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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

2

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

3

Integrated assessment briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Integrated Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Assessment Integrated Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integrated Assessment: Mainstreaming sustainability into policymaking--A guidance manual Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Background analysis Website: www.unep.ch/etb/publications/AI%20guidance%202009/UNEP%20IA%20final.pd Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/times-integrated-assessment-model-0,h Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: Integrated Assessment[1] The Times Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM) comprises several thousand technologies in all sectors of the energy system. It is characterized by several technical and economic parameters and by emission coefficients for

5

Integrated Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for evaluating the condition of steam generator (SG) tubes based on nondestructive examination (NDE) or in situ pressure testing. This integrity assessment is normally performed during a reactor refueling outage. Nuclear power plant licensees who follow this document's guidelines will have satisfied their requirements for condition monitoring and operational assessment as defined in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) initiative, Steam Generator Program Guidelines, NEI 97-06.

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

Integrated use of remote sensing and geographic information systems in riparian vegetation delineation and mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a pilot study on riparian vegetation delineation and mapping using remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) in the Hunter Region, Australia. The aim of the study was to develop appropriate and repeatable assessment ...

X. Yang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: Exposure Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an Official ISEA Glossary,” Journal of Exposure AnalysisGeneva. IPCS (2001) Glossary of Exposure Assessment-Related

McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Space, time and nesting Integrated Assessment Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment Modelling in the field of air pollution has advanced greatly since the 1985 Helsinki Protocol on the reduction of Sulphur emissions and their transboundary fluxes. With subsequent protocols and increased understanding of the inter-relationships ... Keywords: CLRTAP, Integrated Assessment Modelling, Scale, Science-policy interaction, Space, Time

T. Oxley; H. M. ApSimon

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Integrated regional assessment: qualitative and quantitative issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Qualitative and quantitative issues are particularly significant in integrated regional assessment. This chapter examines the terms “qualitative” and “quantitative” separately and in relation to one another, along with a discussion of the degree of interdependence or overlap between the two. Strategies for integrating the two general approaches often produce uneasy compromises. However, integrated regional assessment provides opportunities for strong collaborations in addressing specific problems in specific places.

Malone, Elizabeth L.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Global and Seasonal Assessment of Interactions between Climate and Vegetation Biophysical Processes: A GCM Study with Different Land–Vegetation Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global and seasonal assessment of regions of the earth with strong climate–vegetation biophysical process (VBP) interactions is provided. The presence of VBP and degree of VBP effects on climate were assessed based on the skill of simulations ...

Yongkang Xue; Fernando De Sales; Ratko Vasic; C. Roberto Mechoso; Akio Arakawa; Stephen Prince

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Herbicide Use Safety for Vegetation Management on Powerline Corridors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents original research on herbicide use safety in association with vegetation management on electric transmission line rights of way.BackgroundThe Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted integrated vegetation management assessments for five electric utilities between 2006 and 2009, using EPRI-developed procedures and standards of integrated vegetation management performance. Observations during the assessments indicated that utility ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

Transforming Knowledge of Shrub Ecology and Management to Promote Integrated Vegetation Management on Power Line Corridors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key to integrated vegetation management (IVM) is culturing desirable plant communities that minimize undesirable plants, typically trees. Shrubs are most commonly considered desirable plants. Over time, knowledge of shrubs and other aspects of management have been woven into the IVM approach. In summer 2002, EPRI formally began developing training materials as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program. The program has a societal goal of reducin...

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials  

SciTech Connect

The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

NREL: Wind Research - Utility Grid Integration Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Grid Integration Assessment Utility Grid Integration Assessment Photo of large power transmission towers set against a sunset. The national need for transmission improvements will have a direct impact on the effective use of renewable energy sources such as wind. For wind energy to play a larger role in supplying the nation's energy needs, integrating wind energy into the power grid of the United States is an important challenge to address. NREL's transmission grid integration staff collaborates with utility industry partners and provides data, analysis, and techniques to increase utility understanding of integration issues and confidence in the reliability of new wind turbines. For more information, contact Brian Parsons at 303-384-6958. Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities

16

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Integrated Safety Management Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element&·Slte 16/Jun/09 Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Research Office Building (EROB) Name of-Information System or IT Project Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration Exhibit Project UID 207765 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - ISMS Workshop Finallxw.doc N T "tl I

19

Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Uncertainty in Integrated Assessment Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

The determination of climate policy is a decision under uncertainty. The uncertainty in future climate change impacts is large, as is the uncertainty in the costs of potential policies. Rational and economically efficient policy choices will therefore seek to balance the expected marginal costs with the expected marginal benefits. This approach requires that the risks of future climate change be assessed. The decision process need not be formal or quantitative for descriptions of the risks to be useful. Whatever the decision procedure, a useful starting point is to have as accurate a description of climate risks as possible. Given the goal of describing uncertainty in future climate change, we need to characterize the uncertainty in the main causes of uncertainty in climate impacts. One of the major drivers of uncertainty in future climate change is the uncertainty in future emissions, both of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important species such as sulfur dioxide. In turn, the drivers of uncertainty in emissions are uncertainties in the determinants of the rate of economic growth and in the technologies of production and how those technologies will change over time. This project uses historical experience and observations from a large number of countries to construct statistical descriptions of variability and correlation in labor productivity growth and in AEEI. The observed variability then provides a basis for constructing probability distributions for these drivers. The variance of uncertainty in growth rates can be further modified by expert judgment if it is believed that future variability will differ from the past. But often, expert judgment is more readily applied to projected median or expected paths through time. Analysis of past variance and covariance provides initial assumptions about future uncertainty for quantities that are less intuitive and difficult for experts to estimate, and these variances can be normalized and then applied to mean trends from a model for uncertainty projections. The probability distributions of these critical model drivers, and the resulting uncertainty in projections from a range of models, can provide the basis of future emission scenario set designs.

Mort Webster

2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1162  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COLUMBIA COLUMBIA RIVER MANAGEMENT PR GORGE OJECT VEGETAT ON Final Environmental Assessment DO E/EA-l 162 BONNEVILLE row,. ..", ",,,,.,,0. W x ? -- -- ------ .- .-- b I . , (, I I I ( t ,1 ,0 , . ,' I , ,- , !" 1 , I I ,; ,, 1 1 I .1 . . COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (Hanford-Ostrander and North BonnevilI&Midway Transmission Line Rights-of-Way) Table of Contents Page . 2 3 pqose and Need Background hbfic evolvement Swq ' ' Decbions to Be Made PROPOSED A~ON AND ~~RNA~S Mtemative k No Action " Manual, Mechnical, and Biological Metbh - Ntemative W. Proposed Action- htegrated Vegetation Management ~) tih Herbicides Herbici& Meth& -. PhedActions Comparison of Mtematives ~ . . . . . . ti~D E~OW~ ~ E_O_~m .. CONSEQ~N~S Affmd Environment . Environment Consquen~ hti Use Soils Vegetation Water Resources WildlfeResources Air Quali@lGlobal Warning

22

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosytstems  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Integrated Assessment Systems for Chemical Warfare Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army must respond to a variety of situations involving suspect discovered, recovered, stored, and buried chemical warfare materiel (CWM). In some cases, the identity of the fill materiel and the status of the fusing and firing train cannot be visually determined due to aging of the container, or because the item is contained in an over-pack. In these cases, non-intrusive assessments are required to provide information to allow safe handling, storage, and disposal of the materiel. This paper will provide an overview of the integrated mobile and facility-based CWM assessment system prototypes that have been, and are being developed, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the US Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Project. In addition, this paper will discuss advanced sensors being developed to enhance the capability of the existing and future assessment systems. The Phase I Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS) is currently being used by the Army's Technical Escort Unit (TEU) at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. This system includes equipment for non-intrusively identifying the munitions fill materiel and for assessing the condition and stability of the fuzes, firing trains, and other potential safety hazards. The system provides a self-contained, integrated command post including an on-board computer system, communications equipment, video and photographic equipment, weather monitoring equipment, and miscellaneous safety-related equipment. The Phase II MMAS is currently being tested and qualified for use by the INEEL and the US Army. The Phase II system contains several new assessment systems that significantly enhance the ability to assess CWM. A facility-based munitions assessment system prototype is being developed for the assessment of CWM stored in igloos at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas. This system is currently in the design and fabrication stages. Numerous CWM advanced sensors are being developed and tested, and pending successful test results, may be incorporated in the various munitions assessment systems in the future. These systems are intended to enhance CWM fill materiel identification, agent air monitoring, agent or agent degradation product detection by surface analysis, and real-time x-ray capabilities.

A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; G. L. Thinnes; K. D. Watts; R. J. McMorland

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Assessing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Renewable Energy Options to someone by E-mail Assessing Renewable Energy Options to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Assessing Renewable Energy Options on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Assessing Renewable Energy Options on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Assessing Renewable Energy Options on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Assessing Renewable Energy Options on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Assessing Renewable Energy Options on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Assessing Renewable Energy Options on AddThis.com...

25

Defining assessment projects and scenarios for policy support: Use of ontology in Integrated Assessment and Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment and Modelling (IAM) provides an interdisciplinary approach to support ex-ante decision-making by combining quantitative models representing different systems and scales into a framework for integrated assessment. Scenarios in IAM ... Keywords: Collaborative approach, Integration, Knowledge management, Multi-disciplinary teams, Policy assessment

S. Janssen; F. Ewert; Hongtao Li; I. N. Athanasiadis; J. J. F. Wien; O. Thérond; M. J. R. Knapen; I. Bezlepkina; J. Alkan-Olsson; A. E. Rizzoli; H. Belhouchette; M. Svensson; M. K. van Ittersum

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Assessment of Integrated Health Management Frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging NPPs presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging NPPs. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of an NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of an NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

Lybeck, Nancy; Coble, Jamie B.; Tawfik, Magdy; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

27

EA-1728: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1728: Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment for Integrated Vegetation Management of the Hanford Site, Richland, WA This EA evaluates the...

28

Bringing Water into an Integrated Assessment Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a modeling capability to understand how water is allocated within a river basin and examined present and future water allocations among agriculture, energy production, other human requirements, and ecological needs. Water is an essential natural resource needed for food and fiber production, household and industrial uses, energy production, transportation, tourism and recreation, and the functioning of natural ecosystems. Anthropogenic climate change and population growth are anticipated to impose unprecedented pressure on water resources during this century. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers have pioneered the development of integrated assessment (IA) models for the analysis of energy and economic systems under conditions of climate change. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort led to the development of a modeling capability to evaluate current and future water allocations between human requirements and ecosystem services. The Water Prototype Model (WPM) was built in STELLA®, a computer modeling package with a powerful interface that enables users to construct dynamic models to simulate and integrate many processes (biological, hydrological, economics, sociological). A 150,404-km2 basin in the United States (U.S.) Pacific Northwest region served as the platform for the development of the WPM. About 60% of the study basin is in the state of Washington with the rest in Oregon. The Columbia River runs through the basin for 874 km, starting at the international border with Canada and ending (for the purpose of the simulation) at The Dalles dam. Water enters the basin through precipitation and from streamflows originating from the Columbia River at the international border with Canada, the Spokane River, and the Snake River. Water leaves the basin through evapotranspiration, consumptive uses (irrigation, livestock, domestic, commercial, mining, industrial, and off-stream power generation), and streamflow through The Dalles dam. Water also enters the Columbia River via runoff from land. The model runs on a monthly timescale to account for the impact of seasonal variations of climate, streamflows, and water uses. Data for the model prototype were obtained from national databases and ecosystem model results. The WPM can be run from three sources: 1) directly from STELLA, 2) with the isee Player®, or 3) the web version of WPM constructed with NetSim® software. When running any of these three versions, the user is presented a screen with a series of buttons, graphs, and a table. Two of the buttons provide the user with background and instructions on how to run the model. Currently, there are five types of scenarios that can be manipulated alone or in combination using the Sliding Input Devices: 1) interannual variability (e.g., El Niño), 2) climate change, 3) salmon policy, 4) future population, and 5) biodiesel production. Overall, the WPM captured the effects of streamflow conditions on hydropower production. Under La Niña conditions, more hydropower is available during all months of the year, with a substantially higher availability during spring and summer. Under El Niño conditions, hydropower would be reduced, with a total decline of 15% from normal weather conditions over the year. A policy of flow augmentation to facilitate the spring migration of smolts to the ocean would also reduce hydropower supply. Modeled hydropower generation was 23% greater than the 81 TWh reported in the 1995 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) database. The modeling capability presented here contains the essential features to conduct basin-scale analyses of water allocation under current and future climates. Due to its underlying data structure iv and conceptual foundation, the WPM should be appropriate to conduct IA modeling at national and global scales.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Sands, Ronald; Pitcher, Hugh M.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Development and illustrative outputs of the Community Integrated Assessment System (CIAS), a multi-institutional modular integrated assessment approach for modelling climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and first results of the ''Community Integrated Assessment System'' (CIAS), a unique multi-institutional modular and flexible integrated assessment system for modelling climate change. Key to this development is the ... Keywords: Bespoke Framework Generator, Carbon tax, Climate change, Community Integrated Assessment System, Coupled modelling, Integrated assessment model, SoftIAM, Software engineering

R. Warren; S. de la Nava Santos; N. W. Arnell; M. Bane; T. Barker; C. Barton; R. Ford; H. -M. Füssel; Robin K. S. Hankin; Rupert Klein; C. Linstead; J. Kohler; T. D. Mitchell; T. J. Osborn; H. Pan; S. C. B. Raper; G. Riley; H. J. Schellnhüber; S. Winne; D. Anderson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

31

Assessing the impacts of carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impacts of low carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits. The study further explores the combined… (more)

Paudel, Laxmi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

241-AN Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AN double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations. are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Photovoltaic Systems Assessment: An Integrated Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information from recent photovoltaic (PV) research and technology assessments was synthesized into a review of key planning, hardware, institutional, and operational issues. Researchers reviewed PV cell and module technologies, results from ongoing field tests of intermediate-size systems, and balance-of-system (non-PV components) costs for residential, intermediate, and central station applications. Cost-performance targets for PV systems in various locations were developed.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for evaluating the condition of steam generator (SG) tubes based on nondestructive examination (NDE) or in situ pressure testing. The integrity assessments are normally performed during a reactor refueling outage. Nuclear power plant licensees who follow the guidance in this report will have satisfied the requirements for degradation assessments, condition monitoring, and operational assessment as defined in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Steam Generator Program Guidelin...

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

37

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ecological and Wildlife Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of vegetation on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs) is an essential part of managing electrical transmission and distribution systems. A variety of manual, mechanical, and chemical methods, singly or in combination, are used for this purpose. The method or methods selected must be safe for humans and the environment and cost-effective in accomplishing the goals of ROW management. This report reviews environmental and wildlife safety through an assessment of risk to the environment, incl...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

40

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Modeling and Integrated Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling and Integrated Modeling and Integrated Assessment Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Economic Assessments * Engineering analysis of CO 2 separation and capture * Economic modeling/ integrated assessment of carbon capture and sequestration * Comparison on equal basis of the major sequestration options Economic Modeling Motivation * When might carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) become competitive? * What is its potential scale? * Which technologies look most promising? . . . . And when? * How to see the potential in a general market context? Detailed Reference *Sean Biggs Thesis: S Biggs, S. D., "Sequestering Carbon from Power Plants: The Jury is Still Out," M.I.T. Masters Thesis, (2000). S http://sequestration.mit.edu/pdf/SeanBiggs.pdf What Determines Competitiveness?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

General support for integrated assessment research. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate change problem spans an extraordinarily large number of disciplines from earth sciences to social and political sciences. The interaction of processes described by these different fields is why climate change is such a complex issue. Keeping track of these interactions and bringing coherence to the assumptions underlying each disciplinary insight on the climate problem is a massive undertaking. Integrated assessment is an interdisciplinary approach designed to provide systematic evaluations of technically complex problems such as the analysis of environmental change challenges facing humanity. Ph.D. theses stemming from this application are summarized. Then some aspects of Integrated Climate Assessment Models are described.

Dowlatabadi, Hadi

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Risk Impact Assessment of Extended Integrated Leak Rate Testing Intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a risk impact assessment for extending integrated leak rate test (ILRT) surveillance intervals to 15 years. The assessment demonstrates that on an industry-wide basis there is small risk associated with the extension, provided that the performance bases and defense-in-depth are maintained. There is an obvious benefit in not performing costly, critical-path, time-consuming tests that provide a limited benefit from a risk perspective.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improving Rangeland Monitoring and Assessment: Integrating Remote Sensing, GIS, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems  

SciTech Connect

Creeping environmental changes are impacting some of the largest remaining intact parcels of sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the western United States, creating major problems for land managers. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), located in southeastern Idaho, is part of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, one of the largest ecosystems on the continent. Scientists at the INL and the University of Idaho have integrated existing field and remotely sensed data with geographic information systems technology to analyze how recent fires on the INL have influenced the current distribution of terrestrial vegetation. Three vegetation mapping and classification systems were used to evaluate the changes in vegetation caused by fires between 1994 and 2003. Approximately 24% of the sagebrush steppe community on the INL was altered by fire, mostly over a 5-year period. There were notable differences between methods, especially for juniper woodland and grasslands. The Anderson system (Anderson et al. 1996) was superior for representing the landscape because it includes playa/bare ground/disturbed area and sagebrush steppe on lava as vegetation categories. This study found that assessing existing data sets is useful for quantifying fire impacts and should be helpful in future fire and land use planning. The evaluation identified that data from remote sensing technologies is not currently of sufficient quality to assess the percentage of cover. To fill this need, an approach was designed using both helicopter and fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and image processing software to evaluate six cover types on field plots located on the INL. The helicopter UAV provided the best system compared against field sampling, but is more dangerous and has spatial coverage limitations. It was reasonably accurate for dead shrubs and was very good in assessing percentage of bare ground, litter and grasses; accuracy for litter and shrubs is questionable. The fixed wing system proved to be feasible and can collect imagery for very large areas in a short period of time. It was accurate for bare ground and grasses. Both UAV systems have limitations, but these will be reduced as the technology advances. In both cases, the UAV systems collected data at a much faster rate than possible on the ground. The study concluded that improvements in automating the image processing efforts would greatly improve use of the technology. In the near future, UAV technology may revolutionize rangeland monitoring in the same way Global Positioning Systems have affected navigation while conducting field activities.

Robert Paul Breckenridge

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

PROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to improve their work. Well-qualified internal and external reviewers evaluate the program's learningPROGRAM REVIEW Rubric for Assessing the Integration of Student Learning Assessment into Program Reviews Criterion Initial Emerging Developed Highly Developed Required Elements of the Self-Study Program

47

Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

NONE

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

An Integrated Assessment of Measured and Modeled Integrated Water Vapor in Switzerland for the Period 2001–03  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper an integrated assessment of the vertically integrated water vapor (IWV) measured by radiosonde, microwave radiometer (MWR), and GPS and modeled by the limited-area mesoscale model of MeteoSwiss is presented. The different IWV ...

G. Guerova; E. Brockmann; F. Schubiger; J. Morland; C. Mätzler

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Integrated Safeguards and Security Management Self-Assessment 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2002 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory deployed the first Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) Self-Assessment process, designed to measure the effect of the Laboratory's ISSM efforts. This process was recognized by DOE as a best practice and model program for self-assessment and training. In 2004, the second Self-Assessment was launched. The cornerstone of this process was an employee survey that was designed to meet several objectives: (1) Ensure that Laboratory assets are protected. (2) Provide a measurement of the Laboratory's current security status that can be compared against the 2002 Self-Assessment baseline. (3) Educate all Laboratory staff about security responsibilities, tools, and practices. (4) Provide security staff with feedback on the effectiveness of security programs. (5) Provide line management with the information they need to make informed decisions about security. This 2004 Self Assessment process began in July 2004 with every employee receiving an information packet and instructions for completing the ISSM survey. The Laboratory-wide survey contained questions designed to measure awareness and conformance to policy and best practices. The survey response was excellent--90% of Berkeley Lab employees completed the questionnaire. ISSM liaisons from each division followed up on the initial survey results with individual employees to improve awareness and resolve ambiguities uncovered by the questionnaire. As with the 2002 survey, the Self-Assessment produced immediate positive results for the ISSM program and revealed opportunities for longer-term corrective actions. Results of the questionnaire provided information for organizational profiles and an institutional summary. The overall level of security protection and awareness was very high--often above 90%. Post-survey work by the ISSM liaisons and line management consistently led to improved awareness and metrics, as shown by a comparison of profiles at the end of phase one (August 6, 2004) and phase two (November 1, 2004). The Self-Assessment confirmed that classified information is not held or processed at Berkeley Lab. The survey results also identified areas where increased employee knowledge and awareness of Laboratory policy would be beneficial, the two most prominent being password usage and wireless network service. Line management will be able to determine additional corrective actions based on the results of the Self-Assessment. Future assessments will raise the ratings bar for some existing program elements and add new elements to stimulate further improvements in Laboratory security.

