall measure of the skill of a number of forecasts. This skill score is biased, but the bias is negligible if the number of effectively independent forecasts or simulations is large. Some examples are given in which the LEPS skill score is compared with rmse and anomaly correlation. 14 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Potts, J.M. [IACR-Rothamsted, Hertfordshire (United Kingdom)] [IACR-Rothamsted, Hertfordshire (United Kingdom); Folland, C.K. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Jolliffe, I.T. [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Univ. of Aberdeen (United Kingdom); and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

iTOUGH2-IFC: An Integrated Flow Code in Support of Nagra's Probabilistic Safety Assessment:--User's Guide and Model Description  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the development and use of the Integrated Flow Code (IFC), a numerical code and related model to be used for the simulation of time-dependent, two-phase flow in the near field and geosphere of a gas-generating nuclear waste repository system located in an initially fully water-saturated claystone (Opalinus Clay) in Switzerland. The development of the code and model was supported by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen, Switzerland. Gas generation (mainly H{sub 2}, but also CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) may affect repository performance by (1) compromising the engineered barriers through excessive pressure build-up, (2) displacing potentially contaminated pore water, (3) releasing radioactive gases (e.g., those containing {sup 14}C and {sup 3}H), (4) changing hydrogeologic properties of the engineered barrier system and the host rock, and (5) altering the groundwater flow field and thus radionuclide migration paths. The IFC aims at providing water and gas flow fields as the basis for the subsequent radionuclide transport simulations, which are performed by the radionuclide transport code (RTC). The IFC, RTC and a waste-dissolution and near-field transport model (STMAN) are part of the Integrated Radionuclide Release Code (IRRC), which integrates all safety-relevant features, events, and processes (FEPs). The IRRC is embedded into a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) computational tool that (1) evaluates alternative conceptual models, scenarios, and disruptive events, and (2) performs Monte-Carlo sampling to account for parametric uncertainties. The preliminary probabilistic safety assessment concept and the role of the IFC are visualized in Figure 1. The IFC was developed based on Nagra's PSA concept. Specifically, as many phenomena as possible are to be directly simulated using a (simplified) process model, which is at the core of the IRRC model. Uncertainty evaluation (scenario uncertainty, conceptualization uncertainty, parametric uncertainty) is handled by the outer shell of the PSA model; it is not further discussed in this report. Moreover, justifications for the inclusion or exclusion of FEPs as well as for certain simplifying assumptions are available or can be obtained using detailed process models and other supporting information. The IFC is both a numerical code and a model of a repository system. The numerical code is a modification of the multiphase, multicomponent simulator TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999), as implemented within the iTOUGH2 (Finsterle, 2007abc) framework. The code modifications are mainly concerned with the implementation of relevant FEPs as outlined in Nagra (2007a, AN 07-115), as well as removal of processes and features that are not needed within the IFC; the modifications are summarized in Appendix A1. In addition, the IFC includes a model, i.e., a simplified representation of the repository system. Specifically, a computational grid was generated, which includes the emplacement tunnels for spent fuel, high-level wastes, as well as long-lived intermediate-level wastes. Moreover, the model represents engineered barriers (backfill, seals, plugs, etc.), various tunnels and other underground facilities, and includes a simplified representation of the geological structure, i.e., the host rock (including the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the underground openings), confining units, local aquifers, and a highly transmissive zone. The IFC model was designed in close collaboration with Nagra. This report describes all functional requirements of the IFC and how they are implemented in the IFC. The input formats needed to invoke added modeling capabilities are documented. Finally, the IFC model grid is described, and results from a test simulation are presented.

Finsterle, Stefan A.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mixing Cell Model: A One-Dimensional Numerical Model for Assessment of Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in the Unsaturated Zone  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Mixing Cell Model code, a one-dimensional model for water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone under steady-state or transient flow conditions. The model is based on the principles and assumptions underlying mixing cell model formulations. The unsaturated zone is discretized into a series of independent mixing cells. Each cell may have unique hydrologic, lithologic, and sorptive properties. Ordinary differential equations describe the material (water and solute) balance within each cell. Water flow equations are derived from the continuity equation assuming that unit-gradient conditions exist at all times in each cell. Pressure gradients are considered implicitly through model discretization. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and moisture contents are determined by the material-specific moisture characteristic curves. Solute transport processes include explicit treatment of advective processes, first-order chain decay, and linear sorption reactions. Dispersion is addressed through implicit and explicit dispersion. Implicit dispersion is an inherent feature of all mixing cell models and originates from the formulation of the problem in terms of mass balance around fully mixed volume elements. Expressions are provided that relate implicit dispersion to the physical dispersion of the system. Two FORTRAN codes were developed to solve the water flow and solute transport equations: (1) the Mixing-Cell Model for Flow (MCMF) solves transient water flow problems and (2) the Mixing Cell Model for Transport (MCMT) solves the solute transport problem. The transient water flow problem is typically solved first by estimating the water flux through each cell in the model domain as a function of time using the MCMF code. These data are stored in either ASCII or binary files that are later read by the solute transport code (MCMT). Code output includes solute pore water concentrations, water and solute inventories in each cell and at each specified output time, and water and solute fluxes through each cell and specified output time. Computer run times for coupled transient water flow and solute transport were typically several seconds on a 2 GHz Intel Pentium IV desktop computer. The model was benchmarked against analytical solutions and finite-element approximations to the partial differential equations (PDE) describing unsaturated flow and transport. Differences between the maximum solute flux estimated by the mixing-cell model and the PDE models were typically less than two percent.

A. S. Rood

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mixing Cell Model: A One-Dimensional Numerical Model for Assessment of Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in the Unsaturated Zone  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Mixing Cell Model code, a one-dimensional model for water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone under steady-state or transient flow conditions. The model is based on the principles and assumptions underlying mixing cell model formulations. The unsaturated zone is discretized into a series of independent mixing cells. Each cell may have unique hydrologic, lithologic, and sorptive properties. Ordinary differential equations describe the material (water and solute) balance within each cell. Water flow equations are derived from the continuity equation assuming that unit-gradient conditions exist at all times in each cell. Pressure gradients are considered implicitly through model discretization. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and moisture contents are determined by the material-specific moisture characteristic curves. Solute transport processes include explicit treatment of advective processes, first-order chain decay, and linear sorption reactions. Dispersion is addressed through implicit and explicit dispersion. Implicit dispersion is an inherent feature of all mixing cell models and originates from the formulation of the problem in terms of mass balance around fully mixed volume elements. Expressions are provided that relate implicit dispersion to the physical dispersion of the system. Two FORTRAN codes were developed to solve the water flow and solute transport equations: (1) the Mixing-Cell Model for Flow (MCMF) solves transient water flow problems and (2) the Mixing Cell Model for Transport (MCMT) solves the solute transport problem. The transient water flow problem is typically solved first by estimating the water flux through each cell in the model domain as a function of time using the MCMF code. These data are stored in either ASCII or binary files that are later read by the solute transport code (MCMT). Code output includes solute pore water concentrations, water and solute inventories in each cell and at each specified output time, and water and solute fluxes through each cell and specified output time. Computer run times for coupled transient water flow and solute transport were typically several seconds on a 2 GHz Intel Pentium IV desktop computer. The model was benchmarked against analytical solutions and finite-element approximations to the partial differential equations (PDE) describing unsaturated flow and transport. Differences between the maximum solute flux estimated by the mixing-cell model and the PDE models were typically less than two percent.

A. S. Rood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Overview of total system model used for the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A summary is presented for the total system model used to represent physical processes associated with the seven scenario classes (i.e., nominal conditions, early waste package (WP) failure, early drip shield (DS) failure, igneous intrusive events, igneous eruptive events, seismic ground motion events and seismic fault displacement events) considered in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The total system model estimates dose to an exposed individual resulting from radionuclide movement through the repository system and biosphere. Components of the total system model described in this presentation include models for (i) climate analysis, (ii) land surface infiltration and associated unsaturated zone flow, (iii) multi-scale thermal hydrology and engineered barrier system (EBS) thermal–hydrologic environment, (iv) EBS physical and chemical environment, (v) WP and DS degradation, (vi) drift seepage and drift wall condensation, (vii) waste form degradation and mobilization, (viii) water and radionuclide movement in the EBS and underlying unsaturated and saturated zones, (ix) radionuclide movement in the biosphere and resultant human exposure, and (x) processes specific to early WP and DS failures, intrusive and eruptive igneous events, and seismic ground motion and fault displacement events.

C.W. Hansen; J.T. Birkholzer; J. Blink; C.R. Bryan; Y. Chen; M.B. Gross; E. Hardin; J. Houseworth; R. Howard; R. Jarek; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P. Mariner; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; F.V. Perry; B. Robinson; D. Sassani; S.D. Sevougian; J.S. Stein; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of custom fire behavior fuel models from FCCS fuelbeds for the Savannah River fuel assessment project.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to create fire behavior fuel models that replicate the fire behavior characteristics (spread rate and fireline intensity) produced by 23 candidate FCCS fuelbeds developed for the Savannah River National Wildlife Refuge. These 23 fuelbeds were created by FERA staff in consultation with local fuel managers. The FCCS produces simulations of surface fire spread rate and flame length (and therefore fireline intensity) for each of these fuelbeds, but it does not produce maps of those fire behavior characteristics or simulate fire growth—those tasks currently require the use of the FARSITE and/or FlamMap software systems. FARSITE and FlamMap do not directly use FCCS fuelbeds, but instead use standard or custom fire behavior fuel models to describe surface fuel characteristics for fire modeling. Therefore, replicating fire growth and fire behavior potential calculations using FCCS?simulated fire characteristics requires the development of custom fuel models that mimic, as closely as possible, the fire behavior characteristics produced by the FCCS for each fuelbed, over a range of fuel moisture and wind speeds.

Scott, Joe, H.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

S. Khericha

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Assessment Report  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Assessment Report Assessment of Audit Coverage of Cost Allowability for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 during...

286

A wavelet-based nonlinear ARDL model for assessing the exchange rate pass-through to crude oil prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We investigate whether changes in the US dollar exchange rates of eighteen currencies help explain the movements in the price of crude oil by using a wavelet-based nonlinear autoregressive distributed lags model (W-NARDL). This model allows one to capture the short- and long-run nonlinearities while taking into account the potential of extreme movements and excluding the noise components of the underlying data. We find evidence of significant and asymmetric pass-through of exchange rates to oil prices in both the short and long run. In particular, the long-run negative changes in exchange rates (dollar depreciation) exert a greater impact on oil prices than do the long-run positive changes (dollar appreciation), even though the sign of the effect is commonly negative in most cases. Our results finally suggest that denoising the crude oil and exchange rate data is effective and necessary before their interactions can be analyzed.

