National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for assess stakeholder responses

  1. Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brainstorming and plotting stakeholders achieves a number of vital tasks toward building a community of awareness and advocacy:

  2. Stakeholder participation in health impact assessment: A multicultural approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negev, Maya; Davidovitch, Nadav; Garb, Yaakov; Tal, Alon

    2013-11-15

    The literature on impact assessment (HIA) registers the importance of stakeholder participation in the assessment process, but still lacks a model for engaging stakeholders of diverse ethnic, professional and sectorial backgrounds. This paper suggests that the multicultural approach can contribute to HIA through a revision of the generic 5-step HIA model, and its implementation in a metropolitan plan in Southern Israel. The health issue scoped by the stakeholders in the HIA is related to land uses in the vicinity of the national hazardous industry and hazardous waste site. The stakeholders were representatives of the diverse populations at stake, including rural Bedouins and Jewish city dwellers, as well as representatives from the public sector, private sector, non-governmental organizations and academia. The case study revealed that a multicultural stakeholder participation process helps to uncover health issues known to the community which were not addressed in the original plan, and provides local knowledge regarding health conditions that is especially valuable when scientific data is uncertain or absent. It enables diverse stakeholders to prioritize the health issues that will be assessed. The case study also reveals ways in which the model needs revisions and improvements such as in recruitment of diverse participants. This paper presents a multicultural model of HIA and discusses some of the challenges that are faced when HIA is implemented in the context of current decision-making culture. -- Highlights: • We revised the generic HIA model in light of the multicultural approach. • We tested the model in a case study of zoning a hazardous industry site. • Multicultural stakeholder participation uncovers health issues known to communities. • It enables community prioritization of health issues. • We present a model for multicultural stakeholder participation in HIA.

  3. WHAT'S INSIDE THE BLACK BOX - EXPLAINING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO STAKEHOLDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R; Elmer Wilhite, E

    2009-01-06

    The performance assessment (PA) process is being applied to support an increasing variety of waste management decisions that involve the whole spectrum of stakeholders. As with many technical tools, the PA process can be seen as a black box, which can be difficult to understand when implemented. Recognizing the increasing use of PA and the concerns about difficulties with understanding, the Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board (CAB) made a recommendation that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provide a Public Educational Forum on PAs. The DOE-Headquarters Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Compliance and the DOE-Savannah River (DOE-SR) responded to this recommendation by supporting the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in developing several presentation modules that can be used to describe different aspects of the PA process. For the Public Educational Forum, the PA modules were combined with presentations on DOE perspectives, historical modeling efforts at the Savannah River Site, and review perspectives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The overall goals are to help the public understand how PAs are implemented and the rigor that is applied, and to provide insight into the use of PAs for waste management decision-making.

  4. Revision of three-stakeholder signaling game for environmental impact assessment in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pu Xiao; Cheng Hongguang; Gong Li; Hao Fanghua; Qi Ye

    2011-03-15

    Since environmental impact assessment (EIA) regulations were adopted in China 30 years ago, the implementation rate of EIA policies for development projects has been steadily increasing while national environmental quality keeps deteriorating. This contradiction prevents achievement of the goals that the regulations were originally created for, raising concerns regarding the EIA implementation process. One of the objectives of EIA is the evaluation of socio-economic costs introduced by various commercial activities. However, independent economic entities are inclined to break away from these cost related responsibilities, making it necessary for government agencies and EIA organizations to participate in the evaluation process. The practice of avoiding costs may also bring forth other issues, such as rent-seeking behavior and conspiracies. Reducing private costs and the tendency of the three EIA stakeholders to evade social responsibility are intertwined in every EIA process. Their activities are as follows: The government is the lawmaker whose attitude toward the EIA organization determines how business owners react in the EIA process. The government inclination can be interpreted as a signal from which enterprises can determine the nature of the government, which helps the enterprise owners formulate their future actions. A similar relationship also exists among the government, EIA organizations, and enterprise entities. Fundamentally, the correlations between the EIA stakeholders are determined by their socio-economic situation, namely, the economic costs and benefits they encounter. In this article, signaling game theory derived from the classic game theory is applied to describe the EIA process in China by analyzing the activities of the stakeholders and searching for game equilibrium solutions. The optimal reaction schema for stakeholders was obtained by transforming the equilibrium.

  5. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: A step towards a holistic assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caniato, Marco; Vaccari, Mentore; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Zurbrgg, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: Assessment of infectious waste management in Bangkok, in particular incineration. Integration of social network and stakeholder analysis assessment methods. Assessment of stakeholder characteristics, role, interaction and communication. Interviewees self-evaluate their own characteristics and the system. Non-technical aspects are important for system acceptability, and sustainability. - Abstract: Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not forget or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information about

  6. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Stakeholder Information Index 2016 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2015 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2014 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2013 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2012 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2011 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2010 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2009 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2008 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2007 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents 2006 WIPP Stakeholder

  7. NERSC Stakeholders

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stakeholders NERSC Stakeholders U.S. Department of Energy US DOE Office of Science Logo NERSC Allocation Managers at DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) DOE Phonebook Advisory Groups NERSC Users Group The NERSC Users Group (NUG) provides advice and feedback to NERSC on the current state and future delivery of NERSC resources and services. Open to all NERSC users, the group promotes the effective use of the center's high performance computing facilities by sharing

  8. Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-12-01

    DRQAT (Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool) is the tool for assessing demand response saving potentials for large commercial buildings. This tool is based on EnergyPlus simulations of prototypical buildings and HVAC equipment. The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. The assessment tools will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfor impact for various demand responsive strategies.more » Users of the tools will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tools will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points adjustment.« less

  9. Pediatric Healthcare Response to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Influenza Stakeholder Meeting - Summary of Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the meeting was to bring together subject matter experts to develop tools and resources for use by the pediatric healthcare community in response to 2009 (H1N1) pandemic influenza activity during the 2009 influenza season.

  10. Other Stakeholders

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Stakeholder Contacts Mound Development Corporation (MDC) Mike J. Grauwelman President P.O. Box 232 Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-0232 (937) 865-4462 E-mail: mikeg@mound.com Website: http://mound.com City of Miamisburg Ellen Stanifer Environmental Coordinator City of Miamisburg 600 North Main Street Miamisburg, Ohio 45343 (937) 847-6636 E-mail: ellen.stanifer@cityofmiamisburg.com Mound Science and Energy Museum (MSEM) 1075 Mound Road Miamisburg, Ohio 45342-6714 Website: http://www.moundmuseum.com (937)

  11. Stakeholder Engagement Team Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and interaction with key external stakeholders, which include leadership regulators and governments, industry, think tanks, universities, foundations, and other institutions. ...

  12. Building Envelope Stakeholder Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is hosting a building envelope stakeholder workshop on behalf of the DOE Building Technologies Office.

  13. Enclosures STC Stakeholder Meeting Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enclosures STC Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - Austin, Texas Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Wednesday, February ...

  14. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Transportation Stakeholders Forum OSRP * NNSA Contractors transporting in commerce, are required law to comply with applicable regulations required law to comply with ...

  15. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, John A.

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  16. Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders ...

  17. OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report PDF icon OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Report 2015 Project...

  18. OLED Stakeholder Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OLED Stakeholder Report OLED Stakeholder Report PDF icon 2015 OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report 2015 Project...

  19. Optima Stakeholder Listening Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    he Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Offices (BETO and VTO) are co-hosting a stakeholder Listening Day to help shape a major new Sustainable Transportation initiative: Co-optimization of Fuels and Engines (Optima).

  20. Energy Data Accelerator Stakeholder Engagement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Data Accelerator Stakeholder Engagement 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer ... All Cities and Utilities interested in whole building data access * Key stakeholders, e.g. ...

  1. Testing a Stakeholder Participation Framework for Fielding Bioremediation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anex, Robert P.; Focht, Will

    2004-03-17

    This research is investigating stakeholder attitudes about the use of bioremediation technologies with the objective of reducing conflict among stakeholders. The research protocol includes four closely related components. First, we are testing a framework for stakeholder participation that prescribes appropriate stakeholder involvement strategies based on stakeholders trust of the other parties involved in technology deployment decision-making. Second, we are assessing conflict among stakeholders regarding the acceptability of in situ bioremediation as a means to reduce risks posed by radionuclides and metals in the environment. Third, we are assessing the role that awareness of risk exposure plays in the willingness of stakeholders to engage in problem-solving and making risk tradeoffs. Fourth, we are assessing the potential of using the results of these first three components to forge consensus among stakeholders regarding the use and oversight of bioremediation technologies and stakeholder involvement in the decision process. This poster presents preliminary results of a Q methodological survey of stakeholders who are familiar with radionuclide and heavy metal contamination and DOE efforts to remediate that contamination at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Hanford reservations. The Q study allows the research team to diagnose conflict among stakeholders and discover opportunities for consensus.

  2. Stakeholder Engagement Team Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kerry C. Duggan, Stakeholder Engagement Director Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy March 12, 2013 Stakeholder Engagement Team STEAB 2 The Clean Energy Race: In it to Win It "The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries, we must claim its promise" - President

  3. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Environment, Safety and Health Assessments The Department of Energy's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, within the Office of Enterprise Assessments, is responsible for conducting assessments to provide information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public, and environment from hazards present at Department sites and operations. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for

  4. PPPO Stakeholder Outreach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We strive to maintain a strong, cooperative relationship with local residents, municipalities, and stakeholders. We realize that our mission and site decisions have a significant impact on local residents. This knowledge drives us to conduct the safest operations possible and provide transparent communication about our projects.

  5. Stakeholder Report on Stewardship

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Stakeholder Report on Stewardship presents the attributes and basic elements of a long-term stewardship program; describes the existing and proposed statutory provisions for stewardship and institutional controls; and presents recommendations for a Reservation stewardship program, including stewards, physical and institutional controls, information systems, research, and funding options.

