National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for assess institutional framework

  1. Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Nepal-UNEP Green Economy Advisory Services Nicaragua-Joint Programme on Resource...

  2. Legal and institutional framework of environmental impact assessment in Nigeria: An initial assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olokesusi, F.

    1998-03-01

    Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, has high rates of urbanization and industrialization. Until recently, decisions on most large-scale projects such as expressways, harbors, industries, dams, and irrigation were considered with an emphasis on traditional technical and cost-benefit analysis. Spurred by massive environmental degradation and persistent community agitation in oil producing areas, environmental impact assessment (EIA) legislation was passed in late 1992. The main purpose of this article is to review and assess the content of this legislation and the guidelines produced by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA), the institution responsible for EIA administration. Some EIA reports have been prepared and reviewed by FEPA since 1994. There are some positive outcomes and expectations, but some problems have been identified as well, including: deliberate restriction of public involvement and participation by proponents and/or their consultants, interagency conflict leading to high cost and project delays especially in the oil industry, and restriction of public access to final EIA reports. These are discussed, and recommendations for improving the process are made.

  3. Performance Assessment Institute-NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Joesph

    2012-12-31

    The National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment’s intention is to purchase a multi-purpose computer cluster in support of the Performance Assessment Institute (PA Institute). The PA Institute will serve as a research consortium located in Las Vegas Nevada with membership that includes: national laboratories, universities, industry partners, and domestic and international governments. This center will provide a one-of-a-kind centralized facility for the accumulation of information for use by Institutions of Higher Learning, the U.S. Government, and Regulatory Agencies and approved users. This initiative will enhance and extend High Performance Computing (HPC) resources in Nevada to support critical national and international needs in "scientific confirmation". The PA Institute will be promoted as the leading Modeling, Learning and Research Center worldwide. The program proposes to utilize the existing supercomputing capabilities and alliances of the University of Nevada Las Vegas as a base, and to extend these resource and capabilities through a collaborative relationship with its membership. The PA Institute will provide an academic setting for interactive sharing, learning, mentoring and monitoring of multi-disciplinary performance assessment and performance confirmation information. The role of the PA Institute is to facilitate research, knowledge-increase, and knowledge-sharing among users.

  4. Small Modular Reactors: Institutional Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Perkowski, Ph.D.

    2012-06-01

    ? Objectives include, among others, a description of the basic development status of “small modular reactors” (SMRs) focused primarily on domestic activity; investigation of the domestic market appeal of modular reactors from the viewpoints of both key energy sector customers and also key stakeholders in the financial community; and consideration of how to proceed further with a pro-active "core group" of stakeholders substantially interested in modular nuclear deployment in order to provide the basis to expedite design/construction activity and regulatory approval. ? Information gathering was via available resources, both published and personal communications with key individual stakeholders; published information is limited to that already in public domain (no confidentiality); viewpoints from interviews are incorporated within. Discussions at both government-hosted and private-hosted SMR meetings are reflected herein. INL itself maintains a neutral view on all issues described. Note: as per prior discussion between INL and CAP, individual and highly knowledgeable senior-level stakeholders provided the bulk of insights herein, and the results of those interviews are the main source of the observations of this report. ? Attachment A is the list of individual stakeholders consulted to date, including some who provided significant earlier assessments of SMR institutional feasibility. ? Attachments B, C, and D are included to provide substantial context on the international status of SMR development; they are not intended to be comprehensive and are individualized due to the separate nature of the source materials. Attachment E is a summary of the DOE requirements for winning teams regarding the current SMR solicitation. Attachment F deserves separate consideration due to the relative maturity of the SMART SMR program underway in Korea. Attachment G provides illustrative SMR design features and is intended for background. Attachment H is included for overview

  5. Risk assessment as a framework for decisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert Paul; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Borns, David James

    2010-12-01

    The risk assessment approach has been applied to support numerous radioactive waste management activities over the last 30 years. A risk assessment methodology provides a solid and readily adaptable framework for evaluating the risks of CO2 sequestration in geologic formations to prioritize research, data collection, and monitoring schemes. This paper reviews the tasks of a risk assessment, and provides a few examples related to each task. This paper then describes an application of sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters to reduce the uncertainty in the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive waste repository, which because of importance of the geologic barrier, is similar to CO2 sequestration. The paper ends with a simple stochastic analysis of idealized CO2 sequestration site with a leaking abandoned well and a set of monitoring wells in an aquifer above the CO2 sequestration unit in order to evaluate the efficacy of monitoring wells to detect adverse leakage.

  6. Market Assessment of Distributed Energy in New Commercial and Institutional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building and Critical Infrastructure Facilities, September 2006 | Department of Energy Market Assessment of Distributed Energy in New Commercial and Institutional Building and Critical Infrastructure Facilities, September 2006 Market Assessment of Distributed Energy in New Commercial and Institutional Building and Critical Infrastructure Facilities, September 2006 Potential benefits of distributed energy, or distributed generation, include reduced grid congestion, increased overall

  7. Renewed Importance of the Mound Site Annual Institutional Controls Assessments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) completed its 2014 annual institutional controls (IC) assessment of the Mound site in Miamisburg, Ohio, and confirmed that the...

  8. Kyiv institutional buildings sector energy efficiency program: Technical assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secrest, T.J.; Freeman, S.L.; Popelka, A.; Shestopal, P.A.; Gagurin, E.V.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to characterize the economic energy efficiency potential and investment requirements for space heating and hot water provided by district heat in the stock of state and municipal institutional buildings in the city of Kyiv. The assessment involves three activities. The first is a survey of state and municipal institutions to characterize the stock of institutional buildings. The second is to develop an estimate of the cost-effective efficiency potential. The third is to estimate the investment requirements to acquire the efficiency resource. Institutional buildings are defined as nonresidential buildings owned and occupied by state and municipal organizations. General categories of institutional buildings are education, healthcare, and cultural. The characterization activity provides information about the number of buildings, building floorspace, and consumption of space heating and hot water energy provided by the district system.

  9. Bringing Water into an Integrated Assessment Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Sands, Ronald; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2010-11-30

    We developed a modeling capability to understand how water is allocated within a river basin and examined present and future water allocations among agriculture, energy production, other human requirements, and ecological needs. Water is an essential natural resource needed for food and fiber production, household and industrial uses, energy production, transportation, tourism and recreation, and the functioning of natural ecosystems. Anthropogenic climate change and population growth are anticipated to impose unprecedented pressure on water resources during this century. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers have pioneered the development of integrated assessment (IA) models for the analysis of energy and economic systems under conditions of climate change. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort led to the development of a modeling capability to evaluate current and future water allocations between human requirements and ecosystem services. The Water Prototype Model (WPM) was built in STELLA, a computer modeling package with a powerful interface that enables users to construct dynamic models to simulate and integrate many processes (biological, hydrological, economics, sociological). A 150,404-km2 basin in the United States (U.S.) Pacific Northwest region served as the platform for the development of the WPM. About 60% of the study basin is in the state of Washington with the rest in Oregon. The Columbia River runs through the basin for 874 km, starting at the international border with Canada and ending (for the purpose of the simulation) at The Dalles dam. Water enters the basin through precipitation and from streamflows originating from the Columbia River at the international border with Canada, the Spokane River, and the Snake River. Water leaves the basin through evapotranspiration, consumptive uses (irrigation, livestock, domestic, commercial, mining, industrial, and off-stream power generation), and streamflow

  10. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoudi, Hossein; Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. ; Renn, Ortwin; Vanclay, Frank; Hoffmann, Volker; Karami, Ezatollah

    2013-11-15

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

  11. Institutional Design for Strategic Environmental Assessment on Urban Economic and Social Development Planning in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Guojun Zhou Li; Zhang Lei

    2011-11-15

    The National Economic and Social Development Plans (NESDPs) of cities in China, given their comprehensive, integrated and strategic nature, have significant and profound impacts on the development of cities and their embedded ecological environments. Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs) on city NESDPs have the potential to improve environmental policy integration at strategic level and to safeguard the sustainable development of cities. However, these plans are normally exempted from the current SEA requirement in China. We argue that it is more feasible to apply SEAs on city NESDPs before SEAs are expanded to higher level NESDPs in China. This article attempts to propose a China-specific institutional design for SEAs on city NESDPs based on experiments in selected cities and within the current legal framework. To obtain a holistic view about the long-term development of cities, more qualitative and descriptive analysis-based assessment methods should be adopted to broaden participation, to encourage the exchange of information and to reach consensus. - Highlights: > National Economic and Social Development Plans for Cities (NESDPs) in China is a very popular and significant decision made by municipal government. > We propose a institutional framework to conduct strategic environmental assessment to NESDPs. > The key features of the institutional framework are the independent SEA approval committee and a professional consulting agency.

  12. A Framework for Comparative Assessments of Energy Efficiency Policy Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Helcio; Atkinson, Barbara; Lekov, Alex

    2011-05-24

    When policy makers propose new policies, there is a need to assess the costs and benefits of the proposed policy measures, to compare them to existing and alternative policies, and to rank them according to their effectiveness. In the case of equipment energy efficiency regulations, comparing the effects of a range of alternative policy measures requires evaluating their effects on consumers budgets, on national energy consumption and economics, and on the environment. Such an approach should be able to represent in a single framework the particularities of each policy measure and provide comparable results. This report presents an integrated methodological framework to assess prospectively the energy, economic, and environmental impacts of energy efficiency policy measures. The framework builds on the premise that the comparative assessment of energy efficiency policy measures should (a) rely on a common set of primary data and parameters, (b) follow a single functional approach to estimate the energy, economic, and emissions savings resulting from each assessed measure, and (c) present results through a set of comparable indicators. This framework elaborates on models that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has used in support of its rulemakings on mandatory energy efficiency standards. In addition to a rigorous analysis of the impacts of mandatory standards, DOE compares the projected results of alternative policy measures to those projected to be achieved by the standards. The framework extends such an approach to provide a broad, generic methodology, with no geographic or sectoral limitations, that is useful for evaluating any type of equipment energy efficiency market intervention. The report concludes with a demonstration of how to use the framework to compare the impacts estimated for twelve policy measures focusing on increasing the energy efficiency of gas furnaces in the United States.

  13. Defining resilience within a risk-informed assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Holter, Gregory M.; Bass, Robert B.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-08-01

    The concept of resilience is the subject of considerable discussion in academic, business, and governmental circles. The United States Department of Homeland Security for one has emphasised the need to consider resilience in safeguarding critical infrastructure and key resources. The concept of resilience is complex, multidimensional, and defined differently by different stakeholders. The authors contend that there is a benefit in moving from discussing resilience as an abstraction to defining resilience as a measurable characteristic of a system. This paper proposes defining resilience measures using elements of a traditional risk assessment framework to help clarify the concept of resilience and as a way to provide non-traditional risk information. The authors show various, diverse dimensions of resilience can be quantitatively defined in a common risk assessment framework based on the concept of loss of service. This allows the comparison of options for improving the resilience of infrastructure and presents a means to perform cost-benefit analysis. This paper discusses definitions and key aspects of resilience, presents equations for the risk of loss of infrastructure function that incorporate four key aspects of resilience that could prevent or mitigate that loss, describes proposed resilience factor definitions based on those risk impacts, and provides an example that illustrates how resilience factors would be calculated using a hypothetical scenario.

  14. Gross national happiness as a framework for health impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, Michael; Ura, Karma

    2011-01-15

    The incorporation of population health concepts and health determinants into Health Impact Assessments has created a number of challenges. The need for intersectoral collaboration has increased; the meaning of 'health' has become less clear; and the distinctions between health impacts, environmental impacts, social impacts and economic impacts have become increasingly blurred. The Bhutanese concept of Gross National Happiness may address these issues by providing an over-arching evidence-based framework which incorporates health, social, environmental and economic contributors as well as a number of other key contributors to wellbeing such as culture and governance. It has the potential to foster intersectoral collaboration by incorporating a more limited definition of health which places the health sector as one of a number of contributors to wellbeing. It also allows for the examination of the opportunity costs of health investments on wellbeing, is consistent with whole-of-government approaches to public policy and emerging models of social progress.

  15. Review and analysis of the adequacy of the legal and institutional framework for geothermal development in Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R.G.