Rania Jammazi; Amine Lahiani; Duc Khuong Nguyen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparing land use regression and dispersion modelling to assess residential exposure to ambient air pollution for epidemiological studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Land-use regression (LUR) and dispersion models (DM) are commonly used for estimating individual air pollution exposure in population studies. Few comparisons have however been made of the performance of these methods. Objectives Within the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) we explored the differences between LUR and DM estimates for NO2, PM10 and PM2.5. Methods The ESCAPE study developed LUR models for outdoor air pollution levels based on a harmonised monitoring campaign. In thirteen ESCAPE study areas we further applied dispersion models. We compared LUR and DM estimates at the residential addresses of participants in 13 cohorts for NO2; 7 for PM10 and 4 for PM2.5. Additionally, we compared the DM estimates with measured concentrations at the 20–40 ESCAPE monitoring sites in each area. Results The median Pearson R (range) correlation coefficients between LUR and DM estimates for the annual average concentrations of NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 were 0.75 (0.19–0.89), 0.39 (0.23–0.66) and 0.29 (0.22–0.81) for 112,971 (13 study areas), 69,591 (7) and 28,519 (4) addresses respectively. The median Pearson R correlation coefficients (range) between DM estimates and ESCAPE measurements were of 0.74 (0.09–0.86) for NO2; 0.58 (0.36–0.88) for PM10 and 0.58 (0.39–0.66) for PM2.5. Conclusions LUR and dispersion model estimates correlated on average well for NO2 but only moderately for PM10 and PM2.5, with large variability across areas. DM predicted a moderate to large proportion of the measured variation for NO2 but less for PM10 and PM2.5.

Kees de Hoogh; Michal Korek; Danielle Vienneau; Menno Keuken; Jaakko Kukkonen; Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; Chiara Badaloni; Rob Beelen; Andrea Bolignano; Giulia Cesaroni; Marta Cirach Pradas; Josef Cyrys; John Douros; Marloes Eeftens; Francesco Forastiere; Bertil Forsberg; Kateryna Fuks; Ulrike Gehring; Alexandros Gryparis; John Gulliver; Anna L Hansell; Barbara Hoffmann; Christer Johansson; Sander Jonkers; Leena Kangas; Klea Katsouyanni; Nino Künzli; Timo Lanki; Michael Memmesheimer; Nicolas Moussiopoulos; Lars Modig; Göran Pershagen; Nicole Probst-Hensch; Christian Schindler; Tamara Schikowski; Dorothee Sugiri; Oriol Teixidó; Ming-Yi Tsai; Tarja Yli-Tuomi; Bert Brunekreef; Gerard Hoek; Tom Bellander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An assessment of the pulsar outer gap model. II: Implications for the predicted $\\gamma$-ray spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important predictions of any gap model for pulsar magnetospheres is the predicted $\\gamma$-ray spectra. In the outer gap model, the properties of the synchro-curvature radiation are sensitive to many parameters, whose realistic ranges have been studied in detail in an accompanying paper. There we demonstrated that the uncertainty in the radius of curvature, the magnetic field geometry, and the X-ray surface flux may affect by orders of magnitude the predicted flux and spectral peak in the $\\gamma$-ray regime. Here, we present a systematic, numerical study of the impact of the different parameters on the particle dynamics along the gap and calculate the emitted synchro-curvature radiation along the trajectory. By integrating the emitted radiation along the gap and convolving it with a parametrized particle distribution, we discuss how the comparison with the wealth of {\\em Fermi}-LAT data can be used to constrain the applicability of the model. The resulting spectra show very different energy p...

Viganò, Daniele; Hirotani, Kouichi; Pessah, Martín E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Calculating Impacts of Energy Standards on Energy Demand in U.S. Buildings under Uncertainty with an Integrated Assessment Model: Technical Background Data  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data and assumptions employed in an application of PNNL’s Global Change Assessment Model with a newly-developed Monte Carlo analysis capability. The model is used to analyze the impacts of more aggressive U.S. residential and commercial building-energy codes and equipment standards on energy consumption and energy service costs at the state level, explicitly recognizing uncertainty in technology effectiveness and cost, socioeconomics, presence or absence of carbon prices, and climate impacts on energy demand. The report provides a summary of how residential and commercial buildings are modeled, together with assumptions made for the distributions of state–level population, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per worker, efficiency and cost of residential and commercial energy equipment by end use, and efficiency and cost of residential and commercial building shells. The cost and performance of equipment and of building shells are reported separately for current building and equipment efficiency standards and for more aggressive standards. The report also details assumptions concerning future improvements brought about by projected trends in technology.

Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Hathaway, John E.; Lansing, Carina S.; Liu, Ying; McJeon, Haewon C.; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Zhou, Yuyu

2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

Dust in brown dwarfs and extra-solar planets IV. Assessing TiO2 and SiO nucleation for cloud formation modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clouds form in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and planets. The cloud particle formation processes are similar to the dust formation process studied in circumstellar shells of AGB stars and in Supernovae. Cloud formation modelling in substellar objects requires gravitational settling and element replenishment in addition to element depletion. All processes depend on the local conditions, and a simultaneous treatment is required. We apply new material data in order to assess our cloud formation model results regarding the treatment of the formation of condensation seeds. We re-address the question of the primary nucleation species in view of new (TiO2)_N-cluster data and new SiO vapour pressure data. We apply the density functional theory using the computational chemistry package Gaussian 09 to derive updated thermodynamical data for (TiO2)_N-clusters as input for our TiO2 seed formation model. We test different nucleation treatments and their effect on the overall cloud structure by solving a system of dust momen...

Lee, G; Giles, H; Bromley, S T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ASSESSING THE BARGAINING MODEL OF WAR TERMINATION: AN EXAMINATION OF THE PHILIPPINE-AMERICAN WAR, 1899-1902  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 392 (1970): 14-29; Wallace J. Thies, ?Searching for Peace: Vietnam and the Question of How Wars End.? Polity 7.3(1975): 304-333; Donald Wittman, ?How Wars End: a Rational Model Approach.? The Journal... points. The narrow approach focuses on when and why a war ends and if the specific point of at which a war is terminated can be predicted.6 Literature pertaining to the narrow approach will be the subject of this chapter.7 This chapter reviews...

Brown, Adam David

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

7 - Assessing and modelling the performance of nuclear waste and associated packages for long-term management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Examples of analytical approaches and methodologies for modelling the behaviour of waste forms and waste package metals in long-term management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) are presented. Two cases, long-term geological disposal and interim extended dry storage, are considered. The integrity of the waste package (or canister) that serves as a barrier is dependent upon the performance of construction metals. Corrosion degradation modes of the construction metals are evaluated. The waste behaviour during SNF degradation is also evaluated. In each mode of corrosion or degradation, the associated risk insights are discussed in the system performance of disposal or storage.

T.M. Ahn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

An environmental assessment system for environmental technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new model for the environmental assessment of environmental technologies, EASETECH, has been developed. The primary aim of EASETECH is to perform life-cycle assessment (LCA) of complex systems handling heterogeneous material flows. The objectives of ... Keywords: EASETECH, Flow modelling, LCA model, Life cycle assessment, Uncertainty, Waste

Julie Clavreul, Hubert Baumeister, Thomas H. Christensen, Anders Damgaard

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Methodology to assess potential glint and glare hazards from concentrating solar power plants : analytical models and experimental validation.  

SciTech Connect

With growing numbers of concentrating solar power systems being designed and developed, glint and glare from concentrating solar collectors and receivers is receiving increased attention as a potential hazard or distraction for motorists, pilots, and pedestrians. This paper provides analytical methods to evaluate the irradiance originating from specularly and diffusely reflecting sources as a function of distance and characteristics of the source. Sample problems are provided for both specular and diffuse sources, and validation of the models is performed via testing. In addition, a summary of safety metrics is compiled from the literature to evaluate the potential hazards of calculated irradiances from glint and glare. Previous safety metrics have focused on prevention of permanent eye damage (e.g., retinal burn). New metrics used in this paper account for temporary flash blindness, which can occur at irradiance values several orders of magnitude lower than the irradiance values required for irreversible eye damage.

Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume II. An updated model assessment of aircraft generated air pollution at LAX, JFK, and ORD. Final report Jan 1978-Jul 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized. Both the results of the pollution monitoring analyses in Volume I and the modeling studies in Volume II suggest that: maximum hourly average CO concentrations from aircraft are unlikely to exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) in areas of public exposure and are thus small in comparison to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 ppm; maximum hourly HC concentrations from aircraft can exceed 0.25 ppm over an area several times the size of the airport; and annual average NO2 concentrations from aircraft are estimated to contribute only 10 to 20 percent of the NAAQS limit level.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Diffusion of low-carbon technologies and the feasibility of long-term climate targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Stabilizing the global climate will require large-scale global deployment of low-carbon technologies. Even in the presence of aggressive climate policies, however, the diffusion of such technologies may be limited by several institutional, behavioral, and social factors. In this paper, we review the literature on the sources of such diffusion constraints, and explore the potential implications of such constraints based on the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our analysis highlights that factors that limit technology deployment may have sizeable impacts on the feasibility and mitigation costs of achieving stringent stabilization targets. And such impacts are greatly amplified with major delays in serious climate policies. The results generally indicate that constraints on the expansions of CCS and renewables are more costly than those on nuclear or bioenergy, and jointly constraining these technologies leaves some scenarios infeasible.

Gokul Iyer; Nathan Hultman; Jiyong Eom; Haewon McJeon; Pralit Patel; Leon Clarke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Preliminary geohydrologic conceptual model of the Los Medanos region near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for the purpose of performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a geohydrologic conceptual model of the northern Delaware Basin to be used in modeling three-dimensional, regional ground-water flow for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the Los Medanos region near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Geochemical and hydrological evidence indicates that flow is transient in the Rustler Formation and the Capitan aquifer in response to changing geologic, hydrologic, and climatic conditions. Before the Pleistocene, ground-water flow in the Rustler Formation was generally eastward, but uneven tilting of the Delaware Basin lowered the regional base level and formed fractures in the evaporitic sequence of rocks approximately parallel to the basin axis. Dissolution along the fractures, coupled with erosion, formed Nash Draw. Also, the drop in base level resulted in an increase in the carrying power of the Pecos River, which began incising the Capitan/aquifer near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Erosion and downcutting released hydraulic pressure that caused a reversal in Rustler ground-water flow direction near the WIPP. Flow in the Rustler west of the WIPP is toward Nash Draw and eventually toward Malaga Bend; flow south of the WIPP is toward Malaga Bend. 126 refs., 70 figs., 18 tabs.