Lunford, Dan; Ramsey, Dwayne

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Integrated science model for assessment of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment models are intended to represent processes that govern physical, ecological, economic and social systems. This report describes a scientific model relating emissions to global temperature and sea level. This model is intended to be one component of an integrated assessment model which is, of course, much more comprehensive. The model is able to reproduce past changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, global temperature, and sea level. The model is used to estimate the emissions rates required to lead to stabilization of CO{sub 2} at various levels. The model is also used to estimate global temperature rise, the rate of temperature change, and sea level rise driven by IPCC emissions scenarios. The emission of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} is modeled to have the largest long term effect on climate. Results do show the importance of expected changes of trace greenhouse gases other than CO{sub 2} in the near future. Because of the importance of these other trace gases, further work is recommended to more accurately estimate their effects.

Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kheshgi, H.S. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Metrics for Assessment of Smart Grid Data Integrity Attacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is an emerging consensus that the nation’s electricity grid is vulnerable to cyber attacks. This vulnerability arises from the increasing reliance on using remote measurements, transmitting them over legacy data networks to system operators who make critical decisions based on available data. Data integrity attacks are a class of cyber attacks that involve a compromise of information that is processed by the grid operator. This information can include meter readings of injected power at remote generators, power flows on transmission lines, and relay states. These data integrity attacks have consequences only when the system operator responds to compromised data by redispatching generation under normal or contingency protocols. These consequences include (a) financial losses from sub-optimal economic dispatch to service loads, (b) robustness/resiliency losses from placing the grid at operating points that are at greater risk from contingencies, and (c) systemic losses resulting from cascading failures induced by poor operational choices. This paper is focused on understanding the connections between grid operational procedures and cyber attacks. We first offer two examples to illustrate how data integrity attacks can cause economic and physical damage by misleading operators into taking inappropriate decisions. We then focus on unobservable data integrity attacks involving power meter data. These are coordinated attacks where the compromised data are consistent with the physics of power flow, and are therefore passed by any bad data detection algorithm. We develop metrics to assess the economic impact of these attacks under re-dispatch decisions using optimal power flow methods. These metrics can be use to prioritize the adoption of appropriate countermeasures including PMU placement, encryption, hardware upgrades, and advance attack detection algorithms.

Annarita Giani; Miles McQueen; Russell Bent; Kameshwar Poolla; Mark Hinrichs

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) combine on-site power or distributed generation technologies with thermally activated technologies to provide cooling, heating, humidity control, energy storage and/or other process functions using thermal energy normally wasted in the production of electricity/power. IES produce electricity and byproduct thermal energy onsite, with the potential of converting 80 percent or more of the fuel into useable energy. IES have the potential to offer the nation the benefits of unprecedented energy efficiency gains, consumer choice and energy security. It may also dramatically reduce industrial and commercial building sector carbon and air pollutant emissions and increase source energy efficiency. Applications of distributed energy and Combined heat and power (CHP) in ''Commercial and Institutional Buildings'' have, however, been historically limited due to insufficient use of byproduct thermal energy, particularly during summer months when heating is at a minimum. In recent years, custom engineered systems have evolved incorporating potentially high-value services from Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) like cooling and humidity control. Such TAT equipment can be integrated into a CHP system to utilize the byproduct heat output effectively to provide absorption cooling or desiccant humidity control for the building during these summer months. IES can therefore expand the potential thermal energy services and thereby extend the conventional CHP market into building sector applications that could not be economically served by CHP alone. Now more than ever, these combined cooling, heating and humidity control systems (IES) can potentially decrease carbon and air pollutant emissions, while improving source energy efficiency in the buildings sector. Even with these improvements over conventional CHP systems, IES face significant technological and economic hurdles. Of crucial importance to the success of IES is the ability to treat the heating, ventilation, air conditioning, water heating, lighting, and power systems loads as parts of an integrated system, serving the majority of these loads either directly or indirectly from the CHP output. The CHP Technology Roadmaps (Buildings and Industry) have focused research and development on a comprehensive integration approach: component integration, equipment integration, packaged and modular system development, system integration with the grid, and system integration with building and process loads. This marked change in technology research and development has led to the creation of a new acronym to better reflect the nature of development in this important area of energy efficiency: Integrated Energy Systems (IES). Throughout this report, the terms ''CHP'' and ''IES'' will sometimes be used interchangeably, with CHP generally reserved for the electricity and heat generating technology subsystem portion of an IES. The focus of this study is to examine the potential for IES in buildings when the system perspective is taken, and the IES is employed as a dynamic system, not just as conventional CHP. This effort is designed to determine market potential by analyzing IES performance on an hour-by-hour basis, examining the full range of building types, their loads and timing, and assessing how these loads can be technically and economically met by IES.

LeMar, P.

2002-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Post Storm Damage Assessment and Vegetation Monitoring Using Remote Sensing Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an EPRI study of remote sensing technology as a tool for environmental monitoring and assessment along power line corridors and at utility systems and to view facilities damaged during storms. The report provides a technology overview, details application-oriented field studies at two sites, and offers conclusions and recommendations concerning existing and emerging technologies.

1998-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Exploring the relationships between vegetation measurements and temperature in residential areas by integrating LIDAR and remotely sensed imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population growth and urban sprawl have contributed to the formation of significant urban heat island phenomena in Houston, Texas, the fourth largest city in the United States. The population growth in Houston was 25.8% between 1990 and 2000 nearly double the national average. The demand for information concerning the effects of urban and suburban development is growing. Houston is currently the only major US city lacking any kind of comprehensive city zoning ordinances. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been used as a surrogate variable to estimate land surface temperatures at higher spatial resolutions, given the fact that a high-resolution remotely sensed NDVI can be created almost effortlessly and remotely sensed thermal data at higher resolutions is much more difficult to obtain. This has allowed researchers to study urban heat island dynamics at a micro-scale. However, this study suggests that a vegetation index alone might not be the best surrogate variable for providing information regarding the independent effects and level of contribution that tree canopy, grass, and low-lying plants have on surface temperatures in residential neighborhoods. This research combines LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) feature height data and high-resolution infrared aerial photos to measure the characteristics of the micro-structure of residential areas (residentialstructure), derives various descriptive vegetation measurement statistics, and correlates the spatial distribution of surface temperature to the type and amount of vegetation cover in residential areas. Regression analysis is used to quantify the independent influence that different residential-structures have on surface temperature. In regard to implementing changes at a neighborhood level, the descriptive statistics derived for residential-structure at a micro-scale may provide useful information to decision-makers and may reveal a guide for future developers concerned with mitigating the negative effects of urban heat island phenomena.

Clemonds, Matthew A

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Externalities and electric power: an integrated assessment approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an integrated assessment approach for considering the options that electric utilities have to meet the anticipated demand for their power. The objective that this paper considers is one of meeting the demand for power, with an acceptable degree of reliability, at minimum cost. The total cost is the sum of the private cost of producing the electric power plus the external costs that result from its production. These external costs, or externalities, are effects on the well-being of third parties that producers and consumers of electric power do not take into account in their decisions. The external costs include many different types of effects such as illness, ecosystem damage, and road damage. The solution to the problem of minimizing total cost is addressed in two steps. The first step uses damage function methods to establish a common metric for the weights of the different objectives (i.e., external costs). The damage function analysis also reduces the dimensionality of the analysis in the second step, and identifies criteria to include in that analysis. The second step uses multi-criteria decision methods. This analysis includes the most important externalities that the damage function analysis identifies and, in addition, potentially important factors that can not be quantified reliably using damage function methods. An example of the latter are the damages from global climate change. The two-step method that this paper describes addresses many of the limitations of the damage function method and multi-criteria methods, that arise when they are used separately. This linked method can be used by electric utilities for their integrated resource planning. It can also be adapted to other applications.

Lee, R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ames Laboratory integrated safety management self-assessment report  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of Integrated Safety Management (ISM) at Ames Laboratory began with the signing of the ISM Implementation Charter on February 24, 1997 (see Appendix A). The first step toward implementation of ISM at Ames Laboratory is the performance of a Self-Assessment (SA). In preparation for the SA, a workshop on ISM was provided to the Laboratory`s Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Coordinators, Safety Review Committee members, and the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH&A) staff. In addition, a briefing was given to the Laboratory`s Executive Council and Program Directors. Next, an SA Team was organized. The Team was composed of four Ames Laboratory and four Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office (DOE-CH) staff members. The purpose of this SA was to determine the current status of ES&H management within Ames Laboratory, as well as to identify areas which need to be improved during ISM implementation. The SA was conducted by reviewing documents, interviewing Ames Laboratory management and staff, and performing walkthroughs of Laboratory areas. At the conclusion of this SA, Ames Laboratory management was briefed on the strengths, weaknesses, and the areas of improvement which will assist in the implementation of ISM.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

An integrated assessment tool to define effective air quality policies at regional scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the Integrated Assessment of air quality is dealt with at regional scale. First the paper describes the main challenges to tackle current air pollution control, including economic aspects. Then it proposes a novel approach to manage the ... Keywords: Air quality modeling, Decision support, Integrated assessment modeling, Model reduction, Multi-objective optimization

Claudio Carnevale; Giovanna Finzi; Enrico Pisoni; Marialuisa Volta; Giorgio Guariso; Roberta Gianfreda; Giuseppe Maffeis; Philippe Thunis; Les White; Giuseppe Triacchini

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Assessment of Integrated Health Management (IHM) Frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging nuclear power plants presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to the better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging nuclear power plants. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of a NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of a NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

N. Lybeck; M. Tawfik; L. Bond; J. Coble

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

topics related to ESI Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) A Framework for the Optimization of Integrated Energy Systems(Jain and Alleyne 2012) Energy System...

63

Combining MSS and AVHRR imagery to assess vegetation biomass and dynamics in an arid pastoral ecosystem, Turkana District, Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) imagery was used to develop a vegetation type-biomass map of the 84,000 Km/sup 2/ Turkana District, Kenya. NOAA satellite advanced very high resolution radiometry (AVHRR) imagery was overlaid on the MSS map to trace the seasonal and annual dynamics of vegetation communities used by Turkana pastoral nomads, 1981-1984. Four regions (sub-sectional territories) were compared with respect to peak herbaceous biomass, woody canopy cover, and seasonal fluxes in total green biomass. Results demonstrated major variations among regions and between wet and dry season ranges within regions. Pastoral land use patterns appear to minimize effects of seasonal vegetation fluxes on livestock herds.

Ellis, J.E.; Swift, D.M.; Hart, T.C.; Dick, O.B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Assessment of Vertically Integrated Liquid (VIL) Water Content Radar Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically integrated liquid (VIL) water content is a parameter obtained from a radar performing voluminal scanning. This parameter has proven useful in the detection of severe storms and may be a worthwhile indicator for very short-term rainfall ...

Brice Boudevillain; Hervé Andrieu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Wind Power Integration Technology Assessment and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of power electronics, energy storage, and other wind integration technologies can mitigate the impacts of adding large blocks of wind generation and raise the amount of wind capacity that can be connected to the grid without adversely affecting grid reliability, reserve and regulation requirements, and ancillary service costs. The engineering and economic data and case studies presented in this report can be used to address the available wind integration technology options.

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

67

Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

Paltsev, Sergey

68

Integrated Dry NOx/SO2 Emissions Control System, A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Integrated Dry NO X SO 2 Emissions Control System A DOE Assessment October 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry...

69

INTEGRATING THE DESIGN AND RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF A HYBRID PV-THERMAL MICROCONCENTRATOR SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRATING THE DESIGN AND RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF A HYBRID PV-THERMAL MICROCONCENTRATOR SYSTEM M that the materials from the power electronics industry are also reliable when used in a concentrator PV module and reliability testing have been integrated as concurrent processes, enabling the early optimisation

70

Performance Assessment of an Integrated Cooling/Dehumidification System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews dehumidification technologies appropriate for residential and commercial building applications with a focus on technologies and system configurations that allow dedicated dehumidification to complement other air conditioning systems, such as direct expansion. One such new technology was tested and is reported on here, the Munters DryCool HD, a small to medium central dehumidifier designed for integration into a ducted air conditioning system. This unit uses both Direct Expansion (DX) ...

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

The integration of climatic data sets for wind resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One barrier to wind energy development, in many regions of the world, is the lack of reliable information about the spacial distribution of the wind energy resource. The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program`s wind resource assessment group is to improve the characterization of the wind resource in many of these regions in support of U.S. wind energy industry. NREL provides wind resource assessments for our clients in the form of reports, atlases, and wind resource maps. The assessments estimate the level of the wind resource, at wind turbine hub heights (typically 30m to 50m above ground level), for locations exposed to the prevailing winds.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model for critical facilities in combating the terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical facility vulnerability assessment is a highly complex strategic activity in combating the terrorism and necessitates a structured quantified methodology to support the decision-making process in defense planning. In the system perspective, the ... Keywords: Airport, Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM), Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model (FIVAM), Fuzzy set theory, Interdependency, Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART), Terrorism

Ilker Akgun; Ahmet Kandakoglu; Ahmet Fahri Ozok

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Integrating health impact assessment into the triple bottom line concept  

SciTech Connect

This theoretical study explores the links between the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) concept and the principles of HIA and considers the potential role of HIA to provide a mechanism for integrating health concerns within a broader agenda of government and business. TBL is a framework linked to the broader sustainability agenda that underpins and reviews environmental, economic and social performance of organizations. In its simplest form, TBL acts as a tool for reporting to stakeholders/shareholders organizational performance and the nature of the impacts on the community. The links to HIA are clear as both seek to determine the impact (potential and actual) on the health and well-being of the population. The study found that TBL can operate at four levels within organizations ranging from reporting through to full integration with the organization's goals and practices. Health is narrowly defined and there are tensions about how to undertake the social accountability functions. The study shows the potential role for HIA within the broader policy and accountability agenda. As health is one of the main outcomes of an organization's activities it needs to be taken into account at all levels of activity.

Mahoney, Mary; Potter, Jenny-Lynn

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A Final Environmental Assessment March 2003 Department of Energy, Sandia Site Office Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque New Mexico Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Environmental Assessment March 2003 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Purpose and Need for Agency Action.......................................................................................1 2.0 No Action and Proposed Action Alternatives............................................................................3 2.1 No Action Alternative .................................................................................................3

75

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the US Army US Forces Command (FORSCOM) Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 2, Baseline Detail, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment.

Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate critical environmental impacts at a broader temporal or spatial scale. While many applications have been geared towards implementing project-level environmental assessments, comparatively little research has been done to determine how to incorporate strategically critical environmental impacts into local planning. Although the principles of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are not yet required in local planning in the United States, these principles create a theoretical framework for local environmental assessment. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of local plans to integrate and implement the key SEA principles. This study focuses on increasing the understanding of how and where to integrate environmental impacts into the local planning and decision-making process by converting the principles of SEA into specific planning tools, policies, and implementation strategies. This study develops a protocol with 112 indicators to measure the strengths and weaknesses of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol. Statistical analysis and multiple regression models identify the factors affecting the quality of plans with respect to their ability to assess environmental impacts. The results identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of the ability of local jurisdictions to integrate the SEA principles. The results show that many strategically important environmental issues and tools are rarely adopted by current local plans. The regression analysis results further identify the effects of planning capacity, environmental assessment capacity, public participation and contextual variables on environmental assessment plan quality. The findings extend established planning theory and practice by incorporating strategic environmental considerations into the existing framework of what constitutes a high quality local land use comprehensive plan and suggest ways to improve plan quality.

Tang, Zhenghong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment(LeMar  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment(LeMar Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment(LeMar 2002) Home > Groups > Energy Systems Integration Qinsun's picture Submitted by Qinsun(35) Member 15 November, 2012 - 13:05 Literature Review The author analyzed the market of combine heat and power in commercial buildings. The paper provided the market size of CHP. It analyzed the reduction of emission, energy and cost by 2020. It discussed barrier, market power and impact. It is a good market analysis proach. However, it only considered existing CHP techniques in Commercial buildings. Groups: Energy Systems Integration Login to post comments Latest documents Qinsun Research topics related to ESI Posted: 15 Nov 2012 - 13:55 by Qinsun Qinsun Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) Posted: 15 Nov 2012 - 13:36 by Qinsun

78

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/pnw/mdr/mapss/ MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Screenshot References: MAPSS[1] Applications "A landscape- to global-scale vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere impacts and biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks from climatic change. Model output from MAPSS has been used extensively in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

79

Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A generalized multistage optimization modeling framework for life cycle assessment-based integrated solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is an integral component of civil infrastructure and the global economy, and is a growing concern due to increases in population, urbanization, and economic development. In 2011, 1.3 billion metric tons of municipal solid ... Keywords: Decision support, Life cycle assessment, Multi-stage, Optimization, Solid waste

James W. Levis, Morton A. Barlaz, Joseph F. Decarolis, S. Ranji Ranjithan

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM-FR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM is required to maintain water supplies while water is essential to produce energy. However, the models and energy generally dealt with them separately, the two resources are highly interconnected. Energy

82

Position paper: Selecting among five common modelling approaches for integrated environmental assessment and management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and implementation of effective environmental policies need to be informed by a holistic understanding of the system processes (biophysical, social and economic), their complex interactions, and how they respond to various changes. Models, ... Keywords: Agent-based model, Bayesian network, Coupled component model, Integrated assessment, Knowledge-based model, System dynamics

Rebecca A. Kelly (Letcher), Anthony J. Jakeman, Olivier Barreteau, Mark E. Borsuk, Sondoss Elsawah, Serena H. Hamilton, Hans JøRgen Henriksen, Sakari Kuikka, Holger R. Maier, Andrea Emilio Rizzoli, Hedwig Van Delden, Alexey A. Voinov

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

High-performance computing tools for the integrated assessment and modelling of social-ecological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated spatio-temporal assessment and modelling of complex social-ecological systems is required to address global environmental challenges. However, the computational demands of this modelling are unlikely to be met by traditional Geographic Information ... Keywords: AML, CPU, Cluster, Concurrency, Environmental, GIS, GPU, Global challenges, Graphics processing unit (GPU), Grid, HPC, Multi-core, NPV, Parallel programming

Brett A. Bryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT SAFETY & HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (ISMS) CORE FUNCTION FOR FEEDBACK & CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management assessment is required of US Department of Energy contractors by 10 CFR 830.122 and DOE Order 414.1. The management assessment process is a rigorous, preplanned, forward-looking review. It is required to be performed by owners of the processes that are being assessed. Written from the perspective of the Assessment Program Director and an Assessment Specialist, this paper describes the evolution of the process used by CH2MHILL to implement its management assessment program over the past two years including: roles, responsibilities, and details about our program improvement project designed to produce a clear picture of management processes and to identify opportunities for improvement. The management assessment program is essential to successful implementation, maintenance, and improvement of the CH2MHILL Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System (ISMS). The management assessment program implements, in part, ISMS Core Function No. 5. ''Feedback and Continuous Improvement''. Organizations use the management assessment process to assess ISMS implementation and effectiveness. Management assessments evaluate the total picture of how well management processes are meeting organizational objectives and the customer's requirements and expectations. The emphasis is on management issues affecting performance, systems, and processes such as: strategic planning, qualification, training, staffing, organizational interfaces, communication, cost and schedule control and mission objectives. Management assessments should identify any weaknesses in the management aspects of performance and make process improvements. All managers from first line supervisors to the president and general manager are involved in the management assessment process. More senior managers, in conducting their assessment, will use data from lower levels of management. This approach will facilitate the objective of having managers closer to the work under review focusing on more compliance- and process-oriented aspects of work performance, while senior managers will concentrate on more strategic issues, having more access to information generated from assessments by their subordinates.

VON WEBER, M.

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integrated assessment and the relation between land-use change and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment is an approach that is useful in evaluating the consequences of global climate change. Understanding the consequences requires knowledge of the relationship between land-use change and climate change. Methodologies for assessing the contribution of land-use change to atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are considered with reference to a particular case study area: south and southeast Asia. The use of models to evaluate the consequences of climate change on forests must also consider an assessment approach. Each of these points is discussed in the following four sections.

Dale, V.H.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. • From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

Uhart, M.; et al.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Review of the Independent Integrated Safety Management/Integrated Work Management Assessment of Research and Develoopment and Programmatic Work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Integrated Safety Independent Integrated Safety Management/Integrated Work Management Assessment of Research and Development and Programmatic Work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory December 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

89

Mixed Waste Integrated Program: A technology assessment for mercury-containing mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The treatment of mixed wastes must meet US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for chemically hazardous species and also must provide adequate control of the radioactive species. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development established the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) to develop mixed-waste treatment technology in support of the Mixed Low-Level Waste Program. Many DOE mixed-waste streams contain mercury. This report is an assessment of current state-of-the-art technologies for mercury separations from solids, liquids, and gases. A total of 19 technologies were assessed. This project is funded through the Chemical-Physical Technology Support Group of the MWIP.

Perona, J.J.; Brown, C.H.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program, Evaluation and assessment of containment technology  

SciTech Connect

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the state-of-the art of innovative in situ remediation technologies to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. This program complements similar ongoing integrated demonstration programs being conducted at several DOE sites. The ISRIP has been conducting baseline assessments on in situ technologies to support program planning. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted an assessment and evaluation of subsurface containment barrier technology in support of ISRIP`s Containment Technology Subprogram. This report summarizes the results of that activity and provides a recommendation for priortizing areas in which additional research and development is needed to advance the technology to the point of demonstration in support of DOE`s site restoration activities.

Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

GIS-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of the productive mining areas, involving a wide range of mining and technological factors, considering mineral properties, mineral occurrence conditions and geographical advantages of a mineral deposit location. The model capabilities are exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and power supply infrastructure of the productive mining areas at the Kuznetsk Coal Basin.

Zamaraev, R.Y.; Oparin, V.N.; Popov, S.E.; Potapov, V.P.; Pyastunovich,O.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Vegetation Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Overview Vegetation regulates the flow of numerous biogeochemical cycles, most critically those of water, carbon, and nitrogen; it is also of great importance in local and global energy balances. Vegetation collections data include: Biomass Biome Characteristics Litter Chemistry and Decomposition Geoecology Nutrient Concentration, Profiles, and Turnover Global Fire Emissions, Vegetation, and Leaf Area Index (LAI) Ecosystem Structure and Function Phenoregions Carbon Flux Vegetation Resources The following resources related to Vegetation Collections are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: Global Leaf Area Index Data Net Primary Production Project Get Vegetation Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data

93

Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Space Command (SPACECOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the SPACECOM VAFB facility located approximately 50 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analysis of EROs are presented in ten common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). In addition, a case study of process loads at Space Launch Complex-4 (SLC-4) is included. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O and M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and value index (VI) of each ERO. Finally, an appendix includes a summary of an economic analysis case study of the South Vandenberg Power Plant (SVPP) operating scenarios.

Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; Halverson, M.A.; Hickman, B.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). Projects considered can be either in the form of energy management or energy conservation. The overall efforts of this task are based on a model program PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Cape Canaveral AFS, which is located approximately 10 miles north of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1: Executive Summary and Volume 2: Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M), and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. Descriptions of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions are also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost- effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sandusky, W.F.; Eichman, C.J.; King, D.A.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; Shankle, S.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Griffiss Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Electric resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). FEMP, with support from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is designing this model program for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. The program with Griffiss AFB will (1) identify and evaluate all cost-effective electric energy projects; (2) develop a schedule for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have them procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the ACC Griffiss AFB facility located near Rome, New York. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in seven common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO provides information on the initial cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. The evaluation methodology and technical and cost assumptions are also described for each ERO. Summary tables present the operational performance of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Armstrong, P.R.; Shankle, S.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Stucky, D.J.; Keller, J.M.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Dagle, J.E.; Gu, A.Y.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessing Consumer Values and the Supply-Chain Market for the Integrated Water Heater/Dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a case study of the potential market for the dual-service residential integrated water heater/dehumidifier (WHD). Its principal purpose is to evaluate the extent to which this integrated appliance might penetrate the residential market sector, given current market trends, producer and consumer attributes, and technical parameters. The report's secondary purpose is to gather background information leading to a generic framework for conducting market analyses of technologies. This framework can be used to assess market readiness as well as factor preferred product attributes into the design to drive consumer demand for this product. This study also supports analysis for prototype design. A full market analysis for potential commercialization should be conducted after prototype development. The integrated WHD is essentially a heat-pump water heater (HPWH) with components and controls that allow dedicated dehumidification. Adequate residential humidity control is a growing issue for newly constructed residential homes, which are insulated so well that mechanical ventilation may be necessary to meet fresh air requirements. Leveraging its successful experience with the energy-efficient design improvement for the residential HPWH, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Engineering Science and Technology Division's (ESTD's) Building Equipment Group designed a water-heating appliance that combines HPWH efficiency with dedicated dehumidification. This integrated appliance could be a low-cost solution for dehumidification and efficient electric water heating. ORNL is partnering with Western Carolina University, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, American Carolina Stamping Company, and Clemson University to develop this appliance and assess its market potential. For practical purposes, consumers are indifferent to how water is heated but are very interested in product attributes such as initial first cost, operating cost, performance, serviceability, product size, and installation costs. The principal drivers for penetrating markets are demonstrating reliability, leveraging the dehumidification attributes of the integrated WHD, and creating programs that embrace first-cost and life-cycle cost principles.

Ashdown, BG

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT CENTER FOR INTEGRATED NANOTECHNOLOGIES AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES/NEW MEXICO The United States Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Site Office, has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to construct and operate a CINT Core Facility and establish a Gateway to Sandia Facility. The CINT Core Facility would be constructed on a 20-acre DOE-owned parcel of land on the west side of Eubank Boulevard, north of the entrance to Kirtland Air Force Base. The Gateway to Sandia Facility would be established in existing space within the existing

99

Design and evaluation of the ReKon : an integrated detection and assessment perimeter system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kontek Industries (Kannapolis, NC) and their subsidiary, Stonewater Control Systems (Kannapolis, NC), have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement with Sandia to jointly develop and evaluate an integrated perimeter security system solution, one that couples access delay with detection and assessment. This novel perimeter solution was designed to be configurable for use at facilities ranging from high-security military sites to commercial power plants, to petro/chemical facilities of various kinds. A prototype section of the perimeter has been produced and installed at the Sandia Test and Evaluation Center in Albuquerque, NM. This prototype system integrated fiber optic break sensors, active infrared sensors, fence disturbance sensors, video motion detection, and ground sensors. This report documents the design, testing, and performance evaluation of the developed ReKon system. The ability of the system to properly detect pedestrian or vehicle attempts to bypass, breach, or otherwise defeat the system is characterized, as well as the Nuisance Alarm Rate.

Dabling, Jeffrey Glenn; Andersen, Jason Jann; McLaughlin, James O. [Stonewater Control Systems, Inc., Kannapolis, NC

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fiscal Year 2005 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various purposes, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users. DOE manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project integrates monitoring for various objectives into a single sampling schedule to avoid redundancy of effort and to improve efficiency of sample collection.This report documents the purposes and objectives of groundwater monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

Rieger, JoAnne T.; Hartman, Mary J.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Real-time highway traffic condition assessment framework using vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII) with artificial intelligence (AI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a framework for real-time highway traffic condition assessment using vehicle kinetic information, which is likely to be made available from vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII) systems, in which vehicle and infrastructure agents ... Keywords: artificial intelligence (AI), incident detection, vehicle kinetics, vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII)

Yongchang Ma; Mashrur Chowdhury; Adel Sadek; Mansoureh Jeihani

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FY96 evaluation of Integrated Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Integrated Assessment Program (IAP) is the primary system to assess and monitor overall performance and to drive continuous improvement in the Laboratory. The approach used is a significant departure from the Laboratory`s traditional reliance on auditing methods. It is a move toward the contemporary concepts of measuring organizational performance by encouraging scientific, operational, and business excellence, through self-assessment and strengthening line management accountability for results in product and service quality, safety, and cost. This report describes the approach used (methods and processes), the deployment of that approach in the six Laboratory organizations selected to pilot the approach, and a summary of how the pilot organizations used the results they obtained. Section 3.0 of this report summarizes the top strengths and weaknesses in performance as identified by Division/Directorate self-assessments, Independent Oversight, Internal Audit and peer reviews, and includes the actions that have been, or will be taken, to improve performance in areas that are weak.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Integrated safety assessment of an oxygen reduction project at Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power's Haddam Neck plant  

SciTech Connect

Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCo) has implemented an Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP) for the integrated evaluation and prioritization of plant-specific licensing issues, regulatory policy issues, and plant improvement projects. As part of the ISAP process, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is utilized to evaluate the net safety impact of plant modification projects. On a few occasions, implementation of this approach has resulted in the identification of projects with negative safety impacts that could not be quantified via the normal design review and 10CFR50.59 safety evaluation process. An example is a plant modification that was proposed to reduce the oxygen in the Haddam Neck plant's demineralized water storage tank (DWST). The project involved the design and installation of a nitrogen blanketing system on the DWST. The purpose of the project was to reduce the oxygen content on the secondary side, consistent with recommendations from the Electric Power Research Institute Steam Generator Owners Group. Oxygen is one of the contributors to the corrosion process in systems in contact with the feedwater and can cause damage to associated components if not controlled.

Aubrey, J.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Current Activities Assessing Butt Fusion Joint Integrity in High Density Polyethylene Piping  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, conducted initial studies to evaluate the effectiveness of nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing for assessing butt fusion joint integrity in high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The work provided insightful information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques for detecting lack of fusion (LOF) conditions in the fusion joints. HDPE has been installed on a limited basis in American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 3, buried piping systems at several operating U.S. nuclear power plants and has been proposed for use in new construction. A comparison was made between the results from ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive examinations and the results from mechanical destructive evaluations, specifically the high-speed tensile test and the side-bend test, for determining joint integrity. The data comparison revealed that none of the NDE techniques detected all of the lack-of-fusion conditions that were revealed by the destructive tests. Follow-on work has recently been initiated at PNNL to accurately characterize the NDE responses from machined flaws of varying size and location in PE 4710 materials as well as the LOF condition. This effort is directed at quantifying the ability of volumetric NDE techniques to detect flaws in relation to the critical flaw size associated with joint integrity. A status of these latest investigations is presented.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Doctor, Steven R.; Denslow, Kayte M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermal Integrity Assessment of Building Envelopes of Experimental Houses Using Infrared Thermography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zero Energy Building Research Alliance, or ZEBRAlliance, is a joint DOE-ORNL-construction industry initiative to develop and demonstrate new energy efficiency technologies for residential buildings, as well as fine-tune and integrate existing technologies, to lower energy costs. Construction of residential envelopes, the diaphragms that separate the inside from outdoors, can have enormous impact on whole-building energy usage. Consequently, post-construction thermal integrity assessment of the building envelopes in the experimental ZEBRAlliance homes is an integral part of the research and development cycle. Nondestructive infrared (IR) thermography provides a relatively easy and quick means of inspecting the experimental homes for thermal bridging, insulation imperfections, moisture penetration, air leakage, etc. Two experimental homes located in Oak Ridge, TN were inspected using IR thermography. The homes are designed with two different envelope systems: (i) Structural Insulated Panels (SIP home) consisting of an insulating foam core sandwiched between oriented strand boards, and (ii) Optimal Value Framing (OVF home) using innovatively spaced wood studs, which are designed to minimize the amount of wood framing, reduce thermal bridging, and lower material costs. IR thermal imaging was performed from both outside and inside of the homes. In this paper, IR images of roof and wall sections of the homes are presented and discussed with respect to identification of areas of thermal bridging and any insulation deficiencies.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Conceptual design and techno-economic assessment of integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology  

SciTech Connect

Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic trough collectors causes an increase to competitiveness of solar thermal power plants (STPP) by substitution of oil with direct steam generation that results in lower investment and operating costs. In this study the integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology is introduced and techno-economic assessment of this plant is reported compared with two conventional cases. Three considered cases are: an integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology (ISCCS-DSG), a solar electric generating system (SEGS), and an integrated solar combined cycle system with HTF (heat transfer fluid) technology (ISCCS-HTF). This study shows that levelized energy cost (LEC) for the ISCCS-DSG is lower than the two other cases due to reducing O and M costs and also due to increasing the heat to electricity net efficiency of the power plant. Among the three STPPs, SEGS has the lowest CO{sub 2} emissions, but it will operate during daytime only. (author)

Nezammahalleh, H.; Farhadi, F.; Tanhaemami, M. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, No 593 Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF): A tool for the integrated assessment of acid deposition  

SciTech Connect

A major challenge that has faced policy makers concerned with acid deposition is obtaining an integrated view of the underlying science related to acid deposition. In response to this challenge, the US Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of an integrated Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF) which links together the key acid deposition components of emissions, air transport, atmospheric deposition, and aquatic effects in a single modeling structure. The goal of TAF is to integrate credible models of the scientific and technical issues into an assessment framework that can directly address key policy issues, and in doing so act as a bridge between science and policy. Key objectives of TAF are to support coordination and communication among scientific researchers; to support communications with policy makers, and to provide rapid response for analyzing newly emerging policy issues; and to provide guidance for prioritizing research programs. This paper briefly describes how TAF was formulated to meet those objectives and the underlying principals which form the basis for its development.

Bloyd, C.N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Henrion, M. [Lumina Decision Systems, Los Altos, CA (United States); Marnicio, R.J. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp., Columbus, Ohio (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Assessing Consumer Values and the Supply-Chain Market for the Integrated Water Heater/Dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a case study of the potential market for the dual-service residential integrated water heater/dehumidifier (WHD). Its principal purpose is to evaluate the extent to which this integrated appliance might penetrate the residential market sector, given current market trends, producer and consumer attributes, and technical parameters. The report's secondary purpose is to gather background information leading to a generic framework for conducting market analyses of technologies. This framework can be used to assess market readiness as well as factor preferred product attributes into the design to drive consumer demand for this product. This study also supports analysis for prototype design. A full market analysis for potential commercialization should be conducted after prototype development. The integrated WHD is essentially a heat-pump water heater (HPWH) with components and controls that allow dedicated dehumidification. Adequate residential humidity control is a growing issue for newly constructed residential homes, which are insulated so well that mechanical ventilation may be necessary to meet fresh air requirements. Leveraging its successful experience with the energy-efficient design improvement for the residential HPWH, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Engineering Science and Technology Division's (ESTD's) Building Equipment Group designed a water-heating appliance that combines HPWH efficiency with dedicated dehumidification. This integrated appliance could be a low-cost solution for dehumidification and efficient electric water heating. ORNL is partnering with Western Carolina University, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, American Carolina Stamping Company, and Clemson University to develop this appliance and assess its market potential. For practical purposes, consumers are indifferent to how water is heated but are very interested in product attributes such as initial first cost, operating cost, performance, serviceability, product size, and installation costs. The principal drivers for penetrating markets are demonstrating reliability, leveraging the dehumidification attributes of the integrated WHD, and creating programs that embrace first-cost and life-cycle cost principles.

Ashdown, BG

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

EA-1488: Draft Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

728D 728D Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 Approved for Public Release; Further Disseminat ion Uillimited June 2011 DOE/EA-1728D June 2011 1 2 3 4 5 6 This page intentionally left blank. 7 8 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1728D Draft Environmental Assessment iii June 2011 CONTENTS 1 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 1 3

111

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels Management System Management System in the Midin NWSG mixes beneficial to forage, biofuels production, and wildlife habitatp , 3. identify wildlife habitat benefits associated with varying forage and biofuels management strategies 4. identify optimum

Gray, Matthew

113

Beyond integrated safeguards: performance-based assessments for future nuclear controls.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the future, iE the nuclear nonproliferation and arms control agendas are to advance, they will likely become increasingly seen as parallel undertakings with the objective of comprehensive cradle-to-grave controls over nuclear materials and possibly even warheads removed from defense programs along with materials in civilian use. This 'back to the future' prospect was envisioned in the Acheson-Lillienthal Report and the Baruch Plan, and more modestly in the Atoms-for-Peace Proposal. Unlike the grand plans of the early nuclear years, today's and tomorrow's undertakings will more likely consist of a series of incremental steps with the goal of expanding nuclear controls. These steps will be undertaken at a time of fundamental change in the IAEA safeguards system, and they will be influenced by those changes in profound ways. This prospective influence needs to be taken into account as the IAEA develops and implements integrated safeguards, including its efforts to establish new safeguards criteria, undertake technological and administrative improvements in safeguards, implement credible capabilities for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities and activities and, perhaps, provide for a more intensive involvement in applying safeguards in new roles such as the verification of a fissile materials cutoff treaty. Performance-based criteria offer one promising way to address the effectiveness of integrated safeguards and to provide a common means of assessing the other key areas of a comprehensive approach to nuclear controls as these develop independently and to the extent that they are coordinated in the future.

Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W. (Kory W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Suboptimal Assessment of Interunit Task Interdependence: Modes of Integration and Information Processing for Coordination Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation extends previous research on cross-functional integration. Building on earlier theoretical development, a graduated sequence of modes of integration is tested in relation to interunit task interdependence in a global logistics support ... Keywords: coordination, integration, interdependence, uncertainty

J. Daniel Sherman; Robert T. Keller

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal`s sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E`s technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL&P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Robins Air Force Base Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline Detail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), a US Air Force Materiel Command facility located near Macon, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins AFB. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Robins AFB. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year 1991. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Robins AFB by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

118

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes - Business Case Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, 'HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment', ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. Table 1 summarizes the energy savings potential of the highest scoring options from the 2005 study for all five locations. All system options were scored by the ORNL building equipment research team and by William Goetzler of Navigant Consulting. These scores were reviewed by DOE/BT's Residential Integration program leaders and Building America team members. Based on these results, the two centrally ducted integrated heat pump (IHP) systems (air source and ground source versions) were selected for advancement to Stage 2 (Exploratory Development) business case assessments in FY06. This report describes results of these business case assessments. It is a compilation of three separate reports describing the initial business case study (Baxter 2006a), an update to evaluate the impact of an economizer cooling option (Baxter 2006b), and a second update to evaluate the impact of a winter humidification option (Baxter 2007). In addition it reports some corrections made subsequent to release of the first two reports to correct so

Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Integrated assessment of the spatial variability of ozone impacts from emissions of nitrogen oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the ozone (O{sub 3}) damages caused by nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in different locations around the Atlanta metropolitan area during a summer month. Ozone impacts are calculated using a new integrated assessment model that links pollution emissions to their chemical transformation, transport, population exposures, and effects on human health. It was found that increased NOx emissions in rural areas around Atlanta increase human exposure to ambient O{sub 3} twice as much as suburban emissions. However, increased NOx emissions in central city Atlanta actually reduce O{sub 3} exposures. For downtown emissions, the reduction in human exposures to O{sub 3} from titration by NO in the central city outweighs the effects from increased downwind O{sub 3}. The results indicate that the marginal damage from NOx emissions varies greatly across a metropolitan area. The results raise concerns if cap and trade regulations cause emissions to migrate toward higher marginal damage locations. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Daniel Q. Tong; Nicholas Z. Muller; Denise L. Mauzerall; Robert O. Mendelsohn [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States). Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Transportation and Site Location Analysis for Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment (RIBA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The farmgate cost and available supply of biomass often exhibit considerable variation within a State. This variation, combined with the relatively high cost of transporting bulky biomass material, produces a wide range of expected delivered feedstock costs across a State. As a consequence, both production and transportation costs must be well-modeled when analyzing potential locations for conversion facilities. The Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment system consists of two phases. The descriptive phase characterizes a farmgate cost and supply surface for switchgrass production over a given State. These results are passed to the analytical phase, where a transportation model is used to compute the marginal cost of supplying an ethanol plant at a prescribed level of demand. The model generates a marginal cost surface that illustrates the most promising areas for locating an ethanol plant. Next, a sequential location model simulates the commercial development of ethanol production facilities. This model considers every road network node as a potential site and generates a sequence of likely plant locations. Results from the RIBA analysis demonstrate that the cost of switchgrass can increase dramatically from one location to another. This variation will seriously effect the economics of conversion in the proper sizing and locating of ethanol plant facilities.

Noon, C.E.; Daly, M.J.; Graham, R.L.; Zahn, F.B.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building energy analysis using EnergyPlus. The benchmarkenergy savings benefits of integrated control using the medium office building benchmark

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Integrity-directed sequential state estimation: Assessing high reliability requirements via safe confidence intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study deals with the problem of dynamic state estimation of continuous-time systems from discrete-time measurements in the context of high-integrity applications. The objective of integrity-directed estimation is to provide confidence intervals ... Keywords: Bayesian framework, Dynamic estimation, Dynamic multiple-model estimator, Fault detection, Gaussian mixture, Integrity, Kalman filter, Kullback-Leibler distance, Markov chains, Odometry, Overbounding, Rail navigation, Robust estimation, Safe navigation systems

Olivier Bilenne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

An integrated methodology for quantitative assessment of proliferation resistance of advanced nuclear systems using probabilistic methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proliferation is the results of a competition between the proliferating country (proliferation) and the party to resist the proliferation efforts (safeguarder). An integrated evaluation methodology to evaluate proliferation ...

Ham, Hyeongpil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessment of the Stage of Change for Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Availability and Accessibility in Low-income Families with Preschool Age Children.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The study utilized the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change to assess the psychosocial factors of decisional balance, self-efficacy and processes influencing availability and accessibility of… (more)

Hildebrand, Deana A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of the research project on "Improving Demographic Components of Integrated Assessment Models: The Effect of Changes in Population Composition by Household Characteristics". The overall objective of this project was to improve projections of energy demand and associated greenhouse gas emissions by taking into account demographic factors currently not incorporated in Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) of global climate change. We proposed to examine the potential magnitude of effects on energy demand of changes in the composition of populations by household characteristics for three countries: the U.S., China, and Indonesia. For each country, we planned to analyze household energy use survey data to estimate relationships between household characteristics and energy use; develop a new set of detailed household projections for each country; and combine these analyses to produce new projections of energy demand illustrating the potential importance of consideration of households.

Brian C. O'Neill

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Technical Requirements and Vision for Development of an Integrated Framework for Substation Equipment Performance and Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal motivation for building an integrated assessment framework is to provide support for decisions that influence substation equipment performance. However, because equipment performance can in turn affect substation and system performance, the framework scope should reach beyond the traditional equipment boundaries. The decisions that revolve around maintenance and replacement most directly affect installed substation equipment performance and are therefore the primary focus of this work. Comp...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

132

Final Report: Climate Variability, Stochasticity and Learning in Integrated Assessment Models, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1999  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the work has been on climate variability and learning within computational climate-economy models (integrated assessment models--IAM's). The primary objective of the research is to improve the representation of learning in IAM's. This include's both endogenous and exogenous learning. A particular focus is on Bayesian learning about climate damage. A secondary objective is to improve the representation of climate variability within IAM's.

