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1

Stakeholder Benefit Assessment – Project Success through Management of Stakeholders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper discusses how a project should deal with its internal and external stakeholders who are associated with determining the project's objectives and uncertainty issues. Our experiences during 15 years of uncertainty assessment in many different sectors show that stakeholders are subjective and influenced by the objectives or effects of the project more than expected. This paper focuses on the relationship between the stakeholders and opportunities. We conclude that projects to a little extent find opportunities because risk and opportunities processes not are separated. From our point of view, projects can find and exploit opportunities and benefits to a greater extend if they use a defined opportunity management process. This paper has four parts. Firstly, rationality and methodology are presented. The method that we adopt is of qualitative nature. In the second part, relevant theories are described. Part three presents our ideas about the connection between stakeholders and uncertainty. And finally, conclusion and a description of further research wind up the whole discussion.

Agnar Johansen; Petter Eik-Andresen; Anandasivakumar Ekambaram

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising  

SciTech Connect

Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

Miller, B.; Sinclair, J. [Elon University, Elon, NC (United States). School Community

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Stakeholders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Brainstorming and plotting stakeholders achieves a number of vital tasks toward building a community of awareness and advocacy:

4

Stakeholder participation in health impact assessment: A multicultural approach  

SciTech Connect

The literature on impact assessment (HIA) registers the importance of stakeholder participation in the assessment process, but still lacks a model for engaging stakeholders of diverse ethnic, professional and sectorial backgrounds. This paper suggests that the multicultural approach can contribute to HIA through a revision of the generic 5-step HIA model, and its implementation in a metropolitan plan in Southern Israel. The health issue scoped by the stakeholders in the HIA is related to land uses in the vicinity of the national hazardous industry and hazardous waste site. The stakeholders were representatives of the diverse populations at stake, including rural Bedouins and Jewish city dwellers, as well as representatives from the public sector, private sector, non-governmental organizations and academia. The case study revealed that a multicultural stakeholder participation process helps to uncover health issues known to the community which were not addressed in the original plan, and provides local knowledge regarding health conditions that is especially valuable when scientific data is uncertain or absent. It enables diverse stakeholders to prioritize the health issues that will be assessed. The case study also reveals ways in which the model needs revisions and improvements such as in recruitment of diverse participants. This paper presents a multicultural model of HIA and discusses some of the challenges that are faced when HIA is implemented in the context of current decision-making culture. -- Highlights: • We revised the generic HIA model in light of the multicultural approach. • We tested the model in a case study of zoning a hazardous industry site. • Multicultural stakeholder participation uncovers health issues known to communities. • It enables community prioritization of health issues. • We present a model for multicultural stakeholder participation in HIA.

Negev, Maya, E-mail: mayane@tau.ac.il [Hartog School of Government and Policy, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tel Aviv University, P.O.B. 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)] [Hartog School of Government and Policy, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tel Aviv University, P.O.B. 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Davidovitch, Nadav, E-mail: nadavd@bgu.ac.il [Department of Health Systems Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, P.O.B. 653, Be'er Sheva 84105 (Israel)] [Department of Health Systems Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, P.O.B. 653, Be'er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Garb, Yaakov, E-mail: ygarb@bgu.ac.il [Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel)] [Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel); Tal, Alon, E-mail: alontal@bgu.ac.il [Mitrani Department of Dryland Ecology, Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel)] [Mitrani Department of Dryland Ecology, Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer 84990 (Israel)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Microsoft Word - StakeholderInputForm_LocalPlanningAssessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

planning assessments, including load projects, potential generating resources, and demand response. 2. Projects to be considered as possible alternatives in planning assessments....

6

Assessing stakeholder salience through the view of lean enterprise transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerospace enterprises tend to take a strategic approach to managing their enterprise. This thesis posits that stakeholder theory presents another way of looking at the enterprise, as it incorporates elements of both structure ...

Sisto, Gwendolyn A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Roles and Responsibilities for Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Roles and Responsibilities for Wind for Schools Participants Roles and Responsibilities for Wind for Schools Participants The following section describes the roles and responsibilities of each entity involved in a Wind for Schools project. Note that the structure was not rigidly defined to allow each state to implement the project as was most appropriate. School and Community Wind Application Center State Facilitator Wind Powering America Local Utility or Electric Cooperative State Energy Office School and Community In order for a Wind for Schools project to succeed, many people in the school community supported the concept, including the science teacher, the school principal and administration, the district superintendent and administration, and the school board. The school provided land for the project, support for the wind turbine interconnection to the school

8

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

9

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

10

Regulatory requirements and tools for environmental assessment of hazardous wastes: Understanding tribal and stakeholder concerns using Department of Energy sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many US governmental and Tribal Nation agencies, as well as state and local entities, deal with hazardous wastes within regulatory frameworks that require specific environmental assessments. In this paper we use Department of Energy (DOE) sites as examples to examine the relationship between regulatory requirements and environmental assessments for hazardous waste sites and give special attention to how assessment tools differ. We consider federal laws associated with environmental protection include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as well as regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tribal Nations and state agencies. These regulatory regimes require different types of environmental assessments and remedial investigations, dose assessments and contaminant pathways. The DOE case studies illustrate the following points: 1) there is often understandable confusion about what regulatory requirements apply to the site resources, and what environmental assessments are required by each, 2) the messages sent on site safety issued by different regulatory agencies are sometimes contradictory or confusing (e.g. Oak Ridge Reservation), 3) the regulatory frameworks being used to examine the same question can be different, leading to different conclusions (e.g. Brookhaven National Laboratory), 4) computer models used in support of groundwater models or risk assessments are not necessarily successful in convincing Native Americans and others that there is no possibility of risk from contaminants (e.g. Amchitka Island), 5) when given the opportunity to choose between relying on a screening risk assessments or waiting for a full site-specific analysis of contaminants in biota, the screening risk assessment option is rarely selected (e.g. Amchitka, Hanford Site), and finally, 6) there needs to be agreement on whether there has been adequate characterization to support the risk assessment (e.g. Hanford). The assessments need to be transparent and to accommodate different opinions about the relationship between characterizations and risk assessments. This paper illustrates how many of the problems at DOE sites, and potentially at other sites in the U.S. and elsewhere, derive from a lack of either understanding of, or consensus about, the regulatory process, including the timing and types of required characterizations and data in support of site characterizations and risk assessments.

Joanna Burger; Charles Powers; Michael Gochfeld

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Q methodology study of stakeholders’ views about accountability for promoting healthy food environments in England through the Responsibility Deal Food Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In March 2011, the United Kingdom’s (UK’s) Government launched five Public Health Responsibility Deal Networks to address public health priorities. The Networks used voluntary partnerships to influence peoples’ choice architecture to move them toward healthier behaviors. The purpose of this research was to conduct an exploratory study of diverse stakeholders’ perspectives about perceived responsibility and accountability expectations to improve food environments in England through the Food Network partnerships. A purposive sample of policy elites (n = 31) from government, academia, food industry and non-government organizations sorted 48 statements related to improving food environments in England. Statements were grounded in three theoretical perspectives (i.e., legitimacy, nudge and public health law). \\{PQMethod\\} 2.33 statistical software program used factor analysis to identify viewpoints based on intra-individual differences for how participants sorted statements. The results revealed three distinct viewpoints, which explained 64% of the variance for 31 participants, and emphasized different expectations about responsibility. The food environment protectors (n = 17) underscored government responsibility to address unhealthy food environments if voluntary partnerships are ineffective; the partnership pioneers (n = 12) recognized government–industry partnerships as legitimate and necessary to address unhealthy food environments; and the commercial market defenders (n = 1) emphasized individual responsibility for food choices and rejected government intervention to improve food environments. Consensus issues included: protecting children’s right to health; food industry practices that can and should be changed; government working with industry on product reformulation; and building consumer support for economically viable healthy products. Contentious issues were: inadequacy of accountability structures and government inaction to regulate food marketing practices targeting children. We conclude that understanding different viewpoints is a step toward building mutual trust to strengthen accountability structures that may help stakeholders navigate ideologically contentious issues to promote healthy food environments in England.

Vivica I. Kraak; Boyd Swinburn; Mark Lawrence; Paul Harrison

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

13

Dear Customer/Stakeholder,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1132014 Subject: BPA Post-2011 Energy Efficiency Review Update 4 - Material for January 16 meeting and Proposed Schedule for Workgroups and Meetings Dear CustomerStakeholder,...

14

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. The Demand Response Quick Assessment Tools developed at LBNL will be demonstrated. The tool is built on EnergyPlus simulation and is able to evaluate and compare different DR strategies, such as global temperature reset, chiller cycling, supply air temperature reset, etc. A separate EnergyPlus plotting tool will also be demonstrated during this seminar. Users can use the tool to test EnergyPlus models, conduct parametric analysis, or compare multiple EnergyPlus simulation

15

QER Stakeholder Meeting  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Written summation QER Stakeholder Meeting June 19, 2014 Adnan Mansour, PhD GE Power & Water, Water & Process Technologies Email: Adnan.Mansour@ge.com Phone: 1 215 633 4120...

16

NEPA Stakeholders Directory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Policy Act N E P A DIRECTORY of POTENTIAL STAKEHOLDERS for DOE ACTIONS under NEPA 28 th Edition July 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: July 28, 201 1 REPLY TO ATN OF: Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (C. Chen, GC-54,202-586-0733) SUBJECT: Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA: 2gth Edition TO: DOE NEPA Community I am pleased to announce that the 2sth edition of the Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA, dated July 20 1 1, is now posted on the DOE NEPA website (http://ne-pa. enerm. gov/documents/StakeholdersDirectory. pdfl. The Directory is intended to supplement distribution lists that DOE Offices compile for particular projects or facilities

17

DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle-- Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Collection, assessment, and analysis of Seattle stakeholder input and opinions regarding the commercial building energy asset rating program.

18

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Stakeholders Forum Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 14-16, 2013 Tuesday, May 14 7:00 am - 5:00 pm Registration Niagara Foyer 7:00 am - 7:45 am Breakfast and Networking Grand A 8:00 am - 10:00 am National Updates for Transportation Stakeholder Groups and Guests - Panel Grand BC Moderator: John Giarrusso Jr., MA Emergency Management Agency / Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Co-Chair US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management - Steve O'Connor, Director, Office of Packaging & Transportation US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Earl P. Easton, Senior Level Advisor (retired) and David W. Pstrak, Transportation and Storage Specialist, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation

19

Stakeholder Relations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stakeholder Relations Stakeholder Relations Stakeholder Relations Site tours, like this one near Rifle, Colorado, allow stakeholders to learn more about LM projects. Site tours, like this one near Rifle, Colorado, allow stakeholders to learn more about LM projects. Public meetings give stakeholders an opportunity to gain information about DOE and LM activities. This public meeting was held in Riverton, Wyoming. Public meetings give stakeholders an opportunity to gain information about DOE and LM activities. This public meeting was held in Riverton, Wyoming. Site tours, like this one near Rifle, Colorado, allow stakeholders to learn more about LM projects. Public meetings give stakeholders an opportunity to gain information about DOE and LM activities. This public meeting was held in Riverton, Wyoming.

20

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASSESSMENT OF VARIABLE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMS WITH DEMAND RESPONSE RESOURCES BY ANUPAMA SUNIL KOWLI B of consumers - called demand response resources (DRRs) - whose role has become increasingly important

Gross, George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N N ti l T t ti National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Chicago, IL, May 26, 2010 Ahmad Al-Daouk Date and page number - 1 Director, National Security Department National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center - Albuquerque, NM National Transportation Stakeholders Forum OSRP * NNSA Contractors transporting in commerce, are required law to comply with applicable regulations required law to comply with applicable regulations (e.g. federal, local, tribal) * Great majority of NNSA shipments are non-secured * Off-Site Source Recovery Program (OSRP) - OSRP is a U.S. Government activity sponsored and overseen by NNSA Office of Global Threat Reduction and the program is managed by LANL Mi i i t t d b d d Date and page number - 2 - Mission is to remove excess, unwanted, abandoned, or

22

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATION STAKEHOLDERS TRANSPORTATION STAKEHOLDERS FORUM Activities and Accomplishments May 16, 2013 Buffalo, New York NTSF RESOURCES  Wiki Site  Private domain / Registration required  Repository of information  Users are allowed editing capabilities  Webinars  Cover a variety of topics (NRC Rulemaking, Section 180(c), BRC Recommendations, Strategy for Management and Disposal of UNF and HLRW, etc.)  Recording are available on the wiki site  Input is needed for future content NTSF Working Groups COMMUNICATIONS WORKING GROUP  Webinars  Development Guide  LLW Fact Sheet  Table of Waste Types  New Fact Sheets  Newsletter  NFSTPP Communications Products TEPP WORKING GROUP  Formed a TEPP Working Group after the 2012 NTSF to

23

Enclosures STC Stakeholder Meeting Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enclosures STC Enclosures STC Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - Austin, Texas Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - Austin, Texas 2 Enclosures STC Agenda 2011 REVIEW IDENTIFY & REVIEW NEW GAPS COLLABORATION & 2012 PLAN QUESTIONS & DISCUSSION STRATEGIC GOALS Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - Austin, Texas 3 Enclosures STC 2011 REVIEW Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - Austin, Texas 4  New + Existing, Single + Multi-Family  ROOFS  WALLS  FOUNDATIONS  FENESTRATIONS  AIRTIGHTNESS  MATERIALS  OTHER Enclosures STC Categories Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Wednesday, February 29, 2012 -

24

2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy for discharge over periods of hours, such as large-scale battery storage, compressed air energy, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource Economic system operators, policy makers and other grid stakeholders in the expanded utilization of energy storage

Gross, George

25

Stakeholder Engagement Team | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

stakeholders, which include leadership regulators and governments, industry, think tanks, universities, foundations, and other institutions. The Stakeholder Engagement Team...

26

FUSRAP Stakeholder Report_3.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUSRAP FUSRAP Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Stakeholder Report May 2013 ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has operated the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) since 1974. During that time, we have accomplished many activities to identify and remediate to a safe condition sites that became contaminated with radioactive materials in support of the nation's early atomic energy programs. DOE is responsible for 30 remediated FUSRAP sites (see the map on the next page). Our mission is to keep these sites protective of human health and the environment.To accomplish this, DOE has evaluated risk for the sites and defined long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) requirements to monitor site

27

DOE Mobile Detection Assessment Response System (MDARS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helps Pioneer "Robot" Patrol Technology: Deployment of the Helps Pioneer "Robot" Patrol Technology: Deployment of the DOE Mobile Detection Assessment Response System (MDARS) The use of patrol robots to cost effectively improve security while reducing health and safety risks at DOE and NNSA nuclear facilities is an HSS advanced technology deployment "first". Over the past 2 years, the HSS Office of Technology has played a key role in working with the Army, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and General Dynamics Robotics Systems to purchase, prototype, test and deploy the first of three MDARS patrol robots at NNSS. In addition to the initial purchase, HSS successfully negotiated a mutually acceptable

28

THE INTERFACE BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY: THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the environmental assessment (EA), EA follow-up and voluntary corporate responsibility aspects of natural resourceTHE INTERFACE BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY: THE VICTOR DIAMOND Report No: 436 Title of Research Project: The Interface Between Environmental Assessment and Corporate

29

WIPP Stakeholder Information Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Stakeholder Information Page Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Notification of Panel 6 Closure and Final Waste Emplacement dated November 5, 2013 Notification of Last Waste Emplacement and Intent to Commence Closure of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Panel 5 dated March 30, 2011 Submittal of Final Audit Reports Audit Report A-07-16 for INL/CCP RH Waste Characterization Activities dated November 22, 2006 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for SRS A-07-01 dated November 21, 2006 CEMRC-CCP Final Audit Report Transmittal dated March 27, 2007 Transmittal of the Final Report of CBFO Recertification Audit A-06-06 of the INL Analytical Laboratories dated June 13, 2007 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the INL/CCP Audit A-07-19 dated June 20, 2007

30

Summary Report on Stakeholder Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Devon Manz Electric Power and Propulsion Systems Lab One Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY, 12309 PhoneSummary Report on Stakeholder Workshop Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity on Stakeholder Workshop By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York And University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural Energy

31

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Demand Response Quick Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand response quick assessment tool image The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. This assessment tool will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfort impact for various demand responsive strategies. Users of the tool will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tool will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points

32

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-5319E Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy of the Demand Response Research Center Industrial Controls Experts Working Group: · Jim Filanc, Southern

33

2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Survey 2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey DOE-LM periodically surveys its stakeholders to collect their feedback on DOE-LM performance at...

34

Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Save the Date The spring 2015 meeting...

35

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Stakeholders Forum National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Presentation by Ahmad Al-Daouk, Director of National Security Department NNSA Service Center National...

36

CESP Tool 2.3: Stakeholder Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Tool 2.3: Stakeholder Agenda from Step 2: Identify and Engage Stakeholders of the Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning.

37

ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS utilities consumer advocates regulators environmental groups technology providers policymakers WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO AMERICANS. A smarter electrical grid can save us energy, protect consumers, safeguard our environment and ultimately save money for all Americans. 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Litos Strategic Communication, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that

38

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's 2010 Demand Response and Advanced Metering Survey (2010 FERC Survey, covering calendar year 2009) indicates that advanced metering penetration (i.e., the fraction of all installed meters that are advanced meters) reached approximately 8.7 percent in the United States, compared to approximately 4.7 percent in the 2008 FERC Survey (covering calendar year 2007). The upper Midwest, West and Texas have advanced meter penetrations exceeding 13 percent. As in previous surveys, electric cooperatives have the largest penetration, nearly 25 percent, among

39

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's 2010 Demand Response and Advanced Metering Survey (2010 FERC Survey, covering calendar year 2009) indicates that advanced metering penetration (i.e., the fraction of all installed meters that are advanced meters) reached approximately 8.7 percent in the United States, compared to approximately 4.7 percent in the 2008 FERC Survey (covering calendar year 2007). The upper Midwest, West and Texas have advanced meter penetrations exceeding 13 percent. As in previous surveys, electric cooperatives have the largest penetration, nearly 25 percent, among

40

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: News  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

News News This page lists all of the news referenced on the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's website. Also follow news from the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative by subscribing to its newsletter or through an RSS Feed Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative News RSS Feed . Learn about RSS Feeds. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Subject Category All Agricultural Public Power Schools Small Wind Economic Development Policy Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 464 records found. Page 1 of 93, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: News 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) is the mechanism through which DOE communicates at a national level with states and tribes about the Department's shipments of radioactive waste and materials, as well as occasional high-visibility shipments that are nonradioactive. The purpose of the NTSF is to bring transparency, openness, and accountability to DOE's offsite transportation activities through collaboration with state and tribal governments. The NTSF meetings and webinars will be particularly relevant for personnel with responsibilities in packaging and transportation, emergency management, security, inspection and enforcement, and radiation protection. Send your

42

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Contacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Staff Contacts Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Staff Contacts This page introduces the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach team. If you have questions, please contact the Webmaster. Photo of Patrick Gilman Patrick Gilman Wind Energy Deployment Manager, U.S. Department of Energy 720-356-1420 Photo of Ben Chicoski Ben Chicoski Senior Analyst, Energetics Incorporated 202-406-4149 Photo of Debbie Schultheis Debbie Schultheis Technical Project Officer, U.S. Department of Energy 720-356-1811 Photo of Mark Bolinger Mark Bolinger Research Scientist, Electricity Markets and Policy Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 603-795-4937 Photo of Tessa Dardani Tessa Dardani Administrative Analyst, National Renewable Energy Laboratory 303-384-6962 Photo of Ben Hoen Ben Hoen Principal Research Associate, Electricity Markets and Policy Group,

43

Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit on AddThis.com... Conferences & Workshops Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Electric Vehicle Community Readiness Stakeholder Summit Waste-to-Wheels Plug-In Vehicle & Infrastructure Fuel & Vehicle Strategy 2011 Clean Cities Stakeholder Summit

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment center response Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the work of the UAC. Roles and Responsibilities. Assessment of academic... of responsibility for assessment activities to an ... Source: Sheridan, Jennifer - Women in Science...

45

Stakeholder Perceptions of Short-rotation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................6 2.2 Perceptions of biomass energy....................................................................7 2.2.1 Awareness of biomass energy amongst stakeholders ................................8 2.2.2 Stakeholder concerns in relation to biomass energy................................11 2.2.3 Opposition

46

FINAL_2013_Stakeholder-Letter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send a letter to local officials/stakeholders about your participation in EPA's 2013 ENERGY STAR National Send a letter to local officials/stakeholders about your participation in EPA's 2013 ENERGY STAR National Building Competition by customizing the text below with your organization's information and whether you're also participating in the communications category of the competition. Dear [Name of official], [Name of buildings/space], owned/managed by [organization], has been selected to participate in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 2013 ENERGY STAR National Building Competition: Battle of the Buildings to help improve the energy efficiency of commercial buildings and protect the environment. In the spirit of popular weight-loss competitions, [name of buildings/space] will battle it out against thousands of other teams representing buildings and

47

Researching with stakeholders: Lessons from interdisciplinary climate change research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engagement process as part of your research. They may not all be relevant in every case, and sometimes the Tyndall Centre's vision "to develop sustainable responses to climate change through trans into the practice of stakeholder engagement suggests it can offer various benefits such as: (a) improving

Watson, Andrew

48

Stakeholder theory as an arch to manage successful legitimacy strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Literature on corporate social responsibility has sought to provide explanations for corporate decisions to disclose information in annual reports. A number of studies have been conducted to identify the motivations for corporate social disclosure by using a number of social theories and not the reactions of the users of this information. However, there is a lack of research into managing legitimacy strategies. The understanding of the nature of legitimating strategies and knowing the role that stakeholders can play to influence these strategies might benefit greatly on increasing the effectiveness of these strategies across social locations and through time. The paper is mainly concerned with: a) bringing some coherence to the methodology of stakeholder theory and corporate strategies; b) explaining the role of stakeholder theory in managing legitimacy strategies effectively.

Gehan A. Mousa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Title Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sohn, Michael D., Richard G. Sextro, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(6) Pagination 1792-1796 Date Published Sept. 4-9, 2005 Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, airflow modeling, comis, countermeasures to chemical and biological threats, emergency response, exposure, indoor environment department, shelter-in-place Abstract An accidental or intentional outdoor release of pollutants can produce a hazardous plume, potentially contaminating large portions of a metropolitan area as it disperses downwind. To minimize health consequences on the populace, government and research organizations often recommend sheltering in place when evacuation is impractical. Some reports also recommend "hardening" an indoor shelter, for example by applying duct tape to prevent leakage into a bathroom. However, few studies have quantified the perceived beneficial effects of sheltering and hardening, or examined the limits of their applicability. In this paper, we examine how sheltering and hardening might reduce exposure levels under different building and meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction). We predict concentrations and exposure levels for several conditions, and discuss the net benefits from several sheltering and hardening options

50

Spatial and Quantitative Approach to Incorporating Stakeholder Values into Total Maximum Daily Loads: Dominguez Channel Case Study  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 303(d)(1)(A) requires each state to identify those waters that are not achieving water quality standards. The result of this assessment is called the 303(d) list. The CWA also requires states to develop and implement Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for these waters on the 303(d) list. A TMDL specifies the maximum amount of a pollutant that a water body can receive and still meet water quality standards, and allocates the pollutant loadings to point and non-point sources. Nationwide, over 34,900 segments of waterways have been listed as impaired by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 2006). The EPA enlists state agencies and local communities to submit TMDL plans to reduce discharges by specified dates or have them developed by the EPA. The Department of Energy requested Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop appropriate tools to assist in improving the TMDL process. An investigation of this process by LLNL found that plans to reduce discharges were being developed based on a wide range of site investigation methods. Our investigation found that given the resources available to the interested and responsible parties, developing a quantitative stakeholder input process and using visualization tools to display quantitative information could improve the acceptability of TMDL plans. We developed a stakeholder allocation model (SAM) which uses multi-attribute utility theory to quantitatively structure the preferences of the major stakeholder groups. We then applied GIS to display allocation options in maps representing economic activity, community groups, and city agencies. This allows allocation options and stakeholder concerns to be represented in both space and time. The primary goal of this tool is to provide a quantitative and visual display of stakeholder concerns over possible TMDL options.

Stewart, J S; Baginski, T A; Greene, K G; Smith, A; Sicherman, A

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

National stakeholder workshop summary report  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

53

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Publications  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Publications Publications This page lists all of the publications referenced on the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's website. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Subject Category All Agricultural Public Power Schools Small Wind Economic Development Policy Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 449 records found. Page 1 of 90, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Publication 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 Next Page >>

54

Property:DIA/Stakeholders | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:DIA/Stakeholders Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DIA/Stakeholders Property Type String Description A list of stakeholders for DIA related tools Pages using the property "DIA/Stakeholders" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + economic consultants +, environmental professionals +, government policymakers + Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) + Government policymakers +, economic consultants +, environmental professionals +, ... E E3MG + economic consultants +, environmental professionals +, academics +, ... Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model + government policymakers +, economic consultants +, environmental professionals +

55

DOE Quadrennial Energy Review - Stakeholder Meeting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Quadrennial Energy Review - Stakeholder Meeting August 8, 2014 Casey Dinges, American Society of Civil Engineers As stewards of the nation's infrastructure, civil engineers...

56

Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting #11: Cheyenne,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentations and Comments At the Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting 11: Cheyenne, WY Infrastructure Siting August 21, 2014 Opening Remarks Dr. Karen Wayland, Deputy...