Brinster, K.F. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development of the Conceptual Models for Chemical Conditions and Hydrology Used in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations specify that the DOE must demonstrate on a sound basis that the WIPP disposal system will effectively contain long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides within its boundaries for 10,000 years following closure. In 1996, the DOE submitted the ''40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant'' (CCA) to the EPA. The CCA proposed that the WIPP site complies with EPA's regulatory requirements. Contained within the CCA are descriptions of the scientific research conducted to characterize the properties of the WIPP site and the probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted to predict the containment properties of the WIPP disposal system. In May 1998, the EPA certified that the TRU waste disposal at the WIPP complies with its regulations. Waste disposal operations at WIPP commenced on March 28, 1999. The 1996 WIPP PA model of the disposal system included conceptual and mathematical representations of key hydrologic and geochemical processes. These key processes were identified over a 22-year period involving data collection, data interpretation, computer models, and sensitivity studies to evaluate the importance of uncertainty and of processes that were difficult to evaluate by other means. Key developments in the area of geochemistry were the evaluation of gas generation mechanisms in the repository; development of a model of chemical conditions in the repository and actinide concentrations in brine; selecting MgO backfill and demonstrating its effects experimentally; and determining the chemical retardation capability of the Culebra. Key developments in the area of hydrology were evacuating the potential for groundwater to dissolve the Salado Formation (the repository host formation), development of a regional model for hydrologic conditions, development of a stochastic, probabilistic representation of hydraulic properties in the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation; characterization of physical transport in the Culebra, and the evaluation of brine and gas flow in the Salado. Additional confidence in the conceptual models used in the 1996 WIPP PA was gained through independent peer review in many stages of their development.

LARSON, KURT W.

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

300

Consequence Assessment  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume focuses on the process of performing timely initial assessments necessary to support critical first decisions and the continuous process of refining those initial assessments as more information and resources become available. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany) [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Renn, Ortwin [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany)] [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany); Vanclay, Frank [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Volker [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany)] [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Karami, Ezatollah [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 DOE/EA-1791 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNVIERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 U.S. Department of Energy University of Minnesota Wind Energy Research Consortium Project Golden Field Office Environmental Assessment March 2011 Page i Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1

303

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction and Operation of a Proposed Biogas Anaerobic Digestion Facility at an Ethanol Plant Western Plains Energy, LLC Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas U. S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Cooperative Service 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-3225 August 29, 2011 Environmental Assessment Western Plains Energy, LLC Gove County, Kansas ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I. PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND NEED .................................................................... 1 II. PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES .................................. 2 III. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL AREA .............................................................. 2

304

A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study combines bathymetric, geomorphological, geological data and oil spill predictions to model the impact of oil spills in two accident scenarios from offshore Crete, Eastern Mediterranean. The aim is to present a new three-step method of use by emergency teams and local authorities in the assessment of shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills. The three-step method comprises: (1) real-time analyses of bathymetric, geomorphological, geological and oceanographic data; (2) oil dispersion simulations under known wind and sea current conditions; and (3) the compilation of final hazard maps based on information from (1) and (2) and on shoreline susceptibility data. The results in this paper show that zones of high to very-high susceptibility around the island of Crete are related to: (a) offshore bathymetric features, including the presence of offshore scarps and seamounts; (b) shoreline geology, and (c) the presence near the shore of sedimentary basins filled with unconsolidated deposits of high permeability. Oil spills, under particular weather and oceanographic conditions, may quickly spread and reach the shoreline 5–96 h after the initial accident. As a corollary of this work, we present the South Aegean region around Crete as a valid case-study for confined marine basins, narrow seaways, or interior seas around island groups.

Tiago M. Alves; Eleni Kokinou; George Zodiatis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The PLATO End-to-End CCD Simulator -- Modelling space-based ultra-high precision CCD photometry for the assessment study of the PLATO Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PLATO satellite mission project is a next generation ESA Cosmic Vision satellite project dedicated to the detection of exo-planets and to asteroseismology of their host-stars using ultra-high precision photometry. The main goal of the PLATO mission is to provide a full statistical analysis of exo-planetary systems around stars that are bright and close enough for detailed follow-up studies. Many aspects concerning the design trade-off of a space-based instrument and its performance can best be tackled through realistic simulations of the expected observations. The complex interplay of various noise sources in the course of the observations made such simulations an indispensable part of the assessment study of the PLATO Payload Consortium. We created an end-to-end CCD simulation software-tool, dubbed PLATOSim, which simulates photometric time-series of CCD images by including realistic models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the pointing uncertainty of the satellite ...

Zima, W; De Ridder, J; Salmon, S; Catala, C; Kjeldsen, H; Aerts, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT and STABILIZATION' SCENARIOS PARRERSBURG,'W. VA. SITE FEBRUARY 1980 M. CARSON J. COFFMAN N. MANDELTORT, ! Division of Nuclear Service Operations Chem-Nuclear\ Systems, Inc. 240 Stoneridge Dr., Suite 100 Columbia, South Carolina 29210 Prepared for AMAX Specialty Hetals Corporation One Greenwich Plaza Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 During July' 1978, Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. (CNSI) began an assessment program for AMAX Specialty Metals Corp."(AMAX) u to locate, quantify, and evaluate the'extent of environmental radioactive contamination at the AMAX Parkersburg., West Virginia former zirconium/hafnium processing facility. In addition, preliminary ive assessments were to be made to assist AMAX in evaluat ,ing alternat methods for site cleanup.

307

Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A set of issues that state and local governments should carefully consider, with the goal of helping them assess and anticipate solutions for some worst case or unfortunate case scenarios as they...

308

Venetie, Alaska energy assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Energy Assessment performed for Venetie, Alaska using the principals of an Energy Surety Microgrid (ESM) The report covers a brief overview of the principals of ESM, a site characterization of Venetie, a review of the consequence modeling, some preliminary recommendations, and a basic cost analysis.

Jensen, Richard Pearson; Baca, Micheal J.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Brainard, James Robert

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Rutgers University Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, chemical use, water use, and sustainable materials management into MTCO2e. The EPA WARM Model which helpsRutgers University Environmental Assessment: MOU SemiAnnual Report May 31, 2013 Environmental) pledging to become an environmental steward by implementing a number of green initiatives that would reduce

Hanson, Stephen José

310

Assess in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Assessment (SWERA) SolarDS Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) System Advisor Model (SAM) Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) UNDP-Energy Costing Tool...

311

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment to Identify Energy and Cost Saving Opportunities.to Identify Energy and Cost Savings Opportunities. Accesscan add up to big energy and cost savings. For example, one

Xu, Tengfang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Evaluating Solar Radiation Attenuation Models to Assess the Effects of Climate and Geographical Location on the Heliostat Field Efficiency in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most of the solar power plants using a central receiver which are currently in operation are installed in the Sun Belt region, specifically above the Tropic of Cancer. These plants are located in regions characterized by a dry summers and a yearly sum of Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI) of over 2300 kWh/m2. These regions include the Mojave Desert (semi-arid climate) and Andalucía in southern Spain (Mediterranean and semi-arid climate). Potential locations for installing such plants in Brazil, identified in previous studies, are the São Francisco river basin and the Sobradinho area in the Northeast Region of the country. These locations are characterized by high humidity levels and yearly DNI values ranging from 1800 to 2300 kWh/m2, which is in clear contrast with the dry and desert climates where the solar tower projects currently in operation are located. Besides the combined effects of climate and the inter-tropicalization of the site, based on the solar angles and atmospheric attenuation, the potential locations in Brazil provide a small variation between the monthly averages DNI values. In this paper, the effects of these particularities on the performance of a heliostat field are assessed. For instance, the effects of the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol concentration on the optical performance of the heliostat field are analyzed. The results suggest that, for the same DNI level, the heliostat field in Brazil should be 4% larger due to the effect of the water vapor concentration in the atmosphere. This is an important finding, which shows that the current models for calculating the attenuation between the heliostat and the receiver need to be reviewed and compared with experimental observations and validated for the conditions prevailing at potential locations in Brazil.

JM Cardemil; AR Starke; VK Scariot; IL. Grams; S Colle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT (EA) ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLM Office: Carlsbad Field Office DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA Serial #: NM-123703 Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (SAR) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action 1.1 The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of re-

314

Rapid Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Assessment of Lignin Content and Structure in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Grown Under Different Environmental Conditions David G. J. Mann & Nicole Labbé & Robert W. Sykes & Kristen Gracom & Lindsey Kline & Isabella M. Swamidoss & Jason N. Burris & Mark Davis & C. Neal Stewart Jr. Published online: 13 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a candi- date feedstock in bioenergy, and plant breeding and molecular genetic strategies are being used to improve germplasm. In order to assess these subsequent modifica- tions, baseline biomass compositional data are needed in a relevant variety of environments. In this study, switch- grass cv. Alamo was grown in the field, greenhouse, and growth chamber and harvested into individual leaf and stem tissue components. These components

315

Sleep Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleep Assessment Sleep Assessment 1 | Thank you for taking the time to complete this extensive form. Sleep disturbances and/or fatigue are most often the result of many factors. In order to best treat your condition we need to understand your symptoms and history. Please bring your completed assessment form to your appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 505 844-HBES (4237). Name: Employee ID#: Date: Male Female Age: Health Plan : United BCBSNM Other: Referred by: Sleep and Health History In general, would you describe your sleep as: Refreshing Not Refreshing How would you rate your sleep? Very Good Good Adequate Poor Very Poor How would you describe your sleep problem? Sleep Problem (indicate all that apply) Duration of problem

316

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

317

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS December 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Building Research and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 3. ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.1 No Action Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.2 Proposed Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.3 Alternative Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-3 3.4 Impacts of Proposed and Alternative Standards

318

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee June 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office This page intentionally left blank. DOE/EA-1779 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date Issued-June 2011 Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC and CDM Federal Services Inc. contributed to the preparation of this document and may not be considered for review of the document U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS FIGURES......................................................................................................................................................