    1985-12-01

    The legal and institutional framework within which geothermal energy must develop has its origin in the early 1970s. In 1970, the Federal Geothermal Steam Act was passed into law and in 1974 the Washington State Geothermal Act was passed. The legal and institutional framework thus established by the state and federal governments differed substantially in format, content, and direction. In many instances, the legal and institutional framework established left as many questions unanswered as answered, and in some cases, the framework has proven to be more of an obstacle to development than an aid. From an examination of how the state and federal governments have addressed the varying needs of geothermal development and how the courts have interpreted some of their decisions, it is clear that in order to ensure that the legal and institutional framework is adequate to serve the needs of geothermal development, it must address, at a minimum, the following topics: (1) providing developers with access and a priority right to carry out exploration and development activities; (2) characterization of the resource so as to minimize conflicts with other natural resources; (3) establishing ownership; and (4) giving careful consideration to such lease terms as rentals and royalties, lease renewals, and diligence requirements. In addition, the framework must address groundwater law and its implications for geothermal development and how geothermal development will be considered in terms of establishing utility law. At the local level, it is imperative that geothermal be given careful consideration when decisions on resource management, zoning, and regulation are made. Local governments also have the power to establish programs which can provide substantial incentives for geothermal development and, by so doing, ensure that geothermal energy contributes to economic stability and growth.

  16. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  17. A framework for clarifying the meaning of Triple Bottom-Line, Integrated, and Sustainability Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacking, Theo Guthrie, Peter

    2008-02-15

    Terms such as Integrated Assessment and Sustainability Assessment are used to label 'new' approaches to impact assessment that are designed to direct planning and decision-making towards sustainable development (SD). Established assessment techniques, such as EIA and SEA, are also widely promoted as SD 'tools'. This paper presents the findings of a literature review undertaken to identify the features that are typically promoted for improving the SD-directedness of assessments. A framework is developed which reconciles the broad range of emerging approaches and tackles the inconsistent use of terminology. The framework comprises a three-dimensional space defined by the following axes: the comprehensiveness of the SD coverage; the degree of 'integration' of the techniques and themes; and the extent to which a strategic perspective is adopted. By applying the framework, assessment approaches can be positioned relative to one another, enabling comparison on the basis of substance rather than semantics.

  18. Assessing the Institution of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toomey, Christopher

    2010-05-14

    The nuclear nonproliferation regime is facing a crisis of effectiveness. During the Cold War, the regime was relatively effective in stemming the proliferation of nuclear weapons and building an institutional structure that could, under certain conditions, ensure continued success. However, in the evolving global context, the traditional approaches are becoming less appropriate. Globalization has introduced new sets of stresses on the nonproliferation regime, such as the rise of non-state actors, broadening extensity and intensity of supply chains, and the multipolarization of power. This evolving global context demands an analytical and political flexibility in order to meet future threats. Current institutional capabilities established during the Cold War are now insufficient to meet the nonproliferation regime’s current and future needs. The research was based on information gathered through interviews and reviews of the relevant literature, and two dominant themes emerged. First, that human security should be integrated into the regime to account for the rise of non-state actors and networked violence. Second, confidence in the regime’s overall effectiveness has eroded at a time where verification-based confidence is becoming more essential. The research postulates that a critical analysis of the regime that fully utilizes institutional theory, with its focus on rules, normative structures, and procedures will be essential to adapting the regime to the current global context, building mechanisms for generating trust, creating better enforcement, and providing flexibility for the future.

  19. A general framework for the assessment of solar fuel technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herron, JA; Kim, J; Upadhye, AA; Huber, GW; Maravelias, CT

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of carbon dioxide and water into fuels in a solar refinery presents a potential solution for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while providing a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Towards realizing such a solar refinery, there are many technological advances that must be met in terms of capturing and sourcing the feedstocks (namely CO2, H2O, and solar energy) and in catalytically converting CO2 and H2O. In the first part of this paper, we review the state-of-the-art in solar energy collection and conversion to solar utilities (heat, electricity, and as a photon source for photo-chemical reactions), CO2 capture and separation technology, and non-biological methods for converting CO2 and H2O to fuels. The two principal methods for CO2 conversion include (1) catalytic conversion using solar-derived hydrogen and (2) direct reduction of CO2 using H2O and solar energy. Both hydrogen production and direct CO2 reduction can be performed electro-catalytically, photo-electrochemically, photo-catalytically, and thermochemically. All four of these methods are discussed. In the second part of this paper, we utilize process modeling to assess the energy efficiency and economic feasibility of a generic solar refinery. The analysis demonstrates that the realization of a solar refinery is contingent upon significant technological improvements in all areas described above (solar energy capture and conversion, CO2 capture, and catalytic conversion processes).

  20. Ecological Risk Assessment Framework for Low-Altitude Overflights by Fixed-Wing and Rotary-Wing Military Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2001-01-12

    This is a companion report to the risk assessment framework proposed by Suter et al. (1998): ''A Framework for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources,'' hereafter referred to as the ''generic framework.'' The generic framework is an ecological risk assessment methodology for use in environmental assessments on Department of Defense (DoD) installations. In the generic framework, the ecological risk assessment framework of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1998) is modified for use in the context of (1) multiple and diverse stressors and activities at a military installation and (2) risks resulting from causal chains, e.g., effects on habitat that indirectly impact wildlife. Both modifications are important if the EPA framework is to be used on military installations. In order for the generic risk assessment framework to be useful to DoD environmental staff and contractors, the framework must be applied to specific training and testing activities. Three activity-specific ecological risk assessment frameworks have been written (1) to aid environmental staff in conducting risk assessments that involve these activities and (2) to guide staff in the development of analogous frameworks for other DoD activities. The three activities are: (1) low-altitude overflights by fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft (this volume), (2) firing at targets on land, and (3) ocean explosions. The activities were selected as priority training and testing activities by the advisory committee for this project.

  1. Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF) for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter II, G.W.

    2003-06-18

    The objective of this research is to provide the DoD with a framework based on a systematic, risk-based approach to assess impacts for management of natural resources in an ecosystem context. This risk assessment framework is consistent with, but extends beyond, the EPA's ecological risk assessment framework, and specifically addresses DoD activities and management needs. MERAF is intended to be consistent with existing procedures for environmental assessment and planning with DoD testing and training. The intention is to supplement these procedures rather than creating new procedural requirements. MERAF is suitable for use for training and testing area assessment and management. It does not include human health risks nor does it address specific permitting or compliance requirements, although it may be useful in some of these cases. Use of MERAF fits into the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process by providing a consistent and rigorous way of organizing and conducting the technical analysis for Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) (Sigal 1993; Carpenter 1995; Canter and Sadler 1997). It neither conflicts with, nor replaces, procedural requirements within the NEPA process or document management processes already in place within DoD.

  2. Sustainability principles in strategic environmental assessment: A framework for analysis and examples from Italian urban planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamorgese, Lydia Geneletti, Davide

    2013-09-15

    This paper presents a framework for analysing the degree of consideration of sustainability principles in Strategic environmental assessment (SEA), and demonstrates its application to a sample of SEA of Italian urban plans. The framework is based on Gibson's (2006) sustainability principles, which are linked to a number of guidance criteria and eventually to review questions, resulting from an extensive literature review. A total of 71 questions are included in the framework, which gives particular emphasis to key concepts, such as intragenerational and intergenerational equity. The framework was applied to review the Environmental Report of the urban plans of 15 major Italian cities. The results of this review show that, even if sustainability is commonly considered as a pivotal concept, there is still work to be done in order to effectively integrate sustainability principles into SEA. In particular, most of the attention is given to mitigation and compensation measures, rather than to actual attempts to propose more sustainable planning decisions in the first place. Concerning the proposed framework of analysis, further research is required to clarify equity concerns and particularly to identify suitable indicators for operationalizing the concepts of intra/inter-generational equity in decision-making. -- Highlights: ► A framework was developed in order to evaluate planning against sustainability criteria. ► The framework was applied to analyse how sustainable principles are addressed in 15 Italian SEA reports. ► Over 85% of the reports addressed, to some extent, at least 40% of the framework questions. ► Criteria explicitly linked to intra and inter-generational equity are rarely addressed.

  3. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Kumar, Navanit; Zhang, Yingqi; Jordan, Preston; Pan, Lehua; Granvold, Patrick; Chow, Fotini K.

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a framework for assessing the leakage risk of geologic carbon sequestration sites. This framework, known as the Certification Framework (CF), emphasizes wells and faults as the primary potential leakage conduits. Vulnerable resources are grouped into compartments, and impacts due to leakage are quantified by the leakage flux or concentrations that could potentially occur in compartments under various scenarios. The CF utilizes several model components to simulate leakage scenarios. One model component is a catalog of results of reservoir simulations that can be queried to estimate plume travel distances and times, rather than requiring CF users to run new reservoir simulations for each case. Other model components developed for the CF and described here include fault characterization using fault-population statistics; fault connection probability using fuzzy rules; well-flow modeling with a drift-flux model implemented in TOUGH2; and atmospheric dense-gas dispersion using a mesoscale weather prediction code.

  4. Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masden, Elizabeth A.; Fox, Anthony D.; Furness, Robert W.; Bullman, Rhys; Haydon, Daniel T.

    2010-01-15

    The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

  5. Kyiv institutional buildings sector energy efficiency program: Lending and implementation assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secrest, T.J.; Freeman, S.L.; Popelka, A.; Shestopal, P.A.; Gagurin, E.V.

    1997-08-01

    The government of Ukraine, through the State Committee of Energy Conservation (State Committee), is considering the implementation of energy efficiency measures in state and municipal institutional buildings in the city of Kyiv. The State Committee entered into a Memorandum of Cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct an assessment of the institutional buildings sector efficiency potential. This assessment will be used to support a potential loan by the World Bank for implementing a buildings efficiency improvement program in Kyiv. This report provides an assessment of the options for structuring the lending scenarios and the implementation of the program. Components to the lending structure are options for the disbursement of funds, options for the loan service, and other financial options and considerations. Program implementation includes management structures, reporting, installation activities, and post-installation activities such as training and verification.

  6. A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1997-05-01

    Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

  7. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  8. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  9. Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems: Modeling Individual Steps of a Risk Assessment Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Anuj; Castleton, Karl J.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.

    2004-06-01

    The study of the release and effects of chemicals in the environment and their associated risks to humans is central to public and private decision making. FRAMES 1.X, Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems, is a systems modeling software platform, developed by PNNL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, that helps scientists study the release and effects of chemicals on a source to outcome basis, create environmental models for similar risk assessment and management problems. The unique aspect of FRAMES is to dynamically introduce software modules representing individual components of a risk assessment (e.g., source release of contaminants, fate and transport in various environmental media, exposure, etc.) within a software framework, manipulate their attributes and run simulations to obtain results. This paper outlines the fundamental constituents of FRAMES 2.X, an enhanced version of FRAMES 1.X, that greatly improve the ability of the module developers to “plug” their self-developed software modules into the system. The basic design, the underlying principles and a discussion of the guidelines for module developers are presented.

  10. Institutional constraints on alternative water for energy: a guidebook for regional assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Basic information is presented about the legal, political, and social constraints faced by energy developers in the acquisition of water from underground, irrigation return flow, municipal waste, and saline sources. It is a guide to those institutional constraints which are general and pronounced enough to be important for regional assessments. First, attention was focused on the acquisition phase of the water use cycle. Second, constraints were analyzed primarily from a regional, rather than state-by-state, perspective. Emphasis was placed generally on the West - particularly the synfuel-rich Rocky Mountain states, the East, and Mid-West, in that order. Alaska and Hawaii were not surveyed. Third, the study focuses on the constraints associated with groundwater, municipal waste, irrigation return flow, and sea water, in that order. The phrase, institutional constraints, as used in the study, means legal, social, economic, and political restrictions, requirements, circumstances, or conditions that must be anticipated or responded to in order to acquire water for energy development. The study focuses primarily on legal constraints and secondarily on political constraints, because they tend to encompass or reflect other forms of institutional constraints.