  6. Code System for Emergency Response Dose Assessment.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-01-16

    Version: 00 A dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Dose pathways represented in the model are those that are most likely to be important during and immediately following a release (hours) rather than over an extended time frame (days or weeks). The doses computed include: external dose resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides in the air and deposited on the ground, internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation, and total whole-body dose. Threemore » preprocessors are included. RSFPREP generates the MESORAD run specification (input) file, METWR creates the meteorological data file, and RELPREP prepares the release definition file. PRNT is a postprocessor for generating printer or screen-compatible output. All four programs run interactively. MESORAD was developed from version 2.0 of the MESOI atmospheric dispersion model (NESC 9862) retaining its modular nature.« less

  7. 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's 2010 Demand Response and Advanced Metering Survey (2010 FERC Survey, covering calendar year 2009) indicates that advanced metering penetration (i.e., the fraction of all installed meters that are advanced meters) reached

  8. 2012 Building America Stakeholder Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on March 1, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  9. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Audit Report A-07-16 for INL/CCP RH Waste Characterization Activities dated November 22, 2006 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for SRS A-07-01 dated November 21, 2006 Annual Proposed Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination List Annual Report Submittals Submittal of Acceptable Knowledge Sufficiency Determination Notice of Submittal of a Dispute

  10. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Program, A-08-19 dated November 25, 2008 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Hanford TRU Program dated October 15, 2008 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Argonne National Laboratory-Central Characterization Project, Audit A-08-24 dated September 17,

  11. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of the Recertification Audit Report for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project, Audit A-10-24, dated December 14, 2010 Transmittal of Carlsbad Field Office Final Audit Report A-10-23, Argonne National Laboratory Central Characterization Project for Remote Handled Waste Characterization dated October 14, 2010 Transmittal of Recertification Audit Report

  12. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Notification of Last Waste Emplacement and Intent to Commence Closure of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Panel 5 dated March 30, 2011 Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of the Final Audit Report A-11-20, Argonne National Laboratory Central Characterization Project for Remote-Handled Waste Characterization dated October 26, 2011 Transmittal of the Recertification

  13. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Final Audit Report for the Argonne National Laboratory Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A-12-16 dated December 19, 2012 Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Recertification Audit A-12-14, INL Analytical Laboratories Utilizing the Central Characterization Project dated December 12, 2012 Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Los Alamos

  14. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Notification of Panel 6 Closure and Final Waste Emplacement dated November 5, 2013 Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of the Final Audit Report for Recertification Audit A-14-01 of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project dated December 9, 2013 Final Audit Report for the Argonne National Laboratory Central Characterization Program Recertification Audit A-13-24 dated November 22, 2013

  15. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) The U.S. Department of Energy ...

  16. OLED Stakeholder Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report OLED Stakeholder Report PDF icon 2015 OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report 2016 Project Portfolio 2015

  17. OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting Report OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report PDF icon OLED Stakeholder Meeting Report.pdf More Documents & Publications OLED Stakeholder Report 2016 SSL R&D WORKSHOP ...

  18. Sodium dichromate expedited response action assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) perform an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill. The ERA lead regulatory agency is Ecology and EPA is the support agency. The ERA was categorized as non-time-critical, which required preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA). The EE/CA was included in the ERA proposal. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the removal action may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. This ERA process started in March 1992. The ERA proposal went through a parallel review process with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE Richland Operations (RL), EPA, Ecology, and a 30-day public comment period. Ecology and EPA issued an Action Agreement Memorandum in March 1993 (Appendix A). The memorandum directed excavation of all anomalies and disposal of the collected materials at the Hanford Site Central Landfill. Primary field activities were completed by the end of April 1993. Final waste disposal of a minor quantity of hazardous waste was completed in July 1993.

  19. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-14 of the AMWTP dated September 27, 2007 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-03 of the ANL-CCP dated September 18, 2007 Final Audit Report A-07-24 of the SRS-CCP Battelle Columbus RH Waste dated September 6, 2007 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Hanford Site, Audit A-07-10 dated

  20. Spring 2016 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, Florida Spring 2016 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, Florida Spring 2016 National Transportation ...

  1. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services Waste Management Packaging and Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter National ...

  2. Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The ...

  3. EERE Stakeholder Engagement Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stakeholder Engagement Team EERE Stakeholder Engagement Team The mission of Stakeholder Engagement is to promote the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) programs and initiatives through coordination and interaction with key external stakeholders, which include leadership regulators and governments, industry, think tanks, universities, foundations, and other institutions. The Stakeholder Engagement Team uses direct dialogue among EERE and a broad range of stakeholder

  4. Enclosures STC Stakeholder Meeting Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation outlines the goals of the Enclosures Standing Technical Committee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  5. Stakeholder Engagement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The office engages with DOE laboratories, site offices, program offices, and stakeholders to promote rapid technology transfer to U.S. commercial sectors. OTT collaborates with ...

  6. Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-05-01

    The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Frequency Response Assessment and Improvement of Three

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Major North American Interconnections due to High Penetrations of Photovoltaic Generation (SuNLaMP) | Department of Energy Frequency Response Assessment and Improvement of Three Major North American Interconnections due to High Penetrations of Photovoltaic Generation (SuNLaMP) PROJECT PROFILE: Frequency Response Assessment and Improvement of Three Major North American Interconnections due to High Penetrations of Photovoltaic Generation (SuNLaMP) Funding Program: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram:

  8. Dear Pantex Stakeholder,

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ASSESSMENT FOR THE HIGH EXPLOSIVE SCIENCE & ENGINEERING FACILITY The Department of ... operate, and maintain a High Explosive Science & Engineering Facility (HE S&E) on Pantex ...

  9. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  10. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) is the mechanism through which DOE communicates at a national level with states and tribes about the Department...

  11. Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting - New Orleans,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting - New Orleans, May 27, 2014 Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting - New Orleans, May 27, 2014 May 21, 2014 - 5:03pm Addthis ...

  12. CESP Tool 2.3: Stakeholder Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tool 2.3: Stakeholder Agenda from Step 2: Identify and Engage Stakeholders of the Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning.

  13. Optima Stakeholder Listening Day | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from industry and other important stakeholders, work to accelerate the concurrent ... BETO and VTO designed the Listening Day to obtain guidance from diverse stakeholders. ...

  14. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011 On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations ...

  15. Dear Pantex Stakeholder,

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PRODUCTION OFFICE INVITES COMMENTS ON DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE HIGH EXPLOSIVE SCIENCE & ENGINEERING FACILITY The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office (DOE/NPO) proposes to design, construct, operate, and maintain a High Explosive Science & Engineering Facility (HE S&E) on Pantex federal property using federal funding. The HE S&E facility would provide a modernized capability-based infrastructure at the Pantex Plant needed

  16. NED Stakeholder Engagement Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Update May 1, 2014 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N AGENDA 10:00-10:10 Welcome 10:10-10:15 Introduction of NED Stakeholder Team 10:15-10:30 IS2.0 Status...

  17. Rapid Toolkit Stakeholder Trial Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit offers one location for agencies, developers, and industry stakeholders to work together on state and federal hydropower regulatory processes by using a wiki environment to share permitting guidance, regulations, contacts, and other relevant information.

  18. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.C. Nielsen

    2003-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

  19. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  20. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconductivity Program Stakeholders DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders Map showing the stakeholders involved in High Temperature Superconductivity work with the DOE. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders (104.19 KB) More Documents & Publications High Temperature Superconductivity Partners DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007 Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report

  1. Stakeholder Priorities in Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of stakeholder priorities as they relate to wind power, including priorities by region and type.

  2. CERCLA Process and Stakeholder Education | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CERCLA Process and Stakeholder Education CERCLA Process and Stakeholder Education The CERCLA process involves stakeholder education and input throughout the life of the project. ...

  3. 2016 WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of Final Report for CBFO Audit A-16-19 of the LANL/CCP dated August 9, 2016 Transmittal of Final Report for CBFO Audit A-16-15 of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Central Characterization Program dated July 26, 2016 Interim and Final Audit Report for Hanford Site Central Characterization Program Recertification Audit A-16-11 dated June 27, 2016 Transmittal

  4. PROJECT PROFILE: Photovoltaic Stakeholder Engagement Initiatives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Photovoltaic Stakeholder Engagement Initiatives PROJECT PROFILE: Photovoltaic Stakeholder Engagement Initiatives Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque, NM SunShot Award Amount: $89,000 This project is focused on independent stakeholder engagement activities conducted by Sandia National Laboratory relating to photovoltaic (PV) outreach at the national and international level. APPROACH The International

  5. FUSRAP Stakeholder Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FUSRAP Stakeholder Report FUSRAP Stakeholder Report The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has operated the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) since 1974. During that time,we have accomplished many activities to identify and remediate to a safe condition sites that became contaminated with radioactive materials in support of the nation's early atomic energy programs. FUSRAP Stakeholder Report, May 2013 (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications Recent Developments in DOE

  6. Methane Stakeholder Roundtables | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methane Stakeholder Roundtables Methane Stakeholder Roundtables April 24, 2014 - 3:00pm Addthis Methane Stakeholder Roundtables Advancing the Interagency Methane Strategy As directed by President Obama in his Climate Action Plan, the Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated with other Federal agencies to develop a Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions, which was formally announced by the White House last month. To advance this strategy, DOE is now working with other Federal agencies and the White

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  8. Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Save the Date NTSF Registration Announcement NTSF 2013 Agenda EM's Huizenga Gives Keynote Address at National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Spring 2013 NTSF Presentations May 14, 2013 Presentations

  9. CESP Tool 2.2: Stakeholder Invite | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Stakeholder Invite CESP Tool 2.2: Stakeholder Invite Tool 2.2: Stakeholder Invite from Step 2: Identify and Engage Stakeholders of the Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning. CESP Tool 2.2: Stakeholder Invite (48.46 KB) More Documents & Publications CESP Tool 1.1: Leadership Team Invite Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning: Step 2

  10. Environment, Safety and Health Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Environment, Safety and Health Assessments The Department of Energy's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, within the Office of Enterprise Assessments, is responsible for conducting assessments to provide information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public, and environment from hazards present at Department sites and operations. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for

  11. Decision insight into stakeholder conflict for ERN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siirola, John; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Benz, Zachary O.; Stansbury, Melanie; Richards, Elizabeth H.; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Warrender, Christina E.; Morrow, James Dan

    2012-02-01

    . Stakeholder interaction with the model and associated data capture was facilitated through two very different modes of engagement, one a standard interface involving radio buttons, slider bars, graphs and plots, while the other utilized an immersive serious gaming interface. The decision support architecture developed through this project was piloted in the Middle Rio Grande Basin to examine how these tools might be utilized to promote enhanced understanding and decision-making in the context of complex water resource management issues. Potential applications of this architecture and its capacity to lead to enhanced understanding and decision-making was assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants who represented key stakeholders in the basin.

  12. Co-Optima Stakeholder Listening Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    he Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Offices (BETO and VTO) are co-hosting a stakeholder Listening Day to help shape a major new Sustainable Transportation initiative: Co-optimization of Fuels and Engines (Optima).

  13. 2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE-LM periodically surveys its stakeholders to collect their feedback on DOE-LM performance at both a local and national level. The first customer satisfaction survey was ...

  14. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Pathways to Clean Cities: A Stakeholder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Pathways to Clean Cities: A Stakeholder - Government Engagement Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Pathways to Clean Cities: A Stakeholder - Government Engagement May ...