57

2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued July 31, 2013 - 5:02pm Addthis 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued The Stakeholder Directory, now in its 30th edition, identifies contacts in federal agencies; states, territories, and state government associations; and nongovernmental organizations for reviewing environmental impact statements and environmental assessments, and for other NEPA public involvement and consultation activities. The Directory is primarily intended to supplement lists that Departmental Offices compile for individual projects or facilities. Addthis Related Articles Obama Officials Announce Steps to Promote the Clean Energy Potential of the

58

2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued July 31, 2013 - 5:02pm Addthis 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued The Stakeholder Directory, now in its 30th edition, identifies contacts in federal agencies; states, territories, and state government associations; and nongovernmental organizations for reviewing environmental impact statements and environmental assessments, and for other NEPA public involvement and consultation activities. The Directory is primarily intended to supplement lists that Departmental Offices compile for individual projects or facilities. Addthis Related Articles Secretary Chu Announces Efforts to Strengthen U.S. Electric Transmission

59

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy Regulatory Commission February 2011 The opinions and views expressed in this staff report do not necessarily represent those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, its Chairman, or individual Commissioners, and are not binding on the Commission. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Staff Team Dean Wight, Team Lead Caroline Daly David Kathan Michael P. Lee Kamaria Martin Pamela Silberstein Michael Tita Rebecca Vertes Z, INC. Team Bryan Templeton (Z, INC.) Valerie Richardson (KEMA) Will Gifford (KEMA) Christopher Elsner (Z, INC.) Matthew S. Pettit (KEMA) Geoff Barker (KEMA) Ron Chebra (KEMA) TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary

60

Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management December 2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey December 2012 Table of Contents List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................. iii List of Tables .............................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction............................................................................................................................................ 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Stakeholder Comment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Volume III Stakeholder Comment Prepared for State of Hawaii Department of Ocean Earth Sciences and Technology December 2009 #12;i Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Volume III Stakeholder Comment Comments on the Draft Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan were solicited by posting the document

62

Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming

63

Assessment of the theoretical demand response potential in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract DR (Demand response) measures typically aim at an improved utilization of power plant and grid capacities. In energy systems mainly relying on photovoltaic and wind power, DR may furthermore contribute to system stability and increase the renewable energy share. In this paper, an assessment of the theoretical DR potential in Europe is presented. Special attention is given to temporal availability and geographic distribution of flexible loads. Based on industrial production and electricity consumption statistics, as well as periodic and temperature-dependent load profiles, possible load reduction and increase is estimated for each hour of the year. The analysis identifies substantial DR potentials in all consumer sectors. They add up to a minimum load reduction of 61 GW and a minimum load increase of 68 GW, available in every hour of the year. The overall potential features significant variations during the year, which are characteristic for specific consumers and countries.

Hans Christian Gils

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partners with State, City and Industry Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders to Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders to Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy June 13, 2013 - 1:29pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's ongoing commitment to provide support to communities affected by Hurricane Sandy, the Energy Department today announced that it will partner with the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, City of Hoboken and Public Service Electric & Gas Company (PSE&G) to help assess and develop strategies for improving the reliability and resiliency of the local electric grid in Hoboken. The

65

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Information Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Information Resources These information resources include links to wind energy videos, audio files, and publications. A photo of the wind turbine next to the greenhouse. Ponderosa High School administrators in Flagstaff, Arizona have taken on projects like the greenhouse and the renewable energy installation and a number of others around their campus in order to make it a school of opportunity and a school that's a great example for others. Success Stories Read about the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's success stories. Stakeholder Interviews

66

DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by...

67

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...

68

Project Develops Student-Stakeholders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Develops Student-Stakeholders Project Develops Student-Stakeholders June 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Lead Joel Bradburne, far left,...

69

Clean Cities Coordinators and Stakeholders Awarded at the Green...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coordinators and Stakeholders Awarded at the Green Fleet Conference and Expo Clean Cities Coordinators and Stakeholders Awarded at the Green Fleet Conference and Expo October 22,...

70

Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar-Budget Briefing Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar-Budget Briefing Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at a...

71

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for...

72

Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar-Budget Briefing Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar-Budget Briefing Presentation by...

73

Decision insight into stakeholder conflict for ERN.  

SciTech Connect

Participatory modeling has become an important tool in facilitating resource decision making and dispute resolution. Approaches to modeling that are commonly used in this context often do not adequately account for important human factors. Current techniques provide insights into how certain human activities and variables affect resource outcomes; however, they do not directly simulate the complex variables that shape how, why, and under what conditions different human agents behave in ways that affect resources and human interactions related to them. Current approaches also do not adequately reveal how the effects of individual decisions scale up to have systemic level effects in complex resource systems. This lack of integration prevents the development of more robust models to support decision making and dispute resolution processes. Development of integrated tools is further hampered by the fact that collection of primary data for decision-making modeling is costly and time consuming. This project seeks to develop a new approach to resource modeling that incorporates both technical and behavioral modeling techniques into a single decision-making architecture. The modeling platform is enhanced by use of traditional and advanced processes and tools for expedited data capture. Specific objectives of the project are: (1) Develop a proof of concept for a new technical approach to resource modeling that combines the computational techniques of system dynamics and agent based modeling, (2) Develop an iterative, participatory modeling process supported with traditional and advance data capture techniques that may be utilized to facilitate decision making, dispute resolution, and collaborative learning processes, and (3) Examine potential applications of this technology and process. The development of this decision support architecture included both the engineering of the technology and the development of a participatory method to build and apply the technology. Stakeholder interaction with the model and associated data capture was facilitated through two very different modes of engagement, one a standard interface involving radio buttons, slider bars, graphs and plots, while the other utilized an immersive serious gaming interface. The decision support architecture developed through this project was piloted in the Middle Rio Grande Basin to examine how these tools might be utilized to promote enhanced understanding and decision-making in the context of complex water resource management issues. Potential applications of this architecture and its capacity to lead to enhanced understanding and decision-making was assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants who represented key stakeholders in the basin.

Siirola, John; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Benz, Zachary O.; Stansbury, Melanie; Richards, Elizabeth H.; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Galisteo Consulting); Warrender, Christina E.; Morrow, James Dan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming technical challenges and delivering Building America research results to the market. Learn more about the STCs and the research planning process.

75

mHealth Stakeholders: Follow the Money  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

No business or service organization exists without stakeholders, individuals, or groups with the ability to affect the operations and success of an organization. mHealth developers, investors, and those responsib...

Donna Malvey; Donna J. Slovensky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Working With Stakeholders to Move  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decisions Local elected officials Regulators People affected by decisions Community organizations (volunteer Organizational Structure Formal vs. informal Roles and responsibilities Decision-making methods $64,000 Question

77

Wind Program: Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Outreach Printable Version Bookmark and Share The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program is designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Highlights Resources Wind Resource Maps State Activities What activities are happening in my state? AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY Installed wind capacity maps. Features A image of a house with a residential-scale small wind turbine. Small Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and Businesses Stakeholder Engagement & Outreach Projects

78

Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » Spring 2013 National National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Save the Date NTSF Registration Announcement NTSF 2013 Agenda EM's Huizenga Gives Keynote Address at National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Spring 2013 NTSF Presentations May 14, 2013 Presentations Communication Is Key to Packaging and Transportation Safety and Compliance North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board: Roles and Priorities

79

Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report  

SciTech Connect

On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

AE: Office Supplies Purchasing Stakeholder Survey Notes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AE: Office Supplies Purchasing Stakeholder Survey Notes Updated: 2/20/2012 Overview: · Survey Purchasing Factors: · 37% of people make office supplies purchases monthly, 26% weekly, and 15% quarterly used vendors for office supplies · People mostly purchase from vendors other than Staples due

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wastewater management in Kunming, China: a stakeholder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater management in Kunming, China: a stakeholder perspective on measures at the source EDI systems with central wastewater treatment plants were long considered a successful model that could the feasibility of introducing measures at the source for the different urban wastewater contributions in the city

Richner, Heinz

82

Who Is the Advocate? Stakeholders for Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Who Is the Advocate? Stakeholders for Sustainability Birgit Penzenstadler, Henning Femmer Software@uci.edu Abstract--While the research community has started working on sustainable software engineering recently are the people who actually have an interest in improving the sustainability of a specific software system

Cengarle, María Victoria

83

stakeholder roundtable sept 09 final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UTILITIES AND OTHERS UTILITIES AND OTHERS IMPLEMENTING SMART GRIDS S m a r t G r i d S t a k e h o l d e r R o u n d t a b l e G r o u p * w w w. o e . e n e r g y. g o v / s m a r t g r i d S m a r t G r i d S t a k e h o l d e r R o u n d t a b l e G r o u p P e r s p e c t i v e s f o r U t i l i t i e s & O t h e r s I m p l e m e n t i n g S m a r t G r i d s 1 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

84

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Working Groups  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Wind Working Groups Wind Powering America educates, equips, and supports state wind working groups that form strategic alliances to communicate wind's benefits and challenges to state stakeholders. State Wind Working Groups The U.S. map below shows which states have wind working groups. Click on a state to read about its wind working group. Text version of states with Wind Working Groups Alaska Arizona Arkansas Colorado Connecticut Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maine Massachusetts Michigan Montana Nebraska Nevada New Jersey New Mexico North Carolina

85

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Agricultural Podcasts Wind Powering America Podcasts Handout Wind Powering America provides this printable postcard as an outreach tool. Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produces a series of radio interviews on wind energy aimed at a rural stakeholder audience. To subscribe, click on the PODCAST button below to open up the feed. Copy the URL from your browser's address bar into your podcast subscription software. For a list of podcast software, see Podcasting News' list of podcast software clients. Podcast Title: Wind Energy Forum Enhances Positives of Wind Production

86

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Webinar Podcasts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Webinar Podcasts Webinar Podcasts The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative hosts a series of webinars on current wind energy issues. Audiovisual files and text versions of each webinar are available. To subscribe, click on the PODCAST button below to open up the feed. Copy the URL from your browser's address bar into your podcast subscription software. For a list of podcast software, see Podcasting News' list of podcast software clients. Podcast Title: Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Speaker: Aaron Smith, Suzanne Tegen, David Keyser, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date: November 20, 2013 Running time: 1 hour Title: Small Wind Standards and Policy Update: A WPA Webinar Speaker: Heather Rhoads-Weaver, eFormative Options; Matt Gagne, eFormative

87

U.S. DOE Turbine Program Stakeholder Road Mapping Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DOE Turbine Program Stakeholder Road Mapping Session U.S. DOE Turbine Program Stakeholder Road Mapping Session July 29-30, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

88

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Siting Wind Turbines  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources & Tools Resources & Tools Siting Wind Turbines Wind Powering America works to increase deployment of wind energy. This page provides resources about wind turbine siting. American Wind Wildlife Institute The American Wind Wildlife Institute (AWWI) facilitates timely and responsible development of wind energy, while protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat. AWWI was created and is sustained by a unique collaboration of environmentalists, conservationists, state wildlife agencies, and wind industry leaders. Its purpose is to help lay the scientific groundwork and best practices for wind farm siting and operations, through targeted initiatives: wind-wildlife research, landscape assessment, mitigation, and education. Ordinances Regulating Development of Commercial Wind Energy Facilities

89

Nearly 200 Attend National Transportation Stakeholders Forum | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

200 Attend National Transportation Stakeholders Forum 200 Attend National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Nearly 200 Attend National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga provides the keynote address at the recent National Transportation Stakeholders Forum meeting. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga provides the keynote address at the recent National Transportation Stakeholders Forum meeting. NE's Jeff Williams discusses the status of the Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project. NE's Jeff Williams discusses the status of the Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project. Richard Arnold, with the Pahrump Paiute Tribe, provides an overview of Tribal Caucus action items and initiatives for enhanced national transportation coordination.

90

Infrastructure Assessment Mission: USACE Infrastructure Assessment (IA) Planning and Response Teams (PRTs) have two main  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and structural engineering applications; urban search & rescue (US&R) support; and water/wastewater) include pre- and post-declaration support for deploying an IA management cell, water/wastewater assessment

US Army Corps of Engineers

91

RESPONSES TO PUBLIC AND AGENCY COMMENTS ON THE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESPONSES TO PUBLIC AND AGENCY COMMENTS RESPONSES TO PUBLIC AND AGENCY COMMENTS ON THE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR LEASE OF LAND AND FACILITIES AT THE EAST TENNESSEE TECENOLOGY PARK OAK RIDGE,TENNESSEE @OE/EA-1175) NOVEMBER 1997. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE [blank page] CONTENTS 1 1 . INTRODUCTION ................................................................ 1 2. SCOPE AND ORGANIZATIONS ................................................... 3 3. COMMENTS AND RESPONSES .i ................................................. 5 3.1 DOE NEPA Review Process/Categorical Exclusions .............................. 5 3.1.1 SummaryofComments ............................................... 5 3.1.2 Response/Revisions .................................................. 5

92

Starbucks cups : trash or treasure? : an example of facilitated systems thinking assisting stakeholders in designing their own system to recycle take-away cups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mixed methods, action-research study was conducted to assess the efficacy and usefulness of Facilitated Systems Thinking as an intervention for system design in complex, multi-stakeholder systems, especially where the ...

Czaika, Ellen Gail

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A successful effort to involve stakeholders in a facility siting decision using LIPS with stakeholder involvement  

SciTech Connect

Local public opposition to federal bureaucratic decisions has resulted in public agencies rethinking the role of stakeholders in decision making. Efforts to include stakeholders directly in the decision-making process are on the increase. Unfortunately, many attempts to involve members of the public in decisions involving complex technical issues have failed. A key problem has been defining a meaningful role for the public in the process of arriving at a technical decision. This paper describes a successful effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in New Mexico to involve stakeholders in an important technical decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), a facility intended to consolidate and store wastes generated from the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. A formal priority setting process known as the Laboratory Integration Prioritization System (LIPS) was adapted to provide an approach for involving the public. Although rarely applied to stakeholder participation, the LIPS process proved surprisingly effective. It produced a consensus over a selected site and enhanced public trust and understanding of Project activities.

Merkhofer, L. [Applied Decision Analysis, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Food allergy: Stakeholder perspectives on acceptable risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have reached a point where it is difficult to improve food allergy risk management without an agreement on levels of acceptable risk. This paper presents and discusses the perspectives of the different stakeholders (allergic consumers, health professionals, public authorities and the food industry) on acceptable risk in food allergy. Understanding where these perspectives diverge and even conflict may help develop an approach to define what is acceptable. Uncertainty about food allergy, its consequences and how to manage them is the common denominator of the stakeholders’ views. In patients, uncertainty is caused by the unpredictability of reactions and the concern about whether avoidance strategies will be effective enough. Variability of symptoms and the lack of markers do not allow stratification of patients according to their reactivity, and force health professionals to give the same advice to all patients despite the fact that the risk to each is not identical. Regulators and the food industry struggle with the fact that the lack of management thresholds forces them to make case-by-case decisions in an area of uncertainty with penalties for under- or over-prediction. As zero risk is not a realistic possibility, consensus on acceptable risk will be needed.

Charlotte B. Madsen; René Crevel; Chun-Han Chan; Anthony E.J. Dubois; Audrey DunnGalvin; Bertine M.J. Flokstra-de Blok; M. Hazel Gowland; Sue Hattersley; Jonathan O’B Hourihane; Pia Nørhede; Sylvia Pfaff; Gene Rowe; Sabine Schnadt; Berber J. Vlieg-Boerstra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Memorandum: Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, and Regulators in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, and Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, and Regulators in EM Budget Requests Memorandum: Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, and Regulators in EM Budget Requests From: Merle L. Sykes, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Planning and Budget (EM-30) This memorandum provides information on the involvement of the Environmental Management (EM) Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB), stakeholders, and regulators in the EM budget formulation process for fiscal year (FY) 2011 and future fiscal years. Any future guidance and updates on EM SSAB and other stakeholders' involvement will be provided as part of EM's annual spring budget guidance. Sykes Memorandum - June 1, 2009 More Documents & Publications Memorandum: Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders,

96

2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder 2 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey 2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey DOE-LM periodically surveys its stakeholders to collect their feedback on DOE-LM performance at both a local and national level. The first customer satisfaction survey was conducted in 2005 and focused primarily on DOE-LM's "business lines": records management; site management; personal/real property; and transition management. In 2012, LM updated and expanded on that survey by conducting a communications and outreach stakeholder satisfaction survey to gauge the effectiveness of DOE-LM's communication and outreach strategies. Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey More Documents & Publications

97

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review The Department of Energy conducted a Peer Review of its Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and Development Program on July 20-22, 2010 during which 28 R&D projects were presented for review by industry stakeholders. More than 65 energy sector stakeholders came to network, present, and learn about DOE projects, while more than 20 joined in by webinar. Energy Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review More Documents & Publications

98

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Stakeholders meeting in March 2011, held in Atlanta, Georgia.

99

Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting - Tribal Data: Building...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

American Housing Stakeholder Meeting will discuss effective strategies for tribally led data collection, ways to access and leverage new capital with improved data, and models...

100

U.S. Department of Energy Public Stakeholder Meeting:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

6 October 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Public Stakeholder Meeting: Financing Energy Infrastructure (Transmission, Storage, and Distribution) Munich RE - Green Tech Solutions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting #9: Chicago, IL  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

At the Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting 9: Chicago, IL Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation Issues August 8, 2014 Opening Remarks The Honorable Rahm Emanuel, Mayor of...

102

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Energy Videos  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Energy Videos Wind Energy Videos This page lists wind energy videos. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Subject Category All Agricultural Public Power Schools Small Wind Economic Development Policy Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 30 records found. Page 1 of 6, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Video 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title 1/29/2013 KS News Video Kansas State University Videos Explore Wind Energy [..More] 10/22/2012 NE News

103

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Turbine Ordinances  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Wind Turbine Ordinances This page lists 135 state and local wind turbine ordinances. State and local governments and policymakers can use this collection of example wind turbine ordinances when drafting a new wind energy ordinance in a town or county without existing ordinances. Due to increasing energy demands in the United States and more installed wind projects, rural communities and local governments with limited or no experience with wind energy now have the opportunity to become involved in this industry. Communities with good wind resources may be approached by

104

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Public Power Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Public Power Public Power Resources Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Public Power Resources This page lists wind-related information resources such as publications, websites, and news for public power. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 81 records found. Page 1 of 17, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Public Power 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

105

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Native American Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Resources This page lists resources and tools specifically for Native Americans. Read personal interviews with Native Americans who have experience installing wind power on Native American lands, find wind resource maps that have Indian Reservation boundaries, and watch a video about installing wind power on Native American lands. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 42 records found. Page 1 of 9, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Native Americans 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

106

Response to the Phase Two Report of the Working Group on Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to the Phase Two Report of the Working Group on Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment Joint Task Force on Accountability University of Massachusetts Amherst October 14, 2011 The Phase Two be constructed that is faithful to the demands of both perspectives? This question has national relevance

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

107

From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 From Consumer Resistance to Stakeholder Resistance The case of nanotechnology* Caroline Gauthier proposes to study the resistance of stakeholders, by exploring the nanotech field. Nanotechnology is today in the resistance context. Keywords. Nanotechnology; Resistance Bio. Caroline Gauthier is currently Professor

Boyer, Edmond

108

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) is the mechanism through which DOE engages at a national level with states, tribes, federal agencies and other interested stakeholders about the Department's shipments of radioactive waste and materials, as well as occasional high- visibility shipments that are nonradioactive. The purpose of the NTSF is to bring transparency, openness, and accountability to DOE's offsite transportation activities through collaboration with state and tribal governments. DOE will work through existing agreements and

109

Modeling Stakeholder/Value Dependency through Mean Failure Cost  

SciTech Connect

In an earlier series of works, Boehm et al. discuss the nature of information system dependability and highlight the variability of system dependability according to stakeholders. In a recent paper, the dependency patterns of this model are analyzed. In our recent works, we presented a stakeholder dependent quantitative security model, where we quantify security for a given stakeholder by the mean of the loss incurred by the stakeholder as a result of security threats. We show how this mean can be derived from the security threat configuration (represented as a vector of probabilities that reflect the likelihood of occurrence of the various security threats). We refer to our security metric as MFC, for Mean Failure Cost. In this paper, we analyze Boehm's model from the standpoint of the proposed metric, and show whether, to what extent, and how our metric addresses the issues raised by Boehm's Stakeholder/Value definition of system dependability.

Aissa, Anis Ben [University of Tunis, Belvedere, Tunisia] [University of Tunis, Belvedere, Tunisia; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Mili, Ali [New Jersey Insitute of Technology] [New Jersey Insitute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review August 15, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis The Department of Energy conducted a Peer Review of its Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and Development Program on July 20-22, during which 28 R&D projects were presented for review by industry stakeholders. More than 65 energy sector stakeholders came to network, present, and learn about DOE projects, while more than 20 joined in by webinar. The CEDS program's national lab, academic, and industry partners-including the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) partners and Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIPG)

111

WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT Analysis of Documented Stakeholder Needs for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science University of Colorado Boulder, Colo included drought, flooding, other extreme weather events, and longer-term climatic changes. (Tables 1 and 2: · The need for additional plains snowpack monitoring, especially from the flood control sector. · In regards

Neff, Jason

112

Microsoft PowerPoint - Response on Renewables FINALl_4.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona Renewable Arizona Renewable Arizona Renewable Arizona Renewable Transmission Task Force Transmission Task Force BTA Response BTA Response Chairman of SWAT RTTF Chairman of SWAT RTTF Peter Krzykos Peter Krzykos BTA Workshop BTA Workshop May 22 May 22 - - 23 2008 23 2008 BTA Order BTA Order " " IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that in the next IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that in the next BTA, Commission regulated electric utilities, BTA, Commission regulated electric utilities, in consultation with the stakeholders, in consultation with the stakeholders, should prepare an assessment of ATC for should prepare an assessment of ATC for renewable energy and prepare a plan, renewable energy and prepare a plan, including a description of the location, including a description of the location, amount and transmission needs of amount and transmission needs of

113

Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 National 0 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois NTSF Spring 2010 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Department of Energy Office of Science Transportation Overview Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Status and Future of TRANSCOM Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Meeting Summary Meeting Summary Notes

114

Spring 2012 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Tennessee |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » Spring 2012 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Tennessee Spring 2012 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Tennessee NTSF Registration Website Save The Date! NTSF Spring 2012 Agenda NTSF Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Western Governor's Association Agenda NTSF Presentations Session Newcomers' Orientation Plenary Sessions Keynote Address Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview Global Threat Reduction Initiative Task Force for Strategic Developments to Blue Ribbon Commission

115

Safeguards-By-Design: Guidance and Tools for Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

Effective implementation of the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) approach can help meet the challenges of global nuclear energy growth, by designing facilities that have improved safeguardability and reduced safeguards-related life cycle costs. The ultimate goal of SBD is to implement effective and efficient safeguards that reduce the burden to both the facility operator and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Since 2008, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Safeguards By Design Project has initiated multiple studies and workshops with industry and regulatory stakeholders, including the IAEA, to develop relevant documents to support the implementation of SBD. These 'Good Practices Guides' describe facility and process design features that will facilitate implementation of effective nuclear material safeguards starting in the earliest phases of design through to final design. These guides, which are in their final editorial stages, start at a high level and then narrow down to specific nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as Light Water Reactors, Generation III/IV Reactors, High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors, and Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants. Most recently, NGSI has begun development of a facility safeguardability assessment toolkit to assist the designer. This paper will review the current status of these efforts, provide some examples of these documents, and show some standard IAEA Unattended Instrumentation that is permanently installed in nuclear facilities for monitoring.

Mark Schanfein; Shirley Johnson

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Client Name RETI Stakeholder Steering Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................................................2 Economic Assessment of CREZs............................................................................9 Next Steps in the RETI Process.........................................................................................11 List of Tables Table ES-1. Economic Ranking of California CREZs

117

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind November 20, 2013 3:00PM EST Online Starting more than a year ago, NREL initiated work to expand the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model to include fixed-bottom offshore wind technology. Following the completion of the model (and in partnership with the DOE Wind Program, Illinois State University, and James Madison University), NREL supported the analysis of the regional jobs and economic impacts of offshore wind for the Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, and Gulf Coast regions. The November Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar will provide an overview of the new offshore wind JEDI model and

118

White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Security Stakeholders Forum Energy Security Stakeholders Forum White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum July 27, 2010 - 1:04pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum Tuesday, July 27, 2010 Good afternoon. Thank you Secretary Mabus and Carol Browner for your leadership on these important issues. It's a pleasure to be here today with all of our distinguished panelists and guests. Before I begin my remarks, I want to take a moment to thank all the men and women here today who work day in and day out to keep our country safe. We greatly appreciate your sacrifice and service. It is fitting that today's forum includes representatives from both the energy and defense sectors, from academia and the business community. Our

119

White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum July 27, 2010 - 1:04pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum Tuesday, July 27, 2010 Good afternoon. Thank you Secretary Mabus and Carol Browner for your leadership on these important issues. It's a pleasure to be here today with all of our distinguished panelists and guests. Before I begin my remarks, I want to take a moment to thank all the men and women here today who work day in and day out to keep our country safe. We greatly appreciate your sacrifice and service. It is fitting that today's forum includes representatives from both the energy and defense sectors, from academia and the business community. Our

120

Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents. This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA is primarily intended to supplement lists that Departmental Offices compile for individual projects or facilities. It complements the EIS Distribution Guidance. The Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance updates this Directory annually in July and may issue revisions throughout the year as new information becomes available. NEPAStakeholdersDirectory_10_29_13.pdf More Documents & Publications Diversity Employment and Recruitment Sources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Subscribe to News and Events  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Subscribe to News and Events Subscribe to News and Events Follow news from the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative by subscribing to its newsletter, or following its news and events RSS feeds. Newsletter The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Newsletter informs partners and stakeholders every other week of events and webinars, financial opportunities, new publications, state successes, and other program activities. Enter your e-mail address below to begin the registration process. After you subscribe to the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Newsletter, you can choose to subscribe to other energy efficiency and renewable energy news. Archived copies are not available, but all of the news items can be found on this website under news, events, and publications. Enter your email address:

122

Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences, briefings, news...