319

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

320

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

682 682 Environmental Assessment Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Conducted Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington Environmental Assessment February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 This page intentionally left blank. 1 February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION..............................................................................1. 1.1 BACKGROUND ......................................................................... 3 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTION ......................... 6 1.3 NEPA REQUIREMENTS............................................................... 6 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVE ....................... 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment framework meraf Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENGINEERING CYBERNETICS AND ROBOTICS, 60 Summary: , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment open issues Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENGINEERING CYBERNETICS AND ROBOTICS, 60 Summary: , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment rate niear Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Item Construction Response Rating WSDLWSDL SOAP... , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

324

15th International Conference Ramiran, May 3-6, 2013, Versailles, France Organic residues valorisation by fertilisation: Coupling models to assess the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, UR TSCF, Domaine des Palaquins, Montoldre, 03150, FR (2) Chambre d'Agriculture d'Auvergne, 9 allée attached to Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) inventories, the emission factors commonly used to quantify NO3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Risk Assessment Models and Contamination Management: Implications for Broad-Range Ribosomal DNA PCR as a Diagnostic Tool in Medical Bacteriology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Contamination Management: Implications...alternative approaches (3). 16S...within the life sciences in the late...through careful management of the working...risk assessment approach. FIG. 1...angiomatosis. An approach to the identification...contamination management: implications...

B. Cherie Millar; Jiru Xu; John E. Moore

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The property-assessed clean energy (PACE) model is an innovative mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements on private property. PACE programs allow local...

327

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Introduction; Technical Description of ISC-COMPDEP; Modeling Input Parameters; Discussion of Modeling Results; Summary and Major Assumptions; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Financial Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We would like to thank everyone who helped us with this report, including but not limited to: John Bolduc, Steve Lenkauskas, George Fernandes, and the staff at the City of Cambridge and Danehy Park who helped shape this report and made on-site instrument installation and data collection possible. Mark Lipson, Jack Clarke and Jean Rogers for their guidance with the environmental and community impact assessment. Bob Paine and Scott Abbett for their thoughts and experiences with the Medford McGlynn School wind turbine. This preliminary assessment report investigates the wind resource available at Danehy Park in the City of Cambridge, providing estimated power generation figures as well as cost and revenue estimates and

Cy Chan; Pamela Silva; Chao Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Context for performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

In developing its recommendations on performance assessment for disposal of low-level radioactive waste, Scientific committee 87-3 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has considered a number of topics that provide a context for the development of suitable approaches to performance assessment. This paper summarizes the Committee` discussions on these topics, including (1) the definition of low-level waste and its sources and properties, as they affect the variety of wastes that must be considered, (2) fundamental objectives and principles of radioactive waste disposal and their application to low-level waste, (3) current performance objectives for low-level waste disposal in the US, with particular emphasis on such unresolved issues of importance to performance assessment as the time frame for compliance, requirements for protection of groundwater and surface water, inclusion of doses from radon, demonstrating compliance with fixed performance objectives using highly uncertain model projections, and application of the principle that releases to the environment should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (4) the role of active and passive institutional controls over disposal sites, (5) the role of the inadvertent human intruder in low-level waste disposal, (6) model validation and confidence in model outcomes, and (7) the concept of reasonable assurance of compliance.

Kocher, D.C.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Reviewed: Spring 2008 MSU Departmental Assessment Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reviewed: Spring 2008 MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2008 Department: Electrical realistic planning for program assessment data and analysis. The results of this indepth review of the ECE subsequent on-site accreditation reviews. After careful consideration, the following Assessment Plan model

Dyer, Bill

331

iEMSs 2008:International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software Integrating Sciences and Information Technology for Environmental Assessment and Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be based on results from integrated Earth System Models (ESMs), C-LAMP is helping to establish the metadata

Hoffman, Forrest M.

332

Biology reflective assessment curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I passed back the assessments on natural variation with amultiple-choice assessment on natural selection and naturalI passed back the natural selection assessments with the

Bayley, Cheryl Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Model-data Fusion Approaches for Retrospective and Predictive Assessment of the Pan-Arctic Scale Permafrost Carbon Feedback to Global Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation of the Arctic system carbon cycle in Earth System Modeling frameworks. This proposed study of permafrost carbon processes in terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to operate within coupled Earth system modeling frameworks. PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE This work will provide a critical bridge between the abundant

334

Assessment of subgrid-scale models with an LES-dedicated experimental database: the pulsatile impinging jet in turbulent cross-flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hence, two eddy-viscosity-based SGS models are investigated: the dynamic Smagorinsky model1 geometries. Since the pioneering work of Smagorinsky3 , numerous subgrid-scale (SGS) viscosity models1) many physical mechanisms interact in a time-varying geometry: combustion, spray atomization, multiphase

Boyer, Edmond

335

Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on April 13-14, 2010. The Performance Assessment Community of Practice has been chartered to advise the Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board regarding performance assessments and performance assessment-like analyses, promote consistency in the preparation of performance assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, foster exchange of information among performance assessment practitioners, and develop appropriate guidance for performance assessments such that they are based on sound science and are defensible. The purpose of this technical exchange is to provide a venue for performance assessment and risk assessment practitioners, managers and regulators, and contributors to the Cementitious Barriers Partnership and Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management project to share plans and experiences and share ideas for future performance assessment and risk assessment modeling. The technical exchange will include a combination of plenary presentations and discussions with breakout sessions for specific topics. Discussions will emphasize areas for improved consistency and solicit suggestions for future developments related to modeling tools. A breakout discussion session is also planned to address: DOE Order 435.1 Update, regulatory challenges for performance and risk assessment modeling, and other topical areas. Arrangements have also been made for a GoldSim modeling roundtable at the conclusion of the workshop for participants who are interested in sharing experiences related to the use of GoldSim for their simulations.

336

Evaluating sub-national building-energy efficiency policy options under uncertainty: Efficient sensitivity testing of alternative climate, technolgical, and socioeconomic futures in a regional intergrated-assessment model.  

SciTech Connect

Improving the energy efficiency of the building stock, commercial equipment and household appliances can have a major impact on energy use, carbon emissions, and building services. Subnational regions such as U.S. states wish to increase their energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions or adapt to climate change. Evaluating subnational policies to reduce energy use and emissions is difficult because of the uncertainties in socioeconomic factors, technology performance and cost, and energy and climate policies. Climate change may undercut such policies. Assessing these uncertainties can be a significant modeling and computation burden. As part of this uncertainty assessment, this paper demonstrates how a decision-focused sensitivity analysis strategy using fractional factorial methods can be applied to reveal the important drivers for detailed uncertainty analysis.

Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Zhou, Yuyu; Rice, Jennie S.; Patel, Pralit L.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Life Cycle Assessment: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can develop into life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA), which is a transdisciplinary integration framework of models rather than a model in itself. ... As the environmental burden from agriculture, and especially from livestock breeding, is known to be quite important, such an analysis was interesting for policy purposes. ...

Jeroen B. Guinée; Reinout Heijungs; Gjalt Huppes; Alessandra Zamagni; Paolo Masoni; Roberto Buonamici; Tomas Ekvall; Tomas Rydberg

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Assessor Training Assessment Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

339

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach.

Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a single-fluid diffuse interface model in the ALE-AMR hydrodynamics code to simulate surface tension effects. We show simula- tions and compare them to other surface tension...

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sion effects. We show the result of a test case, and compare it to the result without surface tension. The model describes droplet formation nicely. Application The ARRA-funded...

342

Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Monthly progress reports and final report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Task 7.lD was to (1) establish a collaborative US-USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. At early times following an accident, the direct contamination of pasture and food stuffs, particularly leafy vegetation and grain, can be of great importance. This situation has been modeled extensively. However, models employed then to predict the deposition, retention and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial environments employed concepts and data bases that were more than a decade old. The extent to which these models have been tested with independent data sets was limited. The data gathered in the former-USSR (and elsewhere throughout the Northern Hemisphere) offered a unique opportunity to test model predictions of wet and dry deposition, agricultural foodchain bioaccumulation, and short- and long-term retention, redistribution, and resuspension of radionuclides from a variety of natural and artificial surfaces. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.lD into a multinational effort to evaluate models and data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Real-Time Monitoring of Rare Circulating Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells in an Orthotopic Model by In Vivo Flow Cytometry Assesses Resection on Metastasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...single-exponential models with the Fit TPSF tool. PIT for in vitro and in vivo models PIT was conducted with a red light-emitting diode (LED) light at 680 to 700 nm wavelength (Tech-LED, Marubeni America Co.; ref. 2). Power densities were...

Zhi-Chao Fan; Jun Yan; Guang-Da Liu; Xiao-Ying Tan; Xiao-Fu Weng; Wei-Zhong Wu; Jian Zhou; Xun-Bin Wei

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Assessing recovery from acidification of European surface waters in the year 2010:An evaluation of projections made with the MAGIC model in 1995  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1999 we used the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater In Catchments) model to project acidification of acid-sensitive European surface waters in the year 2010, given implementation of the Gothenburg Protocol to the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP). ...

Rachel Clare Helliwell; Richard F. Wright; Leah A. Jackson-Blake; Robert C. Ferrier; Julian Aherne; Bernard Jack Cosby; Christopher D. Evans; Martin Forsius; Jakub Hruska; Alan Jenkins; Pavel Krám; Jiri Kopacek; Vladimir Majer; Filip Moldan; Maximilian Posch; Jacqueline Potts; Michela Rogora; Wolfgang Schoepp

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

A spatial agent-based model for assessing strategies of adaptation to climate and tourism demand changes in an alpine tourism destination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vast body of literature suggests that the European Alpine Region is amongst the most sensitive socio-ecosystems to climate change impacts. Our model represents the winter tourism socio-ecosystem of Auronzo di Cadore, located in the Dolomites (Italy), ... Keywords: Adaptation strategies, Alpine tourism, Climate change, Social simulation, Spatial agent-based model

Stefano Balbi; Carlo Giupponi; Pascal Perez; Marco Alberti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

347

Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

Monier, Erwan

349

The distribution of the number of alpha hits per target cell: a new parameter to improve risk assessment for cancer induction using ICRP models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......E. Application of multi-compartment wound models to plutonium-contaminated wounds incurred by former workers at Rocky Flats. Health Phys (2006) 91:128-143. 13 Oberdorster G. Lung particle overload: implications for occupational exposures......