  15. EPA Clean Energy Incentive Program Stakeholder Calls - Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Incentive Program Stakeholder Calls - Potential CEIP Project Partners EPA Clean Energy Incentive Program Stakeholder Calls - Potential CEIP Project Partners November 23,...

  16. DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by ...

  17. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders PDF icon programupdatewebinar7-23-12.pdf More Documents & ...

  18. Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas; February 29 - March 2, 2012 Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas; February 29 - March 2, ...

  19. Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 ...

  20. Memorandum: Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, and Regulators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, and Regulators in EM Budget Requests Memorandum: Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, and Regulators in EM Budget Requests From: ...

  1. Partners and Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partners and Stakeholders Partners and Stakeholders Concentrating on the single-family residential sector, this section looks at the organizations and groups that influence financing programs. They typically fall into three general categories: Financing Partners/Agents: Organizations with direct involvement in the lending and financing process. Those are the people who touch the money as it flows through the process. Advisors and Enablers: Organizations that provide direct technical assistance,

  2. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie

    2013-11-01

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  3. Lab Advancements: Rapid assessment for crisis response | Y-12...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A proper and effective response to a nuclear disaster, like the one at Japan's Fukushima ... first responders," Bradshaw said. "If Fukushima were to happen a year from now, we'd be ...

  4. CESP Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Stakeholder Matrix CESP Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix from Step 2: Identify and Engage Stakeholders of the Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning. CESP Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix (27.87 KB) More Documents & Publications Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning: Step 2 Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning CESP Tool 9.1: Monitoring Plan Template

  5. Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - WH Energy and Climate Stakeholders 10...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WH Energy and Climate Stakeholders 10-7-09 final.ppt Microsoft PowerPoint - WH Energy and Climate Stakeholders 10-7-09 final.ppt PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - WH Energy and ...

  7. 2014 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued 2014 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued July 7, 2014 - 5:02pm Addthis ...

  8. Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas;

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 29 - March 2, 2012 | Department of Energy Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas; February 29 - March 2, 2012 Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas; February 29 - March 2, 2012 The Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting was held on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas, and outlined stakeholder needs, collaboration opportunities, and research results as they relate to the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Residential

  9. Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting - New Orleans, May 27, 2014 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting - New Orleans, May 27, 2014 Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting - New Orleans, May 27, 2014 May 21, 2014 - 5:03pm Addthis Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting - New Orleans, May 27, 2014 Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Meeting No. 3 The U.S. Department of Energy is hosting a public meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) in New Orleans on May 27, 2014, with Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz,

  10. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: March

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 | Department of Energy Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011 On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Stakeholders meeting in March 2011, held in Atlanta, Georgia. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting (721.4 KB) More Documents & Publications Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011

  11. Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 5 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico The Spring 2015 meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum will be held on May 12-14, 2015 in Albuquerque, NM. Save the Date NTSF 2015 Registration Announcement NTSF 2015 Agenda - Preliminary More Documents & Publications NTSF Spring 2015

  12. Spring 2016 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, Florida |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, Florida Spring 2016 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, Florida Spring 2016 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, Florida The Spring 2016 meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum will be held on June 7-9, 2016 in Orlando, FL. Save the Date NTSF 2016 Registration Announcement More Documents & Publications NTSF Spring 2016 Save the Date NTSF Spring 2016 Registration

  13. ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS utilities consumer advocates regulators environmental groups technology providers policymakers WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO AMERICANS. A smarter electrical grid can save us energy, protect consumers, safeguard our environment and ultimately save money for all Americans. 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

  14. Fifth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    On April 9--11, 1997, the Department of Energy`s Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its fifth National Stakeholder Workshop. The workshop addressed a wide range of work force restructuring and community transition issues critical to the future success of the Department. Two important elements of the meeting were: (1) reviewing progress made on the challenges identified during the March 1996f stakeholder`s meeting in Atlanta, Georgia; and (2) identifying areas that needed priority attention during the early months of the second Clinton Administration. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The workshop included presentations on the following topics: Welcome and introductions; Opening remarks; Community reuse organizations: recent accomplishments; Privatization: policy, practice and potential pitfalls; Department of Energy`s integrated training initiatives; Congressional perspective on work force restructuring; and, Privatization and the Ten Year Plan.

  15. Communicating Accomplishments to All Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communicating Accomplishments to All Stakeholders Communicating Accomplishments to All Stakeholders This presentation discusses the value of communicating accomplishments related to energy efficiency project implementation and provides suggestions for communications tools. Raytheon Corporation provides tips from their own experience implementing projects. Communicating Accomplishments to All Stakeholders (October 13, 2010) (2.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Sell Management on

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  17. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE CAPABILITIES FOR CONDUCTING INGESTION PATHWAY CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENTS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-11

    Potential airborne releases of radioactivity from facilities operated for the U. S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site could pose significant consequences to the public through the ingestion pathway. The Savannah River National Laboratory has developed a suite of technologies needed to conduct assessments of ingestion dose during emergency response, enabling emergency manager at SRS to develop initial protective action recommendation for state agencies early in the response and to make informed decisions on activation of additional Federal assets that would be needed to support long-term monitoring and assessment activities.

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  19. Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning Report: Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning This report assesses the relationship between high levels of demand-side resources (including end-use efficiency, demand response, and distributed generation) and investment in new transmission or utilization of existing transmission. It summarizes the extensive modeling of transmission scenarios done through DOE-funded studies

  20. CBEI: Stakeholder Engagement Support for the Better Buildings Energy Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerator - 2015 Peer Review | Department of Energy Stakeholder Engagement Support for the Better Buildings Energy Data Accelerator - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Stakeholder Engagement Support for the Better Buildings Energy Data Accelerator - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Erica Cochran, Carnegie-Mellon University View the Presentation CBEI: Stakeholder Engagement Support for the Better Buildings Energy Data Accelerator - 2015 Peer Review (3.16 MB) More Documents & Publications CBEI: Using

  1. Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Engagement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Stakeholder Engagement Quadrennial Energy Review Stakeholder Engagement PROCESS The Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) process itself involves robust engagement of federal agencies and outside stakeholders, and further enables the federal government to translate policy goals into a set of analytically based, integrated actions for proposed investments over a four year planning horizon. In the Presidential Memorandum establishing the QER, President Obama directed the QER Task Force to

  2. Stakeholder Mapping: Learn How to Identify Leaders, Target Audiences, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaps in Your Outreach | Department of Energy Stakeholder Mapping: Learn How to Identify Leaders, Target Audiences, and Gaps in Your Outreach Stakeholder Mapping: Learn How to Identify Leaders, Target Audiences, and Gaps in Your Outreach Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Stakeholder Mapping, June 26, 2014, call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (996.03 KB) More Documents & Publications Voluntary Initiative: Partnerships Toolkit

  3. White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Security Stakeholders Forum White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum July 27, 2010 - 1:04pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman White House Energy Security Stakeholders Forum Tuesday, July 27, 2010 Good afternoon. Thank you Secretary Mabus and Carol Browner for your leadership on these important issues. It's a pleasure to be here today with all of our distinguished panelists and guests. Before I begin my remarks, I want to take a

  4. Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting, Minnesota |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 4 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting, Minnesota Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting, Minnesota NTSF 2014 Meeting Agenda PRESENTATIONS - MAY 13, 2014 Program and Stakeholder Briefings EM Office of Packaging and Transportation DOE Office of Nuclear Energy TRANSCOM National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Regulatory Commission Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance NTSF Tribal Caucus Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group

  5. DOE Releases Updated Directory of Potential Stakeholders | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOE Releases Updated Directory of Potential Stakeholders DOE Releases Updated Directory of Potential Stakeholders July 22, 2016 - 3:04pm Addthis DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents. The Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA, updated in July, 2016, is primarily intended to supplement lists that Departmental Offices compile for individual projects or facilities. It

  6. DOE Releases Updated Directory of Potential Stakeholders | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Releases Updated Directory of Potential Stakeholders DOE Releases Updated Directory of Potential Stakeholders July 29, 2015 - 2:54pm Addthis DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents. The Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA, updated in July, 2015, is primarily intended to supplement lists that Departmental Offices compile for individual projects or facilities. It

  7. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on Achieving High Yields from Algal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO is seeking input from industry, academia, and other stakeholders regarding supply systems and services for the cultivation, logistics, and preprocessing of algal feedstocks. ...

  8. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders, a presentation by the U.S. Department of Energy, Home Energy Score program, from Joan Glickman, Senior Advisor...

  9. Summary of Stakeholder Input From May 2015 Request for Information...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    through issuance of a Request for Information from public and private sector stakeholders. ... in the deployment of improved publicprivate partnership agreements and increase in ...

  10. Stakeholder Mapping: Learn How to Identify Leaders, Target Audiences...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Stakeholder Mapping, June 26, 2014, call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (996.03 KB) More Documents & Publications Voluntary Initiative: ...

  11. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) Stakeholder Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an update on the HPwES program, near term program goals, success stories, stakeholder comments on the HPwES v2 proposal, and next steps.

  12. Smart Grid Stakeholder Roundtable Group Perspectives- September 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is designed to capture key questions posed by stakeholders concerning implementation of smart grids. These perspectives were compiled during a series of discussions among members of...

  13. Mark Your Calendars! 2015 DOE LM Independent Stakeholder Satisfaction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stakeholders and regulators to gather input on the effectiveness of DOE LM community communication strategies. www.lmsurveyaddress.com Survey ad for Quarterly Newsletter...

  14. Optima Stakeholder Listening Day Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon optimalisteningdayagenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Co-Optima Stakeholder Listening Day Summary Report Draft Agenda for U.S.-Africa Energy Ministerial Optima ...

  15. Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences,...

  16. Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    interaction is performed yearly by LM. The tools used for this evaluation include statistical software to track Internet usage, the LM National Stakeholder Database, an overview ...

  17. DOE Quadrennial Energy Review - Stakeholder Meeting #4 The Water...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review - Stakeholder Meeting 4 The Water-Energy Nexus, San Francisco, ... President Operations Panel 2: Integrating Water and Energy Operations, Policy and ...

  18. Microsoft Word - StakeholderInputForm_LocalPlanningAssessment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completing this form does not qualify the participant for receipt of any service, access to confidential information, or any other right not explicitly stated in Southwestern's ...