Kolstad, Charles D.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integrating fuzzy multicriteria analysis and uncertainty evaluation in life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interpretation phase of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies is often hampered by the number and the heterogeneity of impact assessment results as well as by the uncertainties arising from data, models and practitioner's choices. While decision-aiding ... Keywords: Electricity, Fuzzy sets, LCA, Life cycle assessment, Multicriteria analysis, NAIADE, Noise

Enrico Benetto; Christiane Dujet; Patrick Rousseaux

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

An integrated multi-model approach for air quality assessment: Development and evaluation of the OSCAR Air Quality Assessment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a new modelling system for studying air quality on local scales. A multi-model approach has been adopted to develop the OSCAR Air Quality Modelling System to conduct assessments at different levels ... Keywords: Air quality, Model evaluation, Modelling system, Nitrogen oxides, OSCAR, Particulate matter

Ranjeet S. Sokhi; Hongjun Mao; Srinivas T. G. Srimath; Shiyuan Fan; Nutthida Kitwiroon; Lakhumal Luhana; Jaakko Kukkonen; Mervi Haakana; Ari Karppinen; K. Dick van den Hout; Paul Boulter; Ian S. McCrae; Steinar Larssen; Karl I. Gjerstad; Roberto San José; John Bartzis; Panagiotis Neofytou; Peter van den Breemer; Steve Neville; Anu Kousa; Blanca M. Cortes; Ingrid Myrtveit

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Integration of the reliability of passive system in probabilistic safety assessment  

SciTech Connect

Probability Safety Assessment (PSA) of nuclear power plants has demonstrated its efficiency in decision-making process. But the treatment in PSA of safety passive systems, specially those implementing moving working fluid, is a difficult task because in addition to the mechanical failures of components, the failure of the physical process (e.g. natural circulation) has to be considered. The difficulty in the evaluation of the failure risk of the physical phenomenon lies in the great number of parameters that must be taken into account, in their associated uncertainties and in the limitations of physical modelling. We can note that in the existing PSA of future reactors equipped with passive systems, this risk of the physical process failure due to the uncertainties, is not at all taken into account. In this paper, we present a methodology to evaluate this risk of failure and to include it in a PSA. This evaluation is obtained by uncertainty analyses on thermalhydraulic calculations. As an example, a simplified PSA was carried out on a fictive reactor with two types of safety passive systems both in the primary circuit: Residual Passive heat Removal system (RP2) and a safety injection system consisting in accumulators and discharge lines equipped with check valves. An accidental scenario has been analysed, starting with loss of electrical supply when the reactor is at full power. The failure analyses performed on this reactor have allowed the characterisation of the technical failures (on RP2 valves, tubes in RP2 exchanger and safety injection check valves) and the ranges of variation of uncertain parameters which influence the physical process. The resulting accidental scenario is presented in the form of a simplified event tree. The majority of the sequences of this event tree have been analysed by deterministic evaluations with envelope values of the uncertain parameters. For some sequences where the definition of envelope cases was impossible, basic events corresponding to the failure of the physical process have been added and uncertainty analyses have been performed to evaluate the corresponding probability of failure. For this purpose the thermal-hydraulic CATHARE code has been coupled to a Monte-Carlo simulation modulus. The failure probabilities obtained by these reliability analyses have been integrated in the corresponding sequences. This methodology allows the probabilistic evaluation of the influence of the passive system on an accidental scenario and could be used to test the interest to replace an active system by a passive system on specific situations. (authors)

Marques, M. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Building 212, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Les-Durance Cedex (France); Pignatel, J.F.; Saignes, P.; Devictor, N.; La Lumia, V.; Mercier, S

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide. [Contains special sections on analytical energy forecasting, renewable energy resource assessment, demand-side energy management, energy vulnerability assessment, and energy strategy integration  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii's energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii's energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

Schlosser, C. Adam

138

Integrated Substation Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment Tool for Asset Management and Smart Grid Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and risk management are key elements in any well-developed asset management plan, and an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to improving their ability to understand and make risk-based decisions. Consequently, there is growing interest in the tools and methodologies required to better assess equipment performance and risk and provide quantitative information to drive asset management decision processes. In addition, risk and performance assessment tools can be in...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

Integration of fuzzy AHP and FPP with TOPSIS methodology for aeroengine health assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper models the aeroengine health assessment problem as a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) problem and proposes a three-step evaluation model, which combines the techniques of fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (fuzzy AHP), fuzzy preference ... Keywords: Aeroengine health assessment, FPP, Fuzzy AHP, MCDM, TOPSIS

Jianrong Wang; Kai Fan; Wanshan Wang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

GIMS-based method for vegetation microwave monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) To present a working methodology for the combined use of modeling technology and microwave remote-sensing measurements in the assessment of attenuation of electromagnetic waves by the vegetation cover; (2) ... Keywords: GIMS, Microwave, Remote sensing, Vegetative cover

Vladimir F. Krapivin; Anatolij M. Shutko; Alexander A. Chukhlantsev; Sergei P. Golovachev; Gary W. Phillips

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An Integrated Approach Towards Environmental Impact Assessment Of Projects And Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monetary valuation of environmental impacts consist a highly complex matter. Several approaches and techniques have been employed over the last three decades in order to assess effectively environmental projects or policies, within the context of cost benefit analysis. The current paper demonstrates a concise description of the existing environmental impact appraisal methods and, simultaneously, a new combination of monetary valuation techniques applied in each potential receptor which intends to provide an innovative multiperspective assessment concerning future environmental projects. Key words: Environmental assessment, monetary valuation techniques, cost benefit analysis

Aravossis Konstantinos; Vassilios Karydis

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-4-2012_Integration of Spatial Data to Support Risk and Impact Assessments_20121221.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Spatial Data to Support Integration of Spatial Data to Support Risk and Impact Assessments for Deep and Ultra-deepwater Hydrocarbon Activities in the Gulf of Mexico 21 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-4-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

143

Integrative framework for assessing firms' potential to undertake Green IT initiatives via virtualization - A theoretical perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green IT (information technology) has recently emerged into an active research area in the information systems (IS) discipline. A major gap that exists in the Green IT research literature today is the absence of a theoretical framework that can be used ... Keywords: Green information technology implementation, Green information technology practice, Integrative theoretical framework, Process virtualization

Ranjit Bose; Xin Luo

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

An integrated model for assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal limits for bioenergy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion ... Keywords: Agricultural residues, Bioenergy, Model integration, Soil erosion, Soil organic carbon

D. J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption on the base. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Patrick AFB. It is a comparison report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profile information to be used to improve the characterization of energy use on the base. The characteristics of electricity, natural gas, and No. 2 fuel oil are analyzed for on-base facilities and housing. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Patrick AFB facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985-1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the north and south substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; King, D.A.; Parker, S.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Status of integrated performance assessment of the waste packages and engineered barrier system  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment of the engineered barrier system for a nuclear waste repository combines information from relevant disciplines and predicts the net long-term performance of the EBS in unites of regulatory goals for performance. The performance assessment models are specific to the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada site. Early assessments are used for project planning and feedback. The EBS scenarios activity develops the scenarios and the consequent event sequences. Initial model development for single waste packages indicates that the radionuclide release rate performance is sensitive to the water flux, element solubilities, and/or the mode of water contact with the waste. The latter in turn depends on local scale hydrology and the modes of corrosion for the container material. For the release rate summed over waste packages, variations among waste packages and their near-field environments are anticipated. These variations place demands on data acquisition and modeling, as well as modulate the impact of localized changes of conditions. Sampling in uncertainty assessment is a subsequent step in examining the reliability of predictions made in the performance assessments. Advances made in sampling methods are referenced. 14 refs., 6 figs.

O`Connell, W.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assessment of Rooftop and Building-Integrated PV Systems for Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaics (PV) is the technology of solar cells -- solid-state devices that directly, silently, and cleanly convert solar energy into electricity. Although commercially available for many years, PV technology has only recently become sufficiently affordable and efficient to be a practical alternative or supplement to conventional grid power. PV devices are commonly mounted on a structure's rooftop, but are increasingly integrated into building components such as siding, glass, or roof tiles. This rep...

2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assessment of the SRI Gasification Process for Syngas Generation with HTGR Integration -- White Paper  

SciTech Connect

This white paper is intended to compare the technical and economic feasibility of syngas generation using the SRI gasification process coupled to several high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with more traditional HTGR-integrated syngas generation techniques, including: (1) Gasification with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE); (2) Steam methane reforming (SMR); and (3) Gasification with SMR with and without CO2 sequestration.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to use existing simulation tools to quantify the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings. An EnergyPlus medium office benchmark simulation model (V1.0_3.0) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) was used as a baseline model for this study. The baseline model was modified to examine the energy savings benefits of three possible control strategies compared to a benchmark case across 16 DOE climate zones. Two controllable subsystems were examined: (1) dimming of electric lighting, and (2) controllable window transmission. Simulation cases were run in EnergyPlus V3.0.0 for building window-to-wall ratios (WWR) of 33percent and 66percent. All three strategies employed electric lighting dimming resulting in lighting energy savings in building perimeter zones ranging from 64percent to 84percent. Integrated control of electric lighting and window transmission resulted in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) energy savings ranging from ?1percent to 40percent. Control of electric lighting and window transmission with HVAC integration (seasonal schedule of window transmission control) resulted in HVAC energy savings ranging from 3percent to 43percent. HVAC energy savings decreased moving from warm climates to cold climates and increased when moving from humid, to dry, to marine climates.

Hong, T.; Shen, E.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Observed Vegetation–Climate Feedbacks in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed vegetation feedbacks on temperature and precipitation are assessed across the United States using satellite-based fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) and monthly climate data for the period of 1982–2000. This study ...

M. Notaro; Z. Liu; J. W. Williams

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report - 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study Volume I.NREL). 2010. Eastern Wind Integration and TransmissionAvista Corporation Wind Integration Study. March. http://

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration of Variable Renewable Generation The report isISO (CAISO). 2007. Integration of Renewable Resources.recommendations for integrating renewable resources on the

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Integrating Green Hydropower Certification with Strategy Environment Assessment: Towards Sustainable River Basin Development in Yunnan, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China currently put the development of its western region as one of the most important goals. This greatly stimulated the initiative of hydropower development in its ecological sensitive Yunnan Province. Yet the use of a single tool, like strategy environment ... Keywords: strategic environmental assessment (SEA), green hydropower certification, sustainable river basin development, Yunnan Province

Peng Shengjing; Sun Zhenhua; Ou Xiaokun

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Evolving Rights-of-Way Vegetation Management Standards and Practices: Update 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current regulations are shaping how transmission vegetation management is implemented in North America. Regulations are maturing and fines for violations of the NERC standard FAC-003-1 are becoming larger and more consistently assessed. Transmission vegetation managers must maintain a transmission system with no vegetation caused outages and do so cost effectively in an environmental acceptable manner that meets landowner and public approval.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

Innovative approaches in integrated assessment modelling of European air pollution control strategies - Implications of dealing with multi-pollutant multi-effect problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, crucial aspects of the implications and the complexity of interconnected multi-pollutant multi-effect assessments of both air pollution control strategies and the closely related reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be discussed. ... Keywords: Emission control, Integrated assessment, Optimisation

Stefan Reis; Steffen Nitter; Rainer Friedrich

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Urban scale integrated assessment for London: Which emission reduction strategies are more effective in attaining prescribed PM10 air quality standards by 2005?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightening of air quality standards for populated urban areas has led to increasing attention to assessment of air quality management areas (AQMAs) where exceedance occurs, and development of control strategies to eliminate such exceedance. Software ... Keywords: Air quality management, Dispersion modelling, Emission reduction strategies, Integrated assessment, Particulate matter, Urban air pollution

A. Mediavilla-Sahagún; H. M. ApSimon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

159

Conceptual design of an integrated technology model for carbon policy assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the conceptual design of a technology choice model for understanding strategies to reduce carbon intensity in the electricity sector. The report considers the major modeling issues affecting technology policy assessment and defines an implementable model construct. Further, the report delineates the basis causal structure of such a model and attempts to establish the technical/algorithmic viability of pursuing model development along with the associated analyses.

Backus, George A.; Dimotakes, Paul E. (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Hybrid Framework for Voltage Security Assessment Integrating Simulation and Measurement Based Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage stability is the ability of a power system to maintain adequate voltage magnitudes at buses, which is a major concern in daily power system operations and a leading factor to limit power transfers in a prevailing open-access environment. Currently, simulation-based voltage security assessment (VSA) tools are applied widely by electric utilities to analyze either steady-state or transient voltage stability issues. Those VSA tools can help operators foresee the next critical ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Spent Fuel Pool Risk Assessment Integration Framework (Mark I and II BWRs) and Pilot Plant Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the development and pilot application of a generic framework and methodology for conducting a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for spent fuel pools at BWR plants with Mark I or II containment designs. A key aspect of the study is the consideration of potential synergistic relationships between adverse conditions in the reactor and the spent fuel pool.BackgroundUsed nuclear fuel from the operation of nuclear power plants is typically ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of Standardized Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Shutdown Operations Integrated in SPAR Level 1 Model  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear plant operating experience and several studies show that the risk from shutdown operation during Modes 4, 5, and 6 at pressurized water reactors and Modes 4 and 5 at boiling water reactors can be significant. This paper describes using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s full-power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development of risk evaluation models for commercial nuclear power plants. The shutdown models are integrated with their respective internal event at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the SPAR full-power model with shutdown event tree logic. Preliminary human reliability analysis results indicate that risk is dominated by the operator’s ability to correctly diagnose events and initiate systems.

S. T. Khericha; J. Mitman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Message passing for integrating and assessing renewable generation in a redundant power grid  

SciTech Connect

A simplified model of a redundant power grid is used to study integration of fluctuating renewable generation. The grid consists of large number of generator and consumer nodes. The net power consumption is determined by the difference between the gross consumption and the level of renewable generation. The gross consumption is drawn from a narrow distribution representing the predictability of aggregated loads, and we consider two different distributions representing wind and solar resources. Each generator is connected to D consumers, and redundancy is built in by connecting R {le} D of these consumers to other generators. The lines are switchable so that at any instance each consumer is connected to a single generator. We explore the capacity of the renewable generation by determining the level of 'firm' generation capacity that can be displaced for different levels of redundancy R. We also develop message-passing control algorithm for finding switch sellings where no generator is overloaded.

Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Techniques and equipment for assessing the structural integrity of subterranean tower anchor rods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques and equipment for evaluating structural integrity of buried anchor rods in situ are disclosed. The techniques avoid excavation of soil and avoid, or at least reduce, the possibility of damage to the rods or the concrete in which they may be embedded when evaluations are conducted. Instead, ultrasonic energy is transmitted through the rod from a portable transducer, and returned energy (in either or both of direct and mode-converted states) may be analyzed to assist in detecting flaws, corrosion, wastage, or other degradation of the rod. Data from a field evaluation may be compared with baseline data maintained either for a specific rod or for rods of similar composition and length (or both), and periodic field evaluations of a rod may be used to analyze trends in its structure over time.

Hinz, William R. (Martinez, GA); Parker, Matthew J. (Martinez, GA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Message Passing for Integrating and Assessing Renewable Generation in a Redundant Power Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified model of a redundant power grid is used to study integration of fluctuating renewable generation. The grid consists of large number of generator and consumer nodes. The net power consumption is determined by the difference between the gross consumption and the level of renewable generation. The gross consumption is drawn from a narrow distribution representing the predictability of aggregated loads, and we consider two different distributions representing wind and solar resources. Each generator is connected to D consumers, and redundancy is built in by connecting R of these consumers to other generators. The lines are switchable so that at any instance each consumer is connected to a single generator. We explore the capacity of the renewable generation by determining the level of "firm" generation capacity that can be displaced for different levels of redundancy R. We also develop message-passing control algorithm for finding switch settings where no generator is overloaded.

Zdeborová, Lenka; Chertkov, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Integrating Chemical Hazard Assessment into the Design of Inherently Safer Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive hazard associated with chemicals is a major safety issue in process industries. This kind of hazard has caused the occurrence of many accidents, leading to fatalities, injuries, property damage and environment pollution. Reactive hazards can be eliminated or minimized by applying Inherently Safer Design (ISD) principles such as "substitute" or "moderate" strategies. However, ISD would not be a feasible option for industry without an efficient methodology for chemical hazard assessment, which provides the technical basis for applying ISD during process design. In this research, a systematic chemical hazard assessment methodology was developed for assisting the implementation of ISD in the design of inherently safer process. This methodology incorporates the selection of safer chemicals and determination of safer process conditions, which correspond to "substitute" and "moderate" strategies in ISD. The application of this methodology in conjunction with ISD technique can effectively save the time and investment spent on the process design. As part of selecting safer chemicals, prediction models were developed for predicting hazardous properties of reactive chemicals. Also, a hazard index was adopted to rate chemicals according to reactive hazards. By combining the prediction models with the hazard index, this research can provide important information on how to select safer chemicals for the processes, which makes the process chemistry inherently safer. As part of determining safer process conditions, the incompatibility of Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide (MEKPO) with iron oxide was investigated. It was found that iron oxide at low levels has no impact on the reactive hazards of MEKPO as well as the operational safety. However, when iron oxide is beyond 0.3 wt%, it starts to change the kinetics of MEKPO runaway reaction and even the reaction mechanism. As a result, with the presence of a certain level of iron oxide (> 0.3 wt%), iron oxide can intensify the reactive hazards of MEKPO and impose higher risk to process operations. The investigation results can help to determine appropriate materials for fabricating process equipment and safer process conditions.

Lu, Yuan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

SciTech Connect

This special issue has highlighted recent and innovative methods and results that integrate observations and AQ3 modelling analyses of regional to global aspect of biophysical and biogeochemical interactions of land-cover change with the climate system. Both the Earth System and the Integrated Assessment modeling communities recognize the importance of an accurate representation of land use and land-cover change to understand and quantify the interactions and feedbacks with the climate and socio-economic systems, respectively. To date, cooperation between these communities has been limited. Based on common interests, this work discusses research priorities in representing land use and land-cover change for improved collaboration across modelling, observing and measurement communities. Major research topics in land use and land-cover change are those that help us better understand (1) the interaction of land use and land cover with the climate system (e.g. carbon cycle feedbacks), (2) the provision of goods and ecosystem services by terrestrial (natural and anthropogenic) land-cover types (e.g. food production), (3) land use and management decisions and (4) opportunities and limitations for managing climate change (for both mitigation and adaptation strategies).

Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Pongratz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Evaluation and assessment of containment technology  

SciTech Connect

Containment technology refers to a broad range of methods that are used to contain waste or contaminated groundwater and to keep uncontaminated water from entering a waste site. The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development has instituted the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) to advance the state-of-the-art of innovative technologies that contain or treat, in situ, contaminated media such as soil and groundwater, to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. The information provided here is an overview of the state-of-the-art of containment technology and includes a discussion of ongoing development projects; identifies the technical gaps; discusses the priorities for resolution of the technical gaps; and identifies the site parameters affecting the application of a specific containment method. The containment technology described in this document cover surface caps; vertical barriers such as slurry walls, grout curtains, sheet pilings, frozen soil barriers, and vitrified barriers; horizontal barriers; sorbent barriers; and gravel layers/curtains. Within DOE, containment technology could be used to prevent water infiltration into buried waste; to provide for long-term containment of pits, trenches, and buried waste sites; for the interim containment of leaking underground storage tanks and piping; for the removal of contaminants from groundwater to prevent contamination from migrating off-site; and as an interim measure to prevent the further migration of contamination during the application of an in situ treatment technology such as soil flushing. The ultimate goal is the implementation of containment technology at DOE sites as a cost-effective, efficient, and safe choice for environmental remediation and restoration activities.

Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Small integrating meter for assessing long-term exposure to magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small, lightweight meter has been developed for magnetic-field measurements, particularly those needed for exposure-assessment purposes. This meter, known as the AMEX-3D, continuously measures all three axes of magnetic-flux density and electronically combines the data into a single estimate of cumulative exposure to the root-mean-square (rms) resultant flux density. The AMEX-3D weighs about 120 g, measures 2.7 cm x 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm, and is battery powered. Two panel-mounted jacks are provided for measuring battery voltage and for reading cumulative exposure data from the unit. The instrument has, within 3 dB, a flat response to magnetic flux densities at all frequencies in its 30-1,000 Hz bandwidth. A detailed analysis of error sources in the AMEX-3D leads to an estimate of [plus minus] 20% as the accuracy of the instrument over its dynamic range, which extends from 0.02 to 15 microT. The AMEX-3D was tested in the field by asking electric-utility distribution linemen to wear AMEX-3D and EMDEX meters simultaneously while working. Agreement between the two measures of exposure was excellent.