P. Fritsch

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study  

SciTech Connect

A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Minority energy assessment report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy's Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: Exposure Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as life cycle assessment (LCA) fosters the need for simplepotential. The goal of LCA is to confront and assess impactsLCIA) process within in LCA is a systematic framework in

McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mesoscale model cloud scheme assessment using satellite observations Jean-Pierre Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre Cammas, Patrick J. Mascart, and Jean-Pierre Pinty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the convective towers in the generation of synthetic BT maps. INDEX TERMS: 3329 Meteorology and Atmospheric-scale cloudiness in the model. A similar test conducted on the ice water and the liquid water paths confirms Dynamics: Mesoscale meteorology; 3360 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Remote sensing; 3354

Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

355

Schien, D., Shabajee, P., Yearworth, M., & Preist, C. W. (2013). Modeling and assessing variability in Use Phase Energy of online multimedia services.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System (ILCD) Handbook distinguishes between variance as the degree of stochastic uncertainty in a single the uncertainty related to the energy consumption during ICT operation. We use an improved, more accurate model that are too high for national or global digital media power consumption. Additionally, we identify which

Subramanian, Sriram

356

An integrated monitoring/modeling framework for assessing human-nature interactions in urbanizing watersheds: Wappinger and Onondaga Creek watersheds, New York, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In much of the world, rapidly expanding areas of impervious surfaces due to urbanization threaten water resources. Although tools for modeling and projecting land use change and water quantity and quality exist independently, to date it is rare to find ... Keywords: Impervious surface, Remote sensing, Socio-economic factors, Uncertainty, Urbanization, Water resources

Bongghi Hong; Karin E. Limburg; Myrna H. Hall; Giorgos Mountrakis; Peter M. Groffman; Karla Hyde; Li Luo; Victoria R. Kelly; Seth J. Myers

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the  

SciTech Connect

Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Northwest Energy Market Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northwest Energy Market Assessment Pages Northwest-Energy-Market-Assessment Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects &...

359

Applying a weed risk assessment approach to GM crops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current approaches to environmental risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants are modelled on chemical risk assessment methods, which have a strong focus on toxicity. There are additional types of ha...

Paul K. Keese; Andrea V. Robold; Ruth C. Myers; Sarah Weisman…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Final report on activities and findings under DOE grant “Interactive Photochemistry in Earth System Models to Assess Uncertainty in Ozone and Greenhouse Gases”  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry controls the abundances and hence climate forcing of important greenhouse gases including N2O, CH4, HFCs, CFCs, and O3. Attributing climate change to human activities requires, at a minimum, accurate models of the chemistry and circulation of the atmosphere that relate emissions to abundances. This DOE-funded research provided realistic, yet computationally optimized and affordable, photochemical modules to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that augment the CESM capability to explore the uncertainty in future stratospheric-tropospheric ozone, stratospheric circulation, and thus the lifetimes of chemically controlled greenhouse gases from climate simulations. To this end, we have successfully implemented Fast-J (radiation algorithm determining key chemical photolysis rates) and Linoz v3.0 (linearized photochemistry for interactive O3, N2O, NOy and CH4) packages in LLNL-CESM and for the first time demonstrated how change in O2 photolysis rate within its uncertainty range can significantly impact on the stratospheric climate and ozone abundances. From the UCI side, this proposal also helped LLNL develop a CAM-Superfast Chemistry model that was implemented for the IPCC AR5 and contributed chemical-climate simulations to CMIP5.

Prather, Michael J. [UCI

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Assessment 610 (37765) Spring 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment. Students will learn the fundamentals of intellectual and neuropsychological assessment). Comprehensive Handbook of Psychological Assessment: Behavioral Assessment. Wiley & Sons, Inc. Class evaluation

Lockery, Shawn

363

National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This work will enable lower risk/cost deployment of conventional and EGS geothermal power. USGS is also supporting GTP input to DOE National Energy Modeling by providing resource assessment data by geothermal region as input to GTP supply curves.

364

D&D and Risk Assessment Tools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ORISE and PNNL both developed tools to assist in the risk assessment and planning of D&D activities. PNNL developed a Risk D&D tool, a rapid prototype computerbased model, to evaluate...

365

Comprehensive Energy Assessment: EE and RE Project Optimization Modeling for United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study and corresponding model development conducted in support of the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) as part of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA). This research was aimed at developing a mathematical programming framework and accompanying optimization methodology in order to simultaneously evaluate energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) opportunities. Once developed, this research then demonstrated this methodology at a USPACOM installation - Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii. We believe this is the first time such an integrated, joint EE and RE optimization methodology has been constructed and demonstrated.

Brigantic, Robert T.; Papatyi, Anthony F.; Perkins, Casey J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Assessment of actual versus modeled SO/sub 2/ impacts of two pulps mills in a northwestern river valley using complex I  

SciTech Connect

On March 8, 1982, the Air Quality Division of the state of Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) informed Publishers Paper Company, and Crown Zellerbach Corporation West Linn that recent ambient air quality modeling in support of a proposed municipal solid waste resource recovery facility indicated that the mills were causing violations of state and national ambient air quality standards for SO/sub 2/. These violations were predicted in elevated terrain surrounding the West Linn/Oregon city area. The department stated that the mills had two options: one, have their air contaminant discharge permits restricted to some amount of low or no sulfur boiler fuels; or two, perform an ambient monitoring program to resolve the SO/sub 2/ attainment status of the area and to ''calibrate/validate'' the air quality impact model. Discussions with DEQ regarding the companies' concerns led to a cooperative five month monitoring program involving equipment and personnel resources from Publishers, Crown and DEQ. All sampling was done in conformance with Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ambient monitoring guidelines for prevention of significant deterioration with strict quality assurance and quality control. The monitoring program began in October of 1982 and ended in April of 1983. Five months of valid ambient SO/sub 2/ and meteorological data were acquired (November through March).

Crews, W.B.; Gilbert, R.E.; Walther, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Sensitivity of North American agriculture to ENSO-based climate scenarios and their socio-economic consequences: Modeling in an integrated assessment framework  

SciTech Connect

A group of Canadian, US and Mexican natural resource specialists, organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under its North American Energy, Environment and Economy (NA3E) Program, has applied a simulation modeling approach to estimating the impact of ENSO-driven climatic variations on the productivity of major crops grown in the three countries. Methodological development is described and results of the simulations presented in this report. EPIC (the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) was the agro-ecosystem model selected-for this study. EPIC uses a daily time step to simulate crop growth and yield, water use, runoff and soil erosion among other variables. The model was applied to a set of so-called representative farms parameterized through a specially-assembled Geographic Information System (GIS) to reflect the soils, topography, crop management and weather typical of the regions represented. Fifty one representative farms were developed for Canada, 66 for the US and 23 for Mexico. El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) scenarios for the EPIC simulations were created using the historic record of sea-surface temperature (SST) prevailing in the eastern tropical Pacific for the period October 1--September 30. Each year between 1960 and 1989 was thus assigned to an ENSO category or state. The ENSO states were defined as El Nino (EN, SST warmer than the long-term mean), Strong El Nino (SEN, much warmer), El Viejo (EV, cooler) and Neutral (within {+-}0.5 C of the long-term mean). Monthly means of temperature and precipitation were then calculated at each farm for the period 1960--1989 and the differences (or anomalies) between the means in Neutral years and EN, SEN and EV years determined. The average monthly anomalies for each ENSO state were then used to create new monthly statistics for each farm and ENSO-state combination. The adjusted monthly statistics characteristic of each ENSO state were then used to drive a stochastic-weather simulator that provided 30 years of daily-weather data needed to run EPIC. Maps and tables of the climate anomalies by farm show climatic conditions that differ considerably by region, season and ENSO state.

Rosenberg, N.J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Brown, R.A.; Sands, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Legler, D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Ocean Atmosphere Prediction Studies; Srinivasan, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Blacklands Research Center; Tiscareno-Lopez, M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Environmental prediction, risk assessment and extreme events: adaptation strategies for the developing world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...floods-[24]. Assessment of economic value...IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4...period: the pre-industrial period, the twentieth...Beijing Climate Center Climate Model...Flood Forecasts Assessment 2008: community...infobycountry/ 27 Center for International...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assessment of penetration of quantum dots through in vitro and in vivo human skin using the human skin equivalent model and the tape stripping method  

SciTech Connect

Quantum dots (QDs) are rapidly emerging as an important class of nanoparticles (NPs) with potential applications in medicine. However, little is known about penetration of QDs through human skin. This study investigated skin penetration of QDs in both in vivo and in vitro human skin. Using the tape stripping method, this study demonstrates for the first time that QDs can actually penetrate through the stratum corneum (SC) of human skin. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy diverse X-ray (EDX) analysis showed accumulation of QDs in the SC of a human skin equivalent model (HSEM) after dermal exposure to QDs. These findings suggest possible transdermal absorption of QDs after dermal exposure over a relatively long period of time.

Jeong, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwan; Yi, Sang Min [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Jin Ho; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Meyoung-Kon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Sang Wook, E-mail: skin4u@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

A GIS Cost Model to Assess the Availability of Freshwater, Seawater, and Saline Groundwater for Algal Biofuel Production in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a whole, the barren and scrub lands of the southwestern U.S. have limited freshwater supplies, and large net evaporation rates greatly increase the cost of saline alternatives due to the added makeup water required to maintain pond salinity. ... Water consumption in Wigmosta et al.(2) was limited to evaporation; with the addition of saline resources we model the added water demand required to maintain salt concentrations in the pond (“blowdown”). ... However, the land use implications of this analysis need further exploration, as from a water perspective the use of arid sagebrush and desert lands for algae cultivation at energy scales is challenging, and our analysis suggests that presently occupied lands in the southeastern U.S. may have more favorable economic potential. ...

Erik R. Venteris; Richard L. Skaggs; Andre M. Coleman; Mark S. Wigmosta

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

The assess facility descriptor module  

SciTech Connect

The Facility Descriptor (Facility) module is part of the Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS). Facility is the foundational software application in the ASSESS system for modelling a nuclear facility's safeguards and security system to determine the effectiveness against theft of special nuclear material. The Facility module provides the tools for an analyst to define a complete description of a facility's physical protection system which can then be used by other ASSESS software modules to determine vulnerability to a spectrum of insider and outsider threats. The analyst can enter a comprehensive description of the protection system layout including all secured areas, target locations, and detailed safeguards specifications. An extensive safeguard component catalog provides the reference data for calculating delay and detection performance. Multiple target locations within the same physical area may be specified, and the facility may be defined for two different operational states such as dayshift and nightshift. 6 refs., 5 figs.

Jordan, S.E.; Winblad, A.; Key, B.; Walker, S.; Renis, T.; Saleh, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Applying the basin model: Assessing habitat suitability of young-of-the-year demersal fishes on the New York Bight continental shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extent to which young-of-the-year (YOY) fish habitats become saturated with new recruits has remained relatively unevaluated for temperate, demersal, continental shelf fishes. MacCall's [1990. Dynamic Geography of Marine Fish Populations. Washington Sea Grant Program, University of Washington Press, Seattle, Washington] basin model was used as a framework for examining the dynamics of an assemblage of recently settled fishes in relation to available microhabitat on the New York Bight continental shelf (USA). For four abundant species (three flatfish, one merlucciid hake), density-specific patterns of microhabitat selection, spatial dispersion and overall cross-shelf habitat use were investigated using a research submersible over three cross-shelf transects during the late summer settlement season. Typically, recruits that saturated YOY habitats (>1 ind/m2) were randomly distributed within underwater transects and formed weak associations with specific microhabitats. At lower densities (<1 ind/m2), recruit spacing tended toward nonrandom (clumped/even) with increasing significant affinities for ecologically important substrates (i.e. Limanda ferruginea, sand wave crests/low shell hash). For Citharichthys arctifrons, clumping appeared to increase with complexity of the habitat. Several less-abundant species (i.e. Urophycis chuss, Tautogolabrus adspersus) formed tight associations with rare habitat features and may consequently encounter the greatest bottleneck for space during the benthic/pelagic transition. Although restricted by the scale of observation, these results begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which habitat quality and quantity moderate recruitment on the continental shelf.