  19. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection provided, the

  1. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiatives » Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse » Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders Regulators EMATRIX Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Natural Gas Star program Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) Industry groups American Gas Association (AGA) American Gas Foundation (AGF)

  2. Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois NTSF Spring 2010 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Department of Energy Office of Science Transportation Overview Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities EM Waste and Materials Disposition &

  3. Spring 2012 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Tennessee |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Tennessee Spring 2012 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Tennessee NTSF Registration Website Save The Date! NTSF Spring 2012 Agenda NTSF Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Western Governor's Association Agenda NTSF Presentations Session

  4. Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessments Assessments The Department of Energy's (DOE) Enterprise Assessments programs provide DOE line management, Congress, and other stakeholders with an independent evaluation of the effectiveness of DOE policy and line management performance in safety and security, and other critical areas as directed by the Secretary of Energy. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for improvement to our leadership to support the safe performance of the Department's

  5. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; et al

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight.more » We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.« less

  6. Spring 2014 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Social Media for Natural Disaster Response and Recovery Social Media and the NRC: What ... Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Overview More Documents & ...

  7. Safeguards-By-Design: Guidance and Tools for Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Schanfein; Shirley Johnson

    2012-02-01

    Effective implementation of the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) approach can help meet the challenges of global nuclear energy growth, by designing facilities that have improved safeguardability and reduced safeguards-related life cycle costs. The ultimate goal of SBD is to implement effective and efficient safeguards that reduce the burden to both the facility operator and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Since 2008, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Safeguards By Design Project has initiated multiple studies and workshops with industry and regulatory stakeholders, including the IAEA, to develop relevant documents to support the implementation of SBD. These 'Good Practices Guides' describe facility and process design features that will facilitate implementation of effective nuclear material safeguards starting in the earliest phases of design through to final design. These guides, which are in their final editorial stages, start at a high level and then narrow down to specific nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as Light Water Reactors, Generation III/IV Reactors, High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors, and Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants. Most recently, NGSI has begun development of a facility safeguardability assessment toolkit to assist the designer. This paper will review the current status of these efforts, provide some examples of these documents, and show some standard IAEA Unattended Instrumentation that is permanently installed in nuclear facilities for monitoring.

  8. Co-Optima Stakeholder Listening Day Summary Report (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In FY 2015, DOE invited industry stakeholders to the listening day to obtain critical input on the opportunities and challenges of this effort. The meeting was held in Golden, ...

  9. Summary of Stakeholder Input From May 2015 Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sought FY15 feedback through issuance of a Request for Information from public and private sector stakeholders. This RFI received commentary across five areas of...

  10. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders, a presentation by the U.S. Department of Energy, Home Energy Score program, from Joan Glickman, Senior Advisor/Program Manager, July 23, 2012.

  11. Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a 2011 Stakeholders Webinar-Budget Briefing on February 24, 2011. Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget (4.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell ...

  12. Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences, briefings, news...

  13. Co-Optima Stakeholder Listening Day Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report is based on the proceedings of the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima) Stakeholder Listening Day, held on June 16–17, 2015, in Golden, Colorado

  14. USDA BioPreferred Program Public Meeting for Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) BioPreferred® program will host a public meeting for interested stakeholders to discuss the issue of incorporating previously excluded mature market...

  15. Co-Optima Stakeholder Listening Day | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) co-hosted the Optima Stakeholder Listening Day on June 16-17, ...

  16. Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents.  This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

  17. 2012 Independent Communication and Outreach Stakeholder Satisfaction Survey

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE-LM periodically surveys its stakeholders to collect their feedback on DOE-LM performance at both a local and national level. The first customer satisfaction survey was conducted in 2005 and...

  18. Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review | Department of Energy Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review August 15, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis The Department of Energy conducted a Peer Review of its Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and Development Program on July 20-22,

  19. Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy State, City and Industry Stakeholders to Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders to Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy June 13, 2013 - 1:29pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama

  20. Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review | Department of Energy Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review The Department of Energy conducted a Peer Review of its Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and Development Program on July 20-22, 2010 during which 28

  1. Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado NTSF Spring 2011 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Activities and Accomplishments Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation DOE Railcar Fleet Asset Planning & Lessons Learned DOE Shipment Activities: What We Accomplished and a Look Forward DOE-Idaho's Packaging and Transportation Perspective

  2. Co-Optima Stakeholder Listening Day Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optima Stakeholder Listening Day Summary Report Sponsored jointly by the Vehicle Technologies Office and the Bioenergy Technologies Office Hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 16-17, 2015 Golden, Colorado CO-OPTIMA STAKEHOLDER LISTENING DAY SUMMARY REPORT Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

  3. 2013 US Department of Energy National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 US Department of Energy National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Hello Everyone, It's time to register for the 2013 U.S. Department of Energy National Transportation Stakeholders Forum being held in Buffalo, New York on May 14-16. Please access the entitled link to proceed directly to the official registration website. Once you have entered the site you will be able to register for the meeting, select activities (regional/working meetings, group breakout sessions, TRANSCOM training and the

  4. Expediting environmental cleanup--nationwide stakeholder involvement in U.S. Department of Energy`s plume focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, G.H.; Stein, S.L.; Serie, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) faces a major challenge in cleaning up its contaminated sites throughout the United States. One major area of concern is the plumes in soil and ground water, contaminated with a myriad of different pollutants. DOE recently established the Plume Focus Area to address these problems. The mission of the Plume Focus Area is to enhance the deployment of innovative technologies for containing and cleaning up contaminant plumes in ground water and soil at all DOE sites. By involving a range of stakeholders in the selection, demonstration, and evaluation of new technologies, the deployment of these technologies can be enhanced. Through this strategy, technology users join with other stakeholders to assess the appropriateness of new technologies for addressing plume contamination, and characterize the conditions under which those emerging technologies will be acceptable. If new plume cleanup technologies are to be deployable, they must improve on today`s baseline technologies. If sites and their stakeholders understood the technologies, recognize that their concerns are reflected in the evaluations and demonstrations, and participate in assessing how technology performance addresses their concerns, the likelihood of acceptance of those technologies is greater. Thus, broad stakeholder acceptance becomes part of the definition of an improved technology, evaluated in parallel with technical performance, cost, and other traditional parameters. This paper further describes the goals and objectives of the Plume Focus Area and emphasizes the importance of stakeholder involvement in achieving them. The process of coordinating with DOE sites is described to highlight how stakeholder input is considered throughout the Plume Focus Area decision-making process in selecting, developing, demonstrating, and evaluating innovative technologies to address plume problems.

  5. An assessment of the response of the GPHS-RTG to potential accident environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukunda, M.

    1995-01-20

    The Cassini spacecraft is designed to carry out an orbital tour of the Saturnian system and an investigation of the planet, its satellites, atmosphere, and ring system. The spacecraft will carry three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RGTs) to provide electrical power. It is scheduled to be launched aboard the Titan IV/Centaur launch vehicle system. This paper describes the details of the hydrocode analysis simulating the impact of an RTG on the launch pad and the collision of high speed plate fragments with the RTG. Calculations of the response of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and the fueled clads to these events are presented. It will be shown that the analysis is an effective tool to guide and support the experimental satety test program plan which will be conducted as part of the RTG Safety Assessment for Cassini mission. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  6. Final alternatives assessment: Other contamination sources: Interim response action, South Tank Farm Plume. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The South Tank Farm Plume (STFP) is located in the southern half of sections 1 and 2. It is a composite plume of C6H6, MEC6H5, XYLEN, DCPD, and BCHPD which is migrating from the area of tank 464A. Recent investigations have shown that the STFP is being biodegraded naturally and will not migrate into either Lake Ladora or Lower Derby Lake prior to implementation of the final remedy. Monitoring with the specific objectives of (1) Verifying the rate of migration and (2) Locating the leading edge of the plume over the time frame of the IRA is proposed as the preferred alternative action. Sections of this assessment provide information on: (1) Site description-history, previous investigations, hydrogeology, LNAPL plume; (2) IRA objectives and evaluation; and (3) Work plan of the IRA-well network, sampling frequency. Appendices include comments and responses.

  7. SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENT MODELS AT DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Atmospheric Technologies Group develops, maintains, and operates computer-based software applications for use in emergency response consequence assessment at DOE's Savannah River Site. These applications range from straightforward, stand-alone Gaussian dispersion models run with simple meteorological input to complex computational software systems with supporting scripts that simulate highly dynamic atmospheric processes. A software quality assurance program has been developed to ensure appropriate lifecycle management of these software applications. This program was designed to meet fully the overall structure and intent of SRNL's institutional software QA programs, yet remain sufficiently practical to achieve the necessary level of control in a cost-effective manner. A general overview of this program is described.

  8. ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

    2009-04-21

    This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal

  9. Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2014-07-01

    This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

  10. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop on October 2, 2012.

  11. Overview of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Budget: 2011 Stakeholders Webinar—Budget Briefing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at a 2011 Stakeholders Webinar—Budget Briefing on February 24, 2011.

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 1, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  13. Risk Assessment & Management Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NRC - A Proposed Risk Management Regulatory Framework, April 2012 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) web page DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation Workshop on Risk Assessment and Safety Decision Making Under Uncertainty

  14. Tribal Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Meeting Notes and Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategy on the Arctic Region (NSAR) - Ten Year Renewable Energy Strategy Tribal Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Meeting Notes and Analysis Prepared by Denali Daniels and Associates, Inc. Fall 2014 Office of Indian Energy Table o f C ontents Executive S ummary .............................................................................................................................................. 2 --- 6 Background

  15. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Barrow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  16. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Fairbanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  17. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Nome

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  18. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  19. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Anchorage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region. The purpose of this round is to give feedback on the elements of the draft plan.

  20. Guidelines A Primer for Communicating Effectively with NABIR Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, James R.; Word, Charlotte J.; Bilyard, Gordon R.

    2002-03-15

    The purpose of this report is to help scientists communicate with stakeholders and the public (primarily nonscientists) about fundamental science research. The primary audience for this report is scientists involved in the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program of the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the information and insights in the report that are not program-specific should be helpful to scientists in other fundamental science research programs. The report first discusses why scientists should talk to stakeholders and the public, and the challenges associated with discussing the NABIR program. It is observed that communication initiatives can be characterized by three factors: relationships in the social environment, views of what constitutes communication, and accepted forms of communication practices and products. With a focus on informal science communication, recent efforts to gauge public understanding of science and the factors that affect public trust of science institutions are discussed. The social bases for scientist-nonscientist interactions are then examined, including possible sources of distrust and difficulties in transferring discussions of fundamental science from classrooms (where most of the public first learns about science) to public forums. Finally, the report contains specific suggestions for preparing, meeting, and following up on public interactions with stakeholders and the public, including themes common to public discussions of NABIR science and features of scientist-nonscientist interactions observed in interpersonal, small group, and large group interactions between NABIR scientists and stakeholders. A Quick Preparation Guide for Meeting NABIR Stakeholders is provided immediately following the Summary. It condenses some of the information and advice found in the text of the report.