Kaune, W.T.; Niple, J.C.; Liu, M.J.; Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most difficult problems that a federal site has in reducing its energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where the energy is being used, and what technologies could be employed to decrease the energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, he or she may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving the full life-cycle cost savings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets.

Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Y-12 National Security Complex Tennessee Tennessee Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at ORNL & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Challenge In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). In parallel with the EM-1 initiative, the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducting a Critical

178

Operational Space Technology for Global Vegetation Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of global agriculture and the grain sector is to feed 6 billion people. Frequent droughts causing grain shortages, economic disturbances, famine, and losses of life limit the ability to fulfill this goal. To mitigate drought ...

Felix N. Kogan

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Assessment of erosion hotspots in a watershed: Integrating the WEPP model and GIS in a case study in the Peruvian Andes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study in assessment of erosion hotspots in an Andean watershed. To do this, we made use of an interface called Geospatial Modelling of Soil Erosion (GEMSE): a tool that integrates Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with ... Keywords: Andes, GIS, Geospatial modeling, Runoff, Soil loss, WEPP

Guillermo A. Baigorria; Consuelo C. Romero

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Inspection Technologies for Vegetation Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent regulatory changes and budgetary pressures have prompted utilities to seek a more in-depth understanding of the terrain along their transmission line corridor rights-of-way (ROW) and the vegetation on that terrain. Vegetation inspections play an important role in acquiring this information and in avoiding costly vegetation-related outages. While the methods by which the inspections are conducted vary from utility to utility, some form of periodic inspections of transmission ROWs are ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Computational Assessment of the GT-MHR Graphite Core Support Structural Integrity in Air-Ingress Accident Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to perform stress analysis for graphite support structures of the General Atomics’ 600 MWth GT-MHR prismatic core design using ABAQUS ® (ver. 6.75) to assess their structural integrity in air-ingress accident conditions where the structure weakens over time due to oxidation damages. The graphite support structures of prismatic type GT-MHR was analyzed based on the change of temperature, burn-off and corrosion depth during the accident period predicted by GAMMA, a multi-dimensional gas multi-component mixture analysis code developed in the Republic of Korea (ROK)/United States (US) International –Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (I-NERI) project. Both the loading and thermal stresses were analyzed, but the thermal stress was not significant, leaving the loading stress to be the major factor. The mechanical strengths are exceeded between 11 to 11.5 days after loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA), corresponding to 5.5 to 6 days after the start of natural convection.

Jong B. Lim; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Richard R. Schultz; David A. Petti

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for BWR Shutdown Modes 4 and 5 Integrated in SPAR Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear plant operating experience and several studies show that the risk from shutdown operation during modes 4, 5, and 6 can be significant This paper describes development of the standard template risk evaluation models for shutdown modes 4, and 5 for commercial boiling water nuclear power plants (BWR). The shutdown probabilistic risk assessment model uses full power Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The shutdown PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from SPAR full power model with shutdown event tree logic. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheet, including the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate HEP of interest. The preliminary results indicate the risk is dominated by the operator’s ability to diagnose the events and provide long term cooling.

S. T. Khericha; S. Sancakter; J. Mitman; J. Wood

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Effect of Government Actions on Environmental Technology Innovation: Applications to the Integrated Assessment of Carbon Sequestration Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to improve the ability of integrated assessment models (IA) to incorporate changes in technology, especially environmental technologies, cost and performance over time. In this report, we present results of research that examines past experience in controlling other major power plant emissions that might serve as a reasonable guide to future rates of technological progress in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) systems. In particular, we focus on U.S. and worldwide experience with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technologies over the past 30 years, and derive empirical learning rates for these technologies. The patterns of technology innovation are captured by our analysis of patent activities and trends of cost reduction over time. Overall, we found learning rates of 11% for the capital costs of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system for SO{sub 2} control, and 13% for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO{sub x} control. We explore the key factors responsible for the observed trends, especially the development of regulatory policies for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control, and their implications for environmental control technology innovation.

Rubin, E. S.; Hounshell, D. A.; Yeh, S.; Taylor, M.; Schrattenholzer, L.; Riahi, K.; Barreto, L.; Rao, S.

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

DOE/EA-1728-F Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-F 8-F Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 DOE/EA-1728-F 1 2 3 4 5 6 This page intentionally left blank. 7 8 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1728-F Final Environmental Assessment iii February 2012 CONTENTS 1 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 1 3 1.1 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT DETERMINATION 4 RECOMMENDATION ...................................................................................................... 1 5 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION ........................................................... 1 6

188

Systems Integration Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems integration and engineering, life cycle assessment, cyber-physical systems, productivity measurement, sustainability and energy efficiency. ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing, agriculture, and electric power sectors.

Sathaye, Jayant A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Vegetation Dynamics Enhancing Long-Term Climate Variability Confirmed by Two Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different coupled climate–vegetation models, the Community Climate Model version 3 coupled to the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (CCM3–IBIS) and the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique’s climate model coupled to the Organizing Carbon and ...

Christine Delire; Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré; Adriana Sima; Isabelle Gouirand

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 23, 2000 EIS-0285: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Transmission System Vegetation...

193

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and Finding Of No Significant Impacts for ROCK CREEK RESERVE 2001-Closure DOE/EA - 1371 Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service May, 2001 Dear Stakeholder: Enclosed is the Final Rock Creek Reserve Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (Plan), Environmental Assessment (EA), and Finding Of No Significant Impacts (FONSI). The Rock Creek Reserve was dedicated on May 17, 1999, to be jointly managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of Energy. This Plan/EA was developed in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Through cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for joint

194

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment for Rock Creek Reserve Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) with the assistance and cooperation of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service, prepared an Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment (Plan)(DOE/EA-1371) for the Rock Creek Reserve at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) located north of Golden, Colorado. The Rock Creek Reserve was established in May 1999 in recognition of the area's biological significance. Although still under the ownership of the DOE, the Rock Creek Reserve will be co- managed with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of an interagency agreement signed by these two

195

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

196

Integrating gray system theory and logistic regression into case-based reasoning for safety assessment of thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety assessment of thermal power plants (TPPs) is one of the important means to guarantee the safety of production in thermal power production enterprises. Due to various technical limitations, existing assessment approaches, such as analytic hierarchy ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Gray system theory, Intelligent decision support system, Logistic regression, Management safety assessment, Thermal power plants

Changyong Liang; Dongxiao Gu; Isabelle Bichindaritz; Xingguo Li; Chunrong Zuo; Wenen Cheng

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

Murphy, Enda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan Chen, Zhengyu Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice-land model with dynamic vegetation monsoon regions is reduced and the climatic response assessed. Consistent responses among the regions

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

199

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC). 2010a. Integration of Variablemeet/2010/012110/E-9.pdf FERC. 2010b. Order Setting Deadlinemeet/2010/031810/E-3.pdf FERC. 2008. Wholesale Competition

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Design and Assessment of Advanced Daylighting Systems Integrated with Typical Interior Layouts in Multi-Story Office Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two sidelighting solutions — a light shelf system and an optical louver system (FISCH) are assessed and compared in terms of lighting quantity and quality… (more)

Hu, Jianxin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1728-F Final Environmental Assessment F-1 February 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1728-F DOE/EA-1728-F Final Environmental Assessment F-1 February 2012 APPENDIX F FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR INTEGRATED VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ON THE HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON (DOE/EA-1728) AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY An Environmental Assessment (EA) for Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (DOE/EA-1728) has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the Council on Environmental Quality's Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations [CFR], Parts 1500-1508); and DOE's National Environmental Policy Act Implementing

202

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control because the industry assumed that power system operationsPower system operations planners conduct extensive studies to assess whether primary frequency controlcontrol is a fundamental requirement for reliable operation of any power system.

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings from the book ...

204

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols from the book ...

205

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil Feedstocks Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil

206

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

207

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Major role of marine vegetation on the oceanic carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The carbon burial in vegetated sediments, ignored in past assessments of carbon burial in the ocean, was evaluated using a bottom-up approach derived from upscaling a compilation of published individual estimates of carbon burial in vegetated habitats (seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangrove forests) to the global level and a top-down approach derived from considerations of global sediment balance and a compilation of the organic carbon content of vegeatated sediments. Up-scaling of individual burial estimates values yielded a total carbon burial in vegetated habitats of 111 Tmol C y ?1. The total burial in unvegetated sediments was estimated to be 126 Tg C y ?1, resulting in a bottom-up estimate of total burial in the ocean of about 244 Tg C y ?1, two-fold higher than estimates of oceanic carbon burial that presently enter global carbon budgets. The organic carbon

C. M. Duarte; J. J. Middelburg; N. Caraco

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

An integrated artificial neural network-genetic algorithm clustering ensemble for performance assessment of decision making units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study proposes a non-parametric efficiency frontier analysis method based on artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm clustering ensemble (GACE) for measuring efficiency as a complementary tool for the common techniques of the efficiency ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Decision making units, Genetic algorithm, Performance assessment

A. Azadeh; M. Saberi; M. Anvari; M. Mohamadi

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal...

211

NDVI-based vegetation rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area of terrain rendering has seen great improvements both in rendering performance and image quality. The latest terrain rendering algorithms efficiently utilize the capabilities of actual programmable graphics hardware in order to achieve real-time ... Keywords: continuous level of detail, terrain rendering, texture splatting, vegetation rendering

Stefan Roettger

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are needed for repository modeling are severely lacking. In addition, most of existing reactive transport codes were developed for non-radioactive contaminants, and they need to be adapted to account for radionuclide decay and in-growth. The accessibility to the source codes is generally limited. Because the problems of interest for the Waste IPSC are likely to result in relatively large computational models, a compact memory-usage footprint and a fast/robust solution procedure will be needed. A robust massively parallel processing (MPP) capability will also be required to provide reasonable turnaround times on the analyses that will be performed with the code. A performance assessment (PA) calculation for a waste disposal system generally requires a large number (hundreds to thousands) of model simulations to quantify the effect of model parameter uncertainties on the predicted repository performance. A set of codes for a PA calculation must be sufficiently robust and fast in terms of code execution. A PA system as a whole must be able to provide multiple alternative models for a specific set of physical/chemical processes, so that the users can choose various levels of modeling complexity based on their modeling needs. This requires PA codes, preferably, to be highly modularized. Most of the existing codes have difficulties meeting these requirements. Based on the gap analysis results, we have made the following recommendations for the code selection and code development for the NEAMS waste IPSC: (1) build fully coupled high-fidelity THCMBR codes using the existing SIERRA codes (e.g., ARIA and ADAGIO) and platform, (2) use DAKOTA to build an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS), and build a modular code architecture and key code modules for performance assessments. The key chemical calculation modules will be built by expanding the existing CANTERA capabilities as well as by extracting useful components from other existing codes.

Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

NPP and Vegetation Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Data Sets Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of three new net primary production (NPP) and two vegetation data sets. The NPP data sets contain data for...

215

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM many ecosystem services, including carbon storage, soil retention, and water cycling. One in dominant vegetation, often termed state change, will occur. The complex nature of state change requires

216

VEGETABLE LIPIDS AS COMPONENTS OF FUNCTIONAL FOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutritionally beneficial compounds naturally present in vegetable lipids will be subject of this minireview. This article will discuss lipidic compounds from less known vegetable sources and potential advantages of its incorporation into human diet as a functional ingredient.

M. Stuchlík; S. Žák; Milan Stuchlík; Stanislav Žák

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Global Vegetation Root Distribution for Land Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation root distribution is one of the factors that determine the overall water holding capacity of the land surface and the relative rates of water extraction from different soil layers for vegetation transpiration. Despite its importance, ...

Xubin Zeng

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Algorithms and Methodologies for Integrated Substation Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment Tools for Asset Management and Smar t Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed a suite of algorithms and methodologies designed to assess substation equipment performance and risk. These tools and the supporting databases have been enhanced to provide projections of future performance and risk. Utilizing these algorithms and tools, asset and maintenance managers can make better-informed decisions about current and future investments. This report lays out the rationale underlying the development of these tools and sets the foundation for their effective use by uti...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Integrated dynamic policy management methodology and system for strategic environmental assessment of golf course installation policy in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) focuses primarily on assessing how policies, plans, and programs (PPPs) influence the sustainability of the involved regions. However, the processes of assessing policies and developing management strategies for pollution load and resource use are usually separate in the current SEA system. This study developed a policy management methodology to overcome the defects generated during the above processes. This work first devised a dynamic management framework using the methods of systems thinking, system dynamics, and Managing for Results (MFRs). Furthermore, a driving force-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) indicator system was developed. The golf course installation policy was applied as a case study. Taiwan, counties of Taiwan, and the golf courses within those individual counties were identified as a system, subsystems, and objects, respectively. This study identified an object-linked double-layer framework with multi-stage-option to simultaneously to quantify golf courses in each subsystem and determine ratios of abatement and allocation for pollution load and resource use of each golf course. The DPSIR indicator values for each item of each golf course in each subsystem are calculated based on the options taken in the two decision layers. The summation of indicator values for all items of all golf courses in all subsystems according to various options is defined as the sustainability value of the policy. An optimization model and a system (IDPMS) were developed to obtain the greatest sustainability value of the policy, while golf course quantity, human activity intensity, total quantities of pollution load and resource use are simultaneously obtained. The solution method based on enumeration of multiple bounds for objectives and constraints (EMBOC) was developed for the problem with 1.95 x 10{sup 128} combinations of possible options to solve the optimal solution in ten minutes using a personal computer with 3.0 GHz CPU. This study obtain the policy with the optimal environmental sustainability value in Taiwan is 102 golf courses. Human activity intensity and total quantities of pollution load and resource use which are concurrently obtained are less than those of the existing policy and the existing quantities in 2006. The optimal solution remains unchanged under most sensitivity analysis conditions, unless the weights and constraints are extremely changed. The analytical results indicate that the proposed methodology can be used to assist the authorities for simultaneously generating and assessing the policy during the SEA process.

Chen, Ching-Ho, E-mail: chchen@tea.ntue.edu.t [Department of Social and Regional Development, National Taipei University of Education, Taipei City 106, Taiwan (China); Liu, Wei-Lin, E-mail: wlliu@nanya.edu.t [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanya Institute of Technology, Jungli, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Central University, Jungli, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Liaw, Shu-Liang [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Central University, Jungli, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Reactive glass and vegetation patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of vegetation patterns in the arid and the semi-arid climatic zones is studied. Threshold for the biomass of the perennial flora is shown to be a relevant factor, leading to a frozen disordered patterns in the arid zone. In this ``glassy'' state, vegetation appears as a singular plant spots separated by irregular distances, and an indirect repulsive interaction among shrubs is induced by the competition for water. At higher precipitation rates, the diminish of hydrological losses in the presence of flora becomes important and yields spatial attraction and clustering of biomass. Turing-like patterns with characteristic length scale may emerge from the disordered structure due to this positive feedback instability.

N. M. Shnerb; P. Sara; H. Lavee; S. Solomon

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Attack Tree Based Information Security Risk Assessment Method Integrating Enterprise Objectives with Vulnerabilities IAJIT First Online Publication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In order to perform the analysis and mitigation efforts related with the Information Security risks there exists quantitative and qualitative approaches, but the most critical shortcoming of these methods is the fact that the outcome mainly addresses the needs and priorities of the technical community rather than the management. For the enterprise management, this information is essentially required as a decision making aid for the asset allocation and the prioritization of mitigation efforts. So ideally the outcome of an information security risk method must be in synchronization with the enterprise objectives to act as a useful decision tool for the management. Also in the modelling of the threat domain, attack trees are frequently utilized. However the execution of attack tree modelling is costly from the effort and timing requirements and also has inherent scalability issues. So within this article our design-science research based work on an information security risk assessment method that addresses these two issues of enterprise objective inclusion and model scalability will be outlined.

Bugra Karabey; Nazife Baykal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Life cycle assessment of an energy-system with a superheated steam dryer integrated in a local district heat and power plant  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a method for analyzing and assessing the environmental impact of a material, product or service throughout the entire life cycle. In this study 100 GWh heat is to be demanded by a local heat district. A mixture of coal and wet biofuel is frequently used as fuel for steam generation (Case 1). A conversion of the mixed fuel to dried biofuel is proposed. In the district it is also estimated that it is possible for 4000 private houses to convert from oil to wood pellets. It is proposed that sustainable solution to the actual problem is to combine heat and power production together with an improvement in the quality of wood residues and manufacture of pellets. It is also proposed that a steam dryer is integrated to the system (Case 2). Most of the heat from the drying process is used by the municipal heating networks. In this study the environmental impact of the two cases is examined with LCA. Different valuation methods shows the Case 2 is an improvement over Case 1, but there is diversity in the magnitudes of environmental impact in the comparison of the cases. The differences depend particularly on how the emissions of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and hydrocarbons are estimated. The impact of the organic compounds from the exhaust gas during the drying is estimated as low in all of the three used methods.

Bjoerk, H.; Rasmuson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Utility Vegetation Management: Use of Reliability-Centered Maintenance Concepts to Improve Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the approach taken to adapt and apply the principles of reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) to vegetation management (VM) activities on an overhead electric distribution system. The project included a review of relevant literature, production of an RCM primer for vegetation managers, development of VM-specific failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) methods, and production of a structured process and information tool useful in completing an RCM-based assessment of a distributio...

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect

An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O' Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Retrieval of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Water Content Using SSM/I Data over a Corn and Soybean Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for soil moisture and vegetation water content retrieval using Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperature over a corn and soybean field region was analyzed and assessed using datasets from the Soil Moisture ...

Jun Wen; Thomas J. Jackson; Rajat Bindlish; Ann Y. Hsu; Z. Bob Su

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

ORNL DAAC, Vegetation Data, March 10, 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data pertaining to terrain and soils, water resources, forestry, vegetation, agriculture, land use, wildlife, air quality, climate, natural areas, and endangered species at...

229

Monte Carlo simulation model for electromagnetic scattering from vegetation and inversion of vegetation parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis research, a coherent scattering model for microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopy is developed on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. An accurate model of vegetation structure is essential for the ...

Wang, Li-Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

231

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from the electric facilities; (2) increase the program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This DEIS establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this EIS). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed: manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 24 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, they consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would factor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Integrity Lessons from the WAAS Integrity Performance Panel (WIPP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrity Lessons from the WAAS Integrity Performance Panel (WIPP) Todd Walter, Per Enge, Stanford that the integrity requirement would be met, the FAA formed the WAAS Integrity Performance Panel (WIPP). The role of the WIPP is to independently assess the safety of WAAS and to recommend system improvements. To accomplish

Stanford University

233

Commissioning twin houses for assessing the performance of energy conserving technologies," Performance of Exterior Envelopes of Whole Buildings VIII Integration of Building Envelopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is published in / Une version de ce document se trouve dans: Proceedings for Performance of Exterior Envelopes of Whole Buildings VIII: Integration of Building Envelopes, Dec. 2-7, 2001, Clearwater Beach, Florida, pp. 1-10 www.nrc.ca/irc/ircpubs NRCC-44995 assess the energy performance of new and innovative energy efficient materials and components for houses. The two research houses are identical energy efficient houses typical of tract-built models available on the local housing market. They also feature identical simulated occupancies based on home-automation technologies and are monitored for energy performance and thermal comfort. The simulated occupancy controls turn on and off major appliances, lighting and equipment. The houses were commissioned in the winter and spring of 1999, and benchmarked in the next heating season. This paper records the energy features of the houses and commissioning results. With the benefit of detailed monitoring of energy systems in both houses, many of the anomalies in component operation and controls were found and fixed. These anomalies could easily go undetected in regular houses

M. C. Moussa; H. March; Michael C. Swinton; Michael C. Swinton; Member Of Ashrae; Member Of Ashrae; Hussein Moussa; Hussein Moussa; Roger G. March; Roger G. March

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is a must-have for vegetable oil processing and maintenance personnel, as well as equipment manufacturers. Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Processing Hardback Books Processing 02C0292F90CD6AE7B6963975D2B0BF64 1st Edition, 2008

235

World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization Istanbul, Turkey World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil U

236

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical? Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practi

237

FT Duplication Coordinates Reproductive and Vegetative Growth  

SciTech Connect

Annual plants grow vegetatively at early developmental stages and then transition to the reproductive stage, followed by senescence in the same year. In contrast, after successive years of vegetative growth at early ages, woody perennial shoot meristems begin repeated transitions between vegetative and reproductive growth at sexual maturity. However, it is unknown how these repeated transitions occur without a developmental conflict between vegetative and reproductive growth. We report that functionally diverged paralogs FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2), products of whole-genome duplication and homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), coordinate the repeated cycles of vegetative and reproductive growth in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp.). Our manipulative physiological and genetic experiments coupled with field studies, expression profiling, and network analysis reveal that reproductive onset is determined by FT1 in response to winter temperatures, whereas vegetative growth and inhibition of bud set are promoted by FT2 in response to warm temperatures and long days in the growing season. The basis for functional differentiation between FT1 and FT2 appears to be expression pattern shifts, changes in proteins, and divergence in gene regulatory networks. Thus, temporal separation of reproductive onset and vegetative growth into different seasons via FT1 and FT2 provides seasonality and demonstrates the evolution of a complex perennial adaptive trait after genome duplication.