Mark C. Sullivan; Robert K. Cowen; Kenneth W. Able; Michael P. Fahay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

LUser_CompetencyAssessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competency Assessments (Employee) Competency Assessments (Employee) © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Participating in Competency Assessments (Employee) Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users and supervisors through the step-by-step process of participating in a competency assessment by viewing gaps, assigning items, conducting a self- assessment, reviewing completed assessments, and viewing the competency history. View Gaps and Assign Items 6 Steps Task A Employee: Conduct Self Assessment 8 Steps Task B Employee: Review Completed Assessment - 6 Steps Task C Employee: View Competency History 11 Steps Task D SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Participating in Competency Assessments (Employee)

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing anticalcification treatments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 61 Psychometrics for the Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) & Client Summary: Organizational Assessments in TCU Treatment Process Model Supportive...

376

Assessment endpoints: Defining the question  

SciTech Connect

The EPA Framework for Ecological Risk Assessments incorporated two significant improvements in the ecological risk assessment (EcoRA) process. First, the guidance emphasized the importance of defining the problems to be addressed (The Problem Formulation Phase). Secondly, the guidance explicitly calls for dialogue between risk managers and risk assessors. Implementing these elements has proven difficult and sometimes contentious. Risk assessors know how to do many things very well-including literature reviews, toxicity screens, deterministic exposure models, calculations of exposure:effects quotients, etc. However, these efforts often fall short of what risk managers need to make decisions. Moreover, there is a high likelihood that such risk assessment information fails to address the concerns of stakeholders. It is the authors` position that the risk assessors by themselves will seldom be able to produce meaningful assessments because they will usually fail to anticipate the needs of risk managers and the expectations of stakeholders. To become a meaningful part of the social decision process, the EcoRA process (especially the critical Problem Formulation Phase) must be opened to a larger group of participants that includes assessors, managers, and stakeholder representatives. Formal methods in conflict resolution and consensus building among diverse interest groups are available. The authors will describe the need to develop guidelines for the application of these tools to reach agreement on assessment endpoints, Early agreement on the focus of work improves the chances for effective communication of risk and understanding of the basis for environmental management decisions.

Fairbrother, A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Williams, B.A.; Bennett, R.S. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: ExposureAssessment  

SciTech Connect

Human exposure assessment is a key step in estimating the environmental and public health burdens that result chemical emissions in the life cycle of an industrial product or service. This column presents the third in a series of overviews of the state of the art in integrated environmental assessment - earlier columns described emissions estimation (Frey and Small, 2003) and fate and transport modeling (Ramaswami, et al., 2004). When combined, these first two assessment elements provide estimates of ambient concentrations in the environment. Here we discuss how both models and measurements are used to translate ambient concentrations into metrics of human and ecological exposure, the necessary precursors to impact assessment. Exposure assessment is the process of measuring and/or modeling the magnitude, frequency and duration of contact between a potentially harmful agent and a target population, including the size and characteristics of that population (IPCS, 2001; Zartarian, et al., 2005). Ideally the exposure assessment process should characterize the sources, routes, pathways, and uncertainties in the assessment. Route of exposure refers to the way that an agent enters the receptor during an exposure event. Humans contact pollutants through three routes--inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake. Inhalation occurs in both outdoor environments and indoor environments where most people spend the majority of their time. Ingestion includes both water and food, as well as soil and dust uptake due to hand-to-mouth activity. Dermal uptake occurs through contacts with consumer products; indoor and outdoor surfaces; the water supply during washing or bathing; ambient surface waters during swimming or boating; soil during activities such as work, gardening, and play; and, to a lesser extent, from the air that surrounds us. An exposure pathway is the course that a pollutant takes from an ambient environmental medium (air, soil, water, biota, etc), to an exposure medium (indoor air, food, tap water, etc.) and to an exposed individual. Exposure scenarios are used to define plausible pathways for human contact. Recognition of the multiple pathways possible for exposure highlights the importance of a multimedia, multipathway exposure framework.

McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis in an experimental model: dose–response at five-week follow-up based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats  

SciTech Connect

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. Employing an experimental model of liver metastases in rats, we recently demonstrated that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT) at 13 Gy prescribed to tumor is therapeutically useful at 3-week follow-up. The aim of the present study was to evaluate dose–response at 5-week follow-up, based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA-BNCT (n = 19), Beam only (n = 8) and Sham (n = 7) (matched manipulation, no treatment). For each rat, neutron flux was measured in situ and boron content was measured in a pre-irradiation blood sample for retrospective individual dose assessment. For statistical analysis (ANOVA), individual data for the BPA-BNCT group were pooled according to absorbed tumor dose, BPA-BNCT I: 4.5–8.9 Gy and BPA-BNCT II: 9.2–16 Gy. At 5 weeks post-irradiation, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 12.2 +/- 6.6 for Sham, 7.8 +/- 4.1 for Beam only, 4.4 +/- 5.6 for BPA-BNCT I and 0.45 +/- 0.20 for BPA-BNCT II; tumor nodule weight was 750 +/- 480 mg for Sham, 960 +/- 620 mg for Beam only, 380 +/- 720 mg for BPA-BNCT I and 7.3 +/- 5.9 mg for BPA-BNCT II. The BPA-BNCT II group exhibited statistically significant tumor control with no contributory liver toxicity. Potential threshold doses for tumor response and significant tumor control were established at 6.1 and 9.2 Gy, respectively.

Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Veronica A. Trivilin; Lucas L. Colombo; Andrea Monti Hughes; Silvia I. Thorp; Jorge E. Cardoso; Marcel A. Garabalino; Ana J. Molinari; Elisa M. Heber; Paula Curotto; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

Integrated assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) climate change projections on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In response to a congressional mandate, the US Global Change Research Program organized a National Assessment of Climate Change focusing on geographic regions (e.g. Alaska, Great Plains) and sectors (e.g. public health, agriculture, water resources). This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory contributing to the water sector analysis. The subsequent paper makes use of the water supply results to estimate the climate change impacts on irrigated agriculture. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous US to climate changes in 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095 as projected by the Hadley/United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) general circulation model (GCM; HadCM2) were modeled using the Hydrologic Unit Model for the United States (HUMUS). HUMUS, a biophysically based hydrology model, consists of a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the eight-digit United States Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Unit Area (HUA) of which there are 2101 in the conterminous US. Results are aggregated to the four- and two-digit (major water resource region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of maximum/minimum temperature and precipitation (PPT) from 1961 to 1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY), used as a measure of water supply for irrigation, increases from the 1961–1990 baseline period over most of the US in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm (35%) from baseline in the Pacific Northwest. Driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation, WY is projected to decrease in the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins. The HadCM2 (2095) scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in water yield increases of 38% on average. Water yield increases are projected to be significant throughout the eastern US—39% in the Ohio basin, for example. Water yields increase significantly in the western US, as well—57 and 76% in the Upper and Lower Colorado, respectively. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased water yields in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2] to account for the potential impacts of the ‘CO2-fertilization’ effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated [CO2] but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Norman J Rosenberg; Robert A Brown; R.Cesar Izaurralde; Allison M Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Integrated risk assessment for LNG terminals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an integrated risk assessment framework for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminals. The basic steps for risk assessment are the following: a) hazard identification, b) accident sequence modeling, where logic models such as Event Trees and Fault Trees are developed c) data acquisition and parameter estimation, used to estimate frequencies of the initiating events, component unavailability and probabilities of human actions, d) accident sequence quantification, where all accident sequences are assessed, e) consequence assessment, where release, evaporation rate, radiation levels and overpressure owing to immediate or delayed ignition of LNG is performed and f) integration of results where risk indices are assessed. Risk assessment of an onshore and an offshore LNG terminal is performed, according to the basic methodological steps, and the distances where individual risk levels equal to 10?5–10?7/yr are assessed and presented in the form of individual contours. A section dedicated to I.A. Papazoglou, pioneer in Quantitative Risk Assessment both in the nuclear and chemical industry is also provided.

O.N. Aneziris; I.A. Papazoglou; M. Konstantinidou; Z. Nivolianitou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Management Assessment and Independent Assessment Guide  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The revision to this Guide reflects current assessment practices, international standards, and changes in the Department of Energy expectations. Cancels DOE G 414.1-1. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-1B.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Liberia Biomass Resource Assessment Name Liberia Biomass Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner U.S. Agency for International Development Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy09o Country Liberia Western Africa References Assessment of Biomass Resources in Liberia [1] Abstract This study was conducted to estimate the biomass resources currently and potentially available in the country and evaluate their contribution for power generation and the production of transportation fuels

384

Home Energy Assessments  

SciTech Connect

A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

Dispenza, Jason

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

FOR ASSESSING ROOM ACOUSTICS Jasper van Dorp Schuitman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUDITORY MODELLING FOR ASSESSING ROOM ACOUSTICS Jasper van Dorp Schuitman #12;Auditory modelling Promoties, in het openbaar te verdedigen op donderdag 15 september 2011 om 10:00 uur door Jasper VAN DORP

386

An Information Visualization Approach to Intelligent Building Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach can be applied to support IB assessment. Key words: Intelligent building; Assessment; Methodology; Model; Information visualization 1. INTRODUCTION For building assessment, the currently most popular way is to use rating method...-assessment of IBs. 2. METHODOLOGY The methodology adopted in this research comprises several methods focusing on detailed objectives mentioned above. First of all, an extensive literature review is required to explore achievements in the areas of information...

Hong, J.; Chen, Z.; Li, H.; Xu, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Model Refinement for Economic Assessments of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC26-06NT42847 Hawai`i Distributed Energy Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask/Pacific Region; energy policy; planning methods; and environmental valuation. She specializes in economic

388

Assessment and Propagation of Model Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1982). Outlook for World Oil Prices. Washington DC: U. S.run. But, in view of the oil price example, which is worse—Case N-2524-RC, of Oil Prices. Santa Monica, CA: RAND.