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 2, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  2. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting Atlanta, Georgia - March 16-18, 2011 May 2011 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

  3. Assessments InfoCenter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessments InfoCenter Assessments InfoCenter The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) enterprise assessment programs provide line management, Congress, and other stakeholders with an independent evaluation of safety, emergency management, security and cyber performance and programs to ensure these, and other critical areas as directed by the Secretary of Energy, are appropriately addressed. Assessment related information is made available to DOE senior management and stakeholders, such as

  4. EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines December 18, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis ...

  5. DOE and Stakeholders Ponder Best Approach to Major HVAC&R Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Stakeholders Ponder Best Approach to Major HVAC&R Research Effort DOE and Stakeholders Ponder Best Approach to Major HVAC&R Research Effort January 15, 2016 - 11:27am Addthis...

  6. Advanced reactor safety program. Stakeholder interaction and feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H.; Smith, Curtis L.

    2014-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, we began discussions with our industry stakeholders on how to upgrade our safety analysis capabilities. The focus of these improvements would primarily be on advanced safety analysis capabilities that could help the nuclear industry analyze, understand, and better predict complex safety problems. The current environment in the DOE complex is such that recent successes in high performance computer modeling could lead the nuclear industry to benefit from these advances, as long as an effort to translate these advances into realistic applications is made. Upgrading the nuclear industry modeling analysis capabilities is a significant effort that would require substantial participation and coordination from all industry segments: research, engineering, vendors, and operations. We focus here on interactions with industry stakeholders to develop sound advanced safety analysis applications propositions that could have a positive impact on industry long term operation, hence advancing the state of nuclear safety.

  7. Energy Department Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy investments are tapping a vast resource of clean, baseload energy from the earth's heat, according to Douglas Hollett, Program Manager for the Department's Geothermal Technologies Office. Hollett addressed over 1,000 this week at the annual conference of the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) in Reno, Nevadathe industry's largest annual gathering of geothermal energy stakeholders in the nation.

  8. Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Energy Score: Program Update for Interested Stakeholders Joan Glickman Senior Advisor/Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy July 23, 2012 1 eere.energy.gov DOE's objectives for the Home Energy Score Program * Strengthen the home energy improvement market * Provide an affordable and credible means for homeowners to understand - their home's energy performance, - how their home compares to others in their area, and - how to improve its efficiency. * Build on and complement existing home

  9. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across U.S. Regions of the Western Interconnection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Demand response has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles for demand response that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study.

  10. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Wu, W. J.; Wang, J. D.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM₂̣₅) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM₂̣₅ concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM₂̣₅ and its gaseous precursors on PM₂̣₅ concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widely used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM₂̣₅ concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM₂̣₅ to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM₂̣₅ to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.

  11. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Wu, W. J.; et al

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM₂̣₅) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM₂̣₅ concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM₂̣₅ and its gaseous precursors on PM₂̣₅ concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widelymore » used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM₂̣₅ concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM₂̣₅ to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM₂̣₅ to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.« less

  12. Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. C. Nielsen

    2006-01-01

    During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

  13. Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; McKane, Aimee; Goli, Sasank; Therkelsen, Peter; Olsen, Daniel

    2012-01-18

    California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This,study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with

  14. Response Response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Attachment 7 Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent of Mentors that are People with Disabilities 9.00% Total number of Mentors (The count used to calculate the Mentor percentages) 252 Demographic Information Percent of Mentors Two or More Races Not reported Percent of White Mentors 63.00% Percent of Female Mentors 39.00% Percent of Male Mentors 61.00% Percent of Veteran Mentors 21.00% Percent of Asian American Mentors

  15. Non-Targeted Effects of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Risk Assessment and the Radiation Dose Response Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2009-11-01

    Radiation risks at low doses remain a hotly debated topic. Recent experimental advances in our understanding of effects occurring in the progeny of irradiated cells, and/or the non-irradiated neighbors of irradiated cells, i.e., non-targeted effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, have influenced this debate. The goal of this document is to summarize the current status of this debate and speculate on the potential impact of non-targeted effects on radiation risk assessment and the radiation dose response profile.

  16. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed responses to internal independent assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaus, P.S.

    1998-01-06

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to make critical decisions during fiscal year (FY) 1998 regarding privatization contracts for the treatment of Hanford tank waste. Specifically, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL), will make decisions related to proceeding with Phase 1 Privatization. In support of these decisions, the management and integration (M+I) contractor must be able to meet the requirements to support the Phase 1 privatization contractors. As part of the assessment of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) Readiness-To-Proceed (RTP), an independent review of their process and products was required by the RL letter of August 8, 1997. The Independent Review Team reviewed the adequacy of the planning that has been done by the M+I contractor to validate that, if the plans are carried out, there is reasonable assurance of success. Overall, the RTP Independent Review Team concluded that, if the planning by the M+I contractor team is carried out with adequate funding, there is reasonable assurance that the M+I contractor will be able to deliver waste to the privatization contractor for the duration of Phase 1. This conclusion was based on addressing the recommendations contained in the Independent Review Team`s Final Report and in the individual Criteria and Review Approach (CRA) forms completed during the assessment. The purpose of this report is to formally document the independent assessment and the RTP team responses to the Independent Review Team recommendations. It also provides closure logics for selected recommendations from a Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) internal assessment of the Technical Basis Review (TBR) packages. This report contains the RTP recommendation closure process (Section 2.0); the closure tables (Section 3.0) which provide traceability between each review team recommendation and its corresponding Project Hanford Management Contract closure logic; and two attachments that formally document the Independent Review Team

  17. Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders Breakout Session 3D-Building Market Confidence and Understanding III: Engaging Key Audiences in Bioenergy Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders Matt Merritt, Director, Public Relations, POET-DSM Advanced Biofuels merritt_biomass_2014.pdf (1.45 MB) More Documents & Publications Biomass

  18. ABSTRACT: The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hartwell

    2007-02-28

    Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies

  19. Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting- Tribal Data: Building the Bridge to New Capital

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Housing Assistance Council, the Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting will discuss effective strategies for tribally led data collection, ways to access and leverage new capital...

  20. Notice of an Open Meeting on February 26, 2013 of the Multi-stakeholde...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    data privacy multi-stakeholder process concerning the development of an Voluntary Code of Conduct for utility and third parties providing consumer energy use services. The meeting...

  1. Guidelines - A Primer for Communicating Effectively with NABIR Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Harding; B Metting; C Word; G Bilyard; G Hund; J Amaya; J Weber; S Gajewski; S Underriner; T Peterson

    1998-12-10

    This primer is a tool to help prepare scientists for meetings with stakeholders. It was prepared for staff involved with the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. It discusses why some efforts in science communication may succeed while others fail, provides methods of approaching group interactions about science that may better orient expert participants, and summarizes experience drawn from observations of @oups interacting about topics in bioremediation or the NABIR program. The primer also provides briez usefid models for interacting with either expert or non-expert groups. Finally, it identifies topical areas that may help scientists prepare for public meetings, based on the developers' ongoing research in science communication in public forums.

  2. European MSc Programs in Nuclear Sciences - To meet the Need of Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salbu, Brit; Skipperud, Lindis; Priest, Nick; Garelick, Hemda; Tamponnet, Christian; Mitchell, Peter

    2009-08-19

    A stakeholder needs assessment, carried out under the EU-EURAC and EU-ENEN II projects, clearly showed that, at the European level, there are a significant and constant need for post-graduates with skills in radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation dosimetry and environmental modelling and a smaller, but still important, demand for radiobiologists and bio-modellers. Most of these needs are from government organizations. If only the nuclear industry is considered, then the largest demand is for radiochemists and radiation protection dosimetrists. Given this spectrum of need and existing capacity in the areas of radiobiology it was concluded that the needs identified would be most efficiently met by three new degree programs: European MSc Radiation Protection European MSc Analytical Radiochemistry European MSc Radioecology. All three master programs would be developed using the framework provided by the Bologna Convention and the lecturing could be shared among specialist Scientists within a network of collaborating universities. Therefore, educational plans have been developed for the above MSc degrees. These plans envisage each degree comprising three modules that are common to all the degrees (3x10 ECTS credits), three specialist modules (3x10 ECTS credits) and a research project (1x60 ECTS credits). The courses should be aimed, not only to fill the identified European postgraduate education gap in radiological sciences, but also to provide a modular structure that is easily accessed by stakeholders for CPD training. It is anticipated that the European Masters will meet the academic training requirements of qualified 'experts', as defined by the European Commission and the IAEA. At the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB) a pilot MSc in Radioecology has successfully been initiated in collaboration with UK and France.

  3. Assessment of the response of spent fuel transports to malevolent acts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, R.P.

    1983-12-20

    This paper describes the results of a program conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the US Department of Energy to provide an experimental data base for more accurately assessing the radiological consequences from a hypothetical sabotage attack on a spent fuel shipping cask. The primary objectives of the program were limited to: (1) evaluating the effectiveness of selected high explosive devices (HED) in breaching full-size spent fuel casks, (2) quantifying and characterizing relevant aerosol properties of the released fuel, and (3) using the resulting experimental data to evaluate the radiological health consequences resulting from a hypothetical sabotage attack on a spent fuel shipping cask in a densely populated area. Subscale and full-scale experiments in conjunction with an analytical modeling study were performed to meet the programmatic objectives. The data from this program indicate that the Urban Studies greatly overestimated the impact of malevolent acts directed at spent fuel casks in urban environs. From that standpoint this work could be the basis of additional regulatory revisions of the NRC physical protection requirements. In a larger sense this work can also be the basis of more credible worst case analyses since it defines the actual result of an event which is well beyond any expectations of cask failures in accident environments. 5 references.