123

Managing Stakeholder Requirements in High Performance Computing Procurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing Stakeholder Requirements in High Performance Computing Procurement John Rooksby1 , Mark Department of Management, Lancaster University High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are provided strategy can rigorously meet the demands of the potential users. 1 Introduction High Performance Computing

Sommerville, Ian

124

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Kotzebue November 5, 2014 10:00AM to 12:00PM AKST Kotzebue, Alaska Northwest Arctic Heritage Center 171 3rd Ave. Kotzebue, AK 9975...

125

ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal control over exposure as low. Slightly more than half believe that risk reduction should be balanced against cost. We also found that distrust of DOE and its contractors exists, primarily due to the perception that site managers do not share public values; hence, the public is generally unwilling to defer to DOE in its decision-making. The concomitant belief of inefficacy confounds distrust by generating frustration that DOE does not care. Moreover, the public is split with respect to trust of each other, primarily because of the belief that citizens lack technical competence. With respect to bioremediation support, we found that more than 40% of the public has no opinion. However, of those who do, 3 of 4 are favorably disposed – particularly among those who believe that risk is lower and who are more trusting of site management. We presented survey respondents with four alternative participation strategies based on the results of the Q analysis and asked their judgments of each. The public prefers strategies that shifts power to them. The least empowered strategy (feedback) was supported by 46%; support grew as public power increased, reaching 66% support for independently facilitated deliberation. More DOE distrust generates more support for high power strategies. We offer the following recommendations to enhance public acceptance. First, and perhaps most importantly, site managers should pursue robust trust-building efforts to gain public confidence in DOE risk management that meets public expectations. Public trust decreases risk perception, which increases public willingness to defer to site managers’ discretion in decision-making, which in turn increases public acceptance of the decisions that result. Second, site managers should address public concerns about bioremediation such as its effectiveness in reducing risk, performance compared to other remediation alternatives, costs compared against benefits, time required to start and complete remediation, level of risk that is currently posed by contamination, and scope of application. Third, more should be d

Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar—Budget Briefing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at a 2011 Stakeholders Webinar—Budget Briefing on February 24, 2011.

127

Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security personnel to understand local intelligence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security, protecting against, and responding to large scale weather/natural events or terrorism. CCICADA Project on Fusion Center Assessment: A mature, fully functioning national network of fusion centers is critical

129

PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette Program Development and Outreach Response Research Plan #12;2 Demand Response Research Center Objective Scope Stakeholders Develop, prioritize, conduct and disseminate multi- institutional research to facilitate Demand Response. Technologies

130

Geothermal Stakeholder Feedback on the GRR | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Stakeholder Feedback on the GRR Geothermal Stakeholder Feedback on the GRR Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 13 December, 2012 - 10:01 feedback GRR As we head into the holiday season, we thought we'd share with you some of the feedback we've received from industry, agency, consultant and other stakeholder personnel. Thanks again to all, and Happy Holidays! General "GRR is a much needed tool for navigating the geothermal regulatory environment. It will go a long way towards facilitating more geothermal energy development." (agency) "Very impressive product. The workshop [at GRC] was very helpful and thought provoking. Participants very engaged." (industry) "Good, forward-thinking initiative. Highly needed."

131

Memorandum: Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, Regulators, and Tribal Governments in EM FY 2013 Budget Request Memorandum: Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, Regulators, and Tribal Governments in EM FY 2013 Budget Request From: Dae Y. Chung, Principle Deputy Assistant Secretary for EM (EM-2) Subject: Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, Regulators, and Tribal Governments in EM FY 2013 Budget Request The purpose of this memorandum is to transmit guidance for formal, routine, and structured involvement of the public; including, but not limited to, the Environmental Management (EM) Site-Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) members, state regulators , local government officials, community groups, and Tribal government officials (herein

132

The emergent process of social innovation: multi-stakeholders perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the process of how social innovation is created. There have been many researches about social entrepreneurs. However, few studies have been made about social innovation in comparison to many researches in business innovation. Most social innovation is not created by a single entrepreneur (producer) but in collaboration with related stakeholders including customers, civil society organisations, local businesses, researchers and so on. This paper tries to clarify this process through a case study of the Hokkaido Green Fund, an environmental NGO in Japan. They have introduced the first community wind energy business in Japan. The social entrepreneurs co-create unique ideas with stakeholders and obtain various resources from them in tackling social issues, and create an innovative scheme. This paper tries to present a new perspective for the analysis of the social innovation process from the viewpoint of multi-stakeholders.

Kanji Tanimoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: About Wind Powering America  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About About Printable Version Bookmark and Share Awards Contacts About the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Initiative This initiative is focused at advancing the appropriate deployment of wind energy systems while educating communities about the potential impacts of wind development, through supporting projects and activities: Delivering unbiased, relevant, and actionable information to policy and permitting processes, Expanding or preserving access to quality wind resources, Making decisions on wind deployment more certain and predictable for all stakeholders by reducing uncertainty around wind deployment related issues, Developing and providing tools to help communities understand the impact and benefits of potential wind development, and Supporting the development of a national wind workforce though the

134

Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 National 1 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado NTSF Spring 2011 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Activities and Accomplishments Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation DOE Railcar Fleet Asset Planning & Lessons Learned DOE Shipment Activities: What We Accomplished and a Look Forward DOE-Idaho's Packaging and Transportation Perspective Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview Global Threat Reduction Initiative National Nuclear Security Administration Overview

135

Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for advancing the preparedness to act together, and ultimately - for achieving desired shared goals. It is proposed that self-organized social learning will make it possible to promote adequate perception of risk and prevent, by diminishing uncertainties and unknown factors, social amplification of an imagined risk, as well as to increase the trust level and facilitate more adequate equity perception. The proposed approach to the multilevel stakeholder consensus building on international scale is extrapolated to the present-day activities of siting of such near-surface RW disposal facilities which supposedly could have non-negligible trans-boundary impact. A multilevel stakeholder interaction process is considered for the case of resolving of emerged problems in site selection for the planned near-surface RW repository in vicinity of the Lithuanian-Latvian border foreseen for disposal of short lived low- and intermediate level waste arising from the decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. (authors)

Dreimanis, A. [Radiation Safety Centre, Riga LV (Latvia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Assessing the Value of Regulation Resources Based on Their Time Response Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Fast responsive regulation resources are potentially more valuable as a power system regulation resource (more efficient) because they allow applying controls at the exact moment and in the exact amount as needed. Faster control is desirable because it facilitates more reliable compliance with the NERC Control Performance Standards at relatively lesser regulation capacity procurements. The current California ISO practices and markets do not provide a differentiation among the regulation resources based on their speed of response (with the exception of some minimum ramping capabilities). Some demand response technologies, including some generation and energy storage resources, can provide quicker control actions. California ISO practices and markets could be updated to welcome more fast regulation resources into the California ISO service area. The project work reported in this work was pursuing the following objectives: • Develop methodology to assess the relative value of generation resources used for regulation and load following California ISO functions • This assessment should be done based on physical characteristics including the ability to quickly change their output following California ISO signals • Evaluate what power is worth on different time scales • Analyze the benefits of new regulation resources to provide effective compliance with the mandatory NERC Control Performance Standards • Evaluate impacts of the newly proposed BAAL and FRR standards on the potential value of fast regulation and distributed regulation resources • Develop a scope for the follow-up projects to pave a road for the new efficient types of balancing resources in California. The work included the following studies: • Analysis of California ISO regulating units characteristics • California ISO automatic generation system (AGC) analysis • California ISO regulation procurement and market analysis • Fast regulation efficiency analysis • Projection of the California ISO load following and regulation requirements into the future • Value of fast responsive resources depending on their ramping capability • Potential impacts of the balancing authority area control error limit (BAAL), which is a part of the newly proposed NERC standard “Balancing Resources and Demand” • Potential impacts of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) frequency responsive reserve (FRR) standard • Recommendations for the next phase of the project. The following main conclusions and suggestions for the future have been made: • The analysis of regulation ramping requirements shows that the regulation system should be able to provide ramps of at least 40-60 MW per minute for a period up to 6 minutes. • Evaluate if changes are needed in the California ISO AGC system to effectively accommodate new types of fast regulation resources and minimize the California ISO regulation procurement. • California ISO may consider creating better market opportunities for and incentives for fast responsive resources. • An additional study of low probability high ramp events can be recommended to the California ISO. • The California ISO may be willing to consider establishing a more relaxed target CPS2 compliance level. • A BAAL-related study can be recommended for the California ISO as soon as more clarity is achieved concerning the actual enforcement of the BAAL standard and its numerical values for the California ISO. The study may involve an assessment of advantages of the distributed frequency-based control for the California ISO system. The market-related issues that arise in this connection can be also investigated. • A FRR-related study can be recommended for the California ISO as soon as more clarity is achieved concerning the actual enforcement of the FRR standard and its numerical values for the California ISO.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Ma, Jian; Nguyen, Tony B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cities Programme Stakeholder Bulletin No. 2 (Nov 2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy efficiency initiatives are already underway, and recent extreme weather has provided motivation the last stakeholder meeting held in July. This bulletin, reports in more detail on recent progress made considerable potential for Tyndall work to inform strategic policy decisions. Page 1 of 4 #12;Personal

Watson, Andrew

138

MNE 697j Introduction to Stakeholder Engagement Spring Semester 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fatigue d. Review methods and results of engagement e. Modify, update, and improve plans f. Reassess community support for mining projects. Stakeholder engagement is a systematic and reproducible program in the project. It is a standard and ongoing requirement of all projects subscribing to Equator Principles

Holliday, Vance T.

139

Governance in Sociotechnical Systems: Addressing Stakeholder Concerns In-Band  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments, with the main goal of supporting long-term oceanographic and climate research. The OOI resources, including instruments, networks, computing, storage, databases, and workflows. Stakeholder. Not treating them would waste opportunities for improving social and scientific value of oceanographic research

Young, R. Michael

140

Claim Mobile: Engaging Conflicting Stakeholder Requirements in Healthcare in Uganda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Claim Mobile: Engaging Conflicting Stakeholder Requirements in Healthcare in Uganda Melissa R. Ho that subsidizes healthcare by reimbursing health service providers in Uganda for treatment of patients with sexually transmitted infections. As with many development projects, the Uganda Output-Based Aid (OBA

Aoki, Paul M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Combining biogas LCA reviews with stakeholder interviews to analyse life cycle impacts at a practical level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biogas presents an increasing energy production form in municipalities and rural locations, and it is also a feasible waste management option. In terms of environmental life cycle assessments (LCA), biogas production seems to offer a unique opportunity to combine nutrient recycling with energy production using various underutilised resources such as municipal biowastes or manure. \\{LCAs\\} of biogas production suggest benefits related to CO2 emission savings and the replacement of chemical fertilisers, for example. Existing biogas plants have varying practices related to biogas production and actualisation of the life cycle benefits is influenced by policies, local contexts, and the purposes of the biogas production activity. This paper identifies and explores critical points related to biogas production by reviewing LCA studies and comparing them to actual choices made at Finnish biogas plants based on stakeholder interviews. The most critical points related to biogas production involve the end use of the biogas and the end use of the digestate. The practical implementation and site-specific conditions of biogas plants can lead to significant differences between life cycle impacts. Therefore, we emphasise the importance of site-specific LCA studies for reliable impact assessments. In addition, we suggest the incorporation of stakeholder interviews to support LCA at different phases and better implementation of life cycle thinking in policy design.

Suvi Huttunen; Kaisa Manninen; Pekka Leskinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Institutional Void and Stakeholder Leadership: Implementing Renewable Energy Standards in Minnesota  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variety of stakeholders are active in the development of energy policy in Minnesota (see Table 15.1). The state has historically chosen to be inclusive, and the stakeholders tend to have long-standing relations...

Adam R. Fremeth; Alfred A. Marcus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

It's Our Research: Getting Stakeholder Buy-in for User Experience Research Projects, 1st edition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It's Our Research provides a strategic framework for people who practice UX research who wish to be heard by their stakeholders.It gives you the techniques needed to involve stakeholders throughout the process of planning, execution, analysis, and reporting ...

Tomer Sharon

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Assessing the Vegetation Condition Impacts of the 2011 Drought Across the U.S. Southern Great Plains Using the Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI), which combines traditional climate- and satellite-based approaches for assessing vegetation conditions, offers new insights into assessing the impacts of drought from local to regional scales. In ...

Tsegaye Tadesse; Brian D. Wardlow; Jesslyn Brown; Michael Hayes; Mark Svoboda; Brian Fuchs; Denise Gutzmer

145

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Perspectives: Personal Interviews With  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Perspectives: Perspectives: Personal Interviews With Wind Industry Stakeholders, Pioneers, Advocates, and Electric Cooperatives Wind Powering America interviewed various industry stakeholders to show different perspectives of wind energy's value. Wind Powering America also interviewed wind pioneers to examine how they have laid the groundwork for today's U.S. wind energy market. These interviews are one of a kind and provide an insider view of how the wind industry has evolved and is influenced today. Wind Powering America is also interviewing Native Americans to examine their experiences and future plans. Finally, included, are wind power advocate interviews, electric cooperative interviews, and public power pioneer interviews. Public Power Wind Pioneer Interviews Photo of Patricia Bigner and Phil Dougherty

146

New England Wind Forum: Interviews with Wind Industry Stakeholders and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Small Wind Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Interviews With Wind Industry Stakeholders and Pioneers in New England The New England Wind Forum will interview different stakeholders actively shaping the wind power landscape in New England and wind pioneers to examine how they have laid the groundwork for today's New England wind energy market. Stephan Wollenburg, Green Energy Program Director of Energy Consumers Alliance of New England January 2013 A Panel of Seven Offer Insight into the Evolving Drivers and Challenges Facing Wind Development in New England June 2011 John Norden, Manager of Renewable Resource Integration, Independent System Operator-New England September 2010 Angus King, Former Governor of Maine and Co-Founder of Independence Wind

147

2013 US Department of Energy National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 US Department of Energy National Transportation 3 US Department of Energy National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Hello Everyone, It's time to register for the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy National Transportation Stakeholders Forum being held in Buffalo, New York on May 14-16. Please access the entitled link to proceed directly to the official registration website. Once you have entered the site you will be able to register for the meeting, select activities (regional/working meetings, group breakout sessions, TRANSCOM training and the West Valley tour) to attend, view the draft agenda and make lodging reservations. While the event is over two months away, please register at your earliest opportunity as it will greatly

148

ADVANCED REACTOR SAFETY PROGRAM – STAKEHOLDER INTERACTION AND FEEDBACK  

SciTech Connect

In the Spring of 2013, we began discussions with our industry stakeholders on how to upgrade our safety analysis capabilities. The focus of these improvements would primarily be on advanced safety analysis capabilities that could help the nuclear industry analyze, understand, and better predict complex safety problems. The current environment in the DOE complex is such that recent successes in high performance computer modeling could lead the nuclear industry to benefit from these advances, as long as an effort to translate these advances into realistic applications is made. Upgrading the nuclear industry modeling analysis capabilities is a significant effort that would require substantial participation and coordination from all industry segments: research, engineering, vendors, and operations. We focus here on interactions with industry stakeholders to develop sound advanced safety analysis applications propositions that could have a positive impact on industry long term operation, hence advancing the state of nuclear safety.

Benjamin W. Spencer; Hai Huang

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy Department Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy Stakeholders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy investments are tapping a vast resource of clean, baseload energy from the earth's heat, according to Douglas Hollett, Program Manager for the Department's Geothermal Technologies Office. Hollett addressed over 1,000 this week at the annual conference of the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) in Reno, Nevada—the industry's largest annual gathering of geothermal energy stakeholders in the nation.

150

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Unalaska  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

151

National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is seeking input from federally recognized Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a 10-year implementation plan as part of the National Strategy for the Arctic Region, as well as other DOE-related activities in the region. DOE, in conjunction with several other federal agencies, will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings between October and December 2014.

152

EPA-Provided Comment: Stakeholder comment received at the May 12, 2010 Stakeholder meeting in Albuquerque  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the structure of plutonium nanocluster contaminants increases risk of spreading," 2008. DOE Response: The DOE to the much higher pH systems typically of concern in groundwater/brine systems, and transport properties were brine enters the WIPP repository leading to a dissolved concentration release of plutonium (that would

153

Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas; February 29 - March 2, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report Austin, Texas: February 29-March 2, 2012 May 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing plant response Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plants Summary: gas plant technologies. The three technologies assessed are the gas turbine (GT) with heat recovery... 1 Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in...

155

Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response  

SciTech Connect

During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

E. C. Nielsen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing inflammatory response Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

28 Browne, CB, Research Proposal, March 2009 Activation of the Inflammasome in Gout Summary: of inflammasomes in mediating crystal-induced inflammatory responses (3,7)....

157

Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas; February 29- March 2, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting was held on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas, and outlined stakeholder needs, collaboration opportunities, and research results as they relate to the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Residential Buildings Program. Presenters represented key industry stakeholders, as well as the 10 DOE Building America teams. Attendees represented a variety of industries, including manufacturing, government, nonprofit, and private sector programs.

158

Trading zones : cooperating for water resource and ecosystem management when stakeholders have apparently irreconcilable differences .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Disputes over the management of water resources in the United States often seem irreconcilable because stakeholders' differences in values, beliefs, and identities are so hard… (more)

Fuller, Boyd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cellu-WHAT-sic? Communicating the biofuels message to local stakeholde...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Author Author's Title Event Date Presentation Title Cellu-WHAT-sic? Communicating the biofuels message to local stakeholders Matt Merritt Director of Public Relations, POET-DSM...

160

Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting- Tribal Data: Building the Bridge to New Capital  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hosted by the Housing Assistance Council, the Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting will discuss effective strategies for tribally led data collection, ways to access and leverage new capital...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Stakeholder Understandings of Wildfire Mitigation: A Case of Shared and Contested Meanings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article identifies and compares meanings of wildfire risk mitigation for stakeholders in the Front Range of Colorado, USA. We examine the case of...

Joseph G. Champ; Jeffrey J. Brooks; Daniel R. Williams

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Needs and Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting Atlanta, Georgia - March 16-18, 2011 May 2011 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

163

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Resource Maps and Anemometer Loan  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Maps & Data Maps & Data Printable Version Bookmark and Share Utility-Scale Land-Based Maps Offshore Maps Community-Scale Maps Residential-Scale Maps Anemometer Loan Programs & Data Wind Resource Maps and Anemometer Loan Program Data The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides wind maps and validation to help states and regions build capacity to support and accelerate wind energy deployment. Read about the available wind maps for utility-, community-, and residential-scale wind development. A wind resource map of the United States showing land-based with offshore resources. The Energy Department, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and AWS Truepower provide the wind resource map that shows land-based with offshore resources. This map is the first to provide wind developers and policy

164

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Farm Economic Impact Studies  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Wind Farm Economic Impact Studies Wind Powering America compiled studies about the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities in order to compared them side by side. The studies explore the types of information gathered when undertaking an economic impact study, what kind of information is most helpful in using these studies to further promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies. Pedden, M. (September 2004). "Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities." Overview of data collection and

165

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Policy Resources and Tools  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Policy Resources and Tools Policy Resources and Tools This page lists wind-related policy resources and tools such as publications, Web resources, and news. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 120 records found. Page 1 of 24, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Policy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

166

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Education and School Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Education and School Resources Education and School Resources Filter the Wind Powering America database for information resources about Wind for Schools, education and training programs, news, and educational links. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 139 records found. Page 1 of 28, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Schools 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

167

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Resources and Tools for Siting Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Federal, Federal, State, & Local Printable Version Bookmark and Share Economic Development Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Resources & Tools Resources for Siting Wind Turbines This page lists information resources such as publications, websites, and news for siting wind turbines. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 39 records found. Page 1 of 8, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Siting 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

168

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Resources for Public Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Resources for Public Lands This page lists wind-related resources and tools such as publications, Web resources, and news about public lands. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 24 records found. Page 1 of 5, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Public Lands 1 2 3 4 5 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

169

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Economic Development Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Resources and Tools Development Resources and Tools This page lists wind-related economic development resources and tools such as publications, Web resources, and news. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 198 records found. Page 1 of 40, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Econ. Dev. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

170

Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Score: Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Joan Glickman Senior Advisor/Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy July 23, 2012 1 eere.energy.gov DOE's objectives for the Home Energy Score Program * Strengthen the home energy improvement market * Provide an affordable and credible means for homeowners to understand - their home's energy performance, - how their home compares to others in their area, and - how to improve its efficiency. * Build on and complement existing home energy improvement efforts * Help trained workers enter the private sector energy improvement market, as Weatherization work funded by the Recovery Act ramps down 2 eere.energy.gov Better Information: Home Energy Score * Voluntary MPG rating for homes and

171

Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting- New Orleans, May 27, 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy is hosting a public meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) in New Orleans on May 27, 2014, with Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, Deputy Secretary of the Interior Mike Connor and Senator Mary Landrieu. The meeting is on Petroleum Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Issues and takes place at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Medical Education Building Lecture Room, 1901 Perdido Street, New Orleans, LA 70112. Doors open at 8:00 A.M. and the meeting starts at 9:00 A.M. The first installment of the QER will focus on energy transmission, storage and distribution infrastructure (TS&D). The New Orleans meeting is the third stakeholder meeting for the QER.

172

No-threshold dose-response curves for nongenotoxic chemicals: Findings and applications for risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

We tested the hypothesis that no threshold exists when estradiol acts through the same mechanism as an active endogenous estrogen. A Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation accounting for response saturation, background effects, and endogenous estrogen level fit a turtle sex-reversal data set with no threshold and estimated the endogenous dose. Additionally, 31 diverse literature dose-response data sets were analyzed by adding a term for nonhormonal background; good fits were obtained but endogenous dose estimations were not significant due to low resolving power. No thresholds were observed. Data sets were plotted using a normalized MM equation; all 178 data points were accommodated on a single graph. Response rates from {approx}1% to >95% were well fit. The findings contradict the threshold assumption and low-dose safety. Calculating risk and assuming additivity of effects from multiple chemicals acting through the same mechanism rather than assuming a safe dose for nonthresholded curves is appropriate.

Sheehan, Daniel M. [Daniel M. Sheehan and Associates, 1422 Scott St., Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States)]. E-mail: dansheeh@swbell.net

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.I LALI iE REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L. -77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r...

175

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed responses to internal independent assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to make critical decisions during fiscal year (FY) 1998 regarding privatization contracts for the treatment of Hanford tank waste. Specifically, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL), will make decisions related to proceeding with Phase 1 Privatization. In support of these decisions, the management and integration (M+I) contractor must be able to meet the requirements to support the Phase 1 privatization contractors. As part of the assessment of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) Readiness-To-Proceed (RTP), an independent review of their process and products was required by the RL letter of August 8, 1997. The Independent Review Team reviewed the adequacy of the planning that has been done by the M+I contractor to validate that, if the plans are carried out, there is reasonable assurance of success. Overall, the RTP Independent Review Team concluded that, if the planning by the M+I contractor team is carried out with adequate funding, there is reasonable assurance that the M+I contractor will be able to deliver waste to the privatization contractor for the duration of Phase 1. This conclusion was based on addressing the recommendations contained in the Independent Review Team`s Final Report and in the individual Criteria and Review Approach (CRA) forms completed during the assessment. The purpose of this report is to formally document the independent assessment and the RTP team responses to the Independent Review Team recommendations. It also provides closure logics for selected recommendations from a Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) internal assessment of the Technical Basis Review (TBR) packages. This report contains the RTP recommendation closure process (Section 2.0); the closure tables (Section 3.0) which provide traceability between each review team recommendation and its corresponding Project Hanford Management Contract closure logic; and two attachments that formally document the Independent Review Team Final Report and the Internal Assessment Final Report.

Schaus, P.S.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

Using stakeholders’ perspective of ecosystem services and biodiversity features to plan a marine protected area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The definition of a common vision that includes social and environmental goals, ecosystem services and/or biodiversity features that people are interested in maintaining or restoring is a great challenge for marine protected areas (MPAs). Recent initiatives have promoted broadening the focus from biodiversity conservation alone to the conservation of both ecosystem services and biodiversity, indicating that this integration should improve support and compliance from stakeholders. Using a Multiple-Use Coastal Marine Protected Area recently proposed in northern Chile, we investigated (i) stakeholders’ perceptions of the valuation of ecosystem services, threats to their provision, and the prioritization of ecosystem services, biodiversity features, and uses in a planning scenario, and (ii) stakeholders’ expectations for the establishment of a new MPA. The perceptions of different groups of stakeholders were compared and statistically analyzed, and the relationships among prioritizations were studied using a network approach. Stakeholders identified and valued 13 ecosystem services, 28 biodiversity features, 20 uses and activities, and 22 threats. Significant differences among the valuations and prioritizations of different stakeholder groups were attributable principally to artisanal fishermen's perceptions of some components that are directly related to their activities and livelihoods. High expectations of benefits from a new MPA implementation were observed for all categories of stakeholders. To relate the different valuated components, we proposed a network-based conceptual model that reduces complexity, and also as a strategy to communicate relationships and trade-offs occurring in this particular social–ecological system to the several stakeholders. We strongly recommend early stakeholder engagement so as to understand the variability in environmental perceptions and then reflect that variation in the planning and management actions of MPAs, thus improving support for their implementation and achieving conservation and societal goals. Our findings indicate that stakeholders’ perceptions and prioritizations of ecosystem services, biodiversity features and uses should be used as the basis for starting the MPA implementation and planning process.