  11. Framework for assessing impacts of pile-driving noise from offshore wind farm construction on a harbour seal population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Paul M.; Hastie, Gordon D.; Nedwell, Jeremy; Barham, Richard; Brookes, Kate L.; Cordes, Line S.; Bailey, Helen; McLean, Nancy

    2013-11-15

    Offshore wind farm developments may impact protected marine mammal populations, requiring appropriate assessment under the EU Habitats Directive. We describe a framework developed to assess population level impacts of disturbance from piling noise on a protected harbour seal population in the vicinity of proposed wind farm developments in NE Scotland. Spatial patterns of seal distribution and received noise levels are integrated with available data on the potential impacts of noise to predict how many individuals are displaced or experience auditory injury. Expert judgement is used to link these impacts to changes in vital rates and applied to population models that compare population changes under baseline and construction scenarios over a 25 year period. We use published data and hypothetical piling scenarios to illustrate how the assessment framework has been used to support environmental assessments, explore the sensitivity of the framework to key assumptions, and discuss its potential application to other populations of marine mammals. -- Highlights: • We develop a framework to support Appropriate Assessment for harbour seal populations. • We assessed potential impacts of wind farm construction noise. • Data on distribution of seals and noise were used to predict effects on individuals. • Expert judgement linked these impacts to vital rates to model population change. • We explore the sensitivity of the framework to key assumptions and uncertainties.

  12. Assessing cumulative impacts within state environmental review frameworks in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Zhao; Becker, Dennis R.; Kilgore, Michael A.

    2009-11-15

    Cumulative impact assessment (CIA) is the process of systematically assessing a proposed action's cumulative environmental effects in the context of past, present, and future actions, regardless of who undertakes such actions. Previous studies have examined CIA efforts at the federal level but little is known about how states assess the cumulative impacts of nonfederal projects. By examining state environmental review statutes, administrative rules, agency-prepared materials, and a national survey of the administrators of state environmental review programs, this study identifies the legal and administrative frameworks for CIA. It examines current CIA practice, discusses the relationship between CIA policy and its implementation, and explores the opportunities for improvement. The results of the study show that twenty-nine state environmental review programs across twenty-six states required the assessment of cumulative environmental impacts. More than half of these programs have adopted specific procedures for implementing their policies. Some programs assessed cumulative impacts using a standard review document, and others have created their own documentations incorporated into applications for state permits or funding. The majority of programs have adopted various scales, baselines, significance criteria, and coordination practices in their CIA processes. Mixed methods were generally used for data collection and analysis; qualitative methods were more prevalent than quantitative methods. The results also suggest that a program with comprehensive and consistent environmental review policies and procedures does not always imply extensive CIA requirements and practices. Finally, this study discusses the potential for improving existing CIA processes and promoting CIA efforts in states without established environmental review programs.

  13. A framework for environmental assessment of CO2 capture and storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathre, R; Chester, M; Cain, J; Masanet, E

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly seen as a way for society to enjoy the benefits of fossil fuel energy sources while avoiding the climate disruption associated with fossil CO2 emissions. A decision to deploy CCS technology at scale should be based on robust information on its overall costs and benefits. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a framework for holistic assessment of the energy and environmental footprint of a system, and can provide crucial information to policy-makers, scientists, and engineers as they develop and deploy CCS systems. We identify seven key issues that should be considered to ensure that conclusions and recommendations from CCS LCA are robust: energy penalty, functional units, scale-up challenges, non-climate environmental impacts, uncertainty management, policy-making needs, and market effects. Several recent life-cycle studies have focused on detailed assessments of individual CCS technologies and applications. While such studies provide important data and information on technology performance, such case-specific data are inadequate to fully inform the decision making process. LCA should aim to describe the system-wide environmental implications of CCS deployment at scale, rather than a narrow analysis of technological performance of individual power plants. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A critical analysis of hazard resilience measures within sustainability assessment frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Elizabeth C.; Sattler, Meredith; Friedland, Carol J.

    2014-11-15

    Today, numerous sustainability assessment frameworks (SAFs) exist to guide designers in achieving sustainable performance in the design of structures and communities. SAFs are beneficial in educating users and are useful tools for incorporating sustainability strategies into planning, design, and construction; however, there is currently a substantial gap in the ability of existing SAFs to incorporate hazard resistance and hazard mitigation in the broader context of sustainable design. This paper analyzes the incorporation of hazard resistant design and hazard mitigation strategies within SAFs via a multi-level analysis of eleven SAFs. The SAFs analyzed range in scale of application (i.e. building, site, community). Three levels of analysis are presented: (1) macro-level analysis comparing the number of measures strictly addressing resilience versus sustainability, (2) meso-level analysis of the coverage of types of hazards within SAFs (e.g. flood, fire), and (3) micro-level analysis of SAF measures connected to flood-related hazard resilience. The results demonstrate that hazard resistance and hazard mitigation do not figure prominently in the intent of SAFs and that weaknesses in resilience coverage exist that have the potential to lead to the design of structures and communities that are still highly vulnerable to the impacts of extreme events. - Highlights: • Sustainability assessment frameworks (SAFs) were analyzed for resilience coverage • Hazard resistance and mitigation do not figure prominently in the intent of SAFs • Approximately 75% of SAFs analyzed address three or fewer hazards • Lack of economic measures within SAFs could impact resilience and sustainability • Resilience measures for flood hazards are not consistently included in SAFs.

  15. V&V framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, Richard G.; Maniaci, David Charles; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    2015-09-01

    A Verification and Validation (V&V) framework is presented for the development and execution of coordinated modeling and experimental program s to assess the predictive capability of computational models of complex systems through focused, well structured, and formal processes.The elements of the framework are based on established V&V methodology developed by various organizations including the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Four main topics are addressed: 1) Program planning based on expert elicitation of the modeling physics requirements, 2) experimental design for model assessment, 3) uncertainty quantification for experimental observations and computational model simulations, and 4) assessment of the model predictive capability. The audience for this document includes program planners, modelers, experimentalist, V &V specialist, and customers of the modeling results.

  16. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2002-05-09

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km{sup 2} between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  17. Rapidly assessing the activation conditions and porosity of metal-organic frameworks using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, TM; Bloch, ED; Long, JR

    2015-01-01

    A methodology utilizing a thermogravimetric analyzer to monitor propane uptake following incremental increases of the temperature is demonstrated as a means of rapidly identifying porous materials and determining the optimum activation conditions of metal-organic frameworks.

  18. A Systems Framework for Assessing Plumbing Products-Related Water Conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alison; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Lutz, James

    2011-12-02

    Reducing the water use of plumbing productstoilets, urinals, faucets, and showerheads has been a popular conservation measure. Improved technologies have created opportunities for additional conservation in this area. However, plumbing products do not operate in a vacuum. This paper reviews the literature related to plumbing products to determine a systems framework for evaluating future conservation measures using these products. The main framework comprises the following categories: water use efficiency, product components, product performance, source water, energy, and plumbing/sewer infrastructure. This framework for analysis provides a starting point for professionals considering future water conservation measures to evaluate the need for additional research, collaboration with other standards or codes committees, and attachment of additional metrics to water use efficiency (such as performance).

  19. 9.1.3.1 Algae-Based Integrated Assessment Framework: Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    information Goal Statement Reduce the cost of producing algal oil by investigating ... Assessment Tool (PNNL) and the Algae Logistics Model (INL) to consider productivity, ...

  20. General framework for the assessment of dynamic resilience. Part I. Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morari, M.

    1982-02-01

    With increased process integration it has become very important to evaluate and compare the dynamic operability characteristics (dynamic resilience) of alternate designs. Based on recent results in multivariable frequency response theory a new framework is developed for this purpose. It is shown that dynamic resilience is determined by characteristics inherent in the system and that it is independent of the imposed controller structure and type. This gives the new method considerable intuitive appeal and allows it to avoid the lengthy optimization procedures which are typical for the previously published techniques.

  1. AN ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING RELIABLE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICE APPROACHES: ECONOMIC AND NON-PROLIFERATION MERITS OF NUCLEAR FUEL LEASING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreyling, Sean J.; Brothers, Alan J.; Short, Steven M.; Phillips, Jon R.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2010-08-11

    The goal of international nuclear policy since the dawn of nuclear power has been the peaceful expansion of nuclear energy while controlling the spread of enrichment and reprocessing technology. Numerous initiatives undertaken in the intervening decades to develop international agreements on providing nuclear fuel supply assurances, or reliable nuclear fuel services (RNFS) attempted to control the spread of sensitive nuclear materials and technology. In order to inform the international debate and the development of government policy, PNNL has been developing an analytical framework to holistically evaluate the economics and non-proliferation merits of alternative approaches to managing the nuclear fuel cycle (i.e., cradle-to-grave). This paper provides an overview of the analytical framework and discusses preliminary results of an economic assessment of one RNFS approach: full-service nuclear fuel leasing. The specific focus of this paper is the metrics under development to systematically evaluate the non-proliferation merits of fuel-cycle management alternatives. Also discussed is the utility of an integrated assessment of the economics and non-proliferation merits of nuclear fuel leasing.

  2. Development of a Software Framework for System-Level Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.

    2013-02-28

    The overall purpose of this project was to identify, evaluate, select, develop, and test a suite of enhancements to the GoldSim software program, in order to make it a better tool for use in support of Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) projects. The GoldSim software is a foundational tool used by scientists at NETL and at other laboratories and research institutions to evaluate system-level risks of proposed CCS projects. The primary product of the project was a series of successively improved versions of the GoldSim software, supported by an extensive User’s Guide. All of the enhancements were tested by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and several of the enhancements have already been incorporated into the CO{sub 2}-PENS sequestration model.

  3. Approach to proliferation risk assessment based on multiple objective analysis framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I.

    2013-07-01

    The approach to the assessment of proliferation risk using the methods of multi-criteria decision making and multi-objective optimization is presented. The approach allows the taking into account of the specifics features of the national nuclear infrastructure, and possible proliferation strategies (motivations, intentions, and capabilities). 3 examples of applying the approach are shown. First, the approach has been used to evaluate the attractiveness of HEU (high enriched uranium)production scenarios at a clandestine enrichment facility using centrifuge enrichment technology. Secondly, the approach has been applied to assess the attractiveness of scenarios for undeclared production of plutonium or HEU by theft of materials circulating in nuclear fuel cycle facilities and thermal reactors. Thirdly, the approach has been used to perform a comparative analysis of the structures of developing nuclear power systems based on different types of nuclear fuel cycles, the analysis being based on indicators of proliferation risk.

  4. A framework for assessing relative risks associated with multiple stressors in Port Valdez, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegers, J.K.; Landis, W.G.; Mortensen, L.S.; Wilson, V.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this assessment is to develop a versatile process that will provide a mechanism for evaluating both present and future risks to this environment. Much of the regulatory and environmental interest in the port has centered around a Ballast Water Treatment facility that treats and discharges up to 30 mgd of oily ballast water brought in by crude oil tankers. However, six point discharges and other potential sources of pollution exist in the area. The authors have delineated eleven subareas in the port in order to identify the potential anthropogenic stressors, as well as the receptors that could be exposed to these stressors. Potential effects were then characterized for each exposure. Each component is ranked and integrated, resulting in a relative risk estimate in each subarea. Both the discernible risks, based on available data, and the data gaps are presented. Uncertainty is expressed as a range of high and low risk associated with each component. Results of the ranking indicate that hydrocarbons released through discharges, contaminated runoff and spills pose the most discernible risk to sediment quality and wildlife in the port. Undetermined, but potentially severe, risks to all ecological components include possible future oil spills, shoreline development, and the introduction of nonindigenous species. The final assessment provides a tool for current and future ecological monitoring efforts in the Port Valdez area.

  5. Adaptation strategies for health impacts of climate change in Western Australia: Application of a Health Impact Assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery T.; Brown, Helen L.; Katscherian, Dianne

    2011-04-15

    Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing the globe and there is substantial evidence that this will result in a number of health impacts, regardless of the level of greenhouse gas mitigation. It is therefore apparent that a combined approach of mitigation and adaptation will be required to protect public health. While the importance of mitigation is recognised, this project focused on the role of adaptation strategies in addressing the potential health impacts of climate change. The nature and magnitude of these health impacts will be determined by a number of parameters that are dependent upon the location. Firstly, climate change will vary between regions. Secondly, the characteristics of each region in terms of population and the ability to adapt to changes will greatly influence the extent of the health impacts that are experienced now and into the future. Effective adaptation measures therefore need to be developed with these differences in mind. A Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework was used to consider the implications of climate change on the health of the population of Western Australia (WA) and to develop a range of adaptive responses suited to WA. A broad range of stakeholders participated in the HIA process, providing informed input into developing an understanding of the potential health impacts and potential adaptation strategies from a diverse sector perspective. Potential health impacts were identified in relation to climate change predictions in WA in the year 2030. The risk associated with each of these impacts was assessed using a qualitative process that considered the consequences and the likelihood of the health impact occurring. Adaptations were then developed which could be used to mitigate the identified health impacts and provide responses which could be used by Government for future decision making. The periodic application of a HIA framework is seen as an ideal tool to develop appropriate adaptation strategies to

  6. Conceptual Assessment Framework for Forested Wetland Restoration: The Pen Branch Experience. Restoration of a Severely Impacted Riparian Wetland System - The Pen Branch Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolka, R.; Nelson, E.A.; Trettin, C.C.