  4. Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.~I LALI i~E REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L.~ ~ -_77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r _________ rment of the Surveilance Prograrn of the High-Level Storage- Tanks at Hanford P. E WOOD Robert J. Catln, Deputy Directat - Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview Office of Environment MARCH 1980 Report to the U.S. Departrent of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment Washkngon, DC C March 27, 1980

  5. Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

    2011-07-01

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate

  6. Physical Protection of Spent Fuel Shipments: Resolution of Stakeholder Concerns Through Rulemaking - 12284

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, James D.; Halstead, Robert J.; Dilger, Fred

    2012-07-01

    In 1999, the State of Nevada brought its concerns about physical protection of current spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments, and future SNF shipments to a federal repository, before the NRC in a 1999 petition for rulemaking (PRM-73-10). In October 2010, the NRC published a rulemaking decision which would significantly strengthen physical protection of SNF in transit. The newest articulation of the rule (10 CFR 73.37) incorporates regulatory clarifications and security enhancements requested in Nevada's 1999 petition for rulemaking, codifies the findings of the Nuclear NRC and DOE consequence analyses into policy guidance documents and brings forward into regulations the agency and licensee experience gained since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although at present DOE SNF shipments would continue to be exempt from these NRC regulations, Nevada considers the rule to constitute a largely satisfactory resolution to stakeholder concerns raised in the original petition and in subsequent comments submitted to the NRC. This paper reviews the process of regulatory changes, assesses the specific improvements contained in the new rules and briefly describes the significance of the new rule in the context of a future national nuclear waste management program. Nevada's petition for rulemaking led to a generally satisfactory resolution of the State's concerns. The decade plus timeframe from petition to rulemaking conclusion saw a sea change in many aspects of the relevant issues - perhaps most importantly the attacks on 9/11 led to the recognition by regulatory bodies that a new threat environment exists wherein shipments of SNF and HLW pose a viable target for human initiated events. The State of Nevada has always considered security a critical concern for the transport of these highly radioactive materials. This was one of the primary reasons for the original rulemaking petition and subsequent advocacy by Nevada on related issues. NRC decisions on the majority of

  7. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities In Support Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment: Task 2.1.7 Permitting and Planning Fiscal Year 2012 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.; Judd, Chaeli R.; Blake, Kara M.

    2012-09-01

    This fiscal year 2012 year-end report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the MHK industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, NGOs, and industry. Objectives for 2.1.7 are the following: • To work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process. • To work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development. • To communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders. • To engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which are described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning As the MHK industry works with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit and license MHK technologies they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under 2.1.7 is to understand these varied interests, explore mechanisms to reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately identify pathways to reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  8. Advancing sustainable bioenergy: Evolving stakeholder interests and the relevance of research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy L [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bielicki, Dr Jeffrey M [University of Minnesota; Dodder, Rebecca [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kaplan, Ozge [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Miller, C. Andy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2013-01-01

    The sustainability of future bioenergy production rests on more than continual improvements in its environmental, economic, and social impacts. The emergence of new biomass feedstocks, an expanding array of conversion pathways, and expected increases in overall bioenergy production are connecting diverse technical, social, and policy communities. These stakeholder groups have different and potentially conflicting values and cultures, and therefore different goals and decision making processes. Our aim is to discuss the implications of this diversity for bioenergy researchers. The paper begins with a discussion of bioenergy stakeholder groups and their varied interests, and illustrates how this diversity complicates efforts to define and promote sustainable bioenergy production. We then discuss what this diversity means for research practice. Researchers, we note, should be aware of stakeholder values, information needs, and the factors affecting stakeholder decision making if the knowledge they generate is to reach its widest potential use. We point out how stakeholder participation in research can increase the relevance of its products, and argue that stakeholder values should inform research questions and the choice of analytical assumptions. Finally, we make the case that additional natural science and technical research alone will not advance sustainable bioenergy production, and that important research gaps relate to understanding stakeholder decision making and the need, from a broader social science perspective, to develop processes to identify and accommodate different value systems. While sustainability requires more than improved scientific and technical understanding, the need to understand stakeholder values and manage diversity presents important research opportunities.

  9. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  10. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  11. Embedding climate change risk assessment within a governance context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2011-01-01

    Climate change adaptation is increasingly being framed in the context of climate risk management. This has contributed to the proliferation of climate change vulnerability and/or risk assessments as means of supporting institutional decision-making regarding adaptation policies and measures. To date, however, little consideration has been given to how such assessment projects and programs interact with governance systems to facilitate or hinder the implementation of adaptive responses. An examination of recent case studies involving Australian local governments reveals two key linkages between risk assessment and the governance of adaptation. First, governance systems influence how risk assessment processes are conducted, by whom they are conducted, and whom they are meant to inform. Australia s governance system emphasizes evidence-based decision-making that reinforces a knowledge deficit model of decision support. Assessments are often carried out by external experts on behalf of local government, with limited participation by relevant stakeholders and/or civil society. Second, governance systems influence the extent to which the outputs from risk assessment activities are translated into adaptive responses and outcomes. Technical information regarding risk is often stranded by institutional barriers to adaptation including poor uptake of information, competition on the policy agenda, and lack of sufficient entitlements. Yet, risk assessments can assist in bringing such barriers to the surface, where they can be debated and resolved. In fact, well-designed risk assessments can contribute to multi-loop learning by institutions, and that reflexive problem orientation may be one of the more valuable benefits of assessment.

  12. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C

    2009-01-16

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

  13. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS, AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - 11052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C.; Flora, M.; Belencan, H.

    2010-11-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical Separation Facilities (canyons).

  14. DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Smart Grid Technologies | Department of Energy Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies February 12, 2013 - 3:53pm Addthis DOE's Office of Electricy Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) issued a notice of an open meeting on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 (9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET) of the smart grid data privacy multi-stakeholder

  15. Demand Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demand Response Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee ...

  16. Clean Cities Coordinators and Stakeholders Awarded at the Green Fleet Conference and Expo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the 2013 Green Fleet Conference and Expo, a number of Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders received awards for their dedication to increasing the environmental sustainability of vehicle fleets.

  17. The value of adding regional to local stakeholder involvement in evaluating the acceptability of innovative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Patricia, S.

    1995-12-01

    Technology is urgently needed to clean up contamination by volatile organic compounds at United States Department of Energy (DOE) and industrial sites throughout the country. In many cases, however, existing technology is too slow, inefficient, or expensive. The record of technology development is similarly disappointing. Remediation technologies developed at great expense and evaluated piecemeal over long periods have not been deployed because, in the end, the public judged them ineffective or unacceptable. The need for remediation is too great and resources too limited to continue with ineffective technology evaluation. Early and continuing stakeholder involvement is essential to developing successful, deployable technologies. In order to make good decisions about which technologies to deploy, remedial project managers need to know stakeholders` requirements for the performance of proposed technologies. Expanding stakeholder involvement regionally identifies the concerns of a broad range of stakeholders at a arid DOE sites throughout the West - issues that must be taken into account if technologies are to be accepted for wide deployment.

  18. Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach March Webinar: Wind Energy and Property Values

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative will host a webinar presenting the topic of wind turbines and property values. Lead author Carol Atkinson-Palombo, assistant professor at the...

  19. Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA (DOE, 2016)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents.  This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

  20. Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA (DOE, 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents.  This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

  1. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Talks with SRS Workforce, Meets with Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz recently visited the Savannah River Site (SRS), where he toured facilities, spoke with the site’s workforce, and met with stakeholders from surrounding communities in South Carolina and Georgia.

  2. Industry Stakeholder Recommendations for DOE's RD&D for Increasing Energy Efficiency in Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plympton, P.; Dagher, L.; Zwack, B.

    2007-06-01

    This technical report documents feedback for Industry Stakeholders on the direction of future U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development in the area of improving energy efficiency in existing residential buildings.

  3. TH-E-BRF-07: Raman Spectroscopy for Radiation Treatment Response Assessment in a Lung Metastases Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devpura, S; Barton, K; Brown, S; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Sethi, S; Klein, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Raman spectroscopy is an optical spectroscopic method used to probe chemical information about a target tissue. Our goal was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy is able to distinguish lung tumors from normal lung tissue and whether this technique can identify the molecular changes induced by radiation. Methods: 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into the flanks of 6 Balb/C female mice. Four additional mice were used as “normal lung” controls. After 14 days, 3 mice bearing tumors received 6Gy to the left lung with 6MV photons and the other three were treated as “unirradiated tumor” controls. At a 24-hour time point, lungs were excised and the specimens were sectioned using a cryostat; alternating sections were either stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) for evaluation by a pathologist or unstained for Raman measurements. 240 total Raman spectra were collected; 84 from normal lung controls; 63 from unirradiated tumors and 64 from tumors irradiated with 6Gy in a single fraction. Raman spectra were also collected from normal lung tissues of mice with unirradiated tumors. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) were performed to analyze the data. Results: Raman bands assignable to DNA/RNA showed prominent contributions in tumor tissues while Raman bands associated with hemoglobin showed strong contributions in normal lung tissue. PCA/DFA analysis identified normal lung tissue and tumor with 100% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively, relative to pathologic scoring. Additionally, normal lung tissues from unirradiated mice bearing tumors were classified as normal with 100% accuracy. In a model consisting of unirradiated and irradiated tumors identification accuracy was 79.4% and 93.8% respectively, relative to pathologic assessment. Conclusion: Initial results demonstrate the promise for Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis normal vs. lung metastases as well as the assessment of

  4. 2012 Congestion Study Webinars to Present Preliminary Findings and Receive Input from Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host three webinars in August 2012 to present the preliminary findings of the 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study and to receive input and suggestions from state officials, industry representatives, and other stakeholders. Two of the webinars will be designed to discuss with state officials the initial findings of the DOE 2012 congestion analysis. The third webinar will be for industry representatives and other interested parties, although stakeholders may dial into any of the three meetings.

  5. Developing stakeholder understanding, technical capability, and responsibility: The New Bedford Harbor Superfund Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finney, C.; Polk, R.E.

    1995-11-01

    The community of New Bedford, Massachusetts, site of one of the world`s worst underwater polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) dumps, is undergoing a second attempt to choose the method for the first phase of the harbor Superfund site clean-up. The first attempt, which some termed a ``model public participation process,`` ended unfruitfully when the larger community rejected the selected remedy. The authors examine how a new effort -- the ongoing New Bedford Harbor Superfund Forum -- is working to instill in its participants the technical understanding and capability to assist in the selection of a remedy, as well as creating a larger sense of community ownership that will outlive the process. This article briefly reviews the first attempt at public participation and the factors that contributed to its dissolution, and then examines the current forum and the changes that increase the likelihood of the community accepting the forum`s recommendation.

  6. Community assessments: Road maps to successful public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, C.J.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a framework for performing comprehensive community assessments to increase the effectiveness of public involvement efforts. The community assessment process involves systematic and critical examination of beliefs, attitudes, opinions and knowledge of the many groups in the community. A good community assessment gathers information on the concerns or issues directly related to an environmental project as well as other important community issues to ensure development of an effective public involvement program. The framework discusses types of people and organizations that should be included in the community assessment interview process. It also delineates steps that persons charged with performing assessments can take to ensure that the views of all potential stakeholders are included--a necessary consideration in communities that are ethnically, racially, or economically diverse. Lastly, the framework discusses types of written materials that can be analyzed for additional insight into communities. For example, it discusses methods for reviewing past issues of the local newspaper to provide both validation of the information gathered during interviews and an understanding of the ways that community members give and receive information and respond to conflict or perceived threats. This framework is designed to show environmental professionals who are responsible for public involvement how to perform an initial community assessment. It provides illustrations of instances in which information vital to a successful public involvement effort has been uncovered through a careful assessment of the community. Both the U.S. EPA and the public have made clear their intentions to require increased public involvement. Many of these efforts will succeed or fail based on how well those charged with the public involvement component of environmental projects identify community issues and design communications programs that successfully reach all stakeholders.