David Draper

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Modelling and Assessment of Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Until the four-fold increase in oil prices in 1973 energy* was generally taken as abundantly available cheap commodity with the result that its consumption was increasing very rapidly. It increased by a factor...

A. M. Khan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small- and medium-sized manufacturers may be eligible to receive a no-cost assessment provided by DOE Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs). Teams located at 24 universities around the country conduct the energy audits to identify opportunities to improve productivity, reduce waste, and save energy. Each manufacturer typically identifies about $55,000 in potential annual savings on average. Over 15,000 IAC assessments have been conducted. IACs also train the next-generation of energy savvy engineers.

392

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

393

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

394

Assessment in natural sciences.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research study focusses on assessment in the Natural Sciences learning area in grades 8 and 9. The aspect under focus is the extent to… (more)

Singh, Suresh Kamar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

ESCO PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT TEMPLATE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document presents a template and example to help energy service companies (ESCOs) conduct preliminary assessments required for Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects.

396

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

  Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices...

397

Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document has been developed to guide individuals and teams that will be involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the...

398

A. World Summit on Sustainable Development : A First Critical Assessment, here p. 1-3 B. Lecture at the University of Bonn, BIMUN/Bonn International Model United Nations,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. World Summit on Sustainable Development : A First Critical Assessment, here p. 1-3 B. Lecture / NACHLESE World Summit on Sustainable Development: A First Critical Assessment By Prof. Dr. Uwe Holtz on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg was a failure, an opportunity wasted, the triumph of "hard" neo

Franz, Sven Oliver

399

Assessment for Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Tourism Assessment for Lindstrom, Minnesota Final Report May 2008 Prepared for of the University of Minnesota Extension and College of Food, Agricultural & Natural Resource Sciences #12; INTRODUCTION 1 DATA USED IN THE TOURISM ASSESSMENT 2 TOURISM-RELATED DATA FOR LINDSTROM 2 REFERENCES TO TOURISM

Amin, S. Massoud

400

Training Needs Assessment Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The TNA PowerPoint Presentation is targeted for the training points of contacts whose organization's participate in the DOE training needs assessment (TNA). This presentation goes over how the training needs assessment (TNA) is done and the components of the TNA data collection tool.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOEEA-1203 Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

203 203 ~ Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 21 8-W-5 Low-Level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR TRENCH 33 WIDENING IN 21 8-W-5 LOW-LEVEL BURIAL GROUND, HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON JULY 1997 U.S. Department o f Energy DOE/ EA- 1203 This page intentionally left blank. Envi ronmental Assessment J u l y 1997 Portions of this document m y be iliegiile i n electronic image prodads. b a g s are pFoduced from the best adhble original dOCUXllent, DOE/EA-1203 U.S. Department o f Energy Preface PREFACE This envi ronmental assessment (EA) has been prepared t o assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department o

402

Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses Jump to: navigation, search The National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs lifecycle and technoeconomic analyses to promote sustainable energy development. Conducting full life-cycle assessments for biomass products, including electricity, biodiesel, and ethanol, is important for determining environmental benefits. NREL analysts use a life-cycle inventory modeling package and supporting databases to conduct life-cycle assessments. These tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Integrated system analyses, technoeconomic analyses, life-cycle assessments (LCAs), and other analysis tools are essential to our research and development efforts. They provide an understanding of the economic,

403

Preliminary melter performance assessment report  

SciTech Connect

The Melter Performance Assessment activity, a component of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) effort, was designed to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) melter. The melter performance assessment consisted of several activities, including a literature review of all work done with noble metals in glass, gradient furnace testing to study the behavior of noble metals during the melting process, research-scale and engineering-scale melter testing to evaluate effects of noble metals on melter operation, and computer modeling that used the experimental data to predict effects of noble metals on the full-scale melter. Feed used in these tests simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) feed. This report summarizes the results of the melter performance assessment and predicts the lifetime of the HWVP melter. It should be noted that this work was conducted before the recent Tri-Party Agreement changes, so the reference melter referred to here is the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter design.

Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.; Cooper, M.F.; Whitney, L.D.; Shafer, P.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using roadside air quality measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using roadside air quality measurements Sotiris, a probabilistic methodology for assessing urban air quality was proposed. Keywords: Air pollution; Model 535265 1. Introduction Mathematical modelling has been widely used for assessing ambient air quality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

Standardised and transparent model descriptions for agent-based models: Current status and prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agent-based models are helpful to investigate complex dynamics in coupled human-natural systems. However, model assessment, model comparison and replication are hampered to a large extent by a lack of transparency and comprehensibility in model descriptions. ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Domain specific languages, Graphical representations, Model communication, Model comparison, Model design, Model development, Model replication, Standardised protocols

Birgit Müller, Stefano Balbi, Carsten M. Buchmann, Luís De Sousa, Gunnar Dressler, Jürgen Groeneveld, Christian J. Klassert, Quang Bao Le, James D. A. Millington, Henning Nolzen, Dawn C. Parker, J. Gary Polhill, Maja Schlüter, Jule Schulze, Nina Schwarz, Zhanli Sun, Patrick Taillandier, Hanna Weise

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

River Protection Project information systems assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Information Systems Assessment Report documents the results from assessing the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) Hanford Data Integrator 2000 (HANDI 2000) system, Business Management System (BMS) and Work Management System phases (WMS), with respect to the System Engineering Capability Assessment Model (CAM). The assessment was performed in accordance with the expectations stated in the fiscal year (FY) 1999 Performance Agreement 7.1.1, item (2) which reads, ''Provide an assessment report on the selected Integrated Information System by July 31, 1999.'' This report assesses the BMS and WMS as implemented and planned for the River Protection Project (RPP). The systems implementation is being performed under the PHMC HANDI 2000 information system project. The project began in FY 1998 with the BMS, proceeded in FY 1999 with the Master Equipment List portion of the WMS, and will continue the WMS implementation as funding provides. This report constitutes an interim quality assessment providing information necessary for planning RPP's information systems activities. To avoid confusion, HANDI 2000 will be used when referring to the entire system, encompassing both the BMS and WMS. A graphical depiction of the system is shown in Figure 2-1 of this report.

JOHNSON, A.L.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office JANUARY 2013 DOE/EA-1923 iv January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office January 2013 DOE/EA-1923 v January 2013 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment for the Green Energy School Wind Project (DOE/EA-1923) CONTACT: For additional copies or more information on this final Environmental Assessment (EA),

408

IAAP Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 Burlington Atomic Energy Commission Plant- Former Worker Program A US DOE funded project conducted by: Dr. Laurence Fuortes, Principal Investigator The University of Iowa College of Public Health Department of Occupational and Environmental Health 5 2940 Steindler Building Iowa City, IA 52242 TEL: 319 335 9819 FAX: 319 335 9200 BACEP-FWP Needs Assessment 1. INTRODUCTION In August of 2000, the University of Iowa College of Public Health initiated a needs assessment study to evaluate whether or not individuals formerly employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) near Burlington, Iowa, would benefit from a Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. These workers were employed at IAAP in the atomic weapons industry on what was known at the facility as Line 1 or Division B at the

409

Risk Assess - updated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

410

Preliminary Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Revision Sheet for the Environmental Assessment Finding of No Significant Impact Mitigation Action Plan DOE/EA-1731 Bonneville Power Administration May 2011 Walla Walla-Tucannon Transmission Line Rebuild Project 1 Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Revision Sheet for the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1731 Summary This revision sheet documents the changes to be incorporated into the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA). With the addition of these changes, the Preliminary EA will not be reprinted and will serve as the Final

411

Training Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document contains four self-assessment forms that are aligned with the Home Energy Professional Certifications. These forms will help individuals gauge competency and identify training needs before an exam is taken.

412

Technology Readiness Assessment Guide  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-4.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL PERFORMANCE IN DEMO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for sufficient time. Reliable estimates of component lifetimes are an important part of power plant design The basic DEMO design used in the present study is a 1.8 GW device (2.2 GW total thermal power ­ including simulation models and capabilities to assess material performance under the neutron irradiation conditions

414

IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE OLD QUESNEL LANDFILL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE OLD QUESNEL LANDFILL FINAL REPORT DOE FRAP 1995-05 Prepared for List of Figures Site Location/Legal Boundary Old Quesnel Landfill .....................................2 Schematic of Source Pathway Receptor Model at Old Quesnel Landfill .......4 Landfill Extent

415

Pumping System Assessment Tool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pumping System Assessment Tool (PSAT) is a free online software tool to help industrial users assess the efficiency of pumping system operations. PSAT uses achievable pump performance data from Hydraulic Institute standards and motor performance data from the MotorMaster+ database to calculate potential energy and associated cost savings. The tool also enables users to save and retrieve log files, default values, and system curves for sharing analyses with other users.

416

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

417

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

418

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report summarizes the offshore wind resource potential for the contiguous United States and Hawaii as of May 2009. The development of this assessment has evolved over multiple stages as new regional meso-scale assessments became available, new validation data was obtained, and better modeling capabilities were implemented. It is expected that further updates to the current assessment will be made in future reports.

419

Ethiopia-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia-DLR Resource Assessments Ethiopia-DLR Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-DLR Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Dataset, Maps Website http://www.dlr.de/tt/desktopde Program Start 2001 Program End 2004 Country Ethiopia Eastern Africa References DLR-SWERA Resource Assessments[1] From 2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ethiopia on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme. References ↑ "DLR-SWERA Resource Assessments" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ethiopia-DLR_Resource_Assessments&oldid=328651"

420

Algeria-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DLR Resource Assessments DLR Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Name Algeria-DLR Resource Assessments Agency/Company /Organization German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind Topics Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Dataset, Maps Website http://www.dlr.de/en/ Program Start 2007 Program End 2008 Country Algeria Northern Africa References DLR Website [1] From 2007-2008 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) developed a collection of solar and wind resource assessments for Algeria. The key products included maps of existing ressource assessments, pre feasibility studies for CSP and wind projects. References ↑ "DLR Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Algeria-DLR_Resource_Assessments&oldid=328383"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments Agency/Company /Organization German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind Topics Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Dataset, Maps Website http://www.dlr.de/en/ Program Start 2007 Program End 2008 Country Jordan Western Asia References DLR Website [1] From 2007-2008 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) developed a collection of solar and wind resource assessments for Tunisia. The key products included maps of existing resource assessments, pre feasibility studies for CSP and wind projects. References ↑ "DLR Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Jordan-DLR_Resource_Assessments&oldid=328867"

422

Pumping System Assessment Tool Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This power point presentation provides an overview of AMO's pumping system assessment tool (PSAT) that is used during energy savings assessments at large industrial facilities.