P. Francisco Cárcamo; Rosa Garay-Flühmann; Francisco A. Squeo; Carlos F. Gaymer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Assessing Invariance of Factor Structures and Polytomous Item Response Model Parameter Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.e., identical items, different people) for the homogenous graded response model (Samejima, 1969) and the partial credit model (Masters, 1982)? To evaluate measurement invariance using IRT methods, the item discrimination and item difficulty parameters... obtained from the GRM need to be equivalent across datasets. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item discrimination parameters (slope) correlation was 0.828. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item difficulty parameters (location) correlation was 0...

Reyes, Jennifer McGee

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Categorization of residential electricity consumption as a basis for the assessment of the impacts of demand response actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a smart(er) grid context, the existence of dynamic tariffs and bidirectional communications will simultaneously allow and require an active role from the end-user concerning electricity management. However, the residential end-user will not be always available to manage energy resources and decide, based on price signals and preferences/needs, the best response actions to implement or the best usage of the electricity produced locally. Therefore, energy management systems are required to monitor consumption/generation/storage and to make the best decisions according to input signals and the user's needs and preferences. The design of adequate algorithms to be implemented in those systems require the prior characterization of domestic electricity demand and categorization of loads, according to availability, typical usage patterns, working cycles and technical constraints. Automated demand response actions must be tailored and chosen according to this previous analysis of load characteristics. In this paper, a characterization of household electricity consumption is presented and an operational categorization of end-use loads is proposed. The existing potential for demand response to a diversified set of management actions is described and a tool to assess the impact of implementing several actions with different rates of penetration of energy management systems is presented. The results obtained show the potential savings for the end-user and expected changes in the load diagram with a decrease of the aggregated peak electricity demand and a smoothed valley.

Ana Soares; Álvaro Gomes; Carlos Henggeler Antunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Quantitative High Content Imaging of Cellular Adaptive Stress Response Pathways in Toxicity for Chemical Safety Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steven Wink †, Steven Hiemstra †, Suzanna Huppelschoten †, Erik Danen †, Marije Niemeijer †, Giel Hendriks ‡, Harry Vrieling ‡, Bram Herpers †, and Bob van de Water *† ... (37-39) The true power of HCS using automated imagers lies in its ability to capture when and where specific molecular signaling events are taking place, enabling characterization of cellular responses to multiple changes in the environment with high time and spatial resolution, relatively high throughput (depending on the exact setup) and on a single cell basis, enabling the detection of heterogeneity within populations. ... (141) The members of this family are highly expressed in the liver and include PXR, RXR, CAR, AHR, and HXR. ...

Steven Wink; Steven Hiemstra; Suzanna Huppelschoten; Erik Danen; Marije Niemeijer; Giel Hendriks; Harry Vrieling; Bram Herpers; Bob van de Water

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

180

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

Bergren, C

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Agricultural and Rural Resources and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools This page lists resources and tools specifically for the agricultural community. Currently the page lists an online calculator that provides quick, detailed economic evaluation of potential utility-scale wind energy projects and the page links to other Web sites. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 137 records found. Page 1 of 28, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Agricultural 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

182

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy storage. Use of Frequency Response Metrics toand energy storage. xxix Use of Frequency Response Metricsfrequency control such as demand response and energy storage.

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

184

Assessing the human cardiovascular response to moderate exercise: feature extraction by support vector regression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to quantitatively describe the steady-state relationships among percentage changes in key central cardiovascular variables (i.e. stroke volume, heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance and cardiac output), measured using non-invasive means, in response to moderate exercise, and the oxygen uptake rate, using a new nonlinear regression approach—support vector regression. Ten untrained normal males exercised in an upright position on an electronically braked cycle ergometer with constant workloads ranging from 25 W to 125 W. Throughout the experiment, was determined breath by breath and the HR was monitored beat by beat. During the last minute of each exercise session, the cardiac output was measured beat by beat using a novel non-invasive ultrasound-based device and blood pressure was measured using a tonometric measurement device. Based on the analysis of experimental data, nonlinear steady-state relationships between key central cardiovascular variables and were qualitatively observed except for the HR which increased linearly as a function of increasing . Quantitative descriptions of these complex nonlinear behaviour were provided by nonparametric models which were obtained by using support vector regression.

Lu Wang; Steven W Su; Branko G Celler; Gregory S H Chan; Teddy M Cheng; Andrey V Savkin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate dissociation scenarios, and ongoing work may help confirm whether climate change is already impacting the stability of the vast oceanic hydrate reservoir.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

From public participation to stakeholder involvement: The rocky road to more inclusiveness  

SciTech Connect

Surviving always at the edge of extinction, public participation in environmental decision making has an uncertain and problematic history. From its emergence from the urban planning and delivery system efforts of the 1960s to many siting and non-siting uses today, it remains a battleground, with few successes and many failures. While some compelling structural, organizational and cultural explanations for this state of affairs exist, the author offers a further one--a too-limited definition and vision of public participation. One then can argue for a more inclusive process such as stakeholder involvement (SI) to enable a more viable approach to decision making. One can argue that the narrow conceptualization offered in the term public participation (PP) is partly responsible for the meager results of decades of efforts by earnest practitioners. Because of the limited, unique, and self-selected publics that respond to the major PP mechanisms such as public hearings, PP has become largely the province of organized activist groups and is largely accepted as such by most parties, including PP professionals. The author reviews the roles of Congress, federal agencies/proponents, local governments, activist groups and PP professionals in creating the current limited PP processes. She discusses trends and prospects for moving to broader based, more inclusive SI approaches. The emerging SI approach presents major methodological and organizational challenges, but offers the promise of outcomes more likely to be legitimated and potentially more lasting.

Peelle, E.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Numerical simulation of dynamic response of a long-span bridge to assess its vulnerability to non-synoptic wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Winds generated by non-synoptic events such as those from tornadoes, microbursts or gust fronts, that are non-stationary or transient in nature and extreme in magnitude, can cause major damage to flexible structures. In this paper, a time-domain method is used to simulate the response of a long-span bridge subject to winds generated by a particular type of non-synoptic wind phenomenon such as a microburst to assess the vulnerability of the bridge to such winds. The self-excited or motion-induced and buffeting or turbulence-induced wind loads on the structure were modeled and simulated by Rational Functions and buffeting indicial functions, respectively. Wind from a translating microburst was simulated using empirical relationships that were derived from measurements of a laboratory-simulated microburst and the bridge response calculated to compare it with those induced by an equivalent straight-line wind that is used for structural design. It is shown that microburst induced structural vibration could be larger or smaller than the vibration induced by straight-line wind of equivalent magnitude depending on the relative size of the microburst with respect to the bridge span.

Bochao Cao; Partha P. Sarkar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect

An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Guiding Cooperative Stakeholders to Compromise Solutions Using an Interactive Tradespace Exploration Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering projects frequently involve the cooperation of multiple stakeholders with varying objectives and preferences for the resulting system. Finding a mutually agreeable solution is of paramount importance in order ...

Fitzgerald, Matthew E.

190

Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 3D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding III: Engaging Key Audiences in Bioenergy Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders Matt Merritt, Director, Public Relations, POET–DSM Advanced Biofuels

191

Perspectives of Five Stakeholder Groups: Challenging Behavior of Individuals with Mental Retardatoin and/or Autism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from five focus groups, each representing a different stakeholder constituency interested in the challenging behavior of individuals with mental retardation and/or autism, were reported. Emergent themes across ...

Ruef, Michael B.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford; Poston, Denise J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Stakeholder engagement for sustainability : a mixed method study of corporate strategies and engagement outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contributes to our understanding of the strategies the companies use to engage external stakeholders, as well as the processes and outcomes of engagement. The first essay proposes a framework for evaluating ...

Isaacs, Katherine W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach March Webinar: Wind Energy and Property Values  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative will host a webinar presenting the topic of wind turbines and property values. Lead author Carol Atkinson-Palombo, assistant professor at the...

194

Notice of an Open Meeting on February 26, 2013 of the Multi-stakeholde...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

26, 2013 of the Multi-stakeholder Process To Develop a Voluntary Code of Conduct for Smart Grid Data Privacy: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 28 - Feb. 11, 2013 Notice of an...

195

Clean Cities Coordinators and Stakeholders Awarded at the Green Fleet Conference and Expo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

At the 2013 Green Fleet Conference and Expo, a number of Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders received awards for their dedication to increasing the environmental sustainability of vehicle fleets.

196

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Trading zones : cooperating for water resource and ecosystem management when stakeholders have apparently irreconcilable differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disputes over the management of water resources in the United States often seem irreconcilable because stakeholders' differences in values, beliefs, and identities are so hard to resolve. Yet, while many efforts to resolve ...

Fuller, Boyd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DOE Quadrennial Energy Review - Stakeholder Meeting #4 The Water...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

to capture power from water diverted for required deliveries for aqueducts or required fish life releases, etc. o Not dispatchable Dispatchable hydro plants are very responsive...

200

Stakeholder and Grantee Perceptions of the Kenedy County Agricultural Conservation Education Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STAKEHOLDER AND GRANTEE PERCEPTIONS OF THE KENEDY COUNTY AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION EDUCATION CENTER A Thesis by ANNA SUE LANGFORD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Conservation Education Center Copyright 2012 Anna Sue Langford STAKEHOLDER AND GRANTEE PERCEPTIONS OF THE KENEDY COUNTY AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION EDUCATION CENTER A Thesis by ANNA SUE LANGFORD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Langford, Anna

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Knowledge, data and interests: Challenges in participation of diverse stakeholders in HIA  

SciTech Connect

Stakeholder participation is considered an integral part of HIA. However, the challenges that participation implies in a multi-disciplinary and multi-ethnic society are less studied. This paper presents the manifestations of the multiplicity of sectors and population groups in HIA and discusses the challenges that such diversity imposes. Specifically, there is no common ground between participants, as their positions entail contradictory knowledge regarding the current situation, reliance on distinct data and conflicting interests. This entails usage of multiple professional and ethnic languages, disagreements regarding the definition of health and prioritizing health issues in HIA, and divergent perceptions of risk. These differences between participants are embedded culturally, socially, individually and, maybe most importantly, professionally. This complex picture of diverse stakeholder attributes is grounded in a case study of stakeholder participation in HIA, regarding zoning of a hazardous industry site in Israel. The implication is that participatory HIAs should address the multiplicity of stakeholders and types of knowledge, data and interests in a more comprehensive way. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper analyses challenges in participation of diverse stakeholders in HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multiplicity of disciplines and population groups raises fundamental challenges. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stakeholders possess distinct and often contradictory knowledge, data and interests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They speak different languages, and differ on approaches to health and risk perceptions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantial amendments to diverse participation are needed, in HIA and generally.

Negev, Maya, E-mail: negevm@bgu.ac.il

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Subpart W Stakeholder Conference Call July 5, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fields (Uranium Watch), Jennifer Thurston (Information Network for Responsible Mining) INDUSTRY: Oscar Paulson (Kennecott Uranium), Jim Cain (Cotter), Joann Tischler (Denison), Dawn Volkman (Uranerz), Mike Thomas (?), Wayne Heile (URS), Scott Sherman (Uranium 1), John Schwenk (Cameco), Mike Newman (Neutron

203

Benchmark validation comparisons of measured and calculated delayed neutron detector responses for a pulsed photonuclear assessment technique  

SciTech Connect

An MCNPX-based calculational methodology has been developed to numerically simulate the complex electron–photon–neutron transport problem for the active interrogation system known as the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technique. The PPA technique uses a pulsed electron accelerator to generate bremsstrahlung photons in order to fission nuclear materials. Delayed neutron radiation is then detected with helium-3 neutron detectors as evidence of the nuclear material presence. Two experimental tests were designed, setup and run to generate experimental data for benchmarking purposes. The first test irradiated depleted uranium in air, and the second test, depleted uranium in a simulated cargo container (plywood pallet), using 10 MeV electron pulses. Time-integrated, post-flash, delayed neutron counts were measured and compared to calculated count predictions in order to benchmark the calculational methodology and computer models. Comparisons between the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the delayed neutron detector responses resulted in reasonable experiment/calculated ratios of 1.42 and 1.06 for the two tests. High-enriched uranium (HEU) predictions were also made with the benchmarked models.

J. W. Sterbentz; J. L. Jones; W. Y. Yoon; D. R. Norman; K. J. Haskell

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Managing Project Scope Definition to Improve Stakeholders’ Participation and Enhance Project Outcome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Project scope definition is the process whereby a project is defined and prepared for execution. It helps to decide on whether or not to proceed with the project. An incomplete scope definition in early stages of a project's life cycle is a common source of difficulty in construction project development process. Meanwhile, the developing of the project can effect positively or negatively a variety of interests. Construction projects in specific bring different degrees of changes on the surrounding environment and people, not only limited at the construction site. Therefore, project definitions boundaries may be redefined, or subjected to differing expectations and interpretation by different stakeholders. The literature suggests that project scope definition practices and stakeholders’ management are two separate domains, which are often investigated separately. However, project scope definition practices can benefit from stakeholders’ management theories. Using procedural justice and participation theories to bring together the two domains, this research will contribute to theory and practice in the project management field. The paper develops a conceptual framework of an ongoing PhD research that seeks to answer the main research question ‘How can the level of project scope definition completeness be evaluated to account for differences in stakeholders’ concerns to facilitate a better project outcome in public building projects? The research aims to develop a procedure that should help a project management team measure the completeness of project scope definition with adequate consideration for stakeholders’ inputs at the pre-project planning stage of building projects, thereby facilitating a better project outcome.

Mohammed K. Fageha; Ajibade A. Aibinu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Metastructuration actions of management: critical for stakeholder intervention in IS/IT implementations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metastructuration actions (overarching activities from management that shape and align users' activities of IS/IT use) are often advocated to improve the success of IS/IT implementation. But how can management support enhance the success of IS/IT by metastructuration actions, when they are dealing with multiple stakeholders? This key question is addressed in this paper. Building on Orlikowski et al. (1995), we explore the contextual conditions of metastructuration actions of management concerning three other key stakeholders: users, the IT department, and external service providers or consultants. The empirical case context is a Dutch public healthcare organisation that deployed three (different) departmental information systems. Based on 26 interviews with all stakeholders that were involved in the deployment of the three departmental information systems, we find that three types of metastructuration actions were critical in a particular relationship with two types of stakeholders. We conclude that this demonstrates that stakeholder context is indeed conditional to metastructuration actions, and hence the success of an IS/IT implementation in terms of perceived system quality and acceptance.

Benny M.E. De Waal; Ronald Batenburg; Ben Fruytier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Notice of an Open Meeting on February 26, 2013 of the Multi-stakeholder  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Open Meeting on February 26, 2013 of the an Open Meeting on February 26, 2013 of the Multi-stakeholder Process To Develop a Voluntary Code of Conduct for Smart Grid Data Privacy: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 28 - Feb. 11, 2013 Notice of an Open Meeting on February 26, 2013 of the Multi-stakeholder Process To Develop a Voluntary Code of Conduct for Smart Grid Data Privacy: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 28 - Feb. 11, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE OE) will convene the first meeting of the smart grid data privacy multi-stakeholder process concerning the development of an Voluntary Code of Conduct for utility and third parties providing consumer energy use services. The meeting will be held Tuesday, February 26, 2013

207

GRR 2nd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR 2nd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting GRR 2nd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 2 May, 2013 - 14:06 analysis Categorical Exclusions Coordinating Permit Office Cost Mechanisms Cost Recovery geothermal NEPA permitting quarterly meeting White Papers Last week, we held the GRR Stakeholder Update at the Denver Renaissance Hotel in Denver, CO. The meeting was well-attended with over 50 attendees, including in-person and webinar attendance. Thanks to all who attended! Presentation During the meeting, we reviewed the current status of the GRR efforts, including: * Roadmap Development: expansion to Colorado and Texas * Regulatory Analyses: including NEPA, Funding Mechanisms, and Permit Coordination Offices

208

GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting GRR 3rd Quarter - Stakeholder Update Meeting Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 9 July, 2013 - 20:57 Alaska analysis appropriations Categorical Exclusions Coordinating Permit Office Cost Mechanisms Cost Recovery geothermal Hawaii NEPA permitting quarterly meeting White Papers On June 26th, we held the 3rd Quarter GRR Stakeholder Update at the Grand Sierra Resort in Reno, NV. The meeting was well-attended with over 40 attendees, including in-person and webinar attendance. Thanks to all who attended! Presentation During the meeting, we reviewed the current status of the GRR efforts, including: * Roadmap Development: expansion to Colorado and Texas - both sets of flowcharts are developed and available online!

209

Surviving the Spill: Stakeholder Perceptions of the Commercial Seafood Supply Chain in Alabama and Mississippi After the Deepwater Horizon Disaster.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Stakeholders in the commercial seafood industry in Alabama and Mississippi have experienced a series of environmental and man-made shocks in the last decade. Hurricanes Ivan… (more)

Christensen, Stefanie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Social movement heterogeneity in public policy framing: a multi-stakeholder analysis of the Keystone XL pipeline.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 2011, stakeholders with differing objectives formed an alliance to oppose the Keystone XL heavy oil pipeline. The alliance, which came to be known as… (more)

Wesley, David Thor Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

SciTech Connect

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Assessing the potential of residential demand response systems to assist in the integration of local renewable energy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mass market demand response programmes may be utilised to assist bulk ... and software architecture in households. In contrast, demand response systems based only on information exchange between ... uptake. The e...

A. D. Peacock; E. H. Owens

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Office Civilian Waste Management Transportation Institutional Program Update on Collaborative Efforts with Key Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created the Office of National Transportation in 2003 recognizing the need to revitalize and accelerate development of the transportation system. The Department has made a commitment to work through a collaborative planning process before developing specific policies and procedures and making transportation decisions. OCRWM has begun to build the institutional framework to support development of this transportation system. Interactions with stakeholders have been initiated. The authors describe the key stakeholders, identified issues, regional and national planning activities, and mechanisms for interaction.

E. Saris; P. Austin; J.J. Offner

2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. Integration of Renewable Resources. Transmissionfor integrating renewable resources on the California ISO-assess the level of renewable resources that can be reliably

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Power on Public Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Wind Power on Public Lands Through its programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and partners, Wind Powering America is assisting with the evaluation of wind energy development on public lands. The cover of the publication. Federal Wind Energy Assistance through NREL The National Renewable Energy Laboratory assists with wind resource assessment and development activities initiated by federal agencies to facilitate distributed renewable energy projects at federal agency sites. This brief outlines the process for requesting National Renewable Energy Laboratory assistance with federal wind energy projects. Army National Guard NREL provided the Army National Guard at Fort Carson, Colorado, with a 50-m

216

Understanding stakeholders' views and support for solar energy in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful development of renewable energy technologies like solar photovoltaic energy (SPV) critically relies on its understanding and acceptance by consumers and institutional customers. Even in contexts of favorable support at the general level like in Brazil, their implementation faces multiple challenges, including low awareness, misperceptions, insufficient communication, and eco-labels' mixed record as information enhancing tools. This paper discusses how market research has been instrumental in developing the first SPV venture in Brazil, by identifying public's beliefs and level of support for alternative energies, and by testing reactions to a solar energy eco-label scheme proposed as key communication tool. The study indicates that expectations for return on investment are affected by a sustainability penalty, as well as by price and adaptation barriers. It also reveals an assessment gap between the concept and design of eco-label, which led to a new eco-label design capable of better addressing unfavorable beliefs, integrating expectations, and improving overall acceptance.

Fabián Echegaray

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind for Schools Project  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Participant Roles & Responsibilities Affiliate Projects Pilot Project Results Project Funding Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Wind for Schools Project As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. To address these issues, Wind Powering America launched the Wind for Schools project in 2005 by conducting a pilot project in Colorado that resulted in one small wind turbine installation in Walsenburg. The program has ended, but by the end of September 2013: Wind for Schools Portal on OpenEI Visit the OpenEI Wind for Schools Portal to access data from turbines at

218

Climate Change Scenario Planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder Involvement in the Decision-Making Process  

SciTech Connect

This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decision-making process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

Ernst, Kathleen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline [University of Tennessee (UT)] [University of Tennessee (UT)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Climate change scenario planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process  

SciTech Connect

This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decisionmaking process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

Ernst, Kathleen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline [University of Tennessee (UT)] [University of Tennessee (UT)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Stakeholder Analysis of a Platform and Ecosystem for Open Innovation in SMEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stakeholder Analysis of a Platform and Ecosystem for Open Innovation in SMEs Jan Zibuschka, Uwe Laufs, Wolf Engelbach Fraunhofer IAO, Nobelstr. 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany {firstname.lastname}@iao.fraunhofer.de Abstract. In today's globalized economy, innovations become more and more crucial for the success

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):273298, Fall 2013 Stakeholder contemporary knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):273­298, Fall 2013 Stakeholder contemporary knowledge needsSeNyaGeR, Utah Wildlife-In-Need Foundation, P.O. Box 16911, Salt Lake City, UT 84116-6911, USA JaMeS Bu of tall structures, such as power lines, communication towers, wind turbines, and other installations

222

NLG Systems Evaluation: a framework to measure impact on and cost for all stakeholders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Nathalie Colineau a Ross Wilkinson b CSIRO ­ ICT Centre a Building E6B Macquarie University Campus, North 2601, Australia {cecile.paris, nathalie.colineau, ross.wilkinson}@csiro.au 1 Enlarging the view framework that allows for all the stakeholders, capturing who benefits from the system and at what cost. 2

Paris, Cécile

223

Fuel cells for a sustainable future II: stakeholder attitudes to the barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;3 1. Introduction Fuel cells coupled with the hydrogen economy have been identified as keyFuel cells for a sustainable future II: stakeholder attitudes to the barriers and opportunities for stationary fuel cell technologies in the UK Michael Peters and Jane Powell November 2004 Tyndall Centre

Watson, Andrew

224

Assessment endpoints: Defining the question  

SciTech Connect

The EPA Framework for Ecological Risk Assessments incorporated two significant improvements in the ecological risk assessment (EcoRA) process. First, the guidance emphasized the importance of defining the problems to be addressed (The Problem Formulation Phase). Secondly, the guidance explicitly calls for dialogue between risk managers and risk assessors. Implementing these elements has proven difficult and sometimes contentious. Risk assessors know how to do many things very well-including literature reviews, toxicity screens, deterministic exposure models, calculations of exposure:effects quotients, etc. However, these efforts often fall short of what risk managers need to make decisions. Moreover, there is a high likelihood that such risk assessment information fails to address the concerns of stakeholders. It is the authors` position that the risk assessors by themselves will seldom be able to produce meaningful assessments because they will usually fail to anticipate the needs of risk managers and the expectations of stakeholders. To become a meaningful part of the social decision process, the EcoRA process (especially the critical Problem Formulation Phase) must be opened to a larger group of participants that includes assessors, managers, and stakeholder representatives. Formal methods in conflict resolution and consensus building among diverse interest groups are available. The authors will describe the need to develop guidelines for the application of these tools to reach agreement on assessment endpoints, Early agreement on the focus of work improves the chances for effective communication of risk and understanding of the basis for environmental management decisions.

Fairbrother, A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Williams, B.A.; Bennett, R.S. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 50-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind resource maps for most of the states and territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in the United States. Counties, towns, utilities, and schools use community-scale wind resource maps to locate and quantify the wind resource, identifying potentially windy sites determining a potential site's economic and technical viability. Map of the updated wind resource assessment status for the United States. Go to the Washington wind resource map. Go to the Oregon wind resource map. Go to the California wind resource map. Go to the Nevada wind resource map. Go to the Idaho wind resource map. Go to the Utah wind resource map. Go to the Arizona wind resource map. Go to the Montana wind resource map. Go to the Wyoming wind resource map. Go to the Colorado wind resource map. Go to the New Mexico wind resource map. Go to the North Dakota wind resource map. Go to the South Dakota wind resource map. Go to the Nebraska wind resource map. Go to the Kansas wind resource map. Go to the Oklahoma wind resource map. Go to the Missouri wind resource map. Go to the Alaska wind resource map. Go to the Hawaii wind resource map. Go to the Michigan wind resource map. Go to the Illinois wind resource map. Go to the Indiana wind resource map. Go to the Ohio wind resource map. Go to the North Carolina wind resource map. Go to the Virginia wind resource map. Go to the Maryland wind resource map. Go to the West Virginia wind resource map. Go to the Pennsylvania wind resource map. Go to the Rhode Island wind resource map. Go to the Connecticut wind resource map. Go to the Massachusetts wind resource map. Go to the Vermont wind resource map. Go to the New Hampshire wind resource map. Go to the Maine wind resource map. Go to the Kentucky wind resource map. Go to the Tennessee wind resource map. Go to the Arkansas wind resource map. Go to the Puerto Rico wind resource map. Go to the U.S. Virgin Islands wind resource map. Go to the New Jersey wind resource map. Go to the Delaware wind resource map.