  7. Consent Versus Consensus - Stakehold Involvement in the Identification of Necessary and Sufficient Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    2003-03-01

    Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide for the protection of the public and the environment; historically these regulations have proven quite sufficient. Even so, when the Department of Energy (DOE) makes radioactive materials shipments, that are deemed to be a major federal activity, regulations under the National Environmental Policy Act require that public input on safety issues be sought. This requirement leads to interactions with State, Tribal and local stakeholders that often result in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements requirements beyond those prescribed by DOT and NRC regulations. Unfortunately, these additional requirements virtually always increase costs and delay schedules, and usually do so without significantly increasing, and possibly even decreasing overall transportation safety. We believe that this problem arises because of efforts to achieve stakeholder consensus rather than stakeholder consent, where consensus connotes universal agreement with all aspects of the program, while consent, as used here, is simple agreement with the overall course of action. Gaining consensus entails extensive negotiations because all aspects and requirements of the project must be agreed to by each stakeholder. Gaining consent, on the other hand, requires only that stakeholders be satisfied that the project, as planned, provides adequately for their safety needs. This article addresses the issue of consent versus consensus and proposes a systematic, decision science process for reaching consent. Key steps in this proposed process are early identification and involvement of stakeholders, compilation of their concerns, perceptions, needs, causes, and translation of that information into an appropriate set of derived requirements. These derived requirements, along with already-established DOT and NRC regulatory requirements, form the necessary and sufficient conditions for safe transportation and for obtaining

  8. Office of Emergency Management Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Management Assessments Office of Emergency Management Assessments MISSION The Office of Emergency Management Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on emergency management programs and performance. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for improvement to our leadership to support the safe performance of the Department's mission. FUNCTIONS Conducts oversight of the adequacy of DOE emergency

  9. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William T. Hartwell

    2007-05-21

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

  10. A Multidisciplinary Paradigm and Approach to Protecting Human Health and the Environment, Society, and Stakeholders at Nuclear Facilities - 12244

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Clarke, James; Powers, Charles W.; Kosson, David

    2012-07-01

    As the Department of Energy (DOE) continues to remediate its lands, and to consider moving toward long-term stewardship and the development of energy parks on its industrial, remediated land, it is essential to adequately characterize the environment around such facilities to protect society, human health, and the environment. While DOE sites re considering several different land-use scenarios, all of them require adequate protection of the environment. Even if DOE lands are developed for energy parks that are mainly for industrializes sections of DOE lands that will not be remediated to residential standards, there is still the need to consider the protection of human health and the environment. We present an approach to characterization and establishment of teams that will gather the information, and integrate that information for a full range of stakeholders from technical personnel, to public policy makers, and that public. Such information is needed to establish baselines, site new energy facilities in energy parks, protect existing nuclear facilities and nuclear wastes, improve the basis for emergency planning, devise suitable monitoring schemes to ensure continued protection, provide data to track local and regional response changes, and for mitigation, remediation and decommissioning planning. We suggest that there are five categories of information or data needs, including 1) geophysical, sources, fate and transport, 2) biological systems, 3) human health, 4) stakeholder and environmental justice, and 5) societal, economic, and political. These informational needs are more expansive than the traditional site characterization, but encompass a suite of physical, biological, and societal needs to protect all aspects of human health and the environment, not just physical health. We suggest a Site Committee be established that oversees technical teams for each of the major informational categories, with appropriate representation among teams and with a broad

  11. Success stories? an analysis of stakeholder involvement in the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Kelly, C.; Forbes, E.

    1995-12-01

    In several studies conducted by the Office of Environmental Management, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun its first analysis of the benefits of stakeholder involvement. The studies seek to determine how public participation in DOE activities has contributed to cost savings, has changed the course of action for environmental projects, and has influenced the priorities of a national environmental program. This presentation will discuss the results and conclusions of following three studies: Stakeholder Survey of Trust and Confidence; the Success Stories study; and the Site-Specific Advisory Board Evaluation. These studies are taking their data from environmental management projects at Department of Energy sites throughout the United States. The studies of stakeholder involvement are currently analyzing the role of several variables in stakeholder involvement including the climate surrounding the environmental project or decision, the strategies used by DOE, the nature of the actual interactions, the attempts to reach consensus among interested parties, the role played by primary decision-makers, the goals set by the Department or by its stakeholders, and the revision of strategies during the stakeholder involvement process. Based on this analysis the planning and execution of future stakeholder involvement activities in Environmental Management will be improved. The study goal of establishing a set of factors that characterize successful stakeholder involvement within the Environmental Management program, will allow inference as to stakeholder involvement in other Federal and private environmental projects.

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2010-01-22

    Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

  13. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines December 17, 2015 - 9:48am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) have released a request for information (RFI) titled "Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines" (Optima). BETO and VTO are

  14. Integration of MEA Components-Status and Technology Gaps: A Stakeholder's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspective | Department of Energy MEA Components-Status and Technology Gaps: A Stakeholder's Perspective Integration of MEA Components-Status and Technology Gaps: A Stakeholder's Perspective Presentation from U.S. DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop March 16-17, 2010 Denver, CO fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_mar10_debe.pdf (594.7 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE 2010 Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop Agenda DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 5:

  15. Office Civilian Waste Management Transportation Institutional Program Update on Collaborative Efforts with Key Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Saris; P. Austin; J.J. Offner

    2004-12-29

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) created the Office of National Transportation in 2003 recognizing the need to revitalize and accelerate development of the transportation system. The Department has made a commitment to work through a collaborative planning process before developing specific policies and procedures and making transportation decisions. OCRWM has begun to build the institutional framework to support development of this transportation system. Interactions with stakeholders have been initiated. The authors describe the key stakeholders, identified issues, regional and national planning activities, and mechanisms for interaction.

  16. EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines EERE Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines December 18, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) have released a request for information (RFI) titled "Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines" (Optima). BETO and VTO are

  17. Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Childers

    2011-03-30

    Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

  18. Assessing Sources of Stress to Aquatic Ecosystems: Using Biomarkers and Bioindicators to Characterize Exodure-Response Profiles of Anthropogenic Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, S.M.

    1999-03-29

    Establishing causal relationships between sources of environmental stressors and aquatic ecosystem health if difficult because of the many biotic and abiotic factors which can influence or modify responses of biological systems to stress, the orders of magnitude involved in extrapolation over both spatial and temporal scales, and compensatory mechanisms such as density-dependent responses that operate in populations. To address the problem of establishing causality between stressors and effects on aquatic systems, a diagnostic approach, based on exposure-response profiles for various anthropogenic activities, was developed to help identify sources of stress responsible for effects on aquatic systems at ecological significant levels of biological organization (individual, population, community). To generate these exposure-effects profiles, biomarkers of exposure were plotted against bioindicators of corresponding effects for several major anthropogenic activities including petrochemical , pulp and paper, domestic sewage, mining operations, land-development activities, and agricultural activities. Biomarkers of exposure to environmental stressors varied depending on the type of anthropogenic activity involved. Bioindicator effects, however, including histopathological lesions, bioenergetic status, individual growth, reproductive impairment, and community-level responses were similar among many of the major anthropogenic activities. This approach is valuable to help identify and diagnose sources of stressors in environments impacted by multiple stressors. By identifying the types and sources of environmental stressors, aquatic ecosystems can be more effectively protected and managed to maintain acceptable levels of environmental quality and ecosystem fitness.

  19. Climate Change Scenario Planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder Involvement in the Decision-Making Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decision-making process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  20. Climate change scenario planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decisionmaking process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  1. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Tribal Consultation and Stakeholder Outreach Session: Kotzebue

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  2. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on Achieving High Yields from Algal Feedstocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has released a Request for Information (RFI) titled “High Yields through Productivity and Integration Research.” BETO is seeking input from industry, academia, and other stakeholders regarding supply systems and services for the cultivation, logistics, and preprocessing of algal feedstocks.

  3. BETO Seeks Stakeholder Input on the Use of Advanced Biofuel Blends in Small Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office has released a Request for Information (RFI) seeking stakeholder input on the following topics related to the use of advanced biofuel blends in small engines

  4. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Dutch Harbor/Unalaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the second round of tribal consultations and stakeholder outreach meetings on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region (NSAR), 10-Year Plan to accelerate renewable energy deployment in the Arctic Region.

  5. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Pathways to Clean Cities: A Stakeholder – Government Engagement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will be taking part in the "Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Pathways to Clean Cities: A Stakeholder – Government Engagement" on May 20 as part of the annual meeting of the International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy (IPHE).

  6. Assessing the assessments: Pharmaceuticals in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enick, O.V. Moore, M.M.

    2007-11-15

    The relatively new issue of pharmaceutical contamination of the environment offers the opportunity to explore the application of values to the construction, communication and management of risk. The still-developing regulatory policies regarding environmental contamination with pharmaceuticals provide fertile ground for the introduction of values into the definition and management of risk. In this report, we summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmaceutical contamination of the environment and discuss specific attributes of pharmaceuticals that require special consideration. We then present an analysis showing that if values are incorporated into assessing, characterizing and managing risk, the results of risk assessments will more accurately reflect the needs of various stakeholders. Originating from an acknowledgement of the inherent uncertainty and value-laden nature of risk assessment, the precautionary principle (and later, the multi-criteria, integrated risk assessment), provides a direction for further research and policy development.