    2000-10-01

    Development of an assessment framework and indicators can be used to evaluate effectiveness of wetland restoration. Example of these include index of biotic integrity and the hydrogeomorphic method. Both approaches provide qualitative ranks. We propose a new method based on the EPA wetland research program. Similar to other methods, indexes are compared to reference communities; however, the comparisons are quantitative. In this paper we discuss the results of our framework using the Pen Branch riparian wetland system as an example.

  7. Status on the Development of a Modeling and Simulation Framework for the Economic Assessment of Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle; Rabiti, Cristian; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Kim, Jong Suk; Deason, Wesley Ray; Boardman, Richard Doin; Garcia, Humberto E.

    2015-09-01

    An effort to design and build a modeling and simulation framework to assess the economic viability of Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems (NHES) was undertaken in fiscal year 2015 (FY15). The purpose of this report is to document the various tasks associated with the development of such a framework and to provide a status on its progress. Several tasks have been accomplished. First, starting from a simulation strategy, a rigorous mathematical formulation has been achieved in which the economic optimization of a Nuclear Hybrid Energy System is presented as a constrained robust (under uncertainty) optimization problem. Some possible algorithms for the solution of the optimization problem are presented. A variation of the Simultaneous Perturbation Stochastic Approximation algorithm has been implemented in RAVEN and preliminary tests have been performed. The development of the software infrastructure to support the simulation of the whole NHES has also moved forward. The coupling between RAVEN and an implementation of the Modelica language (OpenModelica) has been implemented, migrated under several operating systems and tested using an adapted model of a desalination plant. In particular, this exercise was focused on testing the coupling of the different code systems; testing parallel, computationally expensive simulations on the INL cluster; and providing a proof of concept for the possibility of using surrogate models to represent the different NHES subsystems. Another important step was the porting of the RAVEN code under the Windows™ operating system. This accomplishment makes RAVEN compatible with the development environment that is being used for dynamic simulation of NHES components. A very simplified model of a NHES on the electric market has been built in RAVEN to confirm expectations on the analysis capability of RAVEN to provide insight into system economics and to test the capability of RAVEN to identify limit surfaces even for stochastic constraints. This

  8. Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Jordan, P.D.; Nicot, J.-P.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Bryant, S.L.

    2010-08-01

    The Certification Framework (CF) is a simple risk assessment approach for evaluating CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. In the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project assessed here, five wells at Krechba produce natural gas from the Carboniferous C10.2 reservoir with 1.7-2% CO{sub 2} that is delivered to the Krechba gas processing plant, which also receives high-CO{sub 2} natural gas ({approx}10% by mole fraction) from additional deeper gas reservoirs and fields to the south. The gas processing plant strips CO{sub 2} from the natural gas that is then injected through three long horizontal wells into the water leg of the Carboniferous gas reservoir at a depth of approximately 1,800 m. This injection process has been going on successfully since 2004. The stored CO{sub 2} has been monitored over the last five years by a Joint Industry Project (JIP) - a collaboration of BP, Sonatrach, and Statoil with co-funding from US DOE and EU DG Research. Over the years the JIP has carried out extensive analyses of the Krechba system including two risk assessment efforts, one before injection started, and one carried out by URS Corporation in September 2008. The long history of injection at Krechba, and the accompanying characterization, modeling, and performance data provide a unique opportunity to test and evaluate risk assessment approaches. We apply the CF to the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project at two different stages in the state of knowledge of the project: (1) at the pre-injection stage, using data available just prior to injection around mid-2004; and (2) after four years of injection (September 2008) to be comparable to the other risk assessments. The main risk drivers for the project are CO{sub 2} leakage into potable groundwater and into the natural gas cap. Both well leakage and fault/fracture leakage are likely under some conditions, but overall the risk is low due to ongoing mitigation and monitoring activities. Results of

  9. Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Geological Storage CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Ian

    2014-08-31

    The operational risks for CCS projects include: risks of capturing, compressing, transporting and injecting CO₂; risks of well blowouts; risk that CO₂ will leak into shallow aquifers and contaminate potable water; and risk that sequestered CO₂ will leak into the atmosphere. This report examines these risks by using information on the risks associated with analogue activities such as CO2 based enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), natural gas storage and acid gas disposal. We have developed a new analysis of pipeline risk based on Bayesian statistical analysis. Bayesian theory probabilities may describe states of partial knowledge, even perhaps those related to non-repeatable events. The Bayesian approach enables both utilizing existing data and at the same time having the capability to adsorb new information thus to lower uncertainty in our understanding of complex systems. Incident rates for both natural gas and CO2 pipelines have been widely used in papers and reports on risk of CO2 pipelines as proxies for the individual risk created by such pipelines. Published risk studies of CO2 pipelines suggest that the individual risk associated with CO2 pipelines is between 10-3 and 10-4, which reflects risk levels approaching those of mountain climbing, which many would find unacceptably high. This report concludes, based on a careful analysis of natural gas pipeline failures, suggests that the individual risk of CO2 pipelines is likely in the range of 10-6 to 10-7, a risk range considered in the acceptable to negligible range in most countries. If, as is commonly thought, pipelines represent the highest risk component of CCS outside of the capture plant, then this conclusion suggests that most (if not all) previous quantitative- risk assessments of components of CCS may be orders of magnitude to high. The potential lethality of unexpected CO2 releases from pipelines or wells are arguably the highest risk aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), carbon capture

  10. A resilience assessment framework for infrastructure and economic systems : quantitative and qualitative resilience analysis of petrochemical supply chains to a hurricane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vugrin, Eric D.; Warren, Drake E.

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the nation has recognized that critical infrastructure protection should consider not only the prevention of disruptive events, but also the processes that infrastructure systems undergo to maintain functionality following disruptions. This more comprehensive approach has been termed critical infrastructure resilience (CIR). Given the occurrence of a particular disruptive event, the resilience of a system to that event is the system's ability to efficiently reduce both the magnitude and duration of the deviation from targeted system performance levels. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has developed a comprehensive resilience assessment framework for evaluating the resilience of infrastructure and economic systems. The framework includes a quantitative methodology that measures resilience costs that result from a disruption to infrastructure function. The framework also includes a qualitative analysis methodology that assesses system characteristics that affect resilience in order to provide insight and direction for potential improvements to resilience. This paper describes the resilience assessment framework. This paper further demonstrates the utility of the assessment framework through application to a hypothetical scenario involving the disruption of a petrochemical supply chain by a hurricane.

  11. Environmental Impact Assessment in the marine environment: A comparison of legal frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerra, Flávia; Grilo, Catarina; Pedroso, Nuno M.; Cabral, Henrique

    2015-11-15

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a well-established practice in most developed countries, even though its application to projects in the marine environment is at a much earlier stage of development. We use the Portuguese example to address marine EIA legislation since its exclusive economic zone (EEZ) is currently the third largest in the European Union and its EIA legislation does not require various offshore activities with potentially negative environmental impacts to undergo EIA before being licensed. This paper aims to determine whether three types of projects implemented within Portuguese maritime zones – artificial reefs using sunken ships, hydrocarbon prospecting and wave-energy generation – would benefit from application of an appropriately designed EIA. We have conducted a structured review of EIA legal provisions from seven other countries, and considered whether a full EIA was required for each project type. Consequently, 12 Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) have been compared to identify patterns of (dis)similarity across countries and project types. Additionally, we identified key descriptors and predicted impacts for each project type referred to in their EIS. The main conclusion is that ultimately all three projects would benefit from mandatory EIA in Portugal. This paper is relevant for countries with large maritime areas and underdeveloped marine EIA legislation, helping improve international policy-making relating to these three types of marine projects. - Highlights: • EIA is not mandatory for some project types developed in Portuguese maritime zones. • Artificial reefs, oil&gas prospecting and wave-energy licensing differ in 8 countries. • EIA should be mandatory in Portugal for artificial reefs and oil&gas prospecting. • However, an AEInc approach is enough for wave-energy projects in Portugal. • Findings could be extended to other EU countries with extensive maritime zones.

  12. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  13. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous

  14. Mind the gap in SEA: An institutional perspective on why assessment of synergies amongst climate change mitigation, adaptation and other policy areas are missing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vammen Larsen, Sanne; Kornov, Lone; Wejs, Anja

    2012-02-15

    This article takes its point of departure in two approaches to integrating climate change into Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA): Mitigation and adaptation, and in the fact that these, as well as the synergies between them and other policy areas, are needed as part of an integrated assessment and policy response. First, the article makes a review of how positive and negative synergies between a) climate change mitigation and adaptation and b) climate change and other environmental concerns are integrated into Danish SEA practice. Then, the article discusses the implications of not addressing synergies. Finally, the article explores institutional explanations as to why synergies are not addressed in SEA practice. A document analysis of 149 Danish SEA reports shows that only one report comprises the assessment of synergies between mitigation and adaptation, whilst 9,4% of the reports assess the synergies between climate change and other environmental concerns. The consequences of separation are both the risk of trade-offs and missed opportunities for enhancing positive synergies. In order to propose explanations for the lacking integration, the institutional background is analysed and discussed, mainly based on Scott's theory of institutions. The institutional analysis highlights a regulatory element, since the assessment of climate change synergies is underpinned by legislation, but not by guidance. This means that great focus is on normative elements such as the local interpretation of legislation and of climate change mitigation and adaptation. The analysis also focuses on how the fragmentation of the organisation in which climate change and SEA are embedded has bearings on both normative and cultural-cognitive elements. This makes the assessment of synergies challenging. The evidence gathered and presented in the article points to a need for developing the SEA process and methodology in Denmark with the aim to include climate change in the assessments in a

  15. SEME FRAMEWORK

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003284MLTPL00 Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework https://software.sandia.gov/svn/teva/canary

  16. Introduction to Framework | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Framework (Redirected from Introduction to Methodology) Jump to: navigation, search Stage 1 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans,...

  17. An Analytical Impact Assessment Framework for Wildlife to Inform the Siting and Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States overall electrical generation capacity is expected to increase by 10-25 gigawatts (GW) per year to meet increases in demand. Wind energy is a key component of state and federal renewable energy standards, and central to the Department of Energy’s 20% by 2030 wind production goals. Increased wind energy development may present increased resource conflict with avian wildlife, and environmental permitting has been identified as a potential obstacle to expansion in the sector. ICF developed an analytical framework to help applicants and agencies examine potential impacts in support of facility siting and permitting. A key objective of our work was to develop a framework that is scalable from the local to the national level, and one that is generalizable across the different scales at which biological communities operate – from local influences to meta-populations. The intent was to allow natural resource managers to estimate the cumulative impacts of turbine strikes and habitat changes on long-term population performance in the context of a species demography, genetic potential, and life history. We developed three types of models based on our literature review and participation in the scientific review processes. First, the conceptual model was developed as a general description of the analytical framework. Second, we developed the analytical framework based on the relationships between concepts, and the functions presented in the scientific literature. Third, we constructed an application of the model by parameterizing the framework using data from and relevant to the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA), and an existing golden eagle population model. We developed managed source code, database create statements, and written documentation to allow for the reproduction of each phase of the analysis. ICF identified a potential template adaptive management system in the form of the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Adaptive Harvest

  18. Application of an Informatics-Based Decision-Making Framework and Process to the Assessment of Radiation Safety in Nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Mark D.; Myers, David S.; Cash, Leigh J.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Oberdörster, Günter; Smith, Rachel; Cassata, James R.; Boecker, Bruce B.; Grissom, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has established NCRP Scientific Committee 2-6 to develop a report on the current state of knowledge and guidance for radiation safety programs involved with nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. While the full report is in preparation, this article presents and applies an informatics-based decision-making framework and process through which the radiation protection community can anticipate that nano-enabled applications, processes, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles are likely to become present or are already present in radiation-related activities; recognize specific situations where environmental and worker safety, health, well-being, and productivity may be affected by nano-related activities; evaluate how radiation protection practices may need to be altered to improve protection; control information, interpretations, assumptions, and conclusions to implement scientifically sound decisions and actions; and confirm that desired protection outcomes have been achieved. This generally applicable framework and supporting process can be continuously applied to achieve health and safety at the convergence of nanotechnology and radiation-related activities.