226

DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle -- Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle Final Report G Redmond Wolf J Dohack LD Winges Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation Seattle, Washington Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Washington, D.C. February 2012 DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle Final Report G Redmond Wolf J Dohack LD Winges Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation Seattle, Washington Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Washington, D.C. February 2012 Contents 1.0 Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 1

227

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Calendar of Wind Power-Related Events  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Events Events Printable Version Bookmark and Share Past Events Calendar of Wind Power-Related Events This page provides and extensive list of wind power-related events. Web developers are welcome to download an Excel file containing a list of these events to expedite inclusion on their websites (last updated 12/5/13). The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative also makes its calendar available through an RSS Feed Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative events RSS feed . Learn about RSS Feeds. View Events by State Go to the text version of states with events. View Events by Month To view a list of events by month, select a month from the drop down box below. Make a selection All Events December 2013 January 2014 February 2014 March 2014 April 2014 May 2014 June 2014 July 2014 August 2014 September 2014

228

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Maragaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Cooperative Extension Service & Wind Powering America Collaborate to Provide Wind Energy Information to Rural Stakeholders (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Cooperative Extension's presence blankets much of the United States and has been a trusted information source to rural Americans. By working together, Cooperative Extension, Wind Powering America, and the wind industry can better educate the public and rural stakeholders about wind energy and maximize the benefits of wind energy to local communities. This poster provides an overview of Cooperative Extension, wind energy issues addressed by the organization, and related activities.

Jimenez, A.; Flower, L.; Hamlen, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Meeting the challenge of responding to stakeholder information needs: A program model  

SciTech Connect

In a dynamic, changing environment, effective decision-making is reached at the lower levels of an organization. With this concept in mind, Westinghouse Hanford Company designed a comprehensive information release program to manage information as close as possible to the original source. This paper will describe that program and the issues associated with implementing its objectives: improve the release process to respond to stakeholder requirements and liability for noncompliance.

Birkland, V.L. (Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

DCE-MRI defined subvolumes of a brain metastatic lesion by principle component analysis and fuzzy-c-means clustering for response assessment of radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a pharmacokinetic modelfree framework to analyze the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data for assessment of response of brain metastases to radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with 45 analyzable brain metastases had MRI scans prior to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and at the end of the 2-week therapy. The volumetric DCE images covering the whole brain were acquired on a 3T scanner with approximately 5 s temporal resolution and a total scan time of about 3 min. DCE curves from all voxels of the 45 brain metastases were normalized and then temporally aligned. A DCE matrix that is constructed from the aligned DCE curves of all voxels of the 45 lesions obtained prior to WBRT is processed by principal component analysis to generate the principal components (PCs). Then, the projection coefficient maps prior to and at the end of WBRT are created for each lesion. Next, a pattern recognition technique, based upon fuzzy-c-means clustering, is used to delineate the tumor subvolumes relating to the value of the significant projection coefficients. The relationship between changes in different tumor subvolumes and treatment response was evaluated to differentiate responsive from stable and progressive tumors. Performance of the PC-defined tumor subvolume was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in prediction of nonresponsive lesions and compared with physiological-defined tumor subvolumes. Results: The projection coefficient maps of the first three PCs contain almost all response-related information in DCE curves of brain metastases. The first projection coefficient, related to the area under DCE curves, is the major component to determine response while the third one has a complimentary role. In ROC analysis, the area under curve of 0.88 ± 0.05 and 0.86 ± 0.06 were achieved for the PC-defined and physiological-defined tumor subvolume in response assessment. Conclusions: The PC-defined subvolume of a brain metastasis could predict tumor response to therapy similar to the physiological-defined one, while the former is determined more rapidly for clinical decision-making support.

Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States); Cao, Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Med Inn Building C478, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Using corporate social responsibility benchmarking framework to identify and assess corporate social responsibility trends of real estate companies owning and developing shopping centres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shopping centres that include retail activities have come in for criticism as to their environmental, architectural and social impacts. However, the sector has been applying corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. In an attempt to identify the best practices regarding CSR and trends therein we developed a CSR benchmarking of companies from the real estate sector owning and developing shopping centres. Based on information from websites, annual, environmental and sustainability reports, and customer services department’s information, in 2004 and 2010, a comparative CSR benchmarking was performed on 23 real estate companies with shopping centres based in Europe, China, Australia and the USA. The CRS benchmarking framework focused on reported CSR practices and included categories and sub-categories of evaluation in four domains: (1) external results, (2) internal results, (3) management processes and (4) learning and innovation. The framework was inspired by the sustainability balanced scorecard structure. The United Kingdom real estate sector’s companies studied did relatively well when evaluated by the framework used in this study. The highest ranked real estate companies applied sustainable or environmental buildings standards and did show a commitment to transparency and CSR disclosure. The positive evolution of CSR practices in the 23 companies studied in 2004 and 2010 may reflect efforts to improve competitiveness and the reputation of the companies with shopping centres through CSR initiatives.

Idalina Dias Sardinha; Lucas Reijnders; Paula Antunes

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

NERSC Stakeholders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Laboratory Edward Seidel Edward Seidel University of Illinois Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences Computational...

236

Other Stakeholders  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ohio 45343 (937) 847-6636 E-mail: ellen.stanifer@cityofmiamisburg.com Mound Science and Energy Museum (MSEM) 1075 Mound Road Miamisburg, Ohio 45342-6714 Website: http:...

237

Energy Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy¬タルs 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review July 29, 2010 The Department of Energy conducted a Peer Review of its Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and Development Program on July 20-22, during which 28 R&D projects were presented for review by industry stakeholders. More than 65 energy sector stakeholders came to network, present, and learn about DOE projects, while more than 20 joined in by webinar. The CEDS program's national lab, academic, and industry partners-including the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) partners and Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIPG) project- presented DOE-supported efforts involving secured SCADA communications and smart grid applications,

238

Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia-- March 16-18, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

239

The role of science, stakeholder engagement, and decision making process design in advancing innovation around water management in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sustainable Water Management Initiative is a multi-stakeholder process that the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs convened in early 2010 to seek advice on how to more sustainably manage ...

Corson-Rikert, Tyler Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Foreseeing the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholders' Perspectives and Models of New Technology Diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholders’dual superiority of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) hasneeded to position the hydrogen-fuel cell combination as a

Collantes, Gustavo O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

FORESEEING THE MARKET FOR HYDROGEN FUEL-CELL VEHICLES: STAKEHOLDERS’ PERSPECTIVES AND MODELS OF NEW TECHNOLOGY DIFFUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholders’dual superiority of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) hasneeded to position the hydrogen-fuel cell combination as a

Collantes, Gustavo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On January 30, 2015, President Obama signed an Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder...

243

A value sensitive action-reflection model: evolving a co-design space with stakeholder and designer prompts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a design method for evolving a co-design space to support stakeholders untrained in design. Specifically, the purpose of the method is to expand and shape a co-design space so that stakeholders, acting as designers, focus not only on the ... Keywords: co-design, creativity, design method, envisioning cards, homeless young people, mobile technologies, prototyping, reflection-on-action, safety, security, value scenarios, value sensitive action-reflection model, value sensitive design

Daisy Yoo; Alina Huldtgren; Jill Palzkill Woelfer; David G. Hendry; Batya Friedman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Lessons from stakeholder dialogues on marine aquaculture in offshore wind farms: Perceived potentials, constraints and research gaps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Drawing on a case study in Germany, this contribution explores the practical application of offshore aquaculture within offshore wind farms in view of the different stakeholders involved. Using a transdisciplinary research approach, an understanding of the rationalities and interests among the different involved stakeholder groups was explored. Offshore wind energy is high on the political agenda in Germany. The vast spatial requirements however inherit potential user conflicts with competing, and under current legislation excluded users such as fishermen. Solutions for combining sustainable uses of the same ocean space have thus seen increasing interest within the research community in Germany and in Europe over the past years. This paper was inspired by and presents the outcomes of a stakeholder analysis and in particular a stakeholder workshop. Central focus was placed on academics and private as well as public stakeholders engaged in current research efforts of combining offshore wind farms and aquaculture in the German North Sea. The paper identifies the overall acceptance of such a multi-use scenario in society, opportunities and constraints as perceived by the stakeholders, and key research gaps. The results confirm the assumption that there is a clear need, and also willingness on behalf of the policy makers and the research community, to find sustainable, resource- and space-efficient solutions for combined ocean use.

Lara Wever; Gesche Krause; Bela H. Buck

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Remedial Action Assessment System (RAAS): Evaluation of selected feasibility studies of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect

Congress and the public have mandated much closer scrutiny of the management of chemically hazardous and radioactive mixed wastes. Legislative language, regulatory intent, and prudent technical judgment, call for using scientifically based studies to assess current conditions and to evaluate and select costeffective strategies for mitigating unacceptable situations. The NCP requires that a Remedial Investigation (RI) and a Feasibility Study (FS) be conducted at each site targeted for remedial response action. The goal of the RI is to obtain the site data needed so that the potential impacts on public health or welfare or on the environment can be evaluated and so that the remedial alternatives can be identified and selected. The goal of the FS is to identify and evaluate alternative remedial actions (including a no-action alternative) in terms of their cost, effectiveness, and engineering feasibility. The NCP also requires the analysis of impacts on public health and welfare and on the environment; this analysis is the endangerment assessment (EA). In summary, the RI, EA, and FS processes require assessment of the contamination at a site, of the potential impacts in public health or the environment from that contamination, and of alternative RAs that could address potential impacts to the environment. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Whelan, G. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Hartz, K.E.; Hilliard, N.D. (Beck (R.W.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Control Account Manager (CAM) Responsibilities Control Account Manager (CAM) responsibilities are listed in the PPPL Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedures. Below is a brief summary of those responsibilities: Prior to project start: · Develop Work are listed in the PPPL Project Management System Description (PMSD) and PMSD Appendix E Supporting Breakdown Structure (WBS) with project team and stakeholders · Plan the work and identify tasks

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

247

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public and environment from radiological hazards with a focus on hazardous nuclear facilities and operations. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for improvement to our leadership to support the safe performance of the Department’s mission.

248

Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

Perez, Rodrigo O. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil) [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Habr-Gama, Angelita, E-mail: gamange@uol.com.br [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sao Juliao, Guilherme P. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R. [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nahas, Sergio Carlos [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Colorectal Surgery Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil) [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Division, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Social Acceptance of Wind Power in the United States: Evaluating Stakeholder Perspectives (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

As the wind industry strives to achieve 20% wind energy by 2030, maintaining high levels of social acceptance for wind energy will become increasingly important. Wind Powering America is currently researching stakeholder perspectives in the U.S. market and reviewing findings from wind energy projects around the world to better understand social acceptance barriers. Results from European studies show that acceptance varies widely depending on local community values. A preliminary survey shows similar results in the United States. Further research will be conducted to refine our understanding of key social acceptance barriers and evaluate the best ways to mitigate negative perspectives on wind power.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

252

Stakeholder Database from the Center for Bioenergy Sustainability (Learn who the experts are)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) is a leading resource for dealing with the environmental impacts and the ultimate sustainability of biomass production for conversion to biofuels and bio-based products. Its purpose is to use science and analysis to understand the sustainability (environmental, economic, and social) of current and potential future bioenergy production and distribution; to identify approaches to enhance bioenergy sustainability; and to serve as an independent source of the highest quality data and analysis for bioenergy stakeholders and decision makers. ... On the operational level, CBES is a focal point and business-development vehicle for ORNL’s capabilities related to bioenergy sustainability and socioeconomic analyses. As such, it complements the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), also located at ORNL, which focuses on the problem of converting lignocellulosic biomass into reactive intermediaries necessary for the cellulosic biofuel industry. Together, these centers provide a strong integrating mechanism and business-development tool for ORNL's science and technology portfolio in bioenergy [taken and edited from http://web.ornl.gov/sci/ees/cbes/. The Stakeholder Database allows you to find experts in bioenergy by their particular type of expertise, their affiliations or locations, their specific research areas or research approaches, etc.

253

Making sense of climate change risks and responses at the community level: A cultural-political lens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract How to better assess, communicate and respond to risks from climate change at the community level have emerged as key questions within climate risk management. Recent research to address these questions centres largely on psychological factors, exploring how cognition and emotion lead to biases in risk assessment. Yet, making sense of climate change and its responses at the community level demands attention to the cultural and political processes that shape how risk is conceived, prioritized and managed. I review the emergent literature on risk perceptions and responses to climate change using a cultural-political lens. This lens highlights how knowledge, meaning and power are produced and negotiated across multiple stakeholders at the community level. It draws attention to the different ways of constructing climate change risks and suggests an array of responses at the community level. It further illustrates how different constructions of risk intersect with agency and power to shape the capacity for response and collective action. What matters are whose constructions of risk, and whose responses, count in decision-making. I argue for greater engagement with the interpretive social sciences in research, practice and policy. The interpretive social sciences offer theories and tools for capturing and problematising the ways of knowing, sense-making and mobilising around risks from climate change. I also highlight the importance of participatory approaches in incorporating the multiplicity of interests at the community level into climate risk management in fair, transparent and culturally appropriate ways.

Ainka A. Granderson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Response to comments received from the State of Colorado and the public on the Environmental Assessment for resumption of thermal stabilization of plutonium oxide in Building 707  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this document to respond to comments from the State of Colorado and the public on the draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Resumption of Thermal Stabilization of Plutonium Oxide in Building 707 at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado. The draft EA was provided to the State of Colorado and the public on September 8, 1993, for a comment period of 60 days. The Department`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1021.301) requires that prior to approval of the EA, DOE is to allow the host State and Indian Tribe a period of from 14 to 30 days to review and comment on the EA. The Department established a comment period of 60 days for this EA in response to requests by the public during the first public meeting on July 7, 1993, before preparation of the EA. Other issues raised at the July 7 meeting included the range of alternatives to be considered, the time period for preparation of the EA, and the amount of material to be thermally stabilized. These and other comments made by the public at that meeting were carefully considered in preparation of the EA. In addition to providing the preapproval draft EA to the State of Colorado, DOE distributed the EA to all persons and groups on the RFP public information mailing list and placed the EA and reference documents in the DOE Public Reading Rooms in the RFP area. A public meeting was held on October 6, 1993, to hear public comments on the draft EA. All comments on the draft EA, those received both at the October 6 public meeting and through correspondence, have been reproduced in their entirety in this Response to Comments document. Responses to the commenters` questions and concerns are provided, and changes made to the body of the EA are indicated in the responses. All comments received have been considered in the revision of the EA.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mobilizing Public Markets to Finance Renewable Energy Projects: Insights from Expert Stakeholders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobilizing Public Markets to Mobilizing Public Markets to Finance Renewable Energy Projects: Insights from Expert Stakeholders Paul Schwabe and Michael Mendelsohn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Felix Mormann Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance Stanford University Douglas J. Arent Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55021 June 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Mobilizing Public Markets to Finance Renewable Energy Projects: Insights from Expert

257

Microsoft PowerPoint - WH Energy and Climate Stakeholders 10-7-09 final.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laying the Foundation for a Laying the Foundation for a Generation of Clean Energy Jobs Energy and Climate Stakeholders Briefing October 7, 2009 The message We need a new industrial revolution to ensure American competitiveness, decrease our dependency on foreign oil, and mitigate climate change. The United States has the opportunity to be the innovation leader. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 5 25 20 15 10 0 Production Consumption Million barrels per day We are dependent on foreign oil US became a net oil importer in the 1940s 4 June 2009 summary of climate change impacts on the United States. Sources include the IPCC and CCSP (Climate Change Science Program) 5 Days above 90º F Chicago: ~ 10 days to 75 -90 days greater than 90°F St. Louis: ~ 45 days to ~ 120 days (1/3 of the year) We are also behind in other energy

258

Integration of MEA Components-Status and Technology Gaps: A Stakeholders Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop March 16-17, 2010 Denver, CO 3M Fuel Cell Components Program Mark Debe, Steve Hamrock, Radoslav Atanasoski, Pinar Serim, Eric Funkenbusch, Mike Yandrasits, Stan Garnsworthy and Customers Integration of MEA Components - Status and Technology Gaps - A Stakeholder's Perspective 2 Outline: 1. What does MEA integration mean? 2. Where the technology may be going with regard to 2015 3. Status and relative gaps for 2015 at the individual component level 4. Status and relative gaps for 2015 at the MEA integration level 5. Suggestions where DOE should concentrate its efforts in the near future 6. Other general suggestions and recommendations Integration of MEA Components 3M perspectives on technology development needs and gaps. 3M U.S. DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop Denver, CO, March 16-17, 2010

259

Invited Testimony on the Report from the Panama Canal Stakeholder Working Group 1 Texas Senate Transportation Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invited Testimony on the Report from the Panama Canal Stakeholder Working Group 1 Texas Senate Transportation Committee Public Hearing December 18, 2012 Invited Testimony Report from the Panama Canal terminals in Texas generated $277 billion in economic value to the state in 2011. The Panama Canal

260

The Green Deal Value Chain: Stakeholders and business models for the delivery of the Green Deal and ECO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&A panel with the energy suppliers to discuss the launch and delivery of Green Deal and ECO; explore howPower); Mark Cherry (Head of Green Deal ­ EON); Chris Ronketti (Head of Energy Solutions ­ British Gas BusinessThe Green Deal Value Chain: Stakeholders and business models for the delivery of the Green Deal

Wrigley, Stuart

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microsoft Word - Summary and Guide for Stakeholders 01-03-11 AFD.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

423 423 January 2011 F F inal inal Lo Lo ng- ng- T T e e r r m m M M a a n n a a g g e e me me nt a nt a n n d d S S t t or or a a g g e e of of El El e e m m en en t t a a l l M M e e rc rc u u r r y y En En vironmental Impac vironmental Impac t Statement t Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC For additional information on this Final Mercury Storage EIS, contact: AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT David Levenstein, Document Manager Office of Environmental Compliance (EM-41) U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2612 Germantown, MD 20874 Website: http://www.mercurystorageeis.com Fax: 877-274-5462 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Cover Sheet Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

262

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 90-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the total offshore wind potential that would be possible from developing the available offshore areas. The offshore wind resource maps can be used as a guide to identify regions for commercial wind development. A map of the United States showing offshore wind resource. Washington offshore wind map. Oregon offshore wind map. California offshore wind map. Texas offshore wind map. Minnesota offshore wind map. Lousiana offshore wind map. Wisconsin offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Illinois offshore wind map. Indiana offshore wind map. Ohio offshore wind map. Georgia offshore wind map. South Carolina offshore wind map. North Carolina offshore wind map. Virginia offshore wind map. Maryland offshore wind map. Pennsylvania offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Jersey offshore wind map. New York offshore wind map. Maine offshore wind map. Massachusetts offshore wind map. Rhode Island offshore wind map. Connecticut offshore wind map. Hawaii offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Hampshire offshore wind map.

263

Rocky Flats Closure: the Role of Models in Facilitating Scientific Communication With Stakeholder Groups  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup site for a previous manufacturing plant that made components for the U.S. nuclear weapons arsenal. The facility was shut down in 1989 to address environmental and safety concerns, and left behind a legacy of contaminated facilities, soils, surface and ground water. In 1995, the Site contractor established the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) advisory group to provide advice and technical expertise on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in the air, surface water, groundwater, and soil. Through a combination of expert judgment supported by state-of-the-art scientific measurements, it was shown that under environmental conditions at Rocky Flats, plutonium and americium form insoluble oxides that adhere to small soil, organic, and mineral particles and colloids, or are colloidal materials themselves. A series of models ranging from conceptual, geostatistical, and large-scale wind and surface water erosion models were used to guide stakeholder interactions. The nature of these models, and their use in public communication is described.

Clark, D.L.; Choppin, G.R.; Dayton, C.S.; Janecky, D.R.; Lane, L.J.; Paton, I.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Rocky Flats closure: The role of models in facilitating scientific communication with stakeholder groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup site for a previous manufacturing plant that made components for the U.S. nuclear weapons arsenal. The facility was shut down in 1989 to address environmental and safety concerns, and left behind a legacy of contaminated facilities, soils, surface and ground water. In 1995, the Site contractor established the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) advisory group to provide advice and technical expertise on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in the air, surface water, groundwater, and soil. Through a combination of expert judgment supported by state-of-the-art scientific measurements, it was shown that under environmental conditions at Rocky Flats, plutonium and americium form insoluble oxides that adhere to small soil, organic, and mineral particles and colloids, or are colloidal materials themselves. A series of models ranging from conceptual, geostatistial, and large-scale wind and surface water erosion models were used to guide stakeholder interactions. The nature of these models, and their use in public communication is described.

David L. Clark; Gregory R. Choppin; Christine S. Dayton; David R. Janecky; Leonard J. Lane; Ian Paton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Response and Restoration | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Restoration Restoration Response and Restoration Despite all of ISER's efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system. ISER plans, trains, and coordinates year round with all relevant stakeholders so that it can meet our nation's energy needs by deploying energy emergency responders to coordinate and facilitate system restoration activities with local, state, territorial, Federal, public and private sector stakeholders, in some cases, coordinating the utilization of certain

266

ABSTRACT: The Prince William Sound (PWS) risk assessment was a joint project of Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rensselaer Polytechnic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adverse consequences (accidents). The PWS risk assessment did not attempt to determine an "acceptable. The determination of acceptable risk will be a product of the stakeholder's use of the PWS analysisABSTRACT: The Prince William Sound (PWS) risk assessment was a joint project of Det Norske Veritas

van Dorp, Johan René

267

A GUIDE AND A TOOLBOX FOR PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT IN THE ASSESSMENT AND THE MANAGEMENT OF CONTAMINATED SITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A GUIDE AND A TOOLBOX FOR PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT IN THE ASSESSMENT AND THE MANAGEMENT OF CONTAMINATED, franck.marot@ademe.fr Keywords: Public involvement, Stakeholder, Communication, Guide, Tool, Contaminated of the assessment and the management of a contaminated site. It is also perceived as a difficult and sometimes risky

Boyer, Edmond

268

A successful effort to involve stakeholders in the selection of a site for a corrective action management unit  

SciTech Connect

As part of the effort to clean up hazardous waste sites, Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (SNL/NM) adopted a novel approach to involving stakeholders in a key decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), an area designed to consolidate, store, and treat wastes generated from cleanup activities. The decision-making approach was a variation of a technique known as multiattribute utility analysis (MUA). Although MUA has rarely been undertaken during normal Project activities, it proved to be a surprisingly effective means for involving stakeholders in the decision process, generating consensus over a selected site, and enhancing public trust and understanding of Project activities. Requirements and criteria for selecting CAMU sites are provided by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) CAMU Final Rule (EPA 1993). Recognizing the lack of experience with the Rule and the importance of community understanding and support, the ER Project sought an approach that would allow stakeholders to participate in the site-selection process.

Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Merkhofer, M.W. [Applied Decision Analysis, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oms, E. [USDOE Albuquerque, New Mexico (United State). Kirtland Area Office

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Implementation as it Relates to Referral Reduction among Students of Color in an In-school Suspension Program: Perceptions of Key Stakeholders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and parents that participated in this study. Furthermore, the variance in the "self-sense making" done by each of the stakeholder groups after campus leadership failed to communicate, support, and sustain district expectations for program implementation...

Long, Robert

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

User satisfaction of the community education program as perceived by stakeholders in the north east independent school district in san antonio, texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study was to determine user satisfaction of the community education program as perceived by stakeholders in North East Independent School District. A secondary purpose of this study was to examine the impact of community...

Tharp, Twain Owens

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Relevance of the sterilization-induced effects on the properties of different hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and assessment of the osteoblastic cell response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...34]. Regarding the steam sterilization behaviour...necessary experimental tools. Biomaterials 28, 354-369...crystallization under saturated steam pressure and the self-healing...interactions in biological systems: Dispersing titania...hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and assessment of the osteoblastic cell...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Comparative Evaluation of Three Situational Judgment Test Response Formats: Additional Assessment of Construct-related Validity, Subgroup Differences, Susceptibility to Response Distortion, Test-taker Reactions, and Internal Psychometric Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the construct-related validity of three situational judgment test (SJT) response formats. The present study addressed a potential common method bias threat arising from a shared...

White, Craig Douglas

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

273

Corporate Social Responsibility Practices and Financial Performance over Time for Selected U.S. Corporations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eleven corporate classification variables that represented organizations? geographical location, industry, executive leadership dimensions, and financial health. It also included six CFP variables that iv represented accounting and market...-based measures, and seven CSR variables that represented the key organizational stakeholders of the local community and environment, employees, and customers. The corporate classification variables were utilized to assess CSR performances, while CFP...