Hsu, Chuan-Yu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Adams, Joshua P. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Kim, Hyejin [Mississippi State University (MSU); No, Kyoungok [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ma, Caiping [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Strauss, Steven [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Drnevich, Jenny [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Wickett, Norman [Pennsylvania State University; Vandervelde, Lindsay [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ellis, Jeffrey D. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rice, Brandon [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Page, Grier P. [RTI International; Carlson, John E. [Pennsylvania State University; DePamphilis, Claude [Pennsylvania State University; Luthe, Dawn S. [Pennsylvania State University; Yuceer, Cetin [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona...

239

Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Distributed Resource Integration Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines a framework for assessing current issues and considerations associated with the deployment and operation of distributed resources. The framework is a guide that can assist utility personnel, distributed resource owners, and other stakeholders in planning integration projects and in relating different integration projects to one another. The framework provides a structured organization of the various elements associated with distributed resource integration, including regulatory, busin...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Systems Integration (SI) subprogram works closely with industry, universities, and the national laboratories to overcome technical barriers to the large-scale deployment of solar technologies. To support these goals, the subprogram invests primarily in four areas: grid integration, technology validation, solar resource assessment, and balance of system development.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum (2002) TDE Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive Presentations and abstracts from the recent DOE Terrestrial Science Team Meeting (Argonne National Laboratory, October 29-31, 2001) FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (2001), NDP-078A | PDF Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature (2000), CDIAC-129 Direct effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plants and ecosystems: An updated bibliographic data base (1994), CDIAC-70 A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated

243

Green Vegetable Oil Processing, Revised First Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book addresses alternative green technologies at various stages of oilseed and vegetable oil processing. The Revised First Edition includes much of the content of the first edition, but incorporates updated data, details, images, figures, and captions

244

Web based integrated models for participatory planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper focuses on the development of an integrated assessment model that embeds the web dimension and aims at increasing awareness in society, especially on environmental issues. The model incorporates features that make it capable of promoting ... Keywords: greenhouse gas emissions, increasing awareness, integrated assessment models, web based participatory integrated assessment models

Grammatikogiannis Elias; Maria Giaoutzi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

SunShot Initiative: Transmission Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Grid Integration to Transmission Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Transmission Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Transmission Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transmission Grid Integration on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transmission Grid Integration on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Transmission Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Transmission Grid Integration on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Research, Development, & Demonstration Distribution Grid Integration Transmission Grid Integration Solar Resource Assessment Technology Validation Power Electronics & Balance of System Hardware Technologies Competitive Awards

246

SunShot Initiative: Distribution Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distribution Grid Integration to Distribution Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Distribution Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Distribution Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Distribution Grid Integration on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Distribution Grid Integration on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Distribution Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Distribution Grid Integration on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Research, Development, & Demonstration Distribution Grid Integration Transmission Grid Integration Solar Resource Assessment Technology Validation Power Electronics & Balance of System Hardware Technologies Competitive Awards

247

Clearwater Subbasin Assessment 116 November 2003 5 Vegetative Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cylindrica Jointed Goatgrass X Ambrosia tomentosa Skeletonleaf Bursage X Cardaria draba Hoary Cress X X X X X

248

Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

Michael Lewis

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 19, 2002 July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-96: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Snohomish District Substations July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 9, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-81: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-84: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-80: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-78: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program May 31, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-58: Supplement Analysis

251

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 20, 2003 February 20, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-123: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 19, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-126: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-125: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-124: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 12, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-121: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 10, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-120: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Benton County, Washington January 16, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program December 24, 2002

252

EA-1110: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Final Environmental Assessment 0: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1110: Final Environmental Assessment Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards The purpose of this environmental assessment is to evaluate the alternatives available for controlling vegetative growth at very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards to support the transmission of electrical power throughout Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. Final Environmental Assessment for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards, DOE/EA-1110 (October 1995) More Documents & Publications EA-1110: Finding of No Significant Impact EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-40: Supplement Analysis

253

Design and implementation of a fuzzy expert system for performance assessment of an integrated health, safety, environment (HSE) and ergonomics system: The case of a gas refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to design a fuzzy expert system for performance assessment of health, safety, environment (HSE) and ergonomics system factors in a gas refinery. This will lead to a robust control system for continuous assessment and improvement ... Keywords: Environment, Ergonomics, Expert system, Fuzzy logic, Health, Safety

A. Azadeh; I. M. Fam; M. Khoshnoud; M. Nikafrouz

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Effects of Vegetation Structure and Elevation on Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri, LKMR), 1 of 3 subspecies of Sylvilagus palustris, is endemic to the Lower Florida Keys. The LKMR is listed as an endangered species due to predation by feral and free roaming domestic cats (Felis catus) and raccoons (Procyon lotor), road mortality, effects of storm surges, sea level rise, the small declining metapopulation size, and possible habitat loss from hardwood encroachment. The purpose of this study was to determine the current LKMR density on lands managed by the United States Navy, Naval Air Station Key West and evaluate how vegetation structure and patch elevation effect LKMR population density. I conducted fecal pellet counts to determine LKMR density, collected vegetation data using percent composition of ground cover, Robel range pole, and point-centered quarter methods, and obtained data on patch area and elevation. I used simple linear regression to assess the relationship between LKMR density and 9 measured vegetation characteristics, patch area, and patch elevation to determine which variables have an influence on LKMR density and the relationship between them. In my examination of the simple regression models, 6 out of the 11 variables appeared to influence LKMR population density. The average per patch percent composition of nonliving material and grasses, maximum height of vegetation at the range pole, distance to nearest woody vegetation, patch elevation, and visual obstruction readings (VOR) individually accounted for 26.4%, 30.4% , 18.1%, 8.5%, 6.8%, and 1.4% of the variability in LKMR density, respectively. According to the regression models, LKMR density increased in patches with greater amounts of grasses and with greater distance to woody vegetation. Habitat management is vital to the recovery of the LKMR and needs to focus on providing greater amounts of grasses and reducing the amount of woody vegetation encroachment to enhance LKMR population density.

Dedrickson, Angela

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide fluxes across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for regional scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be 290 89, 408, 48, and 698, 73 gC m-2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then reaggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Cook, Bruce D [University of Minnesota, St Paul; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska; Gough, Christopher M [Ohio State University; Martin, Jonathan G [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Schmid, Hans Peter [Indiana University; Tang, Jianwu [Chicago Botanical Garden, Glencoe, Illiinois; Wang, Weiguo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Influence of Vegetation and Seasonal Forcing on Carbon Dioxide Fluxes Across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for Regional Scaling  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in the Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem–atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens, and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER, and GEP to be ?290 ± 89, 408 ± 48, and 698 ± 73 gC m?2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER, and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER, and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error, and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Ankur R.; Noormets, Asko; Bolstad, Paul V.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, Bruce D.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S.; Gough, Christopher; Martin, Jonathan G.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Schmid, Hans P.; Tang, Jianwu; Wang, Weiguo

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

Life Cycle Assessment of a Pilot Scale Farm-Based Biodiesel Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study used environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate waste vegetable oil (WVO) biodiesel production at the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus, Centre for… (more)

Wasserman, Eli Shawn Jordan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

JM to revise DOE G 414.1-1B, Management and Independent Assessments Guide for Use with 10 CFR, Part 830, Subpart A, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance; DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Manual; and DOE O 226.1A  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Management and Independent Assessments Guide for Use with 10 CFR, Part 830, Subpart A, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance; DOE M 450.4-1, Integrated Safety ...

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Vegetable Oil for Color Only. Sample Includes soybean oil. Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laborat

260

Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation feedbacks on climate, on the subannual time scale, are examined across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice–land model with dynamic vegetation. Initial value ensemble experiments are run in which the total ...

Michael Notaro; Guangshan Chen; Zhengyu Liu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Representation of Variable Root Distribution in Dynamic Vegetation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Root distribution is treated as a static component in most current dynamic vegetation models (DVMs). While changes in leaf and stem biomass are reflected in leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height via specific leaf area (SLA) and allometric ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Intraseasonal Interactions between Temperature and Vegetation over the Boreal Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses statistical and analytical techniques to investigate intraseasonal interactions between temperature and vegetation [surrogated by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)] over the boreal forests. Results indicate that ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Dara Entekhabi; Dong Huang; Yin Su; Robert K. Kaufmann; Ranga B. Myneni

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Vegetation Dynamics within the North American Monsoon Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American monsoon (NAM) leads to a large increase in summer rainfall and a seasonal change in vegetation in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Understanding the interactions between NAM rainfall and vegetation ...

Giovanni Forzieri; Fabio Castelli; Enrique R. Vivoni

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues - Energy Innovation Portal  

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues Inventors: Christoph Benning, Changcheng Xu, Binbin Lu, Jinpeng Gao Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

267

The Uranium Availability and Uptake in the Vegetables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research of a potted experiment ruling uranium availability and uptake by four kinds of vegetables (lettuce,carrot , potatoes , peas) are described. Four kinds of vegetables spiked with the different uranium concentration in the aqueous and different ... Keywords: vegetables, uranium, Soil-liquid distribution, Uptake, Soil-to-plant transfer

Zhang Jing; Chen Diyun; Liu Juan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and-atmosphere interactions are an important component of climate, especially in semi-arid regions such as the Southern Great Plains. Interactions between soil moisture and vegetation modulate land-atmosphere coupling and thus represent a crucial, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture observation sites, and vegetation health is represented by MODIS-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). For the modeling study, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) hydrologic model is employed with two different vegetation parameterizations. The first is the model default vegetation parameter which is interannually-invariant leaf area index (LAI). This parameter is referred to as the control parameter. The second is MODIS-derived LAI, which captures interannual differences in vegetation health. Soil moisture simulations from both vegetation parameterizations are compared and the VIC-simulated soil moisture’s sensitivity to the vegetation parameters is also examined. Correlation results from the observation study suggest that soil moisture-vegetation interactions in Oklahoma are inconsistent, varying both in space and time. The modeling results show that using a vegetation parameterization that does not capture interannual vegetation health variability could potentially result in dry or wet biased soil moisture simulations.

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Simulating Future Changes in Arctic and Subarctic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a sensitive system undergoing dramatic changes related to recent warming trends. Vegetation dynamics—increases in the quantity of green vegetation and a northward migration of trees into the arctic tundra—are a component of ... Keywords: Arctic, biogeography, boreal forest, climate change, forest migration, shrub encroachment, subarctic, tundra, vegetation dynamics models

Howard E. Epstein; Jed O. Kaplan; Heike Lischke; Qin Yu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Di

271

Grid Integration  

SciTech Connect

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its grid integration subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Coordination studies with PNNL's global change assessment model: integrated science modeling and applications to the human dimensions. Final technical report for period October 1996 - March 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) supported by the DOE Program on Health and Environmental Research: Environmental Sciences Program under Grant No. DOE DFGO2-96ER62284. As part of this research proposal, we designed the model that better represent spatial variations and treat the process relevant towards evaluating the biogeochemical cycles important to determining atmospheric composition and resulting climatic effects at the regional scale. The process level understanding of regional impacts into the Integrated Assessment (IA) model will help to improve the understanding of climate change impacts and extend the range of issues, which can be addressed in an IA framework. On the application front, the newly developed model has been applied to a selected set of studies to address policy related questions on climate change, in particular, the role of forestry, and land-use for historical greenhouse gas emissions; projections of future methane emissions; a research study related to energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; and radiative forcing and estimation of a number of important greenhouse gases. In the following, the significant findings from the DOE supported study are outlined.

Wuebbles, Donald J.; Jain Atul

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the coexistence of multiple ...

Jonathan M. Winter; Jeremy S. Pal; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

275

Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009  

SciTech Connect

Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Zhu, Zaichun [Boston University; Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

Jenifer Nordstrom

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Insolation integrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric signal representative of the rate of insolation is integrated to determine if it is adequate for operation of a solar energy collection system.

Dougherty, John J. (Norristown, PA); Rudge, George T. (Lansdale, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who are looking for alternative methods to improve conventional refining methods. During the last decade, energy efficient membrane separation technology has evolved dramatically. This thesis reports a study on degumming crude vegetable oil using membrane separation. In the bench-scale study, two membranes were evaluated for their flux and rejection properties. Process parameters including pressure, temperature, feed velocity and volumetric concentration factor were examined. A 99.6% rejection of phospholipids and a flux of 22.4 LMH were achieved at pressure 300 psi, temperature 40'C and feed velocity 220 1/hr using DS-7 membrane, and significant reduction of the coloring pigments was observed as well. In the pilot-scale study, the spiral wound DS-7 membrane was found effective for 100% rejection of phospholipids with a permeate flux of 57.6 LMH. The rejection rates of phospholipids, Mg and Ca were 100%, 99.6% and 54.6%, respectively. Resistance-in-series model of the membrane system was also studied. The membrane resistance, the fouling resistance, and the polarization resistance for the pilotscale system were 0.29, 0.043, and 4.49, respectively. Evaluation on membrane fouling and cleaning showed that flux decreased rapidly during the first several hours and membrane cleaning presented no significant problem. The pilot-scale study confirmed results of the bench-scale system and provides useful data for commercializing membrane refining process in the near future. KEY WORDS: Membrane separation, crude vegetable oil, degumming, phospholipids.

Lin, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

SunShot Initiative: Solar Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Resource Assessment to Solar Resource Assessment to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Solar Resource Assessment on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Solar Resource Assessment on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Resource Assessment on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Resource Assessment on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Solar Resource Assessment on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Solar Resource Assessment on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Research, Development, & Demonstration Distribution Grid Integration Transmission Grid Integration Solar Resource Assessment Technology Validation Power Electronics & Balance of System Hardware Technologies Competitive Awards Balance of Systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure I-1). The seven states offer a great diversity of vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control noxious weeds at our

282

Projected integrated farm in Nepal  

SciTech Connect

A proposed integrated crop-livestock agro-processing complex to be based at Janakpur, Nepal is described. This project was proposed by the Agricultural Development Bank and is a small effort towards creating a self-sufficient rural community similar to one reported in China. The plan of the farm aims to achieve the integration of several agricultural, aquacultural, solar energy and biogas energy components with complete recycling of waste. These include biogas plants with associated slurry and storage tanks for operating a 3-kW generator, a 3.7-kW pump, providing domestic cooking, as well as energy to operate a fruit-processing plant. Energy for water heating, crop drying and refrigeration will be supplied by solar energy. Fish, livestock, fruits and vegetables will be produced by the farm.

Dhital, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Best Management Practices for Vegetation Management at Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling vegetation inside key electric utility facilities is a necessary maintenance activity for a utility’s safe and reliable operation. Substations, switchyards, and other facilities require perpetual maintenance to maintain a vegetation-free environment. At a minimum, vegetation-maintenance treatment needs to be conducted annually; in some climatic regions, multiple treatments may be required. The objective of this research paper was to define current industry practices by means of a ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Transmission Rights-of-Way Vegetation Management Plan Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) FAC-003-1 standards for vegetation management on electric transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs) have been in place since April 2006. These mandatory standards regulate electric transmission line vegetation management across the United States, and are narrowly focused on minimizing vegetation caused outages in electricity transmission. The NERC FAC-003-1 standards are potentially broadened by the voluntary American National Standards Institute (A...

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-21) Joe Johnson - TFSKalispell - Natural Resource...

286

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Local Incentive-Based Policy...

287

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 9 Printing Inks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 9 Printing Inks Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Printing Inks from the book ...

288

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

methods, (2) the red-edge positioning (REP) methods, and (3) the use of machine learning regression trees. Although there are numerous vegetation indices, we evaluated...

289

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 4 Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 4 Refining Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Refining from the book ...

290

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 5 Bleaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 5 Bleaching Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Bleaching from the book ...

291

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 6 Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 6 Hydrogenation Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Hydrogenation from the book ...

292

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication illustrations the effects of vegetation management on water availability.

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

293

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

294

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility Garners LEED Platinum View the NREL Press Release. NREL's multistory Energy Systems Integration...

296

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Integrated Deployment Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Deployment Workshop Integrated Deployment Workshop The Energy Systems Integration Facility workshop, Integrated Deployment, was held August 21 - 23, 2012 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Each day of the workshop, which included a tour of the Energy Systems Integration Facility, focused on a different topic: Day 1: Utility-Scale Renewable Integration Day 2: Distribution-Level Integration Day 3: Isolated and Islanded Grid Systems The agenda and presentations from the workshop are below. Agenda Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview ESIF Technology Partnerships Integrated Deployment Model Integrated Deployment and the Energy Systems Integration Facility: Workshop Proceedings Printable Version Energy Systems Integration Home Research & Development

297

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Dataset Summary Description Production, acreage, value, prices, imports, exports, per capita use, and beginning stocks for major fresh market and processed vegetables, 1970 onward. Also includes data for potatoes, sweet potatoes, dry beans and peas, and fresh and processed mushrooms. Tags {"United States","Economic Research Service",prices,value,imports,exports,"per capita use","beginning stocks",vegetables,"fresh market",processed,potatoes,"sweet potatoes","dry beans",peas,"fresh muschrooms","processed mushrooms",mushrooms}

298

integr~1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 AUDIT REPORT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY' S MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INTEGRATION MARCH 1998 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Principal Deputy Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on "Audit of the Department of Energy's Management of Research and Development Integration" BACKGROUND The Congress, independent task forces, and advisory groups have pointed out the need for the Department to improve its integration of research and development (R&D) projects. In the past, R&D management was carried out by different program offices with the research being

299

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National Seashore Satellite Remote Sensing Data in FIIS Vegetation Mapping The vegetation communities and spatial patterns necessary. #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Seagrass Habitat Mapping Recent development of hyperspectral

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

300

Predicting Regional Transpiration at Elevated Atmospheric CO2: Influence of the PBL–Vegetation Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled planetary boundary layer (PBL)–vegetation model is used to study the influence of the PBL–vegetation interaction and the ambient CO2 concentration on surface resistance rs and regional transpiration ?E. Vegetation is described using the ...

Cor M. J. Jacobs; Henk A. R. de Bruin

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nonlinear Dynamics in a Coupled Vegetation–Atmosphere System and Implications for Desert–Forest Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the global vegetation distribution is largely controlled by the large-scale climate pattern, the observed vegetation–rainfall relationship is also influenced by vegetation feedback and climate variability. Using a simplified coupled ...

Ning Zeng; Katrina Hales; J. David Neelin

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Integrated System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Window System Our research activities in the field of high performance windows have led us to conclude that even by using high performance insulating glass units, low conductivity frames, and warm edge spacers, there are still untapped sources for improving energy efficiency in the design and use of residential windows. While such high performance windows are a dramatic improvement over conventional units, they do not reduce conductive losses through wall framing around the window, offer guarantees against excessive wall/window infiltration nor do they adapt to the daily and seasonal potentials for night insulation and summer shading. To meet this need, we have been working on the design, development, and prototyping of Integrated Window Systems (IWS) since 1993. Integrated Window Systems are a form of panelized construction where the wall panel includes an operable or fixed window sash, recessed night insulation, integral solar shading, and is built in a factory setting in order to minimize thermal short circuits and infiltration at joints. IWSs can be built in modular lengths to facilitate their installation with conventional wood frame stick construction or other forms of panelized construction.

305

Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dwindling resources of fossil fuels coupled with the steady increase in energy consumption have spurred research interest in alternative and renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives for fossil fuels. It can be made from various renewable sources, including recycled oil, and can be utilized in lieu of petroleum-based diesel. To foster market competitiveness for biodiesel, it is necessary to develop cost-effective and technically sound processing schemes, to identify related key design criteria, and optimize performance. The overall goal of this work was to design and optimize biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester “FAME”) production from vegetable oil. To achieve this goal, several interconnected research activities were undertaken. First, a base-case flow sheet was developed for the process. The performance of this flow sheet along with the key design and operating criteria were identified by conducting computer-aided simulation using ASPEN Plus. Various scenarios were simulated to provide sufficient understanding and insights. Also, different thermodynamic databases were used for different sections of the process to account for the various characteristics of the streams throughout the process. Next, mass and energy integration studies were performed to reduce the consumption of material and energy utilities, improve environmental impact, and enhance profitability. Finally, capital cost estimation was carried out using the ICARUS Process Evaluator computer-aided tools linked to the results of the ASPEN simulation. The operating cost of the process was estimated using the key information on process operation such as raw materials, utilities, and labor. A profitability analysis was carried out by examining the ROI (Return of Investment) and PP (Payback Period). It was determined that the single most important economic factor is the cost of soybean oil, which accounted for more than 90% of the total annualized cost. Consequently, a sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the effect of soybean oil cost on profitability. It was determined that both ROI and PP quickly deteriorate as the cost of soybean oil increases.

Myint, Lay L.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Waste Heat Integration Potential Assessment through Exergy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Hydro-Mechanical Model and Analytical Solutions for Geomechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration · A Novel Method Combined ...

307

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAISY (Market Analysis and Information System) is an energymarket, the spatial component revealed new information regarding the patterns of hot water and energy

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technical work on microgrids towards the key technicalelectrically isolated microgrids will pose. The approachthe grid to operate as microgrids become a real possibility.

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

54 Table 5: Summary of Net MeteringDER Deployment Table 5: Summary of Net Metering Laws Summaryof State Net Metering Programs ( Current) Limit Limit on

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also overlaid with maps of transmission lines (obtained fromMap of Maryland's Major Power Plants and Transmission Lines. ..Map of Maryland's Major Power Plants and Transmission Lines.