423

Socio-economic and climate change impacts on agriculture: an integrated assessment, 1990–2080  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...agriculture: an integrated assessment, 1990-2080 Gunther Fischer...NY, USA A comprehensive assessment of the impacts of climate...Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO...al. 1997). The Canadian Center for Climate Modelling and...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Details about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in...

425

National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification presentation...

426

Resource handbook on transportation risk assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This resource handbook contains useful information to streamline radioactive material transportation risk assessments for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents prepared for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs. Streamlining refers to instituting steps that can increase the efficiency of future assessments, reduce costs, and promote increased quality and consistency across the DOE complex. This handbook takes advantage of the wealth of information developed through decades of DOE's NEPA experience. It contains a review of historical assessments; a description of comprehensive and generally acceptable transportation risk assessment methodology (i.e., models); and a compilation of supporting data, parameters, and generally accepted assumptions. This handbook also includes a discussion paper that addresses cumulative impacts (Appendix A). The discussion paper illustrates the evolving and sometimes unresolved issues encountered in transportation risk assessment. Other topics, such as sabotage, environmental justice, and human factors, may be addressed in the future. This resource document was developed as the first primary reference book providing useful information for conducting transportation risk assessments for radioactive material in the NEPA context.

Chen, S. Y.; Biwer, B. M.; Monette, F. A.; Environmental Assessment; SNL; BAPL; USOE; Battelle Memorial Inst.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cognitive-Developmental Assessments 1 Designing Cognitive-Developmental Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive-Developmental Assessments 1 Designing Cognitive-Developmental Assessments: A Case Study or quote without permission of the authors. #12;Cognitive-Developmental Assessments 2 Designing Cognitive in designing this assessment system is establishing a cognitive-developmental map in which age

Junker, Brian

428

Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment David M. Rouse , Romuald information to humans, and this paper investigates the utility assessment task, where human observers evaluate the usefulness of a natural image as a surrogate for a reference. Current QA algorithms implicitly assess utility

Hemami, Sheila S.

429

Biosystems Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biosystems Modeling Biosystems Modeling Phantoms We are a leader nationally and internationally in the development of models and methods for predicting the behavior of radionuclides and chemicals in the body, assessing the health effects of environmental hazards, and determining the exposure-dose relationships for environmental pollutants. Our work has been a key resource to the medical community in providing the basis for dose estimates in nuclear medicine. Our tools and skills are also applicable to the areas of occupational health and safety, public health and safety, radiation protection, environmental dosimetry, and battlefield effects. Our technology base includes mathematical modeling, bone dosimetry, phantom development, and neutron dosimetry. Please direct any questions concerning the Biosystems Modeling Group to:

430

A stochastic approach to risk assessment of hazardous waste sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A deterministic risk assessment model was evaluated for the variability in its input parameters, Information on these variables was gathered to characterize the variability. Statistical distributions were assigned to the variables based...

Arangath, Vishwanathan Vasu

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Assessment of U.S. cap-and-trade proposals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis model is applied to an assessment of a set of cap-and-trade proposals being considered by the U.S. Congress in spring 2007. The bills specify emissions reductions to be ...

Paltsev, Sergey V.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessment of U.S. Cap-and-Trade Proposals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis model is applied to an assessment of a set of cap-and-trade proposals being considered by the U.S. Congress in spring 2007. The bills specify emissions reductions to be ...

Paltsev, Sergey

433

Multi-hazard Reliability Assessment of Offshore Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A probabilistic framework is developed to assess the structural reliability of offshore wind turbines. Probabilistic models are developed to predict the deformation, shear force and bending moment demands on the support structure of wind turbines...

Mardfekri Rastehkenari, Maryam 1981-

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Students using posters as a means of communication and assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Poster sessions are widely used as a medium ... to their peers. The authors have introduced poster sessions into undergraduate mathematical modelling courses. This ... to devise a scheme for the assessment of posters

John Berry; Ken Houston

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

GAINS – An Interactive Tool for Assessing International GHG Mitigation Regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mitigating greenhouse gases (GHGs) is key to reducing the long-term impacts of climate change. In this paper we present the GAINS system, i.e. a data warehouse with an online integrated assessment model that is a...

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Fabian Wagner…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

An efficient Bayesian approach to history matching and uncertainty assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conditioning reservoir models to production data and assessment of uncertainty can be done by Bayesian theorem. This inverse problem can be computationally intensive, generally requiring orders of magnitude more computation time compared...

Yuan, Chengwu

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

438

Integrated assessment of quality of supply in future electricity networks   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although power system reliability analysis is a mature research area, there is a renewed interest in updating available network models and formulating improved reliability assessment procedures. The main driver of this ...

Hernando Gil, Ignacio

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Anelia Milbrandt and Caroline Uriarte Produced under direction of the United States Agency for International Development by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement AEG-P-00-00003-00; Work for Others Agreement number 3010543; Task Numbers WFE2.1012, WFE2.1013, and WFE2.1014. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-56456 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Anelia Milbrandt and Caroline Uriarte

440

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECEMBER 2012 DECEMBER 2012 Pathway for readying the next generation of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT -OVERVIEW 2 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT-OVERVIEW 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT-OVERVIEW 3 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal li- ability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment model gcam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextineword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site August 1, 2009 U.S. Department of Energy; Office of Science; Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) System location - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Name of Information iPASS System for DOE Office of Science laboratory fellowship programs, including

442

Draft Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for the GILA-NORTH GILA TRANSMISSION LINE REBUILD AND UPGRADE PROJECT (DOE/EA-1948) December 2013 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Prepared by Cooperating Agencies U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Yuma Area Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District DRAFT Gila to North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project Environmental Assessment Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Yuma Area Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Prepared by: December 2013 Gila to North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project

443

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO RECORD HILL WIND LLC FOR CONSTRUCTION OF A WIND ENERGY PROJECT IN ROXBURY, MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 July 2011 DOE/EA-1824 i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to issue a loan guarantee to Record Hill Wind LLC (Record Hill) for the construction of a 50.6 megawatt (MW) wind energy project located in Roxbury, Maine. 1 DOE has prepared this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 4321, et. seq.) Council on Environmental Quality regulations for implementing NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations

444

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Information Resources - FOIAXpress Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Depamnf!l1tal Elel1l~nt&$ite july 23, 2009 Office of Information Resources Office of Management DOE Headquarters, Germantown, Germantown Computer Center Server Room Nameonl1fol'l11i1tion Sysleijlprl'f 'Project FOIAXpress ExhibitProj~tUID TBD NeWPIA ~ Update D Please indicate whether this is a new

445

How well do CMIP5 Earth System Models simulate present climate conditions in Europe and Africa?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study assesses the ability of seven Earth System Models (ESMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison...

S. Brands; S. Herrera; J. Fernández; J. M. Gutiérrez

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95 95 :&,, ' - , i . -- Final Environmental Assessment for Device Assembly - Facility Operations f 3: >fi - , - , ' , 7 - . ' ' , , . I 8 ' , :-<:- L , a . ' ' ' -L. -1 , , ~ e m - . - I ! - , - # 8 , r I I , , , - , . .-- - ' - I S - . ! - , - , Y 2 L - . . 8 : L.-- , r Nevada ' f e s t ~ h e , Nye county, Nevada U. S. Department Of Energy - , 8 - - . 8 - I,, ' - 8 - - , , 8 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for DEVICE ASSEMBLY FACIUTY OPERATIONS MAY 1995 TABLE OF CONTENTS LISTOFFIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv USTOFTABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv A. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8. PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B.1 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

447

National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCA & Development Advisory Committee NCA & Development Advisory Committee Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Production Team Print E-mail National Climate Assessment Staff (USGCRP National Coordination Office) Current NCA Staff Dr. Fabien Laurier, Director, Third National Climate Assessment Dr. Glynis Lough, Chief of Staff for the National Climate Assessment Emily Therese Cloyd, Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Bryce Golden-Chen, Program Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Alison Delgado, Scientist Dr. Ilya Fischhoffkri, Scientist Melissa Kenney, Indicators Coordinator Dr. Fred Lipschultz, Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment

448

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project ID: 143 Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Brief Description: Examines the social, environmental and economic impacts of hydrogen fuel cell and gasoline vehicles. Purpose This project aims to investigate fuel cell vehicles through environmental impact, life cycle assessment, sustainability, and thermodynamic analyses. The project will assist in the development of highly qualified personnel in such areas as system analysis, modeling, methodology development, and applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Organization: University of Ontario Institute of Technology

449

EA-0296: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

296: Final Environmental Assessment 296: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0296: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Commercial and Multifamily Highrise Residential Buildings Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted this environmental assessment to address the possible incremental environmental effects of the proposed standard on selected types of commercial buildings constructed for the federal sector. EA-0296-FEA-Summary-1986.pdf In Support of Proposed Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Commercial and Multifamily Highrise Residential Buildings More Documents & Publications EA-0296: Finding of No Significant Impact Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendices

450

Rutgers University Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for electricity, green energy, fuel use, chemical use, water use, and sustainable materials management into MTCO2eRutgers University Environmental Assessment: MOU SemiAnnual Report November 4, 2011 Environmental) pledging to become an environmental steward by implementing a number of green initiatives that would reduce

Delgado, Mauricio

451

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

452

Fan System Assessment Tool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fan System Assessment Tool (FSAT) is a free online software tool that helps industrial users quantify energy use and savings opportunities in industrial fan systems. Use FSAT to understand how well your fan systems are operating, determine the economic benefit of system modifications, and establish which options are most economically viable when multiple opportunities exist for system modification.

453

Assessments A Training Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manufacturing plant. The energy auditor now finds skills sharpened for the energy side of the business inadequate for the entire process although intuitive observations from energy auditors, which have led and Energy Assessment Original Version: December 1995; Updated Version: September 2001 #12;#12;iii Preface

454

Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the anticipated completion of the Constellation Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in June 2008Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, MODIFICATION, AND OPERATION OF THREE CENTER, FL 32899 February 2007 #12;THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK #12;FINAL DRAFT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL

Waliser, Duane E.

455

Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Readiness Assessment Report Technology Readiness Assessment Report March 2010 U U . . S S . . D D e e p p a a r r t t m m e e n n t t o o f f E E n n e e r r g g y y O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) / Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide March 2008 U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management March 2008 TRA/TMP Process Guide Page 2 of 48 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 4 1.1 Document Purpose............................................................................................................................ 4 2.0 OVERVIEW OF TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENTS AND TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLANS

456

Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Name Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment Website http://www.nrel.gov/internatio Country Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, Vietnam Australia and New Zealand, South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South America, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, , South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South-Eastern Asia