Phelan Ribera, Kelli Catherine

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Residential-Scale 30-Meter Wind Maps  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Residential-Scale 30-Meter Wind Maps Residential-Scale 30-Meter Wind Maps The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 30-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind resource maps for the United States. Businesses, farms, and homeowners use residential-scale wind resource maps to identify wind sites that may be appropriate for small-scale wind projects. A wind resource map of the United States. Go to the California wind resource map. Go to the Washington wind resource map. Go to the Oregon wind resource map. Go to the Idaho wind resource map. Go to the Nevada wind resource map. Go to the Montana wind resource map. Go to the Wyoming wind resource map. Go to the Utah wind resource map. Go to the Colorado wind resource map. Go to the Arizona wind resource map. Go to the New Mexico wind resource map. Go to the North Dakota wind resource map. Go to the South Dakota wind resource map. Go to the Nebraska wind resource map. Go to the Kansas wind resource map. Go to the Oklahoma wind resource map. Go to the Texas wind resource map. Go to the Minnesota wind resource map. Go to the Iowa wind resource map. Go to the Missouri wind resource map. Go to the Arkansas wind resource map. Go to the Louisiana wind resource map. Go to the Wisconsin wind resource map. Go to the Illinois wind resource map. Go to the Indiana wind resource map. Go to the Michigan wind resource map. Go to the Ohio wind resource map. Go to the Kentucky wind resource map. Go to the Tennessee wind resource map. Go to the Mississippi wind resource map. Go to the Alabama wind resource map. Go to the Florida wind resource map. Go to the Georgia wind resource map. Go to the South Carolina wind resource map. Go to the North Carolina wind resource map. Go to the Virginia wind resource map. Go to the West Virginia wind resource map. Go to the Pennsylvania wind resource map. Go to the Maryland wind resource map. Go to the Delaware wind resource map. Go to the New Jersey wind resource map. Go to the New York wind resource map. Go to the Connecticut wind resource map. Go to the Rhode Island wind resource map. Go to the Massachusetts wind resource map. Go to the Vermont wind resource map. Go to the New Hampshire wind resource map. Go to the Maine wind resource map. Go to the Alaska wind resource map. Go to the Hawaii wind resource map.

275

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Framework for Assessing Collaborative Capacity in Community-Based Public Forest Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasingly, agency managers and local stakeholders are utilizing collaborative approaches to address publicA Framework for Assessing Collaborative Capacity in Community-Based Public Forest Management Antony Science+Business Media, LLC 2011 Abstract Community-based collaborative groups involved in public natural

277

Environmental Justice and Federal Facilities: Recommendations for Improving Stakeholder Relations Between Federal Facilities and Enviornmental Justice Communities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

J J FEDERAL FACILITIES R IMPROVING S R BETWEEN FEDERAL F E JUSTICE COMMUNITIES October 2004 Prepared by the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council Waste and Facility Siting Subcommittee Federal Facilities Working Group NVIRONMENTAL USTICE AND ECOMMENDATIONS FOR TAKEHOLDER ELATIONS ACILITIES AND NVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND FEDERAL FACILITIES RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPROVING STAKEHOLDER RELATIONS BETWEEN FEDERAL FACILITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE COMMUNITIES October 2004 Prepared by the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council Waste and Facility Siting Subcommittee Federal Facilities Working Group ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Federal Facilities Working Group of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council's (NEJAC) Waste and Facility Siting Subcommittee wishes to acknowledge and thank the organizations and individuals

278

Model Fire Protection Assessment Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Assessment guide covers the implementation of the DOE's responsibility of assuring that DOE and the DOE Contractors have established Fire Protection Programs that are at the level required for the area being assessed.

279

Microsoft Word - AppendixH_CommentResponse.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NFSS Vicinity Property Report NFSS Vicinity Property Report October 2010 Doc. No. S06246 Page H-1 Responsiveness Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties, New York: Review of Radiological Conditions at Six Vicinity Properties and Two Drainage Ditches on April 23, 2010, for public comment. Report availability was announced through a message to stakeholders sent on behalf of DOE by USACE. The announcement provided a 30-day comment period, closing on March 19, 2010. DOE extended the comment period to June 14, 2010, in response to multiple requests for additional time to review FUSRAP documentation. Twenty comments were received, of which five were from one stakeholder and two from

280

Decentralized demand–supply matching using community microgrids and consumer demand response: A scenario analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Developing countries constantly face the challenge of reliably matching electricity supply to increasing consumer demand. The traditional policy decisions of increasing supply and reducing demand centrally, by building new power plants and/or load shedding, have been insufficient. Locally installed microgrids along with consumer demand response can be suitable decentralized options to augment the centralized grid based systems and plug the demand–supply gap. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) develop a framework to identify the appropriate decentralized energy options for demand–supply matching within a community, and, (2) determine which of these options can suitably plug the existing demand–supply gap at varying levels of grid unavailability. A scenario analysis framework is developed to identify and assess the impact of different decentralized energy options at a community level and demonstrated for a typical urban residential community – Vijayanagar, Bangalore in India. A combination of LPG based CHP microgrid and proactive demand response by the community is the appropriate option that enables the Vijayanagar community to meet its energy needs 24/7 in a reliable, cost-effective manner. The paper concludes with an enumeration of the barriers and feasible strategies for the implementation of community microgrids in India based on stakeholder inputs.

Kumudhini Ravindra; Parameshwar P. Iyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coming to a watershed near you!: Texas Watershed Steward educates stakeholders across the state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, assistant professor and AgriLife Extension water resources specialist. ] Story by Leslie Jordan tx H2O | pg. 12 The TWS team created the program in response to federal and state strategies regarding watersheds. According to the U.S. Environmental...

Jordan, Leslie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. to reduce energy prices and for the positions of the Coal-Based Generation Stakeholders group, I am pleased to enclose AAR briefing papers on the following three railroad priorities: repeal of the 4.3 cent per gallon "deficit reduction" diesel fuel tax, an acceptable resolution of the coal mine valley fill issue, and establishment of a locomotive fuel efficiency program within the Department of Energy. nepdg_2251_2500.pdf Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. More Documents & Publications Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. PoliResponse to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy.

284

Stakeholder Transportation Scorecard: Reviewing Nevada's Recommendations for Enhancing the Safety and Security of Nuclear Waste Shipments - 13518  

SciTech Connect

As a primary stakeholder in the Yucca Mountain program, the state of Nevada has spent three decades examining and considering national policy regarding spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation. During this time, Nevada has identified 10 issues it believes are critical to ensuring the safety and security of any spent nuclear fuel transportation program, and achieving public acceptance. These recommendations are: 1) Ship the oldest fuel first; 2) Ship mostly by rail; 3) Use dual-purpose (transportable storage) casks; 4) Use dedicated trains for rail shipments; 5) Implement a full-scale cask testing program; 6) Utilize a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for the selection of a new rail spur to the proposed repository site; 7) Implement the Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB) 'straw man' process for route selection; 8) Implement Section 180C assistance to affected States, Tribes and localities through rulemaking; 9) Adopt safety and security regulatory enhancements proposed states; and 10) Address stakeholder concerns about terrorism and sabotage. This paper describes Nevada's proposals in detail and examines their current status. The paper describes the various forums and methods by which Nevada has presented its arguments and sought to influence national policy. As of 2012, most of Nevada's recommendations have been adopted in one form or another, although not yet implemented. If implemented in a future nuclear waste program, the State of Nevada believes these recommendations would form the basis for a successful national transportation plan for shipments to a geologic repository and/or centralized interim storage facility. (authors)

Dilger, Fred C. [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States)] [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)] [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States)] [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, Carson City, NV 80906 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hurricane Response and Restoration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Response and Restoration Hurricane Response and Restoration Hurricane Response and Restoration June 1, 2011 - 5:15pm Addthis Despite all of ISER's efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system. ISER plans, trains, and coordinates year round with all relevant stakeholders so that it can meet our nation's energy needs by deploying energy emergency responders to coordinate and facilitate system restoration activities with local, state, territorial, Federal, public and private

286

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis in an experimental model: dose–response at five-week follow-up based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats  

SciTech Connect

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. Employing an experimental model of liver metastases in rats, we recently demonstrated that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT) at 13 Gy prescribed to tumor is therapeutically useful at 3-week follow-up. The aim of the present study was to evaluate dose–response at 5-week follow-up, based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA-BNCT (n = 19), Beam only (n = 8) and Sham (n = 7) (matched manipulation, no treatment). For each rat, neutron flux was measured in situ and boron content was measured in a pre-irradiation blood sample for retrospective individual dose assessment. For statistical analysis (ANOVA), individual data for the BPA-BNCT group were pooled according to absorbed tumor dose, BPA-BNCT I: 4.5–8.9 Gy and BPA-BNCT II: 9.2–16 Gy. At 5 weeks post-irradiation, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 12.2 +/- 6.6 for Sham, 7.8 +/- 4.1 for Beam only, 4.4 +/- 5.6 for BPA-BNCT I and 0.45 +/- 0.20 for BPA-BNCT II; tumor nodule weight was 750 +/- 480 mg for Sham, 960 +/- 620 mg for Beam only, 380 +/- 720 mg for BPA-BNCT I and 7.3 +/- 5.9 mg for BPA-BNCT II. The BPA-BNCT II group exhibited statistically significant tumor control with no contributory liver toxicity. Potential threshold doses for tumor response and significant tumor control were established at 6.1 and 9.2 Gy, respectively.

Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Veronica A. Trivilin; Lucas L. Colombo; Andrea Monti Hughes; Silvia I. Thorp; Jorge E. Cardoso; Marcel A. Garabalino; Ana J. Molinari; Elisa M. Heber; Paula Curotto; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of electricity power transmission lines: A Finnish case review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process concerning the route of a 400 kV power transmission line between Loviisa and Hikiä in southern Finland was reviewed in order to assess how biodiversity issues are treated and to provide suggestions on how to improve the effectiveness of treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of linear development projects. The review covered the whole assessment process, including interviews of stakeholders, participation in the interest group meetings and review of all documents from the project. The baseline studies and assessment of direct impacts in the case study were detailed but the documentation, both the assessment programme and the assessment report, only gave a partial picture of the assessment process. All existing information, baseline survey and assessment methods should be addressed in the scoping phase in order to promote interaction between all stakeholders. In contrast to the assessment of the direct effects, which first emphasized impacts on the nationally important and protected flying squirrel but later expanded to deal with the assessment of impacts on ecologically important sites, the indirect and cumulative impacts of the power line were poorly addressed. The public was given the opportunity to become involved in the EIA process. However, they were more concerned with impacts on their properties and less so on biodiversity and species protection issues. This suggests that the public needs to become more informed about locally important features of biodiversity.

Tarja Söderman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Quantitative Assessment of Appropriate Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Economist Dr. E.F. Schumacher posited the concept of “Intermediate Technology” in his 1973 book Small is Beautiful, catalyzing the explosion of the appropriate technology (AT) movement. But how does one gauge the “appropriateness” of a technology? Quantitative assessment of AT can benefit sustainable community development (SCD) practitioners by way of decision-support and risk mitigation. The following research constructs a generalizable metric for quantitative assessment of AT, and develops a systematic process for its deployment. Forty-nine independent, emergent indicators of appropriateness were identified from a literature meta-analysis. The most prevalent indicators were as follows: community input, affordability, autonomy, transferability, community control, scalability, local availability of raw materials, and adaptability. Using these, a quantitative assessment tool was developed, called the Appropriate Technology Assessment Tool (ATAT). ATAT employs multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods to rank AT alternatives. In this way, inputs are aggregated using a weighted- sum method, giving the composite Appropriateness Index, (Ali). Using VBA coding, the author built ATAT via a simple form populated by the identified indicators. The form automates all necessary calculations, facilitating empirically rigorous quantitative assessment of AT by non-technical SCD workers. AT is only as appropriate as beneficiaries deem. A participatory research approach requires community stakeholders to rank preferred criteria for AT, and rate alternatives against the chosen criteria. This approach makes the tool customizable to local conditions. Using the Mini-Delphi Method, stakeholder opinions translate to ATAT inputs. A local case in the Westwood neighborhood of Denver, Colorado is examined to test ATAT efficacy and process viability. Prior to this research, University of Colorado graduate students partnered with local 501(c)3 Revision International to reduce winter heating costs in Westwood using a solar furnace that locals dubbed “EZ Heat”. ATAT quantified the appropriateness of EZ Heat as Ali = 4.2. This score lends empirical support to the AT's a priori deterministic selection. ATAT is designed to be free and accessible via Internet, and the author is investigating the potential of a mobile application. SCD and other community development practitioners often work in remote areas, and a mobile ATAT application will make the tool more useful.

A. Michael Bauer; Aaron Brown

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

CRE_Response-DOE_Regulatory_Review_Request_for_Comments.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Center for Regulatory Effectiveness 1601 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC, 20009 Tel: (202) 265-2383 Fax: (202) 939-6969 secretary1@mbsdc.com www.TheCRE.com 1 REGULATORY REVIEW MEMORANDUM To: Department of Energy From: Jim Tozzi Subject: Regulatory Burden Request for Information Date: September 4, 2012 CC: Boris Bershteyn/Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs This Memorandum serves as an Executive Summary of Center for Regulatory Effectiveness' (CRE's) attached comments highlighting four issues: 1. DOE's Regulatory Coordination & Harmonization Responsibilities; 2. The Cumulative Costs of Regulations; 3. Retrospective Review of Regulations; and 4. Stakeholder Participation. DOE REGULATORY COORDINATION & HARMONIZATION RESPONSIBILITIES

290

Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

Monsky, Wayne L., E-mail: wayne.monsky@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac [University of California Davis Medical School (United States); Loh, Shaun [University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Lin, Tzu-Chun [University of California Davis, Department of Statistics (United States); Li Chinshang [University of California Davis, Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Services (United States); Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the utilization of IAEA technical assistance; (7) participation in regional arrangements; and (8) public support for nuclear power. In this paper, the Index aggregates the indicators and evaluates and compares the level of readiness in seven countries that have recently expressed various degrees of interest in establishing a nuclear energy program. The NERI Index could be a valuable tool to be utilized by: (1) country officials who are considering nuclear power; (2) the international community, desiring reassurance of a country's capacity for the peaceful, safe, and secure use of nuclear energy; (3) foreign governments/NGO's, seeking to prioritize and direct resources toward developing countries; and (4) private stakeholders interested in nuclear infrastructure investment opportunities.

Saum-Manning,L.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBJECT: Navigant Report Assessing Demand Response Program Potential for the Seventh Plan for Stakeholder and potential, with specific focus on the Northwest region. As a kick-off to preparing a Demand Response Review Stakeholder Review of Demand Response Assessment Per the request of the Northwest Power

293

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and  Advanced Metering:  Development for Demand Response  Calculation ? Findings and Energy  Efficiency and  Demand Response with Communicating 

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy in low carbon cities and social learning: A process for defining priority research questions with UK stakeholders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract City-level decision-making requires timely access to a wide range of relevant and comprehensible data and information. Although a wide range of research on energy and cities is on-going across the social, engineering and natural sciences, it cannot be taken for granted that the questions being asked and the way questions are structured reflect practitioner perspectives and requirements. This paper discusses the ways in which research questions are formed and interpreted by actors in academic research and research user communities. We also report a set of research questions produced via an initial trial of a two stage, participative process consisting of (a) a survey targeted at city-focussed practitioners in the United Kingdom (UK) with an interest in lower carbon energy futures; and (b) a workshop integrating practitioner and academic perspectives. Comparing the set of research questions identified with themes in the academic literature, we find that research and practitioner communities concur on the importance of reducing energy demand and also on a number of cross-cutting issues. However, we also find that academic research places a greater emphasis on the interfaces between the energy system and other urban systems. We conclude that the two stage, participative process followed can serve to generate and legitimate city-related research questions through collaboration between stakeholders and academic researchers.

Chris J. Martin; Peter G. Taylor; Paul Upham; Golnoush Ghiasi; Catherine S.E. Bale; Hannah James; Alice Owen; William F. Gale; Rebecca J. Slack; Simon Helmer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Opportunities and barriers for implementing CO2 capture ready designs: A case study of stakeholder perceptions in Guangdong, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

China has been building at least 50 gigawatt (GW) of new coal-fired power plants every year since 2004. In the absence of CO2 capture ready (CCR) designs, a large fraction of new coal power plants built in the next decade could face ‘carbon lock-in’. Building on the existing engineering and economic literature on CO2 capture ready, the aim of this study is to understand the opportunities and challenges in implementing CCR in China. In early 2010, opinion-leaders perceptions towards implementing CCR in Guangdong with two empirical phases are presented: an online consultation of 31 respondents (out of a sample of 82), three face-to-face focus group discussions including 16 officials from five power plants and two oil companies in the Guangdong province. A majority of respondents in the online survey were engineers. The survey results are compared with an earlier study of stakeholders’ views on demonstrating CCS in China, conducted in April 2009 as part of the EU–UK–China Near Zero Emissions Coal initiative (NZEC) project.

Jia Li; Xi Liang; Tim Cockerill; Jon Gibbins; David Reiner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay Pearce,S.1 ,McKee,L.1 ,Arnold,C.2 ,and,landowners,stakeholders,agencies and regula- tors are facing many watershed-scale sediment-related issues such as erosion,degraded water

297

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

298

Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Development Impacts Assessment Tools help country, regional, and local policymakers find tools and online resources to assess the impacts of low-emission development strategies (LEDS). These tools equip decision makers with information to explore policy options and build consensus with stakeholders to acheive low-emission development. LEDSGP/DIA-Toolkit Pages in category "LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits" The following 65 pages are in this category, out of 65 total.

299

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0003060 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a global assessment of methane gas hydrates that will facilitate informed decision-making regarding the potential development of gas hydrate resources between the scientific community and other stakeholders/decision makers. The Assessment will provide science-based information on the role of gas hydrates in natural climate change and the carbon cycle, their sensitivity to climate change, and the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of hydrate production. Performers Stiftelsen GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway Funding Institutions United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Statoil Schlumberger United States Department of Energy (USDOE)

300

A Generic Assessment of Response Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Mitigation Options 236 704.1 Energy conservation and efficiency 7.7 Regional Differences and International improvement 236 Cooperation 254 7.4.2 Fossil fuel switching 240 7.4.3 Renewable energy technologies 241, including · Energy conservation and efficiency improvement · Fossil fuel switching · Renewable energy

Delaware, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

This is more difficult than we thought! The responsibility of scientists, managers and stakeholders to mitigate the unsustainability of marine fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solution to proper management, if it is to...through improving science alone. In fact...conventional management approach which describes...precaution- ary approach to fisheries management. Advisory Committee...environment. Science 197, 453455...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

SEMILAR: A Semantic Similarity Toolkit For Assessing Students' Natural Language Inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEMILAR: A Semantic Similarity Toolkit For Assessing Students' Natural Language Inputs Vasile Rus to understand students' natural language responses. Accurate assessment of students' responses enables, & Graesser, in press). There are at least two different types of natural language assessments

Rus, Vasile

303

Connecting Stakeholders, Achieving Green  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partner Energy @ Work Toronto, Ontario Canada OCTOBER 2008, ESL-IC-08-10-71 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Green Paper ? Working Paper Connecting... allows barriers to be overcome and benefits to be maximized. ESL-IC-08-10-71 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Green Paper ? Working Paper Connecting...

Rouse, S.; Nolan, B.

304

Partners and Stakeholders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concentrating on the single-family residential sector, this section looks at the organizations and groups that influence financing programs.

305

Dear Customer/Stakeholder,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manual Dan Villalobos and Ross Holter (Flathead Electric) Workgroup 3: Low Income Boyd Wilson and TBA Workgroup 4: Flexibility Mechanisms Melissa Podeszwa and TBA Workgroup...

306

WIPP Stakeholder Information Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Exceedance of a Disposal Room Volatile Organic Compound Monitoring Action Level for Carbon Tetrachloride dated August 11, 2011 Notification of Exceedance of a Disposal Room...

307

FUSRAP Stakeholder Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has operated the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) since 1974. During that time,we have accomplished many activities to identify and...

308

DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Force Research Laboratory Air Force Research Laboratory Air Liquide Air Products and Chemicals Inc. American Electric Power American Superconductor Argonne National Laboratory BOC Group Brookhaven National Laboratory Composite Technology Development Consolidated Edison Cryo-Industries of America Inc. Delta Star Inc. Directed Vapor Technologies Department of Defense Department of Homeland Security Electric Power Research Institute Entergy Florida State University Long Island Power Authority Los Alamos National Laboratory Metal Oxide Technologies Inc. Mipox International Corp. National Grid National Institute for Standards & Tech. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nissan Electric Co. Ltd. Nexans nkt Cables Group Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oxford Superconducting Technology Pacific Gas and Electric

309

2012 SG Peer Review - Expanded Demand Response Functionality - Graham Parker, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expanded Demand Response Functionality Expanded Demand Response Functionality Graham Parker Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 7, 2012 December 2008 Expanded Demand Response Functionality Objectives Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Technical Scope (Insert graphic here) * Determine capabilities and customer benefits of smart appliances to mitigate impacts of renewables (PV/wind) and provide ancillary services in partnership with industry and stakeholders. * Advance the business case-from the consumer perspective-for smart appliances and home energy management systems (HEMs). * Assist developing national standardization and regulatory paradigms to enable mass consumer participation. * Model development and GridLAB-D(tm) modeling and analysis of smart appliances

310

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

311

Assessment Report  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Assessment Report Assessment of Audit Coverage of Cost Allowability for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 during...

312

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office JANUARY 2013 DOE/EA-1923 iv January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office January 2013 DOE/EA-1923 v January 2013 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment for the Green Energy School Wind Project (DOE/EA-1923) CONTACT: For additional copies or more information on this final Environmental Assessment (EA),

313

TEPP Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Products Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-13.p65 1 Model Needs Assessment R E V 8 - 0 7 / 2 0 1 2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s P r o g r a m PURPOSE The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local officials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. 1.0 INTRODUCTION This Model Needs Assessment was developed by the Department of Energy's Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) as a planning and assessment tool for state, tribal, or local government officials. To implement this Model Needs Assessment, a designated official

314

The Impact of Assessment Procedures and Need for Cognition on Fraud Risk Assessments .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to the increasing awareness of fraudulent financial reporting, auditors' responsibility to conduct quality fraud risk assessments has been raised by a current audit standard,… (more)

Trongmateerut, Pailin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Information technology and innovative drainage management practices for selenium load reduction from irrigated agriculture to provide stakeholder assurances and meet contaminant mass loading policy objectives  

SciTech Connect

Many perceive the implementation of environmental regulatory policy, especially concerning non-point source pollution from irrigated agriculture, as being less efficient in the United States than in many other countries. This is partly a result of the stakeholder involvement process but is also a reflection of the inability to make effective use of Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) to facilitate technical information exchange with stakeholders and to provide a forum for innovative ideas for controlling non-point source pollutant loading. This paper describes one of the success stories where a standardized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology was modified to better suit regulation of a trace element in agricultural subsurface drainage and information technology was developed to help guide stakeholders, provide assurances to the public and encourage innovation while improving compliance with State water quality objectives. The geographic focus of the paper is the western San Joaquin Valley where, in 1985, evapoconcentration of selenium in agricultural subsurface drainage water, diverted into large ponds within a federal wildlife refuge, caused teratogenecity in waterfowl embryos and in other sensitive wildlife species. The fallout from this environmental disaster was a concerted attempt by State and Federal water agencies to regulate non-point source loads of the trace element selenium. The complexity of selenium hydrogeochemistry, the difficulty and expense of selenium concentration monitoring and political discord between agricultural and environmental interests created challenges to the regulation process. Innovative policy and institutional constructs, supported by environmental monitoring and the web-based data management and dissemination systems, provided essential decision support, created opportunities for adaptive management and ultimately contributed to project success. The paper provides a retrospective on the contentious planning process and offers suggestions as to how the technical and institutional issues could have been resolved faster through early adoption of some of the core principles of sound EDSS design.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to bring forth increased efficiency and effectiveness in assessing transportation risks associated with radioactive materials or wastes, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Transportation Program (NTP) published a resource handbook in 2002. The handbook draws from the broad technical expertise among DOE national laboratories and industry, which reflects the extensive experience gained from DOE's efforts in conducting assessments (i.e., environmental impact assessments) within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in the past 20 years. The handbook is intended to serve as a primary source of information regarding the approach and basis for conducting transportation risk assessments under normal or accidental conditions that are associated with shipping radioactive materials or wastes. It is useful as a reference to DOE managers, NEPA assessors, technical analysts, contractors, and also stakeholders. It provides a summary of pertinent U.S. policies and regulations on the shipment of radioactive materials, existing guidance on preparing transportation risk assessments, a review of previous transportation risk assessments by DOE and others, a description of comprehensive and generally accepted transportation risk assessment methodologies, and a compilation of supporting data, parameters, and assumptions. The handbook also provides a discussion paper on an issue that has been identified as being important in the past. The discussion paper focuses on cumulative impacts, illustrating the ongoing evolution of transportation risk assessment. The discussion may be expanded in the future as emerging issues are identified. The handbook will be maintained and periodically updated to provide current and accurate information.

Chen, S. Y.; Kapoor, A. K.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Federal Flood Assessment Conference Recommendations and Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Emergency Response Bureau of Reclamation Water Operations Coordination of River/Storage Releases American Canal diversion Federal Flood Assessment Conference Page 6 Proceedings and Recommendations Upstream diversion operation... Federal Flood Assessment Conference Page 20 Proceedings and Recommendations who is in charge during a response. The OSC determines the status of the local response and monitors the situation to determine whether, or how much, federal...