  19. Application of an Informatics-Based Decision-Making Framework and Process to the Assessment of Radiation Safety in Nanotechnology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoover, Mark D.; Myers, David S.; Cash, Leigh J.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Oberdörster, Günter; Smith, Rachel; Cassata, James R.; Boecker, Bruce B.; Grissom, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has established NCRP Scientific Committee 2-6 to develop a report on the current state of knowledge and guidance for radiation safety programs involved with nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. While the full report is in preparation, this article presents and applies an informatics-based decision-making framework and process through which the radiation protection community can anticipate that nano-enabled applications, processes, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles are likely to become present or are alreadymore » present in radiation-related activities; recognize specific situations where environmental and worker safety, health, well-being, and productivity may be affected by nano-related activities; evaluate how radiation protection practices may need to be altered to improve protection; control information, interpretations, assumptions, and conclusions to implement scientifically sound decisions and actions; and confirm that desired protection outcomes have been achieved. This generally applicable framework and supporting process can be continuously applied to achieve health and safety at the convergence of nanotechnology and radiation-related activities.« less

  20. Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

  1. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In February 2014, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the ...

  2. TU-C-17A-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - A Supervised Framework for Automatic Contour Assessment for Radiotherapy Planning of Head- Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Kavanaugh, J; Tan, J; Dolly, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Anastasio, M; Altman, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Precise contour delineation of tumor targets and critical structures from CT simulations is essential for accurate radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. However, manual and automatic delineation processes can be error prone due to limitations in imaging techniques and individual anatomic variability. Tedious and laborious manual verification is hence needed. This study develops a general framework for automatically assessing RT contours for head-neck cancer patients using geometric attribute distribution models (GADMs). Methods: Geometric attributes (centroid and volume) were computed from physician-approved RT contours of 29 head-neck patients. Considering anatomical correlation between neighboring structures, the GADM for each attribute was trained to characterize intra- and interpatient structure variations using principal component analysis. Each trained GADM was scalable and deformable, but constrained by the principal attribute variations of the training contours. A new hierarchical model adaptation algorithm was utilized to assess the RT contour correctness for a given patient. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to evaluate and tune system parameters for the training models. Results: Experiments utilizing training and non-training data sets with simulated contouring errors were conducted to validate the framework performance. Promising assessment results of contour normality/abnormality for the training contour-based data were achieved with excellent accuracy (0.99), precision (0.99), recall (0.83), and F-score (0.97), while corresponding values of 0.84, 0.96, 0.83, and 0.9 were achieved for the non-training data. Furthermore, the areas under the ROC curves were above 0.9, validating the accuracy of this test. Conclusion: The proposed framework can reliably identify contour normality/abnormality based upon intra- and inter-structure constraints derived from clinically-approved contours. It also allows physicians to

  3. LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

    2014-01-19

    In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demandsboth gross withdrawals and net consumptive useare assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an

  4. Financial Institutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A lending program begins with a financial institution that procures the funds they lend from a number of other sources.

  5. Seaborg Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Seaborg Institute The institute provides a primary mechanism for fostering cooperation and collaboration in actinide science among the national laboratories, university campuses, and the national and international actinide science community. Contact Director Albert Migliori (505) 663-5627 Email Deputy Director Franz Freibert (505) 667-6879 Email Professional Staff Assistant Susan Ramsay (505) 665-0858 Email actinide The Seaborg Institute at Los Alamos integrates research programs,

  6. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Engineering Institute Multidisciplinary engineering research that integrates advanced modeling and simulations, novel sensing systems and new developments in information technology. May 14, 2013 Los Alamos Research Park Los Alamos Research Park, the home of Engineering Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505)

  7. Framework for integration of urban planning, strategic environmental assessment and ecological planning for urban sustainability within the context of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Jia; Bao Cunkuan; Shu Tingfei; Yun Xiaoxue; Jiang Dahe; Brwon, Lex

    2011-11-15

    Sustainable development or sustainability has been highlighted as an essential principle in urban master planning, with increasing recognition that uncontrollable urbanization may well give rise to various issues such as overexploitation of natural resources, ecosystem destruction, environmental pollution and large-scale climate change. Thus, it is deemed necessary to modify the existing urban and regional administrative system so as to cope with the challenges urban planning is being confronted with and realize the purpose of urban sustainability. This paper contributed to proposing a mechanism which helps to make urban planning with full consideration of issues with respect to sustainable development. We suggested that the integration of urban planning, SEA and ecological planning be a multi-win strategy to offset deficiency of each mentioned political tool being individually applied. We also proposed a framework where SEA and ecological planning are fully incorporated into urban planning, which forms a two-way constraint mechanism to ascertain environmental quality of urban planning, although in practice, planning and SEA processes may conditionally be unified. Moreover, as shown in the case study, the integration of the three political tools may be constrained due to slow changes in the contextual factors, in particular the political and cultural dimensions. Currently within the context of China, there may be three major elements which facilitate integration of the three political tools, which are (1) regulatory requirement of PEIA on urban planning, (2) the promotion or strong administrative support from government on eco-district building, and (3) the willingness of urban planners to collaborate with SEA experts or ecologists.

  8. GTT Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The GTT proposes a strategic framework that organizes these activities into three interrelated dimensions (informational, analytical, and physical), representative of the systems nature of the grid.

  9. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upon completion of their graduate degrees Over the last seven years, 150 students from 50 academic institutions have participated in the summer school and sixteen such TSM's have...

  10. Challenges to institutionalizing strategic environmental assessment: The case of Vietnam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slunge, Daniel; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen

    2014-09-15

    Building on new institutional theory, this paper develops an analytical framework for analyzing constraints to the institutionalization of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) at four different institutional levels. The framework is tested in an empirical analysis of the environmental assessment system in Vietnam, which is a frontrunner among developing countries regarding the introduction and use of SEA. Building on interviews with Vietnamese and international experts, as well as an extensive literature review, we identify institutional constraints which challenge the effective use of SEA in Vietnam. We conclude that commonly identified constraints, such as inadequate training, technical guidelines, baseline data and financial resources, are strongly linked to constraints at higher institutional levels, such as incentives to not share information between ministries and severe restrictions on access to information and public participation. Without a thorough understanding of these institutional constraints, there is a risk that attempts to improve the use of SEA are misdirected. Thus, a careful institutional analysis should guide efforts to introduce and improve the use of SEA in Vietnam and other developing countries. The analytical framework for analyzing constraints to institutionalization of SEA presented in this paper represents a systematic effort in this direction. - Highlights: • A framework for analyzing constraints to institutionalizing SEA is developed • Empirical analysis of the strategic environmental assessment system in Vietnam • Constraints in the action arena linked to deeper institutional constraints • Institutional analysis needed prior to introducing SEA in developing countries.

  11. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Opportunities » Engineering Institute Engineering Institute Engineering dynamics that include flight, vibration isolation for precision manufacturing, earthquake engineering, blast loading, signal processing, and experimental model analysis. Contact Leader, Los Alamos Charles Farrar Email Leader, UCSD Michael Todd Email Los Alamos Program Administrator Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email Administrative Assistant Stacy Baker (505) 663-5233 Email Collaboration for conducting

  12. Adaptive capacity and its assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engle, Nathan L.

    2011-04-20

    This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

  13. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance On January 8, 2015, the Energy Department released guidance to help the energy sector establish or align existing cybersecurity risk management programs to meet the objectives of the Cybersecurity Framework released by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) in February 2014. The voluntary Cybersecurity Framework consists of standards, guidelines, and

  14. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Download and Data Sets First name * Last name * Email address * Institution * Software & Data Set Selection (Select one or more) SHMTools Software (0.20.0 Beta) mFUSE ...

  15. Quantum Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Institute Quantum Institute A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. Contact Leader Malcolm Boshier (505) 665-8892 Email Two of LANL's most successful quantum technology initiatives: quantum cryptography and the race for quantum computer The area of quantum information, science, and technology is rapidly evolving, with important applications in the areas of quantum

  16. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EI Software Download Request EI Software Download Request Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email Software Download and Data Sets First name * Last name * Email address * Institution * Software & Data Set Selection (Select one or more) SHMTools Software (0.20.0 Beta) mFUSE Interface (0.2.0 Beta) Datasets

  17. MVC Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-06-03

    Provides a reusable model-view-controller application programming interface (API) for use in the rapid development of graphical user interface applications in the .NET 2.0 framework. This includes a mechanism for adding new data stores, data sources, data analyses, and visualizations in the form of plugins.] The MVC Framework is implemented in C# as a .NET 2.0 framework that can then be built against when developing applications. The infrasturcture allows for presenting application specific views (visualizations) tomore » the user to interact with. Based on the interactions the suer makes with a view, requests are generated which in turn are handled by the central controller facility. The controller handles the request in an application specific manner by routing the request to appropriate data stores, data accessors or data analyzers. Retrieved or processed data is published to subscribed components for further processing or for presentation to the user.« less

  18. Modeling the effect of climate change on U.S. state-level buildings energy demands in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Kim, Son H.; Dirks, James A.; Jensen, Erik A.; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.; Schmidt, Laurel C.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into climate policy and regional energy system planning. In this study, we presented a detailed building energy model with a U.S. state-level representation, nested in the GCAM integrated assessment framework. We projected state-level building energy demand and its spatial pattern over the century, considering the impact of climate change based on the estimates of heating and cooling degree days derived from downscaled USGS CASCaDE temperature data. The result indicates that climate change has a large impact on heating and cooling building energy and fuel use at the state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (ranges from -10% to +10%). The sensitivity analysis reveals that the building energy demand is subject to multiple key factors, such as the magnitude of climate change, the choice of climate models, and the growth of population and GDP, and that their relative contributions vary greatly across the space. The scale impact in building energy use modeling highlights the importance of constructing a building energy model with the spatially-explicit representation of socioeconomics, energy system development, and climate change. These findings will help the climate-based policy decision and energy system, especially utility planning related to building sector at the U.S. state and regional level facing the potential climate change.

  19. Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) works with stakeholders to develop a voluntary Framework for reducing cyber risks to critical infrastructure. The Framework aims to be flexible and repeatable, while helping asset owner and operators manage cybersecurity risk.

  20. Institutional Change Principles for Fostering Sustainability | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Principles for Fostering Sustainability Institutional Change Principles for Fostering Sustainability The following eight principles serve as the foundational building blocks for developing strategies to achieve institutional change-but they are not the strategies themselves. They are derived from academic literature and inform the framework for achieving institutional change in a federal organization. Each statement is followed by a general strategy for how the principle can be

  1. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  2. Radiological Assessment Survey of the Vance road Facility Source Vault Building Materials, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratory was the site of extensive nuclear medical research and involved the used of numerous radionuclides. These nuclides were stored in a source vault stored on the first floor of the facility. Nuclear medical research is no longer conducted in this facility, and the source vault was remediated in preparation for converting the area to office space and general use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault and its associated miscellaneous building materials and laboratory equipment in preparation for the conversion to general use space.

  3. Assessing electronic structure approaches for gas-ligand interactions in metal-organic frameworks: The CO{sub 2}-benzene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, Jonathon; Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 ; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720

    2014-03-14

    Adsorption of gas molecules in metal-organic frameworks is governed by many factors, the most dominant of which are the interaction of the gas with open metal sites, and the interaction of the gas with the ligands. Herein, we examine the latter class of interaction in the context of CO{sub 2} binding to benzene. We begin by clarifying the geometry of the CO{sub 2}benzene complex. We then generate a benchmark binding curve using a coupled-cluster approach with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] at the complete basis set (CBS) limit. Against this ?CCSD(T)/CBS standard, we evaluate a plethora of electronic structure approximations: Hartree-Fock, second-order Mller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the resolution-of-the-identity approximation, attenuated MP2, and a number of density functionals with and without different empirical and nonempirical van der Waals corrections. We find that finite-basis MP2 significantly overbinds the complex. On the other hand, even the simplest empirical correction to standard density functionals is sufficient to bring the binding energies to well within 1 kJ/mol of the benchmark, corresponding to an error of less than 10%; PBE-D in particular performs well. Methods that explicitly include nonlocal correlation kernels, such as VV10, vdW-DF2, and ?B97X-V, perform with similar accuracy for this system, as do ?B97X and M06-L.