  7. DCE-MRI defined subvolumes of a brain metastatic lesion by principle component analysis and fuzzy-c-means clustering for response assessment of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue; Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Med Inn Building C478, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a pharmacokinetic modelfree framework to analyze the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data for assessment of response of brain metastases to radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with 45 analyzable brain metastases had MRI scans prior to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and at the end of the 2-week therapy. The volumetric DCE images covering the whole brain were acquired on a 3T scanner with approximately 5 s temporal resolution and a total scan time of about 3 min. DCE curves from all voxels of the 45 brain metastases were normalized and then temporally aligned. A DCE matrix that is constructed from the aligned DCE curves of all voxels of the 45 lesions obtained prior to WBRT is processed by principal component analysis to generate the principal components (PCs). Then, the projection coefficient maps prior to and at the end of WBRT are created for each lesion. Next, a pattern recognition technique, based upon fuzzy-c-means clustering, is used to delineate the tumor subvolumes relating to the value of the significant projection coefficients. The relationship between changes in different tumor subvolumes and treatment response was evaluated to differentiate responsive from stable and progressive tumors. Performance of the PC-defined tumor subvolume was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in prediction of nonresponsive lesions and compared with physiological-defined tumor subvolumes. Results: The projection coefficient maps of the first three PCs contain almost all response-related information in DCE curves of brain metastases. The first projection coefficient, related to the area under DCE curves, is the major component to determine response while the third one has a complimentary role. In ROC analysis, the area under curve of 0.88 0.05 and 0.86 0.06 were achieved for the PC-defined and physiological-defined tumor subvolume in response assessment. Conclusions: The PC

  8. DCE-MRI defined subvolumes of a brain metastatic lesion by principle component analysis and fuzzy-c-means clustering for response assessment of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a pharmacokinetic modelfree framework to analyze the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data for assessment of response of brain metastases to radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with 45 analyzable brain metastases had MRI scans prior to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and at the end of the 2-week therapy. The volumetric DCE images covering the whole brain were acquired on a 3T scanner with approximately 5 s temporal resolution and a total scan time of about 3 min. DCE curves from all voxels of the 45 brain metastases were normalized and then temporally aligned. A DCE matrix that is constructed from the aligned DCE curves of all voxels of the 45 lesions obtained prior to WBRT is processed by principal component analysis to generate the principal components (PCs). Then, the projection coefficient maps prior to and at the end of WBRT are created for each lesion. Next, a pattern recognition technique, based upon fuzzy-c-means clustering, is used to delineate the tumor subvolumes relating to the value of the significant projection coefficients. The relationship between changes in different tumor subvolumes and treatment response was evaluated to differentiate responsive from stable and progressive tumors. Performance of the PC-defined tumor subvolume was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in prediction of nonresponsive lesions and compared with physiological-defined tumor subvolumes. Results: The projection coefficient maps of the first three PCs contain almost all response-related information in DCE curves of brain metastases. The first projection coefficient, related to the area under DCE curves, is the major component to determine response while the third one has a complimentary role. In ROC analysis, the area under curve of 0.88 ± 0.05 and 0.86 ± 0.06 were achieved for the PC-defined and physiological-defined tumor subvolume in response assessment. Conclusions: The PC

  9. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  10. National technology needs assessment for the preparation and implementation of climate change action plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkel, C.W.M. van; Blonk, T.J.; Westra, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) it is recognised that developed countries have a responsibility in assisting developing countries and countries in economic transition in building a national capacity for the development, acquisition and transfer of Climate-related Technologies (CTs). Such assistance is most likely to be successful once it is tailored to the results of a sound assessment of the country`s development needs and once the results of this assessment have been endorsed by the most important stakeholders in the country. Recent insight in the opportunities and constraints for National (technology) Needs Assessments (NNAs) as planning tool for both capacity building and technology transfer regarding Environmentally Sound Technologies (ESTs) is applied here to propose a participatory Climate Change Action Planning (CCAP) process. This participatory planning process is thought to serve the dual objective of defining a national Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) while at the same time contributing to the creation of a broad supportive basis for its acceptance and implementation among stakeholders in the developing country.

  11. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  12. The National Response Plan and the Problems in the Evaluation and Assessment of the Unconventional Modes of Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMone, David V.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Winston, John W. Jr.

    2006-07-01

    In the wake of the events of 9/11, a presidential mandate ordered the development of a master plan to enable governmental agencies to not only seamlessly cooperate but also rapidly react to disasters. The National Response Plan (NRP) is the document in force (December 2004). It was developed to provide a framework for response to catastrophic events whether those events are natural or man-made. Homeland Security, the coordinating entity, is an integral and critical part of that plan. The NRP is a direct outgrowth of the Initial National Response Plan and operates in tandem with the National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS was the first real attempt to amalgamate the capabilities and resources of some 22 governmental entities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector. The effectiveness of this system's response to natural disasters has been tested with reference to its performance during the 2005 late summer-early fall series of catastrophic hurricanes (Katrina, Rita, and Wilma). Ongoing evaluation of the response by the system indicates that there are significant lessons to be learned from system errors that occurred from the federal to local levels of government. Nevertheless, the conclusion would seem to be that Homeland Security's organizational structure of NIMS combined with protocols developed in the NRP represents an excellent response to both natural and man-made catastrophes. The lessons learned in these natural occurrences (chain of command failures and missteps from first responders to national level, periodic inaccurate and irresponsible news reporting, evacuation capabilities, quarantine problems, etc.) are directly applicable to potential man-made disaster events. In the yet largely untested areas of man-made disasters, the NRP document forms the basis for responding to terrorism as well as accidental man-made related incidents. There are two major categories of terrorism: conventional and unconventional. Conventional

  13. Assessment of uncertainties in the response of the African monsoon precipitation to land use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  14. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  15. Development of an objective questionnaire to assess perception, concern, and knowledge of, and attention and response to, the threat of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulman, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to the subject objective, the relationship of specified personality variables (i.e., trait anxiety, locus of control, response tendency towards threat, and denial) to behavioral and psychological responses to the threat of nuclear war were assessed. The quantitative questionnaire, titled the Nuclear Reaction Scale, was composed of items selected from issues discussed in the psychological literature on the threat of nuclear war. These issues included: psychic numbing, cognitive reality, perceptions of likelihood and survival, nuclear illusions, and attention to the threat of nuclear war. A standardization sample of 360 college students was administered the Nuclear Reaction Scale, Trait Anxiety Scale, Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, Facilitation-Inhibition Scale, and Haan Denial Scale. Three additional subsamples, identified as Military, Nuclear Freeze, and Church, were given the Nuclear Reaction Scale to assess the validity of the scale. A factor analysis of the Nuclear Reaction Scale indicated a nine-factor solution that described issues such as concern perceptions, likelihood, survivability, and control over the threat of nuclear war. A number of strong relationships existed between computed factors on the Nuclear Reaction Scale. Demographic comparisons found significant differences related to sex and political affiliation.

  16. Assessment of uncertainties in the response of the African monsoon precipitation to land use change simulated by a regional model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubsmore » and an increase in surface air temperature.« less

  17. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

    2010-01-01

    Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

  18. Fuel Cell Technologies Program FY 2013 Budget Request Rollout to Stakeholders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2013 Budget Request Rollout Washington, DC FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM FY 2013 Budget Request Rollout to Stakeholders Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager February 14, 2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel cell patent growth reflects level of investment in emerging, promising industry  DOE's efforts in fuel cells and hydrogen are spurring innovation throughout the industry. Clean Energy

  19. Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) External Stakeholders Workshop: Workshop Proceedings, 9 October 2008, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komomua, C.; Kroposki, B.; Mooney, D.; Stoffel, T.; Parsons, B.; Hammond, S.; Kutscher, C.; Remick, R.; Sverdrup, G.; Hawsey, R.; Pacheco, M.

    2009-01-01

    On October 9, 2008, NREL hosted a workshop to provide an opportunity for external stakeholders to offer insights and recommendations on the design and functionality of DOE's planned Energy Systems Infrastructure Facility (ESIF). The goal was to ensure that the planning for the ESIF effectively addresses the most critical barriers to large-scale energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) deployment. This technical report documents the ESIF workshop proceedings.

  20. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  1. Implementing Stakeholders' Access to Expertise: Experimenting on Nuclear Installations' Safety Cases - 12160

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilli, Ludivine; Charron, Sylvie

    2012-07-01

    In 2009 and 2010, the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (IRSN) led two pilot actions dealing with nuclear installations' safety cases. One concerned the periodical review of the French 900 MWe nuclear reactors, the other concerned the decommissioning of a workshop located on the site of Areva's La Hague fuel-reprocessing plant site in Northwestern France. The purpose of both these programs was to test ways for IRSN and a small number of stakeholders (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) members, local elected officials, etc.) to engage in technical discussions. The discussions were intended to enable the stakeholders to review future applications and provide valuable input. The test cases confirmed there is a definite challenge in successfully opening a meaningful dialogue to discuss technical issues, in particular the fact that most expertise reports were not public and the conflict that exists between the contrary demands of transparency and confidentiality of information. The test case also confirmed there are ways to further improvement of stakeholders' involvement. (authors)

  2. Stakeholder identification of advanced technology opportunities at international ports of entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, S.K.; Icerman, L.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Technologies for International and Intermodal Ports of Entry (ATIPE) Project, a diverse group of stakeholders was engaged to help identify problems experienced at inland international border crossings, particularly those at the US-Mexican border. The fundamental issue at international ports of entry is reducing transit time through the required documentation and inspection processes. Examples of other issues or problems, typically manifested as time delays at border crossings, repeatedly mentioned by stakeholders include: (1) lack of document standardization; (2) failure to standardize inspection processes; (3) inadequate information and communications systems; (4) manual fee and tariff collection; (5) inconsistency of processes and procedures; and (6) suboptimal cooperation among governmental agencies. Most of these issues can be addressed to some extent by the development of advanced technologies with the objective of allowing ports of entry to become more efficient while being more effective. Three categories of technologies were unambiguously of high priority to port of entry stakeholders: (1) automated documentation; (2) systems integration; and (3) vehicle and cargo tracking. Together, these technologies represent many of the technical components necessary for pre-clearance of freight approaching international ports of entry. Integration of vehicle and cargo tracking systems with port of entry information and communications systems, as well as existing industry legacy systems, should further enable border crossings to be accomplished consistently with optimal processing times.

  3. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo ; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  4. Assessment of Geothermal Data Resources and Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a review of Geothermal Technologies Program activities and archives related to data collection and analysis. It includes an assessment of the current state of geothermal data, future program and stakeholder data needs, existence of and access to critical data, and high-level direction and prioritization of next steps to meet the Program’s data needs.

  5. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

  6. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological program assessment services Minimizing the risk of human exposure to hazardous levels of radioactive materials requires designing a comprehensive safety program that ensures appropriate measures are taken to protect workers and the public. As a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) institute, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) understands the importance of having an effective safety program in place to assure stakeholders and regulators that your radiological

  7. EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input (2015)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard [FFRMS] and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input (2015) amends E.O. 11988,...

  8. EO 13690 (2015): Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard [FFRMS] and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input (2015) amends E.O. 11988,...

  9. Memorandum: Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, Regulators, and Tribal Governments in EM FY 2013 Budget Request

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Dae Y. Chung, Principle Deputy Assistant Secretary for EM (EM-2) Subject: Guidance for Participation of the EM SSAB, Stakeholders, Regulators, and Tribal Governments in EM FY 2013 Budget Request

  10. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.