Reyes, Silvestre; Brock, Peter; Michelsen, Ari

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECEMBER 2012 DECEMBER 2012 Pathway for readying the next generation of affordable clean energy technology -Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT -OVERVIEW 2 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT-OVERVIEW 2012 TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT-OVERVIEW 3 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal li- ability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific

319

Consequence Assessment  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume focuses on the process of performing timely initial assessments necessary to support critical first decisions and the continuous process of refining those initial assessments as more information and resources become available. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Assess Oportunities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess Oportunities Assess Oportunities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs Agency/Company /Organization: UNEP-Risoe Centre Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications, Case studies/examples Website: tech-action.org/Perspectives/FITuseEverywhere.pdf Cost: Free FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs Screenshot References: FIT for Use Everywhere? Assessing Experiences With Renewable Energy Feed-In Tariffs[1] This article aims to provide a summary to governments and stakeholders in developing countries on the function, strengths and potential drawbacks of

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment rate niear Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Item Construction Response Rating WSDLWSDL SOAP... , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

323

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 DOE/EA-1791 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNVIERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 U.S. Department of Energy University of Minnesota Wind Energy Research Consortium Project Golden Field Office Environmental Assessment March 2011 Page i Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1

324

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction and Operation of a Proposed Biogas Anaerobic Digestion Facility at an Ethanol Plant Western Plains Energy, LLC Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas U. S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Cooperative Service 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-3225 August 29, 2011 Environmental Assessment Western Plains Energy, LLC Gove County, Kansas ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I. PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND NEED .................................................................... 1 II. PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES .................................. 2 III. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL AREA .............................................................. 2

325

SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR SCUBA TECHNIQUES USED IN RISK ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE NUCLEAR LEAKAGE AROUND AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA Stephen Jewett, Max Hoberg, Heloise Chenelot, Shawn Harper Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7220 Joanna Burger Division of Life Sciences, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), 604 Allison Road, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082 Michael Gochfeld, CRESP and EOHSI, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 Abstract Amchitka Island, in the Aleutians, had three underground nuclear tests (1 965 to 1971) ranging from approximately 80 kilotons to 5 megatons. Initial surveys (1960s-1970s) did

326

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT and STABILIZATION' SCENARIOS PARRERSBURG,'W. VA. SITE FEBRUARY 1980 M. CARSON J. COFFMAN N. MANDELTORT, ! Division of Nuclear Service Operations Chem-Nuclear\ Systems, Inc. 240 Stoneridge Dr., Suite 100 Columbia, South Carolina 29210 Prepared for AMAX Specialty Hetals Corporation One Greenwich Plaza Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 During July' 1978, Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. (CNSI) began an assessment program for AMAX Specialty Metals Corp."(AMAX) u to locate, quantify, and evaluate the'extent of environmental radioactive contamination at the AMAX Parkersburg., West Virginia former zirconium/hafnium processing facility. In addition, preliminary ive assessments were to be made to assist AMAX in evaluat ,ing alternat methods for site cleanup.

327

Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A set of issues that state and local governments should carefully consider, with the goal of helping them assess and anticipate solutions for some worst case or unfortunate case scenarios as they...

328

Authentic science experiences as a vehicle for assessing orientation towards science and science careers relative to identity and agency: a response to “learning from the path followed by Brad”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This response draws from the literature on adaptive learning, traditional ecological knowledge, and social–ecological systems to show that Brad’s choice is not a simple decision between traditional ecological ...

Pauline W. U. Chinn

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Ofqual's GCSE reform consultation -August 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Ofqual's GCSE reform consultation - August 2013 1 Ofqual: GCSE reform consultation Response by the Wellcome Trust August 2013 Key points and indirect practical assessment in its reform proposals. The total contribution of direct and indirect

Rambaut, Andrew

330

Effects of Shared Activity on Dyadic Stress Response.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to assess sex differences in stress responses to cooperative and competitive activities within same-sex dyads. Participants included 90 undergraduate… (more)

Auer, Brandon John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT (EA) ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLM Office: Carlsbad Field Office DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA Serial #: NM-123703 Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (SAR) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action 1.1 The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of re-

332

Rapid Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Assessment of Lignin Content and Structure in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Grown Under Different Environmental Conditions David G. J. Mann & Nicole Labbé & Robert W. Sykes & Kristen Gracom & Lindsey Kline & Isabella M. Swamidoss & Jason N. Burris & Mark Davis & C. Neal Stewart Jr. Published online: 13 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a candi- date feedstock in bioenergy, and plant breeding and molecular genetic strategies are being used to improve germplasm. In order to assess these subsequent modifica- tions, baseline biomass compositional data are needed in a relevant variety of environments. In this study, switch- grass cv. Alamo was grown in the field, greenhouse, and growth chamber and harvested into individual leaf and stem tissue components. These components

333

Sleep Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleep Assessment Sleep Assessment 1 | Thank you for taking the time to complete this extensive form. Sleep disturbances and/or fatigue are most often the result of many factors. In order to best treat your condition we need to understand your symptoms and history. Please bring your completed assessment form to your appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 505 844-HBES (4237). Name: Employee ID#: Date: Male Female Age: Health Plan : United BCBSNM Other: Referred by: Sleep and Health History In general, would you describe your sleep as: Refreshing Not Refreshing How would you rate your sleep? Very Good Good Adequate Poor Very Poor How would you describe your sleep problem? Sleep Problem (indicate all that apply) Duration of problem

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated sampling assessment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California Collection: Engineering ; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 49 EMERGENCY AUTOMATED RESPONSE SYSTEM (EARS) Summary: participants was conducted to assess...

335

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

336

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS December 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Building Research and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 3. ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.1 No Action Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.2 Proposed Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.3 Alternative Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-3 3.4 Impacts of Proposed and Alternative Standards

337

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee June 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office This page intentionally left blank. DOE/EA-1779 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date Issued-June 2011 Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC and CDM Federal Services Inc. contributed to the preparation of this document and may not be considered for review of the document U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS FIGURES......................................................................................................................................................

338

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

339

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

682 682 Environmental Assessment Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Conducted Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington Environmental Assessment February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 This page intentionally left blank. 1 February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION..............................................................................1. 1.1 BACKGROUND ......................................................................... 3 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTION ......................... 6 1.3 NEPA REQUIREMENTS............................................................... 6 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVE ....................... 8

340

NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Joint...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of naturally occurring radiation to establish baseline levels is a normal part of security and emergency preparedness. This assessment is not in response to an incident or...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CRAD, Configuration Management Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a Configuration Management Program (CM) is in place which allows for the availability and retrievability of accurate information, improves response to design and operational decisions, enhances worker safety, increases facility safety and reliability, increases efficiency of work efforts, and helps maintain integrity of interfacing orders.

342

Superfund Exposure Assessment Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-881001 1-881001 OSWER Directive 9285.5-1 April 1988 Superfund Exposure Assessment Manual U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Remedial Response Washington, DC 20460 Notice This report was prepared under contract to an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any of its employees, contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for any third party' s use of or the results of such use of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use by such third party would not infringe on privately owned rights. ii Table of Contents Chapter Page List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

343

Response Elements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Final Environmental Assessment East Altamont Energy Center Application for Certification (01-AFC-4) Alameda County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EAST ALTAMONT ENERGY CENTER EAST ALTAMONT ENERGY CENTER FINAL STAFF ASSESSMENT / ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.......................................................................................................1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION ....................................................................................................3 RESPONSE TO PUBLIC AND AGENCY COMMENTS.......................................................4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT .....................................................................................5 AIR QUALITY ...........................................................................................................5.1

346

A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA  

SciTech Connect

Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post-construction assessment and mitigation, and sharing information that can be used in other assessments.

Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Day, Robin [No Affiliation; Strickland, M. Dale [Western EcoSystems Technology

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria This document establishes the guidance and criteria for conducting internal and independent Federal Technical Capability Assessments within the Department. The requirements of this document are applicable to those organizations having safety responsibilities for defense nuclear facilities. This includes both headquarters and field organizations. Regardless of the type of assessment conducted, the objectives and criteria within this document are used as a basis for the assessment. Use of consistent objectives and criteria is necessary to establish baselines and to track and trend performance. FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria, 1998 More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program and FTCP Assessment CRADs

348

American Samoa Initial Technical Assessment Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is an initial energy assessment for American Samoa, the first of many steps in developing a comprehensive energy strategy. On March 1, 2010, Assistant Secretary of the Interior Tony Babauta invited governors and their staff from the Interior Insular Areas to meet with senior principals at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Meeting discussions focused on ways to improve energy efficiency and increase the deployment of renewable energy technologies in the U.S. Pacific Territories. In attendance were Governors Felix Camacho (Guam), Benigno Fitial (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands), and Togiola Tulafono, (American Samoa). This meeting brought together major stakeholders to learn and understand the importance of developing a comprehensive strategic plan for implementing energy efficiency measures and renewable energy technologies. For several decades, dependence on fossil fuels and the burden of high oil prices have been a major concern but never more at the forefront as today. With unstable oil prices, the volatility of fuel supply and the economic instability in American Samoa, energy issues are a high priority. In short, energy security is critical to American Samoa's future economic development and sustainability. Under an interagency agreement, funded by the Department of Interior's Office of Insular Affairs, NREL was tasked to deliver technical assistance to the islands of American Samoa. Technical assistance included conducting an initial technical assessment to define energy consumption and production data, establish an energy consumption baseline, and assist with the development of a strategic plan. The assessment and strategic plan will be used to assist with the transition to a cleaner energy economy. NREL provided an interdisciplinary team to cover each relevant technical area for the initial energy assessments. Experts in the following disciplines traveled to American Samoa for on-island site assessments: (1) Energy Efficiency and Building Technologies; (2) Integrated Wind-Diesel Generation; (3) Transmission and Distribution; (4) Solar Technologies; and (5) Biomass and Waste-to-Energy. In addition to these core disciplines, team capabilities also included expertise in program analysis, project financing, energy policy and energy planning. The intent of the technical assessment was to provide American Samoa with a baseline energy assessment. From the baseline, various scenarios and approaches for deploying cost effective energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies could be created to meet American Samoa's objectives. The information provided in this energy assessment will be used as input in the development of a draft strategic plan and the development of scenarios and strategies for deploying cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable products.

Busche, S.; Conrad, M.; Funk, K.; Kandt, A.; McNutt, P.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility – Is there a Dividing Line?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There is growing research in all areas of ethics and CSR that govern the activities of a firm and the value systems that underlie their business activities. In our paper we have explored the concepts of Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility with a perspective that meaningfully CSR should be seen in the context of an overall paradigm of Business Ethics. We have studied CSR through the framework of the stakeholder theory of the firm and posit that CSR as practiced today is a subset of Business Ethics with other dimensions of an overall ethics framework still uncovered.

Mridula Goel; Ms. Preeti E. Ramanathan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Financial Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We would like to thank everyone who helped us with this report, including but not limited to: John Bolduc, Steve Lenkauskas, George Fernandes, and the staff at the City of Cambridge and Danehy Park who helped shape this report and made on-site instrument installation and data collection possible. Mark Lipson, Jack Clarke and Jean Rogers for their guidance with the environmental and community impact assessment. Bob Paine and Scott Abbett for their thoughts and experiences with the Medford McGlynn School wind turbine. This preliminary assessment report investigates the wind resource available at Danehy Park in the City of Cambridge, providing estimated power generation figures as well as cost and revenue estimates and

Cy Chan; Pamela Silva; Chao Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

352

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

353

Promoting decision making through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the steps taken in a decision making process through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM). The development of the SRAM deals with Complex, Large-scale Interconnected, Open, and Socio-technical System (CLIOS). For both large and small contaminated areas, considers potential impacts on neighbouring areas, the contribution to air emissions from the materials of the proposed project and the energy to be consumed. Along this line, the research focused on setting up a model under a systems perspective. A systemigram, from remedial investigation to project closeout, has been developed. For each stage of the remediation project, the process to identify stakeholders has been outlined. Moreover, and as an illustrative example, environmental, social, and economic aspects of remedial operations have been addressed on a specific case using the US Air Force Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT).

Aspasia Kalomoiri; Washington Braida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A planning-oriented sustainability assessment framework for peri-urban water management in developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract DPSIR and the three-pillar model are well-established frameworks for sustainability assessment. This paper proposes a planning-oriented sustainability assessment framework (POSAF). It is informed by those frameworks but differs insofar as it puts more emphasis on a constructivist conception which recognises that sustainability needs to be defined anew for each planning problem. In finding such a consensus definition, POSAF uses participatory scenario analysis and participatory planning, technical feasibility study, participatory assessment, analysis of trade-offs and social networks in an unusual combination and for goals that differ from the original conceptions of these methods. POSAF was applied in a peri-urban area of Mexico City for the design of improved water service provision, integrating solid waste management. It supported consensus amongst users about the importance of environmental issues, informed planners about the values of stakeholders and users, detected local differences, and identified possible conflicts at an early stage of decision-making.

Markus Starkl; Norbert Brunner; Eduardo López; José Luis Martínez-Ruiz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Results of a Strategic Assessment of NRC's Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program  

SciTech Connect

NRC recently completed a strategic assessment of its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) regulatory program. In this paper, we provide the results of this assessment - a prioritized list of activities for our LLW program in the next several years - along with a description of the circumstances that required us to undertake this assessment and the process we used. We obtained ideas from a wide variety of stakeholders on activities we could undertake, and we evaluated them in light of our overall strategic objectives for ensuring safety and security, as well as a number of other factors. We ranked 7 of the 20 activities evaluated as high priority. Their completion in the next several years will help to ensure that LLW will continue to be managed and disposed of safely and securely. (authors)

Bradford, A.W.; Camper, L.W.; Flanders, S.C.; Kennedy, J.E.; Shaffner, J.A.; Tokar, M.; Whited, A.R. [NRC LLW Branch, Mail Stop T-8-F-5, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

account of in workforce planning. The importance of integrating academic training with clinical trainingCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce of the Healthcare Science Workforce Modernising Scientific Careers: The Next Steps Response by the Wellcome Trust

Rambaut, Andrew

357

Biology reflective assessment curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I passed back the assessments on natural variation with amultiple-choice assessment on natural selection and naturalI passed back the natural selection assessments with the

Bayley, Cheryl Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging

359

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging

360

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Demonstration in New York City Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Title Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6470E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, Sila Kiliccote, and Rongxin Yin Date Published 09/2013 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Abstract Demand response (DR) - allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern - continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. Since October 2011, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how OpenADR can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State including the independent system operator, utilities, retail energy providers, and curtailment service providers. In this paper, we present methods to automate control strategies via building management systems to provide event-driven demand response, price response and demand management based on OpenADR signals. We also present cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing for large customers and Auto-DR control strategies developed for demonstration buildings. Lastly, we discuss the communication architecture and Auto-DR system designed for the demonstration project to automate price response and DR participation.

362

Assessor Training Assessment Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

363

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

364

Operations Authorization Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations Authorization Assessment Plan Operations Authorization Assessment Plan Operations Authorization Assessment Plan Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to verify there is documentation in place which accurately describes the safety envelope for a facility, program or project. Criteria: Conditions and requirements should be established to ensure programs addressing all applicable functional areas are adequately implemented to support safe performance of the work. The extent of documentation and level of authority for agreement shall be tailored to the complexity and hazards associated with the work. Personnel shall be responsible and accountable for performance of work in accordance with the controls established. Operations-Authorization.doc More Documents & Publications

365

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

366

Electronic Waste Management in India: A Stakeholder’s Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sampling of heavy metals and toxic organics sediments in E-laden with heavy metals and other toxic materials areecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in

Borthakur, Anwesha; Sinha, Kunal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Stakeholder’s Perspective on Contaminated Land Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NICOLE, the Network for the management of Industrially Contaminated Land in Europe is a leading forum on this matter in Europe, promoting co-operation between industry, academia and service providers. NICOLE’s...

Lida Schelwald- Van der Kley; Johan de Fraye…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Appendix C - Comments and Responses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C COMMENTS AND RESPONSES This appendix contains the comments that were received during the 30-day public comment period on the draft EA (March 22 through April 22, 2002) and their responses. Comments were obtained during the public meeting held in Carlsbad, New Mexico, on April 16, 2002, as well as from letters and electronic mail messages. The comment entries are organized according to comment categories. In compliance with the provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act and Council on Environmental Quality regulations, public comments on the draft EA were assessed individually and collectively. Some comments resulted in changes or modifications that have been incorporated into the final EA. Comments not requiring modifications to the EA resulted in a response to correct the

369

DOEIEA-1086 Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

86 86 Environmental Assessment for Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible i n electronic image products. Images are produced f h m the best avaiIable original document. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employes, makes any warranty, express or implied, or a s s u m e s any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spc- cific commercial product, process, or senrice by trade name, trademark, manufac-

370

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Awards  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Awards Awards Wind Powering America has presented Public Power Wind Awards to public-owned utilities, Wind Cooperative of the Year Awards to cooperatives, Carpe Ventum (Seize the Wind) Awards for the first utility-scale wind projects in a state, Wind Powering America Outstanding Partner Awards, and Advocacy Awards. Public Power Wind Awards Southern California Public Power Authority and Snohomish County Public Utility District Glendora, California; and Everett, Washington; June 2013 Moorhead Public Service, City of Palo Alto Utilities, and Minnesota Municipal Power Agency Moorhead, Minnesota; Palo Alto, California; and Minneapolis, Minnesota; June 2012 CPS Energy and Denton Municipal Electric San Antonio, Texas and Denton, Texas; June 2011 Nebraska Public Power District and Princeton Municipal Light Department

371

Communicating Accomplishments to All Stakeholders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation discusses the value of communicating accomplishments related to energy efficiency project implementation and provides suggestions for communications tools. Raytheon Corporation provides tips from their own experience implementing projects.

372

2014 OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

volume because it is difficult to normalize. 7 Suggested: A catastrophic failure rate given by the number of allowable catastrophic failures for a given number of panels...

373

Working With Stakeholders to Move  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Water and Sediment Quality Subcommittee (WSQ) Public Participation and Education Subcommittee (PPE Subcommittee #12;TWBD Water Conservation Advisory Council #12;$64,000 Question How do you create awareness Messages Specific to each target audience Why should they care? "Share your concerns " "Take advantage

374

SRS Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAVANNAH RIVER BUILDING TRADES SAVANNAH RIVER BUILDING TRADES MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM A NEEDS ASSESSMENT Submitted by The Center to Protect Workers' Rights on behalf of The Building and Construction Trades Dept., AFL-CIO and The Augusta, Georgia Building and Construction Trades Council In Cooperation with Duke University Medical Center Medlantic Research Institute United Brotherhood of Carpenters Health and Safety Fund University of Cincinnati Medical Center Zenith Administrators, Inc. June 23, 1998 Contents Summary and Response to Needs Assessment Questions , page i 1. Introduction and Rationale, 1 a. Aims, 1 b. Focus of Needs Assessment, 1 c. Organization, 1 d. Rationale for Program, 2 2. Need for Medical Evaluation and Notification, 3 a. Medical Surveillance, 3

375

Why Do Educational Administrators and Other Stakeholders Fail to Recognize and Learn From Failure? What Lessons Can We Learn From Theories of Irrational Behavior?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decisions: is there a sunk-cost effect? Social Science &Representing Evidence of Escalation, Sunk-cost, and ProspectMaking Responses……………………. Sunk-cost Theory Applied to

Mukerjee, Diane Elizabeth-Wirt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Assessment Toolkit Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

378

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Assessment Toolkit Impact Assessment Toolkit (Redirected from Gateway:International/Economic and Environmental Impacts) Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

379

Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Assessment Toolkit Land Use Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

380

Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Bioenergy Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EM SSAB ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Presentation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PGDP by DOE personnel is recommended. * DOE should develop lessons learned documents on scheduling, stakeholder interactions, etc. 20 Savannah River Site 21 Disposal operations...

382

I'SOT Canby District Heating Project, Modoc County, California Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 17, 2003 Dear Stakeholder: SUBJECT: NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE PROPOSED IN SEARCH OF TRUTH CANBY DISTRICT HEATING PROJECT, MODOC COUNTY, CALIFORNIA (DOE/EA 1460) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Golden Field Office (GO) has issued the final Environmental Assessment (EA) and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the subject geothermal project. These documents are available online in the GO electronic reading room at www.golden.doe.gov. Copies of the documents can be obtained by contacting Steve Blazek at the address and telephone number listed below. GO has prepared the final EA and FONSI in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and DOE's NEPA implementation guidance.

383

Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: Exposure Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as life cycle assessment (LCA) fosters the need for simplepotential. The goal of LCA is to confront and assess impactsLCIA) process within in LCA is a systematic framework in

McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Livermore Livermore Field Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field Office The purpose of the Livermore Field Office (LFO) Teclmical Qualification Program (TQP) is to ensure that federal teclmical personnel with safety oversight responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory possess competence commensurate with responsibilities. LFO is committed to ensuring it has the necessary teclmical capabilities to provide the kind of management, direction, and guidance essential to safe operation ofDOE's defense nuclear facilities. LFO TQP Self-Assessment, May 2013 More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Nevada Site Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Sandia Site Office

385

Northwest Energy Market Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northwest Energy Market Assessment Pages Northwest-Energy-Market-Assessment Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects &...

386

CRAD, Maintenance Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maintenance Assessment Plan Maintenance Assessment Plan CRAD, Maintenance Assessment Plan Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of parts, materials, and services needed to support the

387

TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Needs Assessment Document Model Needs Assessment Document TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local officials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. This Model Needs Assessment was developed by the Department of Energy's Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) as a planning and assessment tool for state, tribal, or local government officials. To implement this Model Needs Assessment, a designated official from the jurisdiction will conduct a self-assessment by answering various questions. By doing so, the official will determine strengths and identify improvement areas. To support the assessment process, and any proposed recommendations for improvement, this document includes

388

OUTLINE FOR THE IPCC WORKING GROUP II CONTRIBUTION TO THE FOURTH ASSESSMENT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Assessment of Observed Changes and Responses in Natural and Managed Systems · Methods in detectionOUTLINE FOR THE IPCC WORKING GROUP II CONTRIBUTION TO THE FOURTH ASSESSMENT REPORT CLIMATE CHANGE · Scope of this Assessment · Relation to other reports and studies A. ASSESSMENT OF OBSERVED CHANGES 1

Fischlin, Andreas

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-muc1 antibody responses Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 3800Evaluation of Immunity Ricardo U. Sorensen, M.D September 2004. Summary: in response to immunizations The assessment of specific antibodies requires not only the...

390

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-flagellin antibody responses Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 3800Evaluation of Immunity Ricardo U. Sorensen, M.D September 2004. Summary: in response to immunizations The assessment of specific antibodies requires not only the...

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-product antibody responses Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 3800Evaluation of Immunity Ricardo U. Sorensen, M.D September 2004. Summary: in response to immunizations The assessment of specific antibodies requires not only the...

392

System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of the current research is to assess differences in NOx emissions between biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuels, resulting from fundamental issues and system-response issues.

393

Regional GHG Mitigation Response and Leakage Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional GHG Mitigation Response and Leakage Effects: Scenario Analysis of U.S. Forestry of Analysis · Assess net GHG mitigation potential in forestry & ag · Use FASOM-GHG model · Mitigation results) ­ vary GHG targets ­ vary payment approach · Show regional mitigation potential across U

McCarl, Bruce A.

394

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States); Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Assessment 610 (37765) Spring 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment. Students will learn the fundamentals of intellectual and neuropsychological assessment). Comprehensive Handbook of Psychological Assessment: Behavioral Assessment. Wiley & Sons, Inc. Class evaluation

Lockery, Shawn

396

ASSESSMENT FOR THE SOUTHWEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICE CLIMATE CHANGE & CULTURAL RESOURCE PLANNING PROGRAM 17 EARTH SYSTEM MODELS 18 CLIMATE ASSESSMENTS

Wong, Pak Kin

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic mercury assessment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sea Grant Institute in consultation with the panel chairs. Summary: the assessment of fish-mercury responses to changes in mercury loadings. High net methylation rates in...

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing potential dietary Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

personal copy A human dietary risk assessment associated with glycoalkaloid responses of potato to Colorado... al., 1994), there has not been an analytical consider- ation of the...

399

Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

Paltsev, Sergey

400

MURDAM1.0. Minority Utility Rate Design Assessment Model  

SciTech Connect

Econometric model simulates consumer demand response to various user-supplied, two-part tariff electricity rate designs and assesses their economic welfare impact on black, hispanic, poor and majority households.

Poyer, D.A.; Butler, J.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

pollution response in emergencies marine impact assessment and monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chain of custody Transport and storage Sample preparation considerations Chemical analytical methods guidelines #12;post-incident monitoring guidelines science series technical report no.146 Robin J. Law1-INCIDENT MONITORING GUIDELINES These guidelines are produced as part of the Premiam project. This project represents

402

Chapter 5 Comments on Draft Environmental Assessment and Responses  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EA. The following letters were received: A. United States Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services, Colorado Field Office, LeRoy W. Carlson,...

403

EA-1776: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Final Environmental Assessment 6: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1776: Final Environmental Assessment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of creating and operating a radiological response training range by evaluating two alternative approaches to achieve the proposed action and a 'No Action' alternative. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed several possible on-site and off-site alternatives and determined that the reasonable alternative included two on-site locations; no off-site locations met the site-selection criteria. Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range Final Environmental Assessment, DOE/EA-1776 (October 2010) More Documents & Publications

404

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and requirements for the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), as set forth in the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hoisting & Rigging ISMS Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in the

406

Hoisting & Rigging ISMS Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in the

407

LUser_CompetencyAssessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competency Assessments (Employee) Competency Assessments (Employee) © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Participating in Competency Assessments (Employee) Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users and supervisors through the step-by-step process of participating in a competency assessment by viewing gaps, assigning items, conducting a self- assessment, reviewing completed assessments, and viewing the competency history. View Gaps and Assign Items 6 Steps Task A Employee: Conduct Self Assessment 8 Steps Task B Employee: Review Completed Assessment - 6 Steps Task C Employee: View Competency History 11 Steps Task D SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Participating in Competency Assessments (Employee)

408

Corporate social responsibility and its impact on the corporate decision-making process for university undergraduate research fellows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, vastly different academic theories on CSR. The framework that exists groups thoughts on CSR into three categories, which are as follows: normative stakeholder theory, shareholder wealth maximization theory, and strategic stakeholder theory. Proponents...