  4. A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

    2014-04-07

    A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

  5. QER- Comment of Electric Power Research Institute 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    I am Barbara Tyran, Director of Washington & State Relations, at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI recently completed a Concept Paper, 'The Integrated Grid', which examines the rapid rise of Distributed Energy Resources and how these technologies could be integrated into the electric power systems so customers could enjoy the benefit of both the central power system and the distributed technologies in the most cost-effective manner. The integrated grid enables the optimal combination of local generation, energy storage, energy efficiency and new uses of electricity – integrated with central generation – to provide reliable, affordable and environmentally sustainable electricity. The approach allows resource deployment that will realize all potential benefits and requires a modern grid characterized by connectivity, enabling interconnection rules, and rate structures that enhance the value of the power system to all consumers. Although the journey towards a fully integrated grid will take decades, EPRI is pleased to submit the first of three phases, 'The Integrated Grid' Concept Paper, into the permanent QER comments library and to discuss it at any time. EPRI plans to finalize Phase II in Summer 2014. The next phase will establish a comprehensive framework to address research gaps in key areas and assess the technology needs by examining: 1) a benefit-cost framework; 2) interconnection technical guidelines; and 3) grid planning and operations. This scientifically rigorous assessment before system-wide deployment will support prudent investment for grid modernization. Phase II will also be submitted to the QER library when complete. Phase III will involve demonstrations of the methodology for a particular power system to assess the feasibility of an integrated benefit/cost methodology, as well as one or more technology demonstrations, and will continue over the next two years. EPRI looks forward to providing future updates and to continuing our

  6. Human choice and climate change. Volume 1: The societal framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.; Malone, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    Foreward: Preface; Introduction; Science and decisionmaking; Population and climate change; Human needs and wants; Cultural discourses; Institutional frameworks for political action; and Sponsoring organizations, International Advisory Board, and project participants.

  7. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INSTITUTE INSTITUTE INSTITUTE INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS April 1, 2000-March 31, 2001 2000 April 4 Dr. B. Launé, Institut de Physique Nucléaire - Orsay, France GANIL: Overview and Perspectives April 11 Dr. Z. Lin, Cyclotron Institute, TAMU J/psi Absorption in Hadronic Matter April 20 Dr. R. Tribble, Texas A&M University Nuclear Astrophysics at Texas A&M April 23 Prof. S.A. Gurvitz, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel Confinement and Scaling in Deep Inelastic

  8. Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.~I LALI i~E REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L.~ ~ -_77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r _________ rment of the Surveilance Prograrn of the High-Level Storage- Tanks at Hanford P. E WOOD Robert J. Catln, Deputy Directat - Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview Office of Environment MARCH 1980 Report to the U.S. Departrent of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment Washkngon, DC C March 27, 1980

  9. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Photo left to right: CMI Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Not pictured: Carol Bergman. CMI staff phone 515-296-4500, e-mail CMIdirector@ameslab.gov 2332 Pammel Drive, 134 Wilhelm Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1025 The Critical Materials Institute focuses on technologies that make better use of

  10. Southern Research Institute Visit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Reaserch Engineering Capabilities Briefing 2010 Southern Research Institute Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Research Briefing 2010 CAMD Introduction - Richard Kurtz Mary ...

  11. Advanced Studies Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute » Advanced Studies Institute Science of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Developing innovative solution strategies for problems that support the forward deployment theme of the Science of Signatures Pillar, and building skills needed for successful research program development. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran

  12. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-March 31, 2006 2005 April 1 Dr. Ralf Rapp, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Thermal Field Theory and Instantons II April 8 Mr. Deqiang Sun, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Bottomonium in QGP and Heavy-Ion Collisions April 22 Dr. Ralf Rapp, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Thermal Field Theory and Instantons III May 6 Dr. Massimo Mannarelli, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

  13. Assess Oportunities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assess Oportunities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities DevelopBAU Stage 4:...

  14. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are already in place that mitigate that risk, and propose additional controls if needed. Step 1: Identify Risks - What can go wrong? This step should identify the negative outcomes that could result from an action or decision . It is important to consider a wide range of risks, and so the Department's ERM framework includes

  15. CBI Technology Impact Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CBI Technology Impact Framework 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, ...

  16. Climate Risk and Financial Institutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment Website: www.ifc.orgifcextsustainability.nsfAttachmentsByTitlepClimateRisk Climate Risk and Financial Institutions...

  17. Standard Agent Framework 1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4)more » Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.« less

  18. Graduate Studies - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Students wishing to carry out their dissertation research at the Cyclotron Institute must be formally enrolled in the graduate program of either the Department of Physics or the Department of Chemistry, but may elect to work with any Institute faculty research advisor, irrespective of that advisor's departmental affiliation. Research programs at the Cyclotron Institute are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Robert A. Welch Foundation. Application

  19. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hass, The Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel A New Precision Measurement of the 7 Be ... Yigal Ronen, Ben Gurion University Beer-Sheva, Israel Space Travel: Science or Fiction? ...

  20. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raymond Moreh, Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York Neutron Scattering of keV ...

  1. Institute for Advanced Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    working on joint NMC proposals. Participation in the projects must not negatively impact partner institutions. Funding for joint projects should be through partner...

  2. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeffrey W. Martin, Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Ultracold Neutrons April 20 Professor J. W. Watson, Department of Physics, ...

  3. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. She was previously a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Integrated...

  4. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  5. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emeritus Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics (KIT) The Exotic World of Quantum Matter: Novel States Induced by Fluctuations Tuesday, June 30, 2015 2 - 3pm MSL...

  6. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China Probing the Nuclear Symmetry Energy with ... Jiansong Wang, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, China The Status of Hadronic Physics ...

  7. Information Science & Technology Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ISTI Information Science & Technology Institute Providing connection to program management for capability needs, as well as IS&T integration and support for mission-critical...

  8. Careers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers The Critical Materials Institute at the The Ames Laboratory, a Department of Energy national laboratory affiliated with Iowa State University, offers a variety of career ...

  9. Coordinating with Corporate and Institutional Affiliates | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy with Corporate and Institutional Affiliates Coordinating with Corporate and Institutional Affiliates Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Coordinating with Corporate and Institutional Affiliates, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, February 12, 2015. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (3.49 MB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Community Readiness Assessments Nothing But Networking for Residential

  10. Conductive open frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Wan, Shun; Doonan, Christian J.; Wang, Bo; Deng, Hexiang

    2016-02-23

    The disclosure relates generally to materials that comprise conductive covalent organic frameworks. The disclosure also relates to materials that are useful to store and separate gas molecules and sensors.

  11. The Partnership Evaluation Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: The Partnership Evaluation Framework: How to evaluate a potential partner’s business model and identify areas for collaboration.

  12. Generic Overlay Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    This software provides a framework for building application layter overlay networks. It includes example overlays that can be used without modification. Also provided are example multicast and routing protocols that can be used with the overlays.

  13. Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Cyclotron Institute has expanded steadily since commissioning the original cyclotron in 1967 and is currently upgrading again. The diagram to the left shows the variety of sophisticated detectors and spectrometers that enhance the Institute's capacity for nuclear research. Follow the above links for more detailed information about our facilities.

  14. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrade Overview / K150 Cyclotron / Light Ion Guide / Heavy Ion Guide / Negative Ion Source / CB-ECRIS Facility Upgrade White Paper Overview Picture of the experimental set up to measure beta-decay half-lives. On January 3, 2005 the Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project (CIUP) began with the approval of the CIUP management plan by the Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Office. The project will extend to the first quarter of calendar year 2011. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide

  15. Single-Institution Experience in the Treatment of Primary Mediastinal B Cell Lymphoma Treated With Immunochemotherapy in the Setting of Response Assessment by {sup 18}Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Ahmed, Mohamed Amin; Costelloe, Colleen; Wogan, Christine F.; Reed, Valerie; Romaguera, Jorge E.; Neelapu, Sattva; Oki, Yasuhiro; Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Frederick B.; Nastoupil, Loretta; Turturro, Francesco; Fowler, Nathan; Fanale, Michelle A.; and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Excellent outcomes obtained after infusional dose-adjusted etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab (R-EPOCH) alone have led some to question the role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL). We reviewed the outcomes in patients treated with 1 of 3 rituximab-containing regimens (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone [R-CHOP]; hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone [R-HCVAD], or R-EPOCH) with or without RT. We also evaluated the ability of positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT) to identify patients at risk of relapse. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 97 patients with diagnoses of stage I/II PMBCL treated at our institution between 2001 and 2013. The clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and toxicity were assessed. We analyzed whether postchemotherapy PET-CT could identify patients at risk for progressive disease according to a 5 point scale (5PS) Deauville score assigned. Results: Among 97 patients (median follow-up time, 57 months), the 5-year overall survival rate was 99%. Of patients treated with R-CHOP, 99% received RT; R-HCVAD, 82%; and R-EPOCH, 36%. Of 68 patients with evaluable end-of-chemotherapy PET-CT scans, 62% had a positive scan (avidity above that of the mediastinal blood pool [Deauville 5PS = 3]), but only 9 patients experienced relapse (n=1) or progressive disease (n=8), all with a 5PS of 4 to 5. Of the 25 patients who received R-EPOCH, 4 experienced progression, all with 5PS of 4 to 5; salvage therapy (RT and autologous stem cell transplantation) was successful in all cases. Conclusion: Combined modality immunochemotherapy and RT is well tolerated and effective for treatment of PMBCL. A postchemotherapy 5PS of 4 to 5, rather than 3 to 5, can identify patients at high risk of progression who should be considered for therapy beyond

  16. INL Sitewide Institutional Controls Annual Report FY2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-08-01

    This document reports the results of the fiscal year 2006 institutional controls assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites at the Idaho National Laboratory. These activities are described in the INEEL Sitewide Institutional Control Plan. Inspections were performed by Long-term Stewardship Program personnel with representatives of the various facilities. The assessments showed that the various institutional control measures in place across the Idaho National Laboratory Site are functioning as intended. Information in the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan was reviewed as part of the annual assessment and was revised as needed to reflect the current status of the institutional control sites.

  17. Flexible Framework for Building Energy Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E.; Macumber, D.; Weaver, E.; Shekhar, D.

    2012-09-01

    In the building energy research and advanced practitioner communities, building models are perturbed across large parameter spaces to assess energy and cost performance in the face of programmatic and economic constraints. This paper describes the OpenStudio software framework for performing such analyses.

  18. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-March 31, 2003 2002 April 2 Dr. Bency John, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Isoscalar Giant Resonances in 12 C April 9 Professor J. Rapaport, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio Charge Exchange Reactions and Spin Transfer Measurements April 16 M. Sanchez-Vega and V. E. Jacob, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Test of the Unitarity of the CKM Matrix via Superallowed β + decay. April 23 Dr. Subrata Pal, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Strange Particle

  19. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Battelle Memorial Institute- EA-2007-07

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Battelle Memorial Institute related to Radiological Events and the Independent Assessment Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  20. Classification Training Institute Catalog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Classification Training Institute Catalog Classification Training Institute Catalog Classification Training Institute (CTI) Catalog

  1. Financial Institution Lending Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Financial institution loans for clean energy projects are originated and serviced through an entity other than the government, typically banks. In this case, a state or local government is not the...

  2. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  3. New England Fuel Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and CEO of the New England Fuel Institute Before the U.S. Department of Energy and the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Public Hearing on "New England Regional ...

  4. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PSI: the X-ray free electron laser SwissFEL and its future experimental capabilities. Biography: Prof. Dr. Jol Mesot is, since 2008, director of the Paul Scherrer Institute...

  5. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  6. People - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Dr. Ralf Rapp meets with his research group. At the Institute we focus on conducting basic research, educating students in accelerator-based science and technology, and providing technical capabilities for a wide variety of applications in space science, materials science, analytical procedures and nuclear medicine. Approximately 100 Institute members - scientists, engineers, technicians, support staff, graduate students and undergraduate students - are involved in these programs.

  7. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources The Critical Materials Institute offers connections to resources, including: List of resources U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table Government agency contacts CMI unique facilities CMI recent presentations Photographs via Flick'r: Critical Materials Institute, The Ames Laboratory Videos from The Ames Laboratory Webinars from Colorado School of Mines To offer comments on the CMI website or to ask questions, please contact us via e-mail at CMIdirector@ameslab.gov or call 515-296-4500.