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity prices must be forecast, and the potential forPrices. 112 Figure 37: Residenial Population Density - Single Family Detached Homes . 113 Figure 38: Adoption Forecast

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Bill ..the customer's total electricity bill, with the customera large part of the electricity bill, around 30% (California

Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

NONE

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation 42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah Summary This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western's proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska. The EIS website is http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/western/transmission/infrastruct/Pages/Western%20FS%20EIS.aspx.

316

Microsoft PowerPoint - Town Bluff Vegetation impact.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the 's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis Power Plant. The plant has two S Power Plant. The plant has two S - - Tube type turbines Tube type turbines which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and

317

Interpretation of Surface and Planetary Directional Albedos for Vegetated Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric solar radiation model has been coupled with surface reflectance measurements for two vegetation types, pasture land and savannah, in order to address several issues associated with understanding the directional planetary albedo; ...

Inna L. Vulis; Robert D. Cess

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication Processing eChapters Processing 716316455FE47FB5D9A86E048BC2AE36 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication...

319

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 10 Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 10 Hydrogenation Processing eChapters Processing 7672D25097D246FF512E7AB73F722C4B AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Hydrogenation from the book ...

320

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming Processing eChapters Processing 57ACA7723A9727237283ACEAD636027C AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming from the book ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

How important is vegetation phenology for European climate and heatwaves?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that vegetation phenology may play an important role for the mid-latitude climate. In this study, we investigate the impact of interannual and intraseasonal variations in phenology on European climate using Regional ...

Ruth Lorenz; Edouard L. Davin; David M. Lawrence; Reto Stöckli; Sonia I. Seneviratne

322

Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

Nepf, Heidi

323

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. Work will take place along Custer-Intalco 1 230 kV transmission line. The...

324

Global Vegetation Indices from the NOAA-7 Meteorological Satellite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern and Southern Hemisphere polar stereographic maps of “vegetation index” are now being produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The maps are derived from visible and near-infrared data from NOAA's operational polar ...

J. D. Tarpley; S. R. Schneider; R. L. Money

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sensible Heat Transfer Parameterization for Surfaces with Anisothermal Dense Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar roughness for sensible beat can be directly formulated in terms of the surface temperature. Therefore, in the case of an anisothermal vegetation canopy, the concept of a scalar roughness is ill defined and it may vary greatly depending ...

Wilfried Brutsaert; Michiaki Sugita

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EA-1773: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1773: Final Environmental Assessment NEOS New Planet BioEnergy, LLC Commercial Scale Integrated Demonstration BioEnergy Center, Vero Beach, Florida...

327

The relationship between teacher Levels of Technology Integration (LoTi) on 3rd-5th Grade Students on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) scores at Alamo Heights Independent School District, San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi) teacher self-ratings and Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) scores. The study assessed the relationship between LoTi ratings and TAKS scores of 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students as reported in student records at Alamo Heights Independent School District (AHISD), San Antonio, Texas. The study determined the degree to which teacher LoTi ratings were a predictor of success on TAKS exam scores as reported in student records at Alamo Heights Independent School District, San Antonio, Texas. In addition, the study determined whether a teacher's LoTi scores impacted students' achievement levels for the variable of socioeconomic status. School and student performance analysis included only Cambridge and Woodridge Elementary Schools in the Alamo Heights Independent School District. The student data in the study came from approximately 278 3rd graders, 268 4th graders, and 283 5th graders (829 total students). A total of 47 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade reading and math teachers from the two elementary campuses made up the population under study. The research findings of this study included: 1. There was no significant relationship at the elementary level between teacher LoTi ratings and TAKS scores for reading and math for grades 3, 4, 5 students. 2. The grade 4 reading analysis results demonstrate that teachers with a higher LoTi level do impact student achievement on the TAKS test for students who are in the economically disadvantaged subpopulation. The following recommendations were made: 1. Additional research is needed to examine how technology is specifically implemented in both reading and math classrooms at the elementary level. 2. Additional research is needed to examine how staff development on the LoTi instrument affected classroom practice and teacher responses on the LoTi survey. 3. Continued support is needed to provide teachers with professional development regarding the integration of technology as a teaching tool and repeat the research procedures after this initial year of using the LoTi instrument.

Bashara, Dana Marie

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Revised Hydrology for the ECMWF Model: Verification from Field Site to Terrestrial Water Storage and Impact in the Integrated Forecast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land (TESSEL) is used operationally in the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) for describing the evolution of soil, vegetation, and snow over the continents at diverse spatial resolutions. A revised ...

Gianpaolo Balsamo; Anton Beljaars; Klaus Scipal; Pedro Viterbo; Bart van den Hurk; Martin Hirschi; Alan K. Betts

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Rooting Characteristics of Vegetation Near Areas 3 and 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site--Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy emplaced high-specific-activity low-level radioactive wastes and limited quantities of classified transuranic wastes in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1984 to 1989. The boreholes are located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada. The boreholes were backfilled with native alluvium soil. The surface of these boreholes and trenches is expected to be colonized by native vegetation in the future. Considering the long-term performance of the disposal facilities, bioturbation (the disruption of buried wastes by biota) is considered a primary release mechanism for radionuclides disposed in GCD boreholes as well as trenches at both Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. This report provides information about rooting characteristics of vegetation near Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. Data from this report are being used to resolve uncertainties involving parameterization of performance assessment models used to characterize the biotic mixing of soils and radionuclide transport processes by biota. The objectives of this study were to: (1) survey the prior ecological literature on the NTS and identify pertinent information about the vegetation, (2) conduct limited field studies to describe the current vegetation in the vicinity of Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs so as to correlate findings with more extensive vegetation data collected at Yucca Mountain and the NTS, ( 3 ) review prior performance assessment documents and evaluate model assumptions based on current ecological information, and (4) identify data deficiencies and make recommendations for correcting such deficiencies.

D. J. Hansen

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

EA-1863: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1863: Draft Environmental Assessment Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345 kV Transmission Lines Vegetation Management Project within the Coconino National Forest Flagstaff, Arizona Comment Period Ends: 12/29/11 For more information, contact: Ms. Linette King Electronic mail: lking@wapa.gov The Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345 kV vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance project (Project) serves to update the existing operation and maintenance program to include all transmission facilities and access roads into one comprehensive and proactive vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program (Program). This environmental assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental consequences of the proposed Project, as required under the National

332

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility Newsroom The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) will be one of the only megawatt-scale test facilities in the United States that...

333

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Solar Integration National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study datasets greatly advanced the modeling of wind and solar power production...

334

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Wind Integration Datasets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Integration Datasets The Wind Integration Datasets provide energy professionals with a consistent set of wind profiles for the eastern United States and the western United...

335

Global Vegetation and Climate Change due to Future Increases in CO2 as Projected by a Fully Coupled Model with Dynamic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient simulations are presented of future climate and vegetation associated with continued rising levels of CO2. The model is a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–land–ice model with dynamic vegetation. The impacts of the radiative and ...

Michael Notaro; Steve Vavrus; Zhengyu Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IWTU Integrated Waste Treatment Unit LCO Limiting Condition for Operation LSS Life Safety Systems MSA Management Self-Assessment OFI Opportunity for Improvement ORR Operational...

337

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IWTU Integrated Waste Treatment Unit LCO Limiting Condition for Operation LSS Life Safety Systems MSA Management Self-Assessment OFI Opportunity for Improvement OGC Off-Gas...

338

EPRI Integrated Dose Reduction Program Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integrated Dose Reduction (IDR) project is an integral part of EPRI's support to nuclear plant radiation protection programs. The broad objective of the IDR program is to review existing and recent industry developments and provide utilities with an integrated plan for EPRI's assistance based on a plant's specific needs. This document describes a pilot test of this product at a host site, and identifies areas where EPRI's RP assessments and technical assistance can support key plant programs.

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Innovative approaches to integrated global change modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated models are important tools to investigate the interactions between planetary processes and the growing impacts of human populations - in short: global change. Current models still have significant shortcomings, notably in their representation ... Keywords: Global change, Innovative approaches, Integrated assessment, Modelling, Research priorities

Carlo Giupponi, Mark E. Borsuk, Bert J. M. De Vries, Klaus Hasselmann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources Anthony Papavasiliou model for assessing the impacts of the large-scale integration of renewable energy sources. In order to accurately assess the impacts of renewable energy integration and demand response integration

Oren, Shmuel S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Probabilistic Risk Assessment - A Bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk analysis is an integration of failure modes and effects analysis (FEMA), fault tree analysis and other techniques to assess the potential for failure and to find ways to reduce risk. This bibliography references 160 documents in the ...

Program NASA Scientific and Technical Information

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Guide for Piping Stress Analysis and Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives recommendations for piping analysis methods and integration with inspection and operating data to give estimates of risk and remaining life. The scope of the document is as follows: Objectives of piping assessment Selected literature review of assessment practices for piping and other relevant components Failure modes Inspection and operating data Piping analysis: methods and data Risk assessment Integration of analysis, inspection, and operating data for assessments and recommendations...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excessive phosphorus (P) in runoff contributes to eutrophication of fresh water bodies. Studies have shown that manure and effluent applied from animal feeding operations to waste application fields (WAFs) have contributed to excess P in segments of the North Bosque River in east central Texas. There is a growing need for environmentally sound, economically viable, and easy to establish best management practices to control such pollution. Vegetative buffer strips offer a potential solution for reducing runoff P from WAFs by extracting it from soil and by reducing sediment P delivery (due to reduced runoff and soil erosion) to streams. In a field study, ten plots (5m x 5m) were assigned to five replicated treatments, namely control (bare, without having any plant cover), cool season grass, warm season forb, warm season grass, and warm season legume to assess their efficacy of runoff sediment control and P sequestration potential from soil. These plots were established on a coastal Bermuda grass WAF that received dairy lagoon effluent. A runoff collection system, a 1m x 1m sub-plot with a runoff conveyance and collection apparatus, was installed on the upstream and downstream margins of each plot. Natural rainfall runoff samples were collected and analyzed subsequently for total P, soluble P, and total suspended solids in the laboratory. Additionally, the total mass of runoff collected from each sub-plot was calculated. Results suggested that the warm season forb and warm season grass were the most effective vegetative covers for the reduction of runoff P, followed by coastal Bermuda and cool season grass, respectively. The lesser amount of runoff total P in these two treatments was due to lesser runoff mass and lesser sediments in the runoff due to initial interception of rain and less raindrop impact on soil because of denser vegetative cover in both treatments compared to all other treatments.

Giri, Subhasis

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

Ingley, H A

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

SciTech Connect

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

Fermilab | Directorate | Office of Integrated Planning & Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Integrated Planning & Performance Management (IPPM) Office of Integrated Planning & Performance Management (IPPM) Integrated Planning Diagram Integrated Planning Diagram [Download PPT] Mission: The Office of Integrated Planning and Performance Management (IPPM) within the Fermilab Directorate provides systems and management processes for institutional planning and performance assessment and evaluation. The office of IPPM leads multi-year, forward-looking planning and integration of institutional plans, programs, projects, operations and budgets. In addition it develops, implements and maintains integrated laboratory systems and management processes for strategic planning and goal setting, project and program oversight, enterprise risk management and performance planning and oversight. IPPM Facilitates:

348

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number of recorded events which could be reliably tied to known outages. The project involved two years costly, and prolonged outages can have crippling effects. According #12;2 to some estimates, the U year to year. Vegetation-related outages not caused by hazard trees also remain relatively constant

349

Changes in Vegetation Condition and Surface Fluxes during NAME 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vegetation in the core region of the North American monsoon (NAM) system changes dramatically after the onset of the summer rains so that large changes may be expected in the surface fluxes of radiation, heat, and moisture. Most of this ...

Christopher J. Watts; Russell L. Scott; Jaime Garatuza-Payan; Julio C. Rodriguez; John H. Prueger; William P. Kustas; Michael Douglas

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 8 Nano-neutralization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 8 Nano-neutralization Processing eChapters Processing 11583F09728A04038E6F4D332D58B26A AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Nano-neutralization from the book ...

351

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 9 Physical Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 9 Physical Refining Processing eChapters Processing 7E84B6524348AB59C4DF2B6D388E2582 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Physical Refining from the book ...

352

24 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral Did you read chapter 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicken Fat & Marbling in Meat Solid Fat Shortening (Crisco) Solid Fat Butter Solid Fat Margarine Liquid CHEMISTRY Atomic-Level Structure of Complex Materials Determines Properties Animals & Vegetables Fats: Margarine and Olive oil Fats and oils at room temperature ­ What observations can we make? Butter Easy

Hart, Gus

353

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 7 Deodorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 7 Deodorization Processing eChapters Processing AOCS B581B45B54FDB5F113096DE186B3B999 Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Deodorization from the book ...

354

The Roughness Length for Heat of Sparse Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-source model that solves the energy balance over vegetation and soil separately can be inverted to obtain the roughness length for heat z0h of a single-source model. Model parameters for the dual-source model were taken from previous ...

E. M. Blyth; A. J. Dolman

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Integrated Designs to Integrated Operations using BMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Designs to Integrated Operations using BMS Speaker(s): Punit Desai Date: February 6, 2013 - 12:15pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Girish Ghatikar The...

356

Evaluation of Vegetation Effects on the Generation and Modification of Mesoscale Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the present study is to evaluate (i) the effect of vegetated surfaces on modifying sea breeze and daytime thermally induced upslope flows, and (ii) the generation of thermally induced flow by vegetated areas contrasted by bare soil ...

M. Segal; R. Avissar; M. C. McCumber; R. A. Pielke

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Studies on the Bulk Transfer Coefficients over a Vegetated Surface with a Multilayer Energy Budget Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multilayer energy budget model for vegetation canopy is developed to describe the fluxes of sensible and latent heat exchanged between the vegetated surface and the atmosphere. The model gives satisfactory results when the calculated radiative ...

Junsei Kondo; Tsutomu Watanabe

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes details, validation, and sensitivity analysis of a new atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and radiation schemes for the ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Climate and Vegetation in the Middle East: Interannual Variability and Drought Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Euphrates Plain (EP) experiences large interannual variability in vegetation cover, especially in areas of marginal rain-fed agriculture. Vegetation in this region is primarily limited by available soil moisture, as determined by winter ...

Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Jason P. Evans; Roland A. Geerken; Ronald B. Smith

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Feedbacks of Vegetation on Summertime Climate Variability over the North American Grasslands. Part I: Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedbacks of vegetation on summertime climate variability over the North American Grasslands are analyzed using the statistical technique of Granger causality. Results indicate that normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) anomalies early in ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Nathan Phillips; Robert K. Kaufmann; Christopher Potter; Ranga B. Myneni

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Sensitivity Study of Convective Cloud Formation by Vegetation Forcing with Different Atmospheric Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable vegetation cover is a possible trigger for convection, especially in semiarid areas due to differential surface forcing. A two-dimensional numerical model with explicit cloud physics and a detailed vegetation parameterization scheme is ...

Xiaodong Hong; Martin J. Leach; Sethu Raman

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Simulating Competition and Coexistence between Plant Functional Types in a Dynamic Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distribution of vegetation is broadly determined by climate, and where bioclimatic parameters are favorable for several plant functional types (PFTs), by the competition between them. Most current dynamic global vegetation models (...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Large-Scale Vegetation Feedbacks on a Doubled CO2 Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in vegetation cover are known to influence the climate system by modifying the radiative, momentum, and hydrologic balance of the land surface. To explore the interactions between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere for doubled ...

Samuel Levis; Jonathan A. Foley; David Pollard

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Intraseasonal Variability of Satellite-Derived Rainfall and Vegetation over Southern Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-derived rainfall and vegetation [normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)] data for the period 1981–2000 are used to reveal spatial and temporal interrelationships via principal component analysis. The unimodal seasonal cycle peaks ...

Hector Chikoore; Mark R. Jury

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Influence of MODIS-derived dynamic vegetation on VIC-simulated soil moisture in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture-vegetation interactions are an important component of land-atmosphere coupling, especially in semi-arid regions such as the North American Great Plains. However, many land surface models parameterize vegetation using an interannually-...

Trent W. Ford; Steven M. Quiring

366

Hierarchical set of models for estimating the effects of air pollution on vegetation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three models have been developed to estimate the effects of air pollutants on vegetation at the photosynthetic process (PHOTO), plant (GROWl), and community (SILVA) levels of resolution. PHOTO simulates the enhancement of photosynthesis at low H/sub 2/S levels, depression of photosynthesis at high H/sub 2/S levels, and the threshold effects for sulfur pollutants. GROWl simulates the growth and development of a plant during a growing season. GROWl has been used to assess the effects on sugar beets of geothermal energy development in the Imperial Valley, California. SILVA is a community-level model simulating the effects of SO/sub 2/ on growth, species composition, and succession, for the mixed conifer forest types of the Sierra Nevada, California.

Kercher, J.R.; Axelrod, M.C.; Bingham, G.E.

1981-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

The impact of cattle grazing on salt marsh and elevated hummock vegetation communities of a Texas barrier island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To assess the effects of cattle herbivory on vegetation community structure and composition in a Texas coastal salt marsh, data measuring several vegetation parameters were collected in four distinct habitats within a heavily grazed marsh over an eighteen month period. Grazing reduced total biomass and total cover in the intertidal zone, mainly due to reductions in Spartina alterniflora Loisel. Biomass and cover of the non-palatable Salicornia virginica L., the other common species in the zone, was relatively unaffected. Grazing had a negative effect on average height of both species. Grazing effects increased with elevation for all tested variables. Substantial shoreline erosion was measured, but marsh loss was unattributable to grazing. Grazing also strongly reduced cover and average height of both species in the intertidal marsh/salt flat boundary ecotone. The S. virginica vegetation line in ungrazed plots advanced landward while the line in grazed plots receded. Results for S. alterniflora vegetation line migration in response to cattle activity were unclear. Data tracking average distances between the vegetation line and nearest landward individual of the two species also suggest that cattle presence may have inhibited the natural expansion of the vegetation line. The negative impacts of cattle in the intertidal marsh and the marsh flat ecotone on S. alterniflora performance were almost certainly due to consumption of plants by cattle, while reduced S. virginica performance was attributed mainly to deterioration of edaphic conditions and other associated effects of trampling. In the more diverse hummocks, grazing effect was directly related to elevation for three plant categories, with greater reductions in cover and average height observed in grazed plots in higher elevation zones. These results were attributed to the increased palatability of higher zone grasses compared to the less palatable halophytic succulents and forbs occurring in the highly saline lower zones. The results also showed a temporal increase in grazing effect for most species over the course of the study. Grazing also resulted in decreased species richness in the hummocks. Grazing generally inhibited growth and accelerated mortality of transplants in the salt flats, although ultimate survival was probably due more to physical factors.

Carothers, James Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

What is a healthy A diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cup fat free milk + 1 tbsp vegetable oil 1 egg 2 egg whites 1 tbsp butter 3/4 tbsp liquid vegetableWhat is a healthy diet? A diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products; Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, nuts; and Is low in saturated

Cantlon, Jessica F.

369

ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main industrial products Myriam and main industrial products Most of biobased polyols for polyurethanes are synthesized from vegetable oils literature; focus on the industrial synthetic routes. Keywords: vegetable oils; biobased polyols

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.  

SciTech Connect

This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

Brent Sohngen

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Calibrating a Coupled SVAT–Vegetation Growth Model with Remotely Sensed Reflectance and Surface Temperature—A Case Study for the HAPEX-Sahel Grassland Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models simulating the seasonal growth of vegetation have been recently coupled to soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes (SVATS). Such coupled vegetation–SVATS models (V–S) account for changes of the vegetation leaf area index (LAI) over ...

P. Cayrol; L. Kergoat; S. Moulin; G. Dedieu; A. Chehbouni

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability  

SciTech Connect

The System Assessment Capability is an integrated system of computer models and databases to assess the impact of waste remaining at Hanford. This tool will help decision makers and the public evaluate the cumulative effects of contamination from Hanford. This report describes the results of an initial assessment performed with the System Assessment Capability tools.

Bryce, Robert W.; Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Chain Transfer of Vegetable Oil Macromonomers in Acrylic Solution Copolymerization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) as comonomers in emulsion polymerization enables good film coalescence without the addition of solvents that constitute volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOMMs are derived from renewable resources and offer the potential of post-application crosslinking via auto-oxidation. However, chain transfer reactions of VOMMs with initiator and/or polymer radicals during emulsion polymerization reduce the amount of allylic hydrogen atoms available for primary auto-oxidation during drying. Vegetable oils and derivatives were reacted in combination with butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate via solution polymerization. The copolymerization was monitored using in situ infrared spectroscopy to determine the extent of chain transfer. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the loci of chain transfer and the molecular weight characteristics of the polymers were characterized by SEC. Solution polymerization was utilized to minimize temperature fluctuations and maintain polymer solubility during the initial characterization.