Bain, Joseph E

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

409

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

410

Solar Resource Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

numerical models & information Systems, Nice: France (2013)" Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper presents an approach for Environmental Impact Assessment through the use of geolocalized LCA approach, for fixed and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EUsponsored EnerGEO project, aiming at providing a versatile modeling platform for stakeholders allowing calculation, forecasting and monitoring of environmental impacts of different sources of energy. This paper described the geolocalized LCA approach, and its use for the evaluation of environmental impacts of wind energy. The effects of offshore wind farms on global environnemental impacts are evaluated though the LCA approach. It takes into account the type of wind farm, the construction phase, all technical aspects, the operation and maintenance scheme and the decommissioning. It also includes geolocalized information such as wind resources, bathymetry, accessibility … Environmental impact parameters are accessible through a web service helping the decision makers in assessing the environnemental impacts. 1

Catherine Guermont; Lionel Ménard; Isabelle Blanc

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Exposure Assessment for Bioaerosols in Health Studies Speaker(s): Carol Rao Date: July 9, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Exposures to fungi have been linked with asthma, toxicoses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and a range of non-specific symptoms. Definitive associations between indoor fungal exposure and health effects in population-based exposure-response studies, however, have not been well established. Issues in exposure assessment methods, both in collection and analysis, are major limitations. Classic methods for assessing airborne fungi rely upon collecting and analyzing whole fungal spores by culture. However, quantifying whole fungal spores may not fully describe fungal exposures, especially for purposes of investigating adverse respiratory

413

Identify roles and responsibilities for LEDS process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

roles and responsibilities for LEDS process roles and responsibilities for LEDS process Jump to: navigation, search Stage 1 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

414

Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6064 (2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 04/15/2010 6064 (2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 04/15/2010 (4) Document Type: [I Digital Image ElHard copy (a) Number of pages (including the DRF) or 15 Z PDF Video number of digital images (5) Release Type 0 New l Cancel 11: Page Change l complete Revision (6) Document Title: Meeting Minutes for the WMA C PA Features, Events, and Processes Working Session (7) Change/Release Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Description: Waste Management Area C performance assessment on Features, Events, and Processes (8) Change N/A Justification: (9) Associated (a) Structure Location: (c) Building Number: Structure, System, and Component N/A N/A (SSC) and Building (b) System Designator: (d) Equipment ID Number (EIN): Number:

415

NATIONAL GEOTHERMAL DATA SYSTEM (NGDS) GEOTHERMAL DATA DOMAIN: ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL COMMUNITY DATA NEEDS  

SciTech Connect

To satisfy the critical need for geothermal data to ad- vance geothermal energy as a viable renewable ener- gy contender, the U.S. Department of Energy is in- vesting in the development of the National Geother- mal Data System (NGDS). This paper outlines efforts among geothermal data providers nationwide to sup- ply cutting edge geo-informatics. NGDS geothermal data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are dis- cussed. In particular, this paper addresses the various types of data required to effectively assess geother- mal energy potential and why simple links to existing data are insufficient. To create a platform for ready access by all geothermal stakeholders, the NGDS in- cludes a work plan that addresses data assets and re- sources of interest to users, a survey of data provid- ers, data content models, and how data will be ex- changed and promoted, as well as lessons learned within the geothermal community.

Anderson, Arlene [United States Department of Energy; Blackwell, David [Southern Methodist University; Chickering, Cathy [Southern Methodist University; Boyd, Toni [Oregon Institute of Technology; Horne, Roland [Stanford University; MacKenzie, Matthew [Uberity Technology Corporation; Moore, Joseph [University of Utah; Nickull, Duane [Uberity Technology Corporation; Richard, Stephen [Arizona Geological survey; Shevenell, Lisa A. [University of Nevada, Reno

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Management Assessment and Independent Assessment Guide  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The revision to this Guide reflects current assessment practices, international standards, and changes in the Department of Energy expectations. Cancels DOE G 414.1-1. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-1B.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT CLOSURE OF SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA C AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Current proposed regulatory agreements (Consent Decree) at the Hanford Site call for closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C in the year 2019. WMA C is part of the SST system in 200 East area ofthe Hanford Site and is one of the first tank farm areas built in mid-1940s. In order to close WMA C, both tank and facility closure activities and corrective actions associated with existing soil and groundwater contamination must be performed. Remedial activities for WMA C and corrective actions for soils and groundwater within that system will be supported by various types of risk assessments and interim performance assessments (PA). The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the State ofWashington Department of Ecology (Ecology) are sponsoring a series of working sessions with regulators and stakeholders to solicit input and to obtain a common understanding concerning the scope, methods, and data to be used in the planned risk assessments and PAs to support closure of WMA C. In addition to DOE-ORP and Ecology staff and contractors, working session members include representatives from the U.S. Enviromnental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), interested tribal nations, other stakeholders groups, and members of the interested public. NRC staff involvement in the working sessions is as a technical resource to assess whether required waste determinations by DOE for waste incidental to reprocessing are based on sound technical assumptions, analyses, and conclusions relative to applicable incidental waste criteria.

BERGERON MP

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most out of using less energy?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont ♦ Maine ♦ New Mexico ♦ California ♦ Illinois ♦ Oregon ♦ Washington Making the Most of Responsive Electricity Customers Mid-America Regulatory Conference June 8, 2010 Richard Sedano About the Regulatory Assistance Project  RAP is a non-profit organization providing technical and educational assistance to government officials on energy and environmental issues. RAP Principals all have extensive utility regulatory experience. - Richard Sedano was commissioner of the Vermont Department of Public Service from 1991-2001 and is an engineer.  Funded by foundations and the US Department Of Energy. We have worked in nearly every state and many nations.  Also provides educational assistance to stakeholders, utilities, advocates. 2 Context

419

Forced response analysis of hydroelectric systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At off-design operating points, Francis turbines develop cavitation vortex rope in the draft tube which may interact with the hydraulic system. Risk resonance assessment by means of eigenmodes computation of the system is usually performed. However, the system response to the excitation source induced by the cavitation vortex rope is not predicted in terms of amplitudes and phase. Only eigenmodes shapes with related frequencies and dampings can be predicted. Besides this modal analysis, the risk resonance assessment can be completed by a forced response analysis. This method allows identifying the contribution of each eigenmode into the system response which depends on the system boundary conditions and the excitation source location. In this paper, a forced response analysis of a Francis turbine hydroelectric power plant including hydraulic system, rotating train, electrical system and control devices is performed. First, the general methodology of the forced response analysis is presented and validated with time domain simulations. Then, analysis of electrical, hydraulic and hydroelectric systems are performed and compared to analyse the influence of control structures on pressure fluctuations induced by cavitation vortex rope.

S Alligné; P C O Silva; A Béguin; B Kawkabani; P Allenbach; C Nicolet; F Avellan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capabilities/vat/assess/ capabilities/vat/assess/ ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, Nuclear Engineering Division, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL Philosophy on Vulnerability Assessments Argonne Vulnerability Assessment Team Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP , 630-252-6168 1. There are a number of conventional tools for finding security vulnerabilities. These include security surveys, risk management, design basis threat, CARVER Method, Delphi Method, software vulnerability assessment tools, infrastructure modeling, etc. 2. These tools have some value, and indeed we have used them all. 3. Experience has shown, however, that these methods do not usually result in dramatic improvements to security, nor do they reliably predict catastrophic security incidents that

422

Home Energy Assessments  

SciTech Connect

A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

Dispenza, Jason

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments. A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment More Documents & Publications EIS-0218-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents

424

Safety Assessment for a Surface Repository in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone - Methodology for Assessing Disposal under Intervention Conditions - 13476  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (RWDF) Buryakovka was constructed in 1986 as part of the intervention measures after the accident at Chernobyl NPP (ChNPP). Today, RWDF Buryakovka is still being operated but its maximum capacity is nearly reached. Plans for enlargement of the facility exist since more than 10 years but have not been implemented yet. In the framework of an European Commission Project DBE Technology GmbH prepared a safety analysis report of the facility in its current state (SAR) and a preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) based on the planned enlargement. Due to its history RWDF Buryakovka does not fully comply with today's best international practices and the latest Ukrainian regulations in this area. The most critical aspects are its inventory of long-lived radionuclides, and the non-existent multi-barrier waste confinement system. A significant part of the project was dedicated, therefore, to the development of a methodology for the safety assessment taking into consideration the facility's special situation and to reach an agreement with all stakeholders involved in the later review and approval procedure of the safety analysis reports. Main aspect of the agreed methodology was to analyze the safety, not strictly based on regulatory requirements but on the assessment of the actual situation of the facility including its location within the Exclusion Zone. For both safety analysis reports, SAR and PSAR, the assessment of the long-term safety led to results that were either within regulatory limits or within the limits allowing for a specific situational evaluation by the regulator. (authors)

Haverkamp, B.; Krone, J. [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, Eschenstr. 55, D-31224 Peine (Germany)] [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, Eschenstr. 55, D-31224 Peine (Germany); Shybetskyi, I. [Radioenvironmental Centre at Presidium of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ul. O. Gonchara 55 b, 01054 Kiev (Ukraine)] [Radioenvironmental Centre at Presidium of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ul. O. Gonchara 55 b, 01054 Kiev (Ukraine)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field Office Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Livermore Field Office The purpose of the Livermore Field Office (LFO) Teclmical Qualification Program (TQP) is to ensure that federal teclmical personnel with safety oversight responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory possess competence commensurate with responsibilities. LFO is committed to ensuring it has the necessary teclmical capabilities to provide the kind of management, direction, and guidance essential to safe operation ofDOE's defense nuclear facilities. LFO TQP Self-Assessment, May 2013 More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Pacific Northwest

426

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are

427

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.edisonfoundation.net/IEE/Documents/EPRI_AssessmentAchievableEEPote Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/assessment-achievable-potential-energ Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Mandates/Targets This report discusses the 2008 U.S. Energy Information Administration statistic that electricity consumption in the United States is predicted to

428

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cross-sector Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

432

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

433

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

PHMC post-NPH emergency response training  

SciTech Connect

This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

Conrads, T.J.

1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

436

Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response. Provides information and resources concerning the development of Operational Guidelines as part of planning guidance for protection and recovery following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and/or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents. Operational Guidelines Technical (OGT) Manual, 2009 RESRAD-RDD Complementing Software to OGT Manual EPA Protective Action Guidelines (2013), Interim Final Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC)

437

EA-1633: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1633: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1633: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1633: Final Environmental Assessment Green Mountain Reservoir Substitution and Power Interference Agreements In response to a request from Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities), the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), an agency of the Department of the Interior, is considering entering into a Green Mountain Reservoir Substitution Agreement with Springs Utilities and a Power Interference Agreement with Springs Utilities and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA). The execution of the proposed agreements would allow Springs Utilities to provide a reliable source of municipal water to the citizen owners and customers of Springs Utilities. DOE/EA-1633: Environmental Assessment for Green Mountain Reservoir

438

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

439

Response Protocol Distressed Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Protocol Distressed Students REFERRAL IDENTIFIERS: Student distress may manifest, the Distressed Student Protocol will assist you in responding to the student and providing appropriate referrals

California at Santa Barbara, University of

440

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

GADRAS Detector Response Function.  

SciTech Connect

The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small- and medium-sized manufacturers may be eligible to receive a no-cost assessment provided by DOE Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs). Teams located at 24 universities around the country conduct the energy audits to identify opportunities to improve productivity, reduce waste, and save energy. Each manufacturer typically identifies about $55,000 in potential annual savings on average. Over 15,000 IAC assessments have been conducted. IACs also train the next-generation of energy savvy engineers.

443

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

444

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

445

Assessment in natural sciences.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research study focusses on assessment in the Natural Sciences learning area in grades 8 and 9. The aspect under focus is the extent to… (more)

Singh, Suresh Kamar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

ESCO PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT TEMPLATE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document presents a template and example to help energy service companies (ESCOs) conduct preliminary assessments required for Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects.

447

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

  Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices...

448

Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document has been developed to guide individuals and teams that will be involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the...

449

Towards Building an Optimal Demand Response Framework for DC Distribution Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards Building an Optimal Demand Response Framework for DC Distribution Networks Hamed Mohsenian, an optimization-based foundation is proposed for demand response in DC distribution networks in presence to assess the performance and to gain insights into the proposed demand-response paradigm. Keywords: DC

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

450

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area CPM User's Guide Area CPM User's Guide 1. Introduction Field sampling has the potential to be an extremely time-consuming and expensive portion of a radiological site remediation. Collected samples must be shipped to an off-site laboratory or counted in an on-site mobile unit in order to establish areas of contamination and to ensure that acceptable residual levels of contaminants remain. The Area CPM Calculator is a web-based calculator that estimates a gamma detector response for a target level of surface contamination. This calculator provides a rapid, exceptionally cost-effective assessment of contamination and cleanup standards based on field instrument data, which minimizes the use of more expensive sample collection and laboratory analysis. A correction factor for cpm analysis established between this

451

Sensor response rate accelerator  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Information Incident Response Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Incident Response Procedure Authority The Information Incident Response Procedure (IIRP) is authorized under the UWM Information Security Policy S59; section III-D (http://www4.uwm Information Security Office, and UWM Internal Audit. This document will be reviewed and updated annually

Saldin, Dilano

453

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600-2006-014 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Jackalyne Pfannenstiel Chairman James D Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared

454

RESPONSIBILITIES October 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRINCIPLES RESPONSIBILITIES PRACTICES October 2012 HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY AT STANFORD #12;1 Health & Safety Policy at Stanford October 2012 Table of Contents PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH & SAFETY 2 RESPONSIBILITIES PROVIDING A SAFE WORKPLACE 4 Facility Design 4 Hazard Identification and Correction 4 Shutdown of Dangerous

Kay, Mark A.

455

Eastern Frequency Response Study  

SciTech Connect

This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Building Energy Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country

457

Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for Landscape Waste  

SciTech Connect

DOE orders mandate the development of a waste minimization program. The program`s goals are to: reduce volumes of wastes and toxicity; implement a system of tracking and reporting improvements; and devise a method for performing tasks. To satisfy the requirements of this program, Sandia conducts pollution prevention opportunity assessments (PPOAs) to identify waste-generating processes. The information collected from a PPOA then is used to identify waste minimization opportunities. This pollution prevention opportunity assessment was conducted using Sandia`s new methodology for prioritizing, evaluating and managing site-wide waste streams. This new methodology and the list of priority waste streams are described in the wastes revision of the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment Plant. This PPOA addresses landscape waste minimization, partially in response to recent legislation and regulations.

Phillips, N.M.; Raubfogel, S.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Transportation Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transportation Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country

459

Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of NREL's South Table...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SITE-WIDE EA Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 March5, 2003 DearStakeholder: SUBJECT: NOTICE OF AV AILABILITY OF DRAFT...

460

Assessment for Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Tourism Assessment for Lindstrom, Minnesota Final Report May 2008 Prepared for of the University of Minnesota Extension and College of Food, Agricultural & Natural Resource Sciences #12; INTRODUCTION 1 DATA USED IN THE TOURISM ASSESSMENT 2 TOURISM-RELATED DATA FOR LINDSTROM 2 REFERENCES TO TOURISM

Amin, S. Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Training Needs Assessment Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The TNA PowerPoint Presentation is targeted for the training points of contacts whose organization's participate in the DOE training needs assessment (TNA). This presentation goes over how the training needs assessment (TNA) is done and the components of the TNA data collection tool.

462

DOEEA-1203 Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

203 203 ~ Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 21 8-W-5 Low-Level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR TRENCH 33 WIDENING IN 21 8-W-5 LOW-LEVEL BURIAL GROUND, HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON JULY 1997 U.S. Department o f Energy DOE/ EA- 1203 This page intentionally left blank. Envi ronmental Assessment J u l y 1997 Portions of this document m y be iliegiile i n electronic image prodads. b a g s are pFoduced from the best adhble original dOCUXllent, DOE/EA-1203 U.S. Department o f Energy Preface PREFACE This envi ronmental assessment (EA) has been prepared t o assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department o

463

Assess economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives Assess economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

464

EA-1113: Final Environmental Assessment (Addendum) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

113: Final Environmental Assessment (Addendum) 113: Final Environmental Assessment (Addendum) EA-1113: Final Environmental Assessment (Addendum) Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Environmental Assessment (EA) Addendum (DOE/EA-1113-A) in response to a proposal from Horizon Center LLC, a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET), requesting transfer of title of the presently leased Parcel ED-1 (also known as Horizon Center) in order to continue to support economic development in the region. Environmental Assessment Addendum for the Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1, DOE/EA-1113-A (April 2003) More Documents & Publications EA-1113: Finding of No Significant Impact (Addendum) EA-1175: Final Environmental Assessment (Addendum)

465

Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

466

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

467

Stage 3b: Assessing Opportunities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b: Assessing Opportunities b: Assessing Opportunities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3b LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

468

Cyber Assessment Methods for SCADA Security | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Methods for SCADA Security Assessment Methods for SCADA Security Cyber Assessment Methods for SCADA Security This paper describes vulnerability assessment methodologies used in ongoing research and assessment activities designed to identify and resolve vulnerabilities so as to improve the security of the nation's critical infrastructure. The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 brought to light threats and vulnerabilities that face the United States. In response, the U.S. Government is directing the effort to secure the nation's critical infrastructure by creating programs to implement the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace (1). One part of this effort involves assessing Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. These systems are essential to the control of critical elements of our national

469

Stage 3c: Developing and Assessing Low Emissions Development Scenarios |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stage 3c: Developing and Assessing Low Emissions Development Scenarios Stage 3c: Developing and Assessing Low Emissions Development Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

470

Your Records Management Responsibilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Records Management Your Records Management Responsibilities Table of Contents INTRODUCTION RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IMPORTANCE OF RECORDS MANAGEMENT YOUR RECORDS MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES RECORDS MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE ELECTRONIC RECORDS & RECORDKEEPING LAW, REGULATION, AND POLICY ASSISTANCE RECORDS MANAGEMENT TERMS 2 INTRODUCTION If you are a government employee or contractor working for a federal agency, records management is part of your job. This pamphlet explains your responsibilities for federal records and provides the context for understanding records management in the federal government and in the Department of Energy. TOP RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

471

ARAC: A flexible real-time dose consequence assessment system  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginning, the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), an emergency radiological dose assessment service of the US Government, has been called on to do consequence assessments for releases into the atmosphere of radionuclides and a variety of other substances. Some of the more noteworthy emergency responses have been for the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accidents, and more recently, for a cloud of gases from a rail-car spill into the Sacramento river of the herbicide metam sodium, smoke from hundreds of burning oil wells in Kuwait, and ash clouds from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The spatial scales of these responses range from local, to regional, to global, and the response periods from hours, to weeks, to months. Because of the variety of requirements of each unique assessment, ARAC has developed and maintains a flexible system of people, computer software and hardware.

Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

1993-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment August 4, 2010 Media contact: Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 The public is invited to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment that the U.S. Department of Energy has published for a proposed radiological response training range at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). At the range, INL experts would train personnel, conduct exercises, and perform technology evaluation and demonstrations in support of national technical nuclear forensic and radiological emergency response programs. �The Radiological Response Training Range will allow emergency responders to prepare for a major radiological incident by training in an environment that safely simulates scenarios they might encounter,� said Vic Pearson, DOE�s document manager for the environmental assessment. �Activities at the range would directly support the nation�s readiness to respond to a radiological incident, but more importantly, would enable responders to develop proficiency in characterizing the scene in support of determining the origins of the incident.�

473

Response (7/8/2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

J J u l y 8 , 2009 Mr. James A. Ajello Chair Environmental Management Advisory Board U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S. W. Washington, DC 20585 Dear Chairman Ajello: Thank you for your letter of May 5,2009, transmitting the Board's report and recommendations regarding the Energy Park Initiative (EPI). As the Office of Environmental Management (EM) makes continuing progress in remediating our sites and reducing the EM footprint, we are very cognizant of the need to work with our sites, local communities, and stakeholders to prepare them for transitioning the sites to future beneficial uses. These sites possess tremendous Federal assets, and we need to ensure that the returns on investment to the taxpayer are maximized. We in EM have been holding discussions with Department of Energy senior

474

Accident Response Group  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for DOE response to accidents and significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear weapon components. Cancels DOE O 5530.1. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

475

RTP Customer Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence on customer demand response to hourly pricing from the largest and...real-time pricing...(RTP) program in the United States. RTP creates value by inducing load reductions at times...

Steven Braithwait; Michael O’Sheasy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Supplier Management Responsibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supplier management, at the organization level, has two basic responsibilities: (1) to ensure that the engineering environment is based on a defined engineering process, with engineers trained to work within that...

Raymond Kehoe; Alka Jarvis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

What's BP's social responsibility?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would like to suggest a third, inanimate culprit: the cult of corporate social responsibility. As crude poured into the Gulf of Mexico and the world economy struggled to recover from the financial crisis

478

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and Finding Of No Significant Impacts for ROCK CREEK RESERVE 2001-Closure DOE/EA - 1371 Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service May, 2001 Dear Stakeholder: Enclosed is the Final Rock Creek Reserve Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (Plan), Environmental Assessment (EA), and Finding Of No Significant Impacts (FONSI). The Rock Creek Reserve was dedicated on May 17, 1999, to be jointly managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of Energy. This Plan/EA was developed in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Through cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for joint

479

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement and support. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Lynette Schlandt for her help during my stay at this University. vu TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. . . . . nl DEDICATION... tool for control. The State of Texas passed and implemented OSPRA (Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act) of 1991. The most significant requirement for both these laws was the need for a Facility Response Plan for the companies. This would help a...

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

480

A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "assess stakeholder responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

IAAP Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 Burlington Atomic Energy Commission Plant- Former Worker Program A US DOE funded project conducted by: Dr. Laurence Fuortes, Principal Investigator The University of Iowa College of Public Health Department of Occupational and Environmental Health 5 2940 Steindler Building Iowa City, IA 52242 TEL: 319 335 9819 FAX: 319 335 9200 BACEP-FWP Needs Assessment 1. INTRODUCTION In August of 2000, the University of Iowa College of Public Health initiated a needs assessment study to evaluate whether or not individuals formerly employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) near Burlington, Iowa, would benefit from a Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. These workers were employed at IAAP in the atomic weapons industry on what was known at the facility as Line 1 or Division B at the

482

Risk Assess - updated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

483

Preliminary Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Revision Sheet for the Environmental Assessment Finding of No Significant Impact Mitigation Action Plan DOE/EA-1731 Bonneville Power Administration May 2011 Walla Walla-Tucannon Transmission Line Rebuild Project 1 Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Revision Sheet for the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1731 Summary This revision sheet documents the changes to be incorporated into the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA). With the addition of these changes, the Preliminary EA will not be reprinted and will serve as the Final

484

Training Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document contains four self-assessment forms that are aligned with the Home Energy Professional Certifications. These forms will help individuals gauge competency and identify training needs before an exam is taken.

485

Technology Readiness Assessment Guide  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-4.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function of DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Larry H. Thompson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Why This Project To understand the relative importance of individual DNA repair and DNA-damage response pathways to the recovery of mammalian cells after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). This understanding may lead to better ways of setting limits on human exposure to IR. In spite of the discovery of many mammalian DNA repair genes, our current knowledge of how many of these genes contribute to cellular recovery from IR exposure is quite limited. Project Goals Measure cellular responses at doses in the 5-100 cGy range, which generally cause changes too small to detect in normal, repair-proficient cells Focus on DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA oxidative base

487

Pumping System Assessment Tool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pumping System Assessment Tool (PSAT) is a free online software tool to help industrial users assess the efficiency of pumping system operations. PSAT uses achievable pump performance data from Hydraulic Institute standards and motor performance data from the MotorMaster+ database to calculate potential energy and associated cost savings. The tool also enables users to save and retrieve log files, default values, and system curves for sharing analyses with other users.

488

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacDonald, R.R. [ed.] [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Vienna, VA (United States); Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Action plan for the Tiger Team assessment report  

SciTech Connect

This document contains responses and planned actions that address the findings of the Tiger Team Assessment of Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1990. In addition, the document contains descriptions of the management and organizational structure to be used in conducting planned actions, root causes for the problems identified in the findings, responses, planned actions, schedules and milestones for completing planned actions, and, where known, costs associated with planned actions.

Not Available

1990-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

491

CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan CRAD, Self-Assessment Program Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should ensure that effective management and independent self-assessments are being conducted periodically by technically qualified personnel. [10 CFR 830.122, subpart A & DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance] Criteria: Managers shall assess their management processes and be actively involved in the assessment process to ensure results contribute to improved performance of programs, systems, and work processes. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment and safety management program shall focus on achieving DOE/NNSA expectations through federal regulations and standards. DOE O 414.1A, Criterion 9 (a) An effective assessment supports management's goal to protect

492