  8. Site Map - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Cyclotron Institute About K500 Beam Schedule Recent News Seminars and Colloquia Cyclotron Institute Safety (limited access) Radiation Effects Facility REU Program Research Heavy Ion Reactions Fundamental Interactions Nuclear Astrophysics Interactions of Highly Charged Ions With Matter Theoretical Nuclear Physics Nuclear Structure External Collaborations Publications Research Groups Facilities K500 Cyclotron ECR Ion Sources MARS Big Sol MDM Spectrometer NIMROD Precision On-Line Decay

  9. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS April 1, 2010-March 31, 2011 2010 May 11 Dr. J. J. Ressler, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Surrogate Reactions for Nuclear Energy Application May 12 Professor Lie-Wen Chen, Institute of Nuclear, Particle Astronomy and Cosmology (INPAC) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China Probing the Nuclear Symmetry Energy with Heavy-Ion Reactions and Neutron Skin Thickness of Heavy Nuclei May 13 Professor A. R.

  10. Energy Department Releases Guidance for Implementation of Cybersecurity Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today released guidance to help the energy sector establish or align existing cybersecurity risk management programs to meet the objectives of the Cybersecurity Framework released by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) in February 2014. The voluntary Cybersecurity Framework consists of standards, guidelines, and practices to promote the protection of critical infrastructure and was developed in response to Executive Order 13636 “Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity” through collaboration between industry and government.

  11. Technical Meeting: Software Framework for Transactive Energy: VOLTTRON(tm)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 | Department of Energy Energy: VOLTTRON(tm) 2015 Technical Meeting: Software Framework for Transactive Energy: VOLTTRON(tm) 2015 On July 23 and 24, 2015, BTO held technical meetings graciously hosted by the Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute on a Software Framework for Transactive Energy: VOLTTRON(tm). The purpose of this meeting was to provide an overview of the VOLTTRON platform, present new developments and uses, discuss advancement of the Transactional Network concept, and

  12. Crystalline Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities in Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Crystalline Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities in Energy Research April 26, 2011 at 3pm/38-401A Mircea Dinca Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology dinca abstract: Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline solids wherein inorganic nodes are connected by organic ligands to give rise to highly ordered and monodisperse micropores with diameters ranging from 0.5 to ~ 2 nanometers. The micropores are

  13. Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices...

  14. Sci-Vis Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-03-11

    SVF is a full featured OpenGL 3d framework that allows for rapid creation of complex visualizations. The SVF framework handles much of the lifecycle and complex tasks required for a 3d visualization. Unlike a game framework SVF was designed to use fewer resources, work well in a windowed environment, and only render when necessary. The scene also takes advantage of multiple threads to free up the UI thread as much as possible. Shapes (actors) inmore » the scene are created by adding or removing functionality (through support objects) during runtime. This allows a highly flexible and dynamic means of creating highly complex actors without the code complexity (it also helps overcome the lack of multiple inheritance in Java.) All classes are highly customizable and there are abstract classes which are intended to be subclassed to allow a developer to create more complex and highly performant actors. There are multiple demos included in the framework to help the developer get started and shows off nearly all of the functionality. Some simple shapes (actors) are already created for you such as text, bordered text, radial text, text area, complex paths, NURBS paths, cube, disk, grid, plane, geometric shapes, and volumetric area. It also comes with various camera types for viewing that can be dragged, zoomed, and rotated. Picking or selecting items in the scene can be accomplished in various ways depending on your needs (raycasting or color picking.) The framework currently has functionality for tooltips, animation, actor pools, color gradients, 2d physics, text, 1d/2d/3d textures, children, blending, clipping planes, view frustum culling, custom shaders, and custom actor states« less

  15. GTT Framework | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Grid Tech Team » GTT Framework GTT Framework GTT Framework Strategic Framework The GTT proposes a strategic framework that organizes these activities into three interrelated dimensions (informational, analytical, and physical), representative of the systems nature of the grid. Each of these dimensions have a corresponding strategic focus: The informational dimension aims to improve the visibility of grid conditions. The analytical dimension increases our understanding of the implications of

  16. News - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News August 25th, 2016 12:46 AM "Texas A&M Science - Labors of Lab." REU student Kassie Marble featured in TAMU College of Science Video July 23rd, 2016 12:46 AM The 2015-2016 Cyclotron Institute Annual Report, "Progress in Research", is now available. You may view/download the complete document and you may also browse individual articles. July 7th, 2015 1:01 AM The 2014-2015 Cyclotron Institute Annual Report, "Progress in Research", is now available. You may

  17. Rahus Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rahus Institute is a policy organization located in Martinez, California. References About Rahus Institute Retrieved...

  18. Institutional Change Process for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For establishing institutional change in a federal agency to achieve sustainability or other energy efficiency goals, follow the five-step institutional change process.

  19. Ecologic Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Name: Ecologic Institute Address: Pfalzburger Strasse 4344 Place: Berlin, Germany Year Founded: 1995 Phone Number: +49 (30) 86880-0 Website: ecologic.eu...

  20. Strategies for Achieving Institutional Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many strategies—including those derived from Institutional Change Principles–may be used to effect institutional change in support of energy and sustainability objectives.

  1. Commitment Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Commitment can be a crucial element that helps federal agencies inject and emphasize sustainability in their organizational culture. Institutions and people change when they have made definite commitments to change, especially when those commitments relate to future conditions. Research shows that explicit commitments improve the rate at which people adopt energy-efficient behaviors.

  2. Use of Institutional Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    The Policy ensures that the Department of Energy will use institutional controls in the management of resources, facilities and properties under its control, and in implementing its programmatic responsibilities. Certified 1-28-11. Superseded by Chg 1 (Admin Chg), dated 12-7-15.

  3. Use of Institutional Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    The Policy ensures that the Department of Energy will use institutional controls in the management of resources, facilities and properties under its control, and in implementing its programmatic responsibilities. Certified 1-28-11. Supersedes DOE P 454.1, dated 4-9-03.

  4. EMN Framework Examples

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EMN Framework Examples Palo Alto, CA April 15, 2016 Neha Rustagi Technology Manager Fuel Cell Technologies Office | 2 New Material Innovations for Clean Energy 2X Faster and 2X Cheaper Predictive Simulation Across Scales Synthesis & Characterization Rapid Screening End Use Performance Process Scalability Process Control Real-time Characterization Reliability Validation Data Management & Informatics Coordinated resource network with a suite of capabilities for advanced materials R&D

  5. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting

  6. Isomerism in Metal-Organic Frameworks: "Framework Isomers" |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isomerism in Metal-Organic Frameworks: "Framework Isomers" Previous Next List Trevor A. Makal, Andrey A. Yakovenko, and Hong-Cai Zhou, J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2011, 2 (14), pp ...

  7. A Route to Metal-Organic Frameworks through Framework Templating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Route to Metal-Organic Frameworks through Framework Templating Previous Next List Zhangwen Wei, Weigang Lu, Hai-Long Jiang, and Hong-Cai Zhou, Inorg. Chem., 2013, 52 (3), pp ...

  8. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P.

    2014-08-19

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  9. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P

    2012-11-20

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  10. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  11. The institutional needs of joint implementation projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watt, E.; Sathaye, J.; Buen, O. de; Masera, O.; Gelil, I.A.; Ravindranath, N.H.; Zhou, D.; Li, J.; Intarapravich, D.

    1995-10-21

    In this paper, the authors discuss options for developing institutions for joint implementation (JI) projects. They focus on the tasks which are unique to JI projects or require additional institutional needs--accepting the project by the host and investor countries and assessing the project`s greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction or sequestration--and they suggest the types of institutions that would enhance their performance. The evaluation is based on four sets of governmental and international criteria for JI projects, the experiences of ten pilot JI projects, and the perspectives of seven collaborating authors from China, Egypt, India, Mexico, and Thailand, who interviewed relevant government and non-government staff involved in JI issue assessment in their countries. After examining the roles for potential JI institutions, they present early findings arguing for a decentralized national JI structure, which includes: (1) national governmental panels providing host country acceptance of proposed JI projects; (2) project parties providing the assessment data on the GHG reduction or sequestration for the projects; (3) technical experts calculating these GHG flows; (4) certified verification teams checking the GHG calculations; and (5) members of an international JI Secretariat training and certifying the assessors, as well as resolving challenges to the verifications. 86 refs.

  12. Nuclear Energy Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NEI) Summit Presentation University-Industry- Laboratory Partnerships: Gauging Effectiveness Douglas Kothe, CASL Director Oak Ridge National Laboratory February 26, 2014 CASL-U-2014-0355-000 CASL-U-2014-0355-000 University-Industry-Laboratory Partnerships Gauging Effectiveness CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub Douglas B. Kothe Oak Ridge National Laboratory Director, CASL 9 th Nuclear Energy R&D Summit Nuclear Energy Institute

  13. Publications - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications "Progress in Research", Cyclotron Institute Annual Reports View individual articles: 2016 / 2015 / 2014 / 2013 / 2012 / 2011 / 2010 / 2009 / 2008 / 2007 / 2006 / 2005 / 2004 / 2003 / 2002 / 2001 / 2000 / 1999 Download complete documents: 2016 / 2015 / 2014 / 2013 / 2012 / 2011 / 2010 / 2009 / 2008 / 2007 / 2006 / 2005 / 2004 / 2003 List of Papers Published by Year 2012 / 2011 / 2010 / 2009 / 2008 / 2007/ 2006 / 2005 / 2004 / 2003 / 2002 / 2001 / 2000 / 1999 / 1998 / 1997 /

  14. Research - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Viewing gamma ray spectra. The Institute research program focuses on the atomic nucleus, a many-body system of strongly interacting constituents bound together by the strongest forces known in nature. The properties investigated often can be described in terms of the motions of single nucleons (neutrons and protons), the correlated motions of several nucleons, and the collective motions of many nucleons. On a finer scale, they can be understood in terms of the degrees of freedom of

  15. Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Four Research Thrusts organizational chart of four research thrusts (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses for leaders.) CMI has more than 30 projects focused in four areas. Project titles are available in a table, which can be sorted by project leader, location of project leader, project title or project number. CMI research is conducted at partner institutions, including national laboratories, universities and

  16. SRF Institute | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SRF Institute Jefferson Lab is recognized as a world leader in accelerator science. This expertise comes from the planning, building, maintaining and operating of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) - the lab's particle accelerator. CEBAF is based on superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology and produces a stream of charged electrons that scientists use to probe the nucleus of the atom. CEBAF was the first large-scale application of SRF technology in the U.S., and it

  17. Contact - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Website Manager Bruce Hyman Email: hyman@comp.tamu.edu Mailing Address Cyclotron Institute Texas A&M University 3366 TAMU College Station, TX, 77843-3366 Campus Location Luedecke Building / Building #434 Campus Map Google Map Phone Number 979-845-1411 Fax Number 979-845-1899 Directory Graduate Faculty Full Directory For Information about Graduate Studies Contact: Professor Che Ming Ko Email: ko@comp.tamu.edu For Potential Use of Our Facility Contact: Professor Sherry J. Yennello

  18. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-March 31, 2002 2001 April 10 Dr. Massimo Di Toro, LNS/INFN and the University of Catania, Italy Isospin Effects on Nuclear Dynamics April 12 Dr. C. Lewis, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle, North Carolina Air Pollution Research Using Radiocarbon Measurements April 17 Professor Olga Kocharovskaya, Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Laser Control of Mossbauer Nuclear Transitions May 1 Dr. Bency John, Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M

  19. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-March 31, 2007 2006 April 6 Dr. Jamal Jalilian-Marian, Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington An Introduction to Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions April 7 Professor Taka Kajino, National Astronomical Observatory, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan A Frontier of Nuclear Astrophysics: Big-Bang Cosmology and Supernova Nucleosynthesis April 19 Dr. Anna Stasto, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York High Energy Limit and Parton

  20. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7-March 31, 2008 2007 April 5 Dr. Nigel Orr, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, France Probing Nuclear Structure Far from Stability: from Breakup to Knockout April 10 Dr. Lie-wen Chen, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China Probing the Nuclear Symmetry Energy with Heavy-Ion Reactions Induced by Neutron- Rich Nuclei April 11 Dr. Nigel Orr, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie,

  1. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09-March 31, 2010 2009 April 17 Professor Jian-Wei Qiu, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York QCD and High Energy Nuclear Collisions April 21 Dr. Peter Levai, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary Can We Find Quark-Gluon Plasma in pp Collision at LHC? April 28 Professor Wolfgang Mittig, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Nuclear Power and Global Energy

  2. Robust Systems Test Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-01-01

    The Robust Systems Test Framework (RSTF) provides a means of specifying and running test programs on various computation platforms. RSTF provides a level of specification above standard scripting languages. During a set of runs, standard timing information is collected. The RSTF specification can also gather job-specific information, and can include ways to classify test outcomes. All results and scripts can be stored into and retrieved from an SQL database for later data analysis. RSTF alsomore » provides operations for managing the script and result files, and for compiling applications and gathering compilation information such as optimization flags.« less

  3. Spark Distributed Analytic Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apache Spark Spark Distributed Analytic Framework Description and Overview Apache Spark(tm) is a fast and general engine for large-scale data processing. How to Use Spark Because of its high memory and I/O bandwidth requirements, we recommend you run your spark jobs on Cori. Follow the steps below to use spark, note that the order of the commands matters. DO NOT load the spark module until you are inside a batch job. Interactive mode Submit an interactive batch job with at least 2 nodes: salloc

  4. Utilization Technology Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utilization Technology Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Utilization Technology Institute Place: Des Plaines, IL References: Utilization Technology Institute1...