Black, Micah [University of Southern Mississippi, The; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Rawlins, James [University of Southern Mississippi, The

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sigma Mesa: Background elemental concentrations in soil and vegetation, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979, soil and vegetation samples were collected on Sigma Mesa to provide background data before construction on the mesa. Elemental data are presented for soil, grass, juniper, pinon pine, and oak. None of the data looks out of the ordinary. The purpose of the sampling program was to acquire, before any disturbance, a set of data to be used as background for future impact analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Gladney, E.S.; Brooks, G.H. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Prediction of leaf area index in almonds by vegetation indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three levels of scale for determining leaf area index (LAI) were explored within an almond orchard of alternating rows of Nonpareil and Monterey varieties using hemispherical photography and mule lightbar (MLB) at ground level up to airborne and satellite ... Keywords: Canopy light interception, EVI, GMI, LADP, LAI, Leaf area index, MASTER, MCARI, MLB, Multispectral indices, NDVI, NDWI, RMSE, SR, VI, Vegetation indices, fPAR

Jose L. Zarate-Valdez; Michael L. Whiting; Bruce D. Lampinen; Samuel Metcalf; Susan L. Ustin; Patrick H. Brown

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outreach to someone by E-mail Outreach to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Outreach on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Outreach on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Outreach on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Outreach on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Outreach on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Outreach on AddThis.com... Home Introduction Assessing Renewable Energy Options Planning, Programming, & Budgeting Project Funding Building Design Project Construction Commissioning Operations & Maintenance

377

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Construction to someone by E-mail Project Construction to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Project Construction on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Project Construction on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Project Construction on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Project Construction on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Project Construction on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Project Construction on AddThis.com... Home Introduction Assessing Renewable Energy Options Planning, Programming, & Budgeting

378

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training to someone by E-mail Training to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Training on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Training on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Training on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Training on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Training on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Training on AddThis.com... Home Introduction Assessing Renewable Energy Options Planning, Programming, & Budgeting Project Funding Building Design Project Construction Commissioning Operations & Maintenance

379

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by E-mail Resources to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Resources on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Resources on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Resources on AddThis.com... Home Introduction Assessing Renewable Energy Options Planning, Programming, & Budgeting Project Funding Building Design Project Construction Commissioning Operations & Maintenance

380

Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Renovations to someone by E-mail Major Renovations to someone by E-mail Share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Facebook Tweet about Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Twitter Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Google Bookmark Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Delicious Rank Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on Digg Find More places to share Guide to Integrating Renewable Energy in Federal Construction: Major Renovations on AddThis.com... Home Introduction Assessing Renewable Energy Options Planning, Programming, & Budgeting Project Funding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Agency/Company /Organization: World Agroforestry Centre Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Adaptation, Background analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.worldagroforestrycentre.org/sea/Publications/files/policybrief/PB0 Country: Philippines South-Eastern Asia Coordinates: 12.879721°, 121.774017° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":12.879721,"lon":121.774017,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

384

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

385

Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wind Integration Study Methods (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of common elements, differences, integration costs, and errors in integration analysis.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance (4/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance 9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance William Erickson Natural Resource Specialist - TFP/Walla Walla Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Little Goose-Lower Granite #1 and #2 Transmission Line Corridor from Towers 4/3 to 8/1. The right-of-way has an easement width of 258 feet and contains two 500kV Single Circuit Transmission Lines. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor as referenced in the attached checklist. Location: The subject right-of-way is located in Columbia County, WA., being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: The work will be accomplished by an Integrated Vegetation Management approach using a combination of manual, mechanical, herbicides and biological

388

Energy Systems Integration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Integration Systems Integration Ben Kroposki, PhD, PE Director, Energy Systems Integration National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Reducing investment risk and optimizing systems in a rapidly changing energy world * Increasing penetration of variable RE in grid * Increasing ultra high energy efficiency buildings and controllable loads * New data, information, communications and controls * Electrification of transportation and alternative fuels * Integrating energy storage (stationary and mobile) and thermal storage * Interactions between electricity/thermal/fuels/data pathways * Increasing system flexibility and intelligence Current Energy Systems Future Energy Systems Why Energy Systems Integration? 3 Energy Systems Integration Continuum Scale Appliance (Plug)

389

Potential of arid zone vegetation as a source of substrates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three aspects of the potential of vegetation in arid zones as a source of substrates are discussed. The first includes the limitations on efficiency of conversion of solar energy to the stored chemical energy of biomass in green plants, and the subsequent biochemical pathways of carbon dioxide fixation and biosynthesis. Second is the potential of plants endogenous to arid zones. Finally, the use of covered agriculture or controlled environmental agriculture (CEA) is considered both in its present form and in terms of possible extenion to the large scale production of stable crops. (JGB)

Bassham, J.A.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

EA-1750: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas Abstract: DOE prepared this EA to...

391

EA-1457: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1457: Final Environmental Assessment Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico, Sandia Site Office, Kirtland Air Force Base,...

392

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling the competition betweenSystems Integrated with Wind Energy Resources in California,Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems, Environmental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Relational measures and integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work in fuzzy modeling has recently made its way from the interval $[0,1]\\subseteq {\\mathord{\\rm I \\! R}}$ to the ordinal or even to the qualitative level. We proceed further and introduce relational measures and relational integration. First ideas of ... Keywords: Choquet integral, evidence and belief, measure, necessity, plausibility, possibility measures, relation algebra, relational, sugeno integral

Gunther Schmidt

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Environmental assessment for Kelley Hot Spring geothermal project: Kelley Hot Spring Agricultural Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental impacts of an integrated swine production unit are analyzed together with necessary ancillary operations deriving its primary energy from a known geothermal reservoir in accordance with policies established by the National Energy Conservation Act. This environmental assessment covers 6 areas designated as potentially feasible project sites, using as the basic criteria for selection ground, surface and geothermal water supplies. The six areas, comprising +- 150 acres each, are within a 2 mile radius of Kelley Hot Springs, a known geothermal resource of many centuries standing, located 16 miles west of Alturas, the county seat of Modoc County, California. The project consists of the construction and operation of a 1360 sow confined pork production complex expandable to 5440 sows. The farrow to finish system for 1360 sows consists of 2 breeding barns, 2 gestation barns, 1 farrowing and 1 nursery barn, 3 growing and 3 finishing barns, a feed mill, a methane generator for waste disposal and water storage ponds. Supporting this are one geothermal well and 1 or 2 cold water wells, all occupying approximately 12 acres. Environmental reconnaissance involving geology, hydrology, soils, vegetation, fauna, air and water quality, socioeconomic, archaelogical and historical, and land use aspects were carefully carried out, impacts assessed and mitigations evaluated.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electric Transmission Line Right-of-Way Post-Blackout Vegetation Management Strategies: 2008 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the federal government in regulating vegetation management on power line corridors changed significantly after the August 2003 blackout that affected more than 50 million people in the eastern United States and Canada. In 2004, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released a series of reports on vegetation management associated with the blackout, with a respondent sequence of draft standards for vegetation management released from 2005-2006. These standards are being promulgated an...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

CHANGES IN 137 CS CONCENTRATIONS IN SOIL AND VEGETATION ON THE FLOODPLAIN OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER OVER A 30 YEAR PERIOD  

SciTech Connect

{sup 137}Cs released during 1954-1974 from nuclear production reactors on the Savannah River Site, a US Department of Energy nuclear materials production site in South Carolina, contaminated a portion of the Savannah River floodplain known as Creek Plantation. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations have been measured in Creek Plantation since 1974 making it possible to calculate effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in soil and vegetation and assess the spatial distribution of contaminants on the floodplain. Activity concentrations in soil and vegetation were higher near the center of the floodplain than near the edges as a result of frequent inundation coupled with the presence of low areas that trapped contaminated sediments. {sup 137}Cs activity was highest near the soil surface, but depth related differences diminished with time as a likely result of downward diffusion or leaching. Activity concentrations in vegetation were significantly related to concentrations in soil. The plant to soil concentration ratio (dry weight) averaged 0.49 and exhibited a slight but significant tendency to decrease with time. The effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in shallow (0-7.6 cm) soil and in vegetation were 14.9 (95% CI = 12.5-17.3) years and 11.6 (95% CI = 9.1-14.1) years, respectively, and rates of {sup 137}Cs removal from shallow soil and vegetation did not differ significantly among sampling locations. Potential health risks on the Creek Plantation floodplain have declined more rapidly than expected on the basis of radioactive decay alone because of the relatively short effective half-life of {sup 137}Cs.

Paller, M.; Jannik, T.; Fledderman, P.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

397

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry from the book ...

400

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 14 Process Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 14 Process Equipment Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 14 Process Equipment from the book ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Simulation of vegetation and hydrology for climate change analysis of a mountain watershed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate change is expected to have both direct and indirect effects on water resources. Hydrologic impacts of two indirect effects, vegetation density and stomata! conductance,… (more)

[No author

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation from the book ...

403

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 9 Fat Crystallization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 9 Fat Crystallization Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Fat Crystallization from the book ...

404

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures from the book ...

405

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 12 Loss Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 12 Loss Management Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Loss Management from the book ...

406

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 11 Oil Quality Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 11 Oil Quality Management Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Oil Quality Management from the book ...

407

Lighting Group: Controls: Systems Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Integration Building Control Systems Integration Objective This research project investigates how diverse building control systems can be integrated to provide seamless...

408

Microsoft PowerPoint - S05-03_Boomer_Tank Integrity 11-2010 Final.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kayle Boomer Kayle Boomer Kayle Boomer Hanford Tank Hanford Tank Integrity Project Integrity Project November 17, 2010 November 17, 2010 Print Close Tank Operations Contract 2 Page 2 Overview of Tank Integrity * Tank History * Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project - Objectives - Inspections - Chemistry Control * Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project - Objectives - Structural Integrity and Leak Monitoring - SST Integrity Panel Print Close Tank Operations Contract 3 Page 3 Double-shell Tank Integrity Program (DSTIP) *DST UT/Visual *DST System Videos *DST System Line Tests *DST Pit Inspections *DST Facility Integrity Assessments *Technical Safety Requirements for Chemistry Control *Annulus Ventilation System Operation *Corrosion Probe Development *Laboratory Testing INTEGRITY ASSESSME NTS CHEMISTRY CONTROL

409

Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk will discuss details of the approach and present results for some example calculations performed in Manhattan in support of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) using some of the tools developed as part of this new capability.

Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Integrated Traction System  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy elaborates the compelling need for a commercialized competitively priced electric traction drive system to proliferate the acceptance of HEVs, PHEVs, and FCVs in the market. The desired end result is a technically and commercially verified integrated ETS (Electric Traction System) product design that can be manufactured and distributed through a broad network of competitive suppliers to all auto manufacturers. The objectives of this FCVT program are to develop advanced technologies for an integrated ETS capable of 55kW peak power for 18 seconds and 30kW of continuous power. Additionally, to accommodate a variety of automotive platforms the ETS design should be scalable to 120kW peak power for 18 seconds and 65kW of continuous power. The ETS (exclusive of the DC/DC Converter) is to cost no more than $660 (55kW at $12/kW) to produce in quantities of 100,000 units per year, should have a total weight less than 46kg, and have a volume less than 16 liters. The cost target for the optional Bi-Directional DC/DC Converter is $375. The goal is to achieve these targets with the use of engine coolant at a nominal temperature of 105C. The system efficiency should exceed 90% at 20% of rated torque over 10% to 100% of maximum speed. The nominal operating system voltage is to be 325V, with consideration for higher voltages. This project investigated a wide range of technologies, including ETS topologies, components, and interconnects. Each technology and its validity for automotive use were verified and then these technologies were integrated into a high temperature ETS design that would support a wide variety of applications (fuel cell, hybrids, electrics, and plug-ins). This ETS met all the DOE 2010 objectives of cost, weight, volume and efficiency, and the specific power and power density 2015 objectives. Additionally a bi-directional converter was developed that provides charging and electric power take-off which is the first step towards enabling a smart-grid application. GM under this work assessed 29 technologies; investigated 36 configurations/types power electronics and electric machines, filed 41 invention disclosures; and ensured technology compatibility with vehicle production. Besides the development of a high temperature ETS the development of industrial suppliers took place because of this project. Suppliers of industrial power electronic components are numerous, but there are few that have traction drive knowledge. This makes it difficult to achieve component reliability, durability, and cost requirements necessary of high volume automotive production. The commercialization of electric traction systems for automotive industry requires a strong diverse supplier base. Developing this supplier base is dependent on a close working relationship between the OEM and supplier so that appropriate component requirements can be developed. GM has worked closely with suppliers to develop components for electric traction systems. Components that have been the focus of this project are power modules, capacitors, heavy copper boards, current sensors, and gate drive and controller chip sets. Working with suppliers, detailed component specifications have been developed. Current, voltage, and operation environment during the vehicle drive cycle were evaluated to develop higher resolution/accurate component specifications.

Greg Smith; Charles Gough

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 4, 2009 September 4, 2009 EA-1655: Final Environmental Assessment Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development September 1, 2009 EA-1584: Final Environmental Assessment Sand Point Wind Installation Project Sand Point, Alaska September 1, 2009 EA-1788: Final Environmental Assessment Sapphire Energy, Inc.'s Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) Facility in Columbus, New Mexico August 3, 2009 EA-1674: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Refrigerated Bottled or Canned Beverage Vending Machines August 3, 2009 EA-1659: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Demolition of Building 330 at Argonne National Laboratory August 3, 2009 EA-1652: Final Environmental Assessment

413

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 16, 2011 August 16, 2011 EA-1870: Draft Environmental Assessment Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant Kanab, Utah August 15, 2011 EA-1888: Draft Environmental Assessment Old Town Fuel and Fiber Proposed Demonstration-Scale Integrated Biorefinery August 13, 2011 EA-1862: Draft Environmental Assessment Oneida Seven Generations Corporation: Energy Recovery Project, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin August 12, 2011 EA-1723: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment General Motors LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California August 1, 2011 EA-1829: Draft Environmental Assessment Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, HI

414

Quantifying biological integrity of California sage scrub communities using plant life-form cover.  

SciTech Connect

The California sage scrub (CSS) community type in California's Mediterranean-type ecosystems supports a large number of rare, threatened, and endangered species, and is critically degraded and endangered. Monitoring ecological variables that provide information about community integrity is vital to conserving these biologically diverse communities. Fractional cover of true shrub, subshrub, herbaceous vegetation, and bare ground should fill information gaps between generalized vegetation type maps and detailed field-based plot measurements of species composition and provide an effective means for quantifying CSS community integrity. Remote sensing is the only tool available for estimating spatially comprehensive fractional cover over large extent, and fractional cover of plant life-form types is one of the measures of vegetation state that is most amenable to remote sensing. The use of remote sensing does not eliminate the need for either field surveying or vegetation type mapping; rather it will likely require a combination of approaches to reliably estimate life-form cover and to provide comprehensive information for communities. According to our review and synthesis, life-form fractional cover has strong potential for providing ecologically meaningful intermediate-scale information, which is unattainable from vegetation type maps and species-level field measurements. Thus, we strongly recommend incorporating fractional cover of true shrub, subshrub, herb, and bare ground in CSS community monitoring methods. Estimating life-form cover at a 25 m x 25 m spatial scale using remote sensing would be an appropriate approach for initial implementation. Investigation of remote sensing techniques and an appropriate spatial scale; collaboration of resource managers, biologists, and remote sensing specialists, and refinement of protocols are essential for integrating life-form fractional cover mapping into strategies for sustainable long-term CSS community management.

Hamada, Y.; Stow, D. A.; Franklin, J. (Environmental Science Division); (San Diego State University, Department of Geography); (Arizona State University, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Academic integrity policies in a computing education context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Academic integrity policies embody widely accepted principles of ethics and behaviour, instantiating in their codes the standards and processes that apply to the institutions enacting them. Application of these principles to the field of computing, which ... Keywords: academic dishonesty, academic integrity, assessment, cheating, collaboration, collusion, educational, plagiarism, policies, practices

Charles P. Riedesel; Alison L. Clear; Gerry W. Cross; Janet M. Hughes; Simon; Henry M. Walker

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Integrability vs Quantum Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-integrability is often taken as a prerequisite for quantum thermalization. Still, a generally accepted definition of quantum integrability is lacking. With the basis in the driven Rabi model we discuss this careless usage of the term "integrability" in connection to quantum thermalization. The model would be classified as non-integrable according to the most commonly used definitions, for example, the only preserved quantity is the total energy. Despite this fact, a thorough analysis conjectures that the system will not thermalize. Thus, our findings suggest first of all (i) that care should be paid when linking non-integrability with thermalization, and secondly (ii) that the standardly used definitions for quantum integrability are unsatisfactory.

Jonas Larson

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Integrated Safety Management (ISM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Safety Management Integrated Safety Management Home ISM Policy ISM Champions ISM Workshops Resources Archives Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Integrated Safety Management (ISM) ism logo Welcome to the Department of Energy's Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Web Site. The Department and its contractors remain firmly committed to ISM as first defined in 1996. The objective of ISM is to perform work in a safe and environmentally sound manner. More specifically, as described in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy: "The Department and Contractors must systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are accomplished while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. This is to be accomplished through effective integration of safety management into all facets of work planning and execution." "

418

Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Energy Systems Integration Environmentallyenergy use, combined with the capability of the BMS system, including alarms to identify anomalies. Integration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & Manufacturing (IIEDM) Project. ... designed to support distributed supply chain integration and e ...

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Computer Integrated Building Processes Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laboratory effective in October 2011, the Computer Integrated Building Processes Group ... Chris Brown) are now in the Systems Integration Division. ...

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Integrated Biosystems for Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated biosystems for sustainable development Proceedings of the InFoRM 2000 National Workshop on Integrated

Kev Warburton; Usha Pillai-mcgarry; Deborah Ramage; No Ms; Dr. Kev Warburton

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Materials - Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Assessment The staff of the Energy Systems Division has a long history of technical and economic analysis of the production and recycling of materials for transportation...

423

Substation Data Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to implement a field demonstration of automated substation data integration. To achieve the goal of the smart grid, it will be necessary to integrate substation intelligent electronic device (IED) data into a data warehouse or data mart. Converting data to information to allow improved decision making requires automation, which is referred to as an information smart approach. The report discusses automated integration of data from substation IEDs and automated analysis of r...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

424

Integrated Computational Materials Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This short course is based on the Summer School for Integrated Computational Materials Education, which was developed to meet this need. We will present a ...

425

Software Component Integration Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a combination of off-the-shelf components, with new components integrated to satisfy ... oriented, that is, it consists of objects with state and behavior. ...

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

426

Grid Integration Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration Group The Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducts research that advances the near-term adoption of demand response (DR) technologies, policies, programs,...

427

Integrated waste management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated waste management is considered from a systems’ approach, with a particular emphasis on advancing sustainability. The focus of the thesis is to examine the… (more)

Seadon, Jeffrey Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Vegetation Management by Electric Utilities: Use of Herbicides and Other Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the essential elements and principles comprising electric utility vegetation management programs, defines management problems, and discusses possible research on vegetation management issues. The report particularly focuses on the use of herbicides and their effects on wildlife and human health. Legal and regulatory aspects and cost control issues are also covered.

1995-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Coupled Soil-Vegetation Scheme: Description, Parameters, Validation, and, Sensitivity Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled soil-vegetation scheme is presented. A one-layer canopy and a three-layer soil representation is used. The impact of canopy morphological properties on radiation and momentum transfer in the vegetation is modeled as simply as possible. ...

Ferenc Ács

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference papers for bound 3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol and 3-MCPD esters)in foods, vegetable oils, and fats. Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis ao

431

Classification of floodplain vegetation by data fusion of spectral (CASI) and LiDAR data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To safeguard the goals of flood protection and nature development, a river manager requires detailed and up-to-date information on vegetation structures in floodplains. In this study, remote-sensing data on the vegetation of a semi-natural floodplain ...

G. W. Geerling; M. Labrador-Garcia; J. G. P. W. Clevers; A. M. J. Ragas; A. J. M. Smits

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is to provide technical and integration support to Fluor Hanford, Inc., including operable unit investigations at 300-FF-5 and other groundwater operable units, strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project).

Fix, N. J.

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-11)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-13)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Projects to Integrated Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Twitter Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Google Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Delicious Rank FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on Digg Find More places to share FCT Technology Validation: Integrated Projects on AddThis.com... Home Transportation Projects Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects Integrated Projects DOE Projects Non-DOE Projects Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Integrated Projects To maximize overall system efficiencies, reduce costs, and optimize

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assessment integrated vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

442

High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Effects of Satellite-Derived Vegetation Cover Variability on Simulated Land–Atmosphere Interactions in the NAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substantial evolution of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NVDI)-derived vegetation cover (Fg) exists in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The intraseasonal and wet-/dry-year fluctuations of Fg are linked to observed precipitation ...

Toshihisa Matsui; Venkataraman Lakshmi; Eric E. Small

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluating Aspects of the Community Land and Atmosphere Models (CLM3 and CAM3) Using a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM–DGVM) is used diagnostically to identify land and atmospheric model biases that lead to biases in the simulated vegetation. The CLM–DGVM driven with observed ...

Gordon B. Bonan; Samuel Levis

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION IN INTERIOR ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY likely to change vegetation type. Finally, vegetation recovery, estimated using a remotely-sensed................................................................................6 Chapter 2. Mapping Burn Severity Using Satellite Remote Sensing..........................8

Ruess, Roger W.