  5. Ethiopian Development Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethiopian Development Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ethiopian Development Research Institute Name: Ethiopian Development Research Institute Address: Ethiopia...

  6. CMI Social Media | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Social Media Facebook: Critical Materials Institute Twitter: CMI_hub LinkedIn: Critical Materials Institute Flickr: Critical Materials Institute

  7. The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Excellence | Department of Energy The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence Report provides an assessment of the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Energy and Water Management Awards program to identify the institutional elements of award-winning projects and analyze the relative emphasis placed on them. Download the FEMP Awards Program:

  8. Risk Assessment & Management Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NRC - A Proposed Risk Management Regulatory Framework, April 2012 Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) web page DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation Workshop on Risk Assessment and Safety Decision Making Under Uncertainty

  9. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    05/2010 Teppei Katori, MIT 1 Teppei Katori for the MiniBooNE collaboration Massachusetts Institute of Technology U-Maryland Nuclear/HEP seminar, College Park, October, 5, 2010 MiniBooNE, a neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab 10/05/2010 Teppei Katori, MIT 2 Outline 1. Introduction 2. Neutrino beam 3. Events in the detector 4. Cross section model 5. Oscillation analysis and result 6. New Low energy excess result 7. Anti-neutrino oscillation result 8. Neutrino disappearance result 9.

  10. LIG - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Ion Guide Light Ion Guide. Texas A&M University is currently configuring a scheme for the production of radioactive-ion beams that incorporates a light-ion guide (LIG) coupled with an ECRIS constructed for charge-boosting (CB-ECRIS). This scheme is part of an upgrade to the Cyclotron Institute and is intended to produce radioactive beams suitable for injection into the K500 superconducting cyclotron. The Light-Ion Guide (LIG) will produce radioactive species mainly from (p,n)

  11. Cyclotron Institute REU Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Texas A&M Science - Labors of Lab." REU student Kassie Marble featured in TAMU College of Science Video The Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute, with support from the National Science Foundation, serves as a Research Experiences for Undergraduates site during the summer of each year. Alysssa Dibidad in the K150 control room. This REU site focuses on research in nuclear and particle science. Students will have the opportunity to work closely with internationally renowned scientists

  12. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-March 31, 2005 2004 April 8 Dr. Jeffrey W. Martin, Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Ultracold Neutrons April 20 Professor J. W. Watson, Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio Short-range Correlations in Nuclei from (p,2p+n) and (e,e'p+N) Measurements May 10 Mr. Sean Liddick, NSCL- Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan The Evolution of Shell Structure in the A~60 Mass Region May 25 Dr. Juha Ärje, Department of

  13. Proceedings of the distributed utility valuation project institutional issues workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    These proceedings summarize the discussions during a one-day working session on institutional issues related to the distributed utility (DU) concept. The purpose of the session was to provide an initial assessment of the {open_quotes}institutional{close_quotes} issues, including legal, regulatory, industry structure, utility organization, competition, and related matters that may affect the development and the relationships among distributed utility stakeholders. The assessment was to identify institutional barriers to utilities realizing benefits of the distributed concept (should these benefits be confirmed), as well as to identify opportunities for utilities and other stakeholders for moving ahead to more easily capture these benefits.

  14. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  15. Preparation of metal-triazolate frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J; Gandara-Barragan, Felipe; Britt, David K

    2014-10-07

    The disclosure provides for novel metal-triazolate frameworks, methods of use thereof, and devices comprising the frameworks thereof.

  16. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of Contents...

  17. 2011 Annual IC Assessment Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of ... of Sitewide Institutional Controls, Mound Site U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  18. ORISE: Dose modeling and assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers dose modeling and assessment services to demonstrate that federal andor state regulatory compliance requirements...

  19. ORISE: Hazard Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazard Assessments The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) analyzes accumulated data to identify potential workplace hazards to which individuals or groups of workers may be exposed. ORISE assesses both chemical and radiation exposures, and conducts both internal and external radiation dose assessments. Our capabililities include: Linkage of exposure data to site rosters Assessment of retrospective exposures Preparation of assessment protocols Design and testing of dose

  20. A framework for selecting indicators of bioenergy sustainability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dale, Virginia H; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Kline, Keith L; Davitt, Marcia S

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: A framework for selecting and evaluating indicators of bioenergy sustainability is presented. This framework is designed to facilitate decision-making about which indicators are useful for assessing sustainability of bioenergy systems and supporting their deployment. Efforts to develop sustainability indicators in the United States and Europe are reviewed. The fi rst steps of the framework for indicator selection are defi ning the sustainability goals and other goals for a bioenergy project or program, gaining an understanding of the context, and identifying the values of stakeholders. From the goals, context, and stakeholders, the objectives for analysis and criteria for indicator selectionmore » can be developed. The user of the framework identifi es and ranks indicators, applies them in an assessment, and then evaluates their effectiveness, while identifying gaps that prevent goals from being met, assessing lessons learned, and moving toward best practices. The framework approach emphasizes that the selection of appropriate criteria and indicators is driven by the specifi c purpose of an analysis. Realistic goals and measures of bioenergy sustainability can be developed systematically with the help of the framework presented here.« less

  1. Integrative Bioengineering Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddington, David; Magin,L,Richard; Hetling, John; Cho, Michael

    2009-01-09

    Microfabrication enables many exciting experimental possibilities for medicine and biology that are not attainable through traditional methods. However, in order for microfabricated devices to have an impact they must not only provide a robust solution to a current unmet need, but also be simple enough to seamlessly integrate into standard protocols. Broad dissemination of bioMEMS has been stymied by the common aim of replacing established and well accepted protocols with equally or more complex devices, methods, or materials. The marriage of a complex, difficult to fabricate bioMEMS device with a highly variable biological system is rarely successful. Instead, the design philosophy of my lab aims to leverage a beneficial microscale phenomena (e.g. fast diffusion at the microscale) within a bioMEMS device and adapt to established methods (e.g. multiwell plate cell culture) and demonstrate a new paradigm for the field (adapt instead of replace). In order for the field of bioMEMS to mature beyond novel proof-of-concept demonstrations, researchers must focus on developing systems leveraging these phenomena and integrating into standard labs, which have largely been ignored. Towards this aim, the Integrative Bioengineering Institute has been established.

  2. Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Report Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Scott

    2011-03-23

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program was established to ensure that Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is implemented institutionally and by all divisions. The ES&H Self-Assessment Program, managed by the Office of Contractor Assurance (OCA), provides for an internal evaluation of all ES&H programs and systems at LBNL. The primary objective of the program is to ensure that work is conducted safely and with minimal negative impact to workers, the public, and the environment. Self-assessment follows the five core functions and guiding principles of ISM. Self-assessment is the mechanism used to promote the continuous improvement of the Laboratory's ES&H programs. The process is described in the Environment, Safety, and Health Assurance Plan (PUB-5344) and is composed of three types of self-assessments: Division ES&H Self-Assessment, ES&H Technical Assurance Program Assessment, and Division ES&H Peer Review. The Division ES&H Self-Assessment Manual (PUB-3105) provides the framework by which divisions conduct formal ES&H self-assessments to systematically identify program deficiencies. Issue-specific assessments are designed and implemented by the divisions and focus on areas of interest to division management. They may be conducted by teams and involve advance planning to ensure that appropriate resources are available. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program Manual (PUB-913E) provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs and processes. The ES&H Technical Assurance Program Assessment is designed to evaluate whether ES&H programs and processes are compliant with guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented by LBNL divisions. The Division ES&H Peer Review Manual provides the framework by which division ISM systems are evaluated and improved. Peer Reviews are conducted by teams under the direction of senior division management and focus on higher-level management

  3. Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

  4. Stage 3b: Assessing Opportunities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stage 3b: Assessing Opportunities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3b LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities...

  5. Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Large Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transformers; Interim Report for FY 2012 | Department of Energy for Large Power Transformers; Interim Report for FY 2012 Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Large Power Transformers; Interim Report for FY 2012 The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is a research, development, and deployment program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. The program is operated in collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's)

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory Institutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Institutes The National Security Education Center has formed several institutes, each with a partner university or consortia of universities. The formation of these institutes serves the need for LANL to recruit new staff and provide educational opportunities that will enhance retention at the Laboratory. This is accomplished by:  Developing long-term collaborative relationships with universities whose research interests are important to the Laboratory. 

  7. Izabela Stroe: Worcester Polytechnic Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Izabela Stroe: Worcester Polytechnic Institute Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Izabela Stroe: Worcester Polytechnic Institute Former postdoc, now collaborator November 1, 2014 Izabela Stroe Izabela Stroe Contact Linda Anderman Email Izabela Stroe Izabela Stroe now at Worcester Polytechnic Institute Izabela Stroe's history with the Lab dates back to 2001 and over the years she's been a summer student,

  8. PNNL: About PNNL - Institutional Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we engage at the institutional level, inviting them to provide input into the Laboratory strategy. Joint Appointments To enable long term strategic collaborations with...

  9. Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Institutional change integrates technology, policy, and behavior to make new sustainability practices and perspectives become a typical part of how an agency operates.

  10. Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ecause it takes time to establish institutional change, federal agencies need multiyear plans that continuously work to achieve, reinforce, and improve significant and persistent sustainability goals.

  11. Atlanta Community Leaders’ Institute Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atlanta Community Leaders Institute (CLI) held a conference on February 8 and 9 at Morehouse School of Medicine, in Atlanta, Georgia.

  12. Bolton Community Leaders’ Institute Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bolton Community Leaders Institute (CLI) held a conference on February 22 and 23 at the Southeastern Community College in Whiteville, North Carolina.

  13. Research and Institutional Integrity Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about any of these ethics policies and related procedures, please contact Meredith Montgomery, Director of Institutional Assurance and Integrity, at 510-486-4453 or...

  14. My Account | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    My Account Primary tabs Log in(active tab) Request new password Username * Enter your Critical Materials Institute username. Password * Enter the password that accompanies your ...

  15. Honda Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Honda Research Institute Place: Mountain View, California Sector: Biofuels, Solar Product: California-based research institute of Honda. The institute conducts...

  16. Rocky Mountain Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rocky Mountain Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Rocky Mountain Institute Name: Rocky Mountain Institute Address: 1820 Folsom Street Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80302...

  17. Industrial Technology Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Industrial Technology Research Institute Name: Industrial Technology Research Institute Address: Rm. 112, Bldg. 24,...

  18. Sustainable Europe Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Europe Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sustainable Europe Research Institute Name: Sustainable Europe Research Institute Address: Garnisongasse 721 A -1090...

  19. Form:Research Institution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Research Institution Jump to: navigation, search Add a Research or Development Institution Input your research or development institution name below to add to the registry. If your...

  20. Low Carbon Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Low Carbon Research Institute Name: Low Carbon Research Institute Address: King Edward VII Avenue CF10 3NB Place: Cardiff,...

  1. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cornell Fuel Cell Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cornell Fuel Cell Institute Place: Ithaca, New York Zip: 14850 Product: The Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI)...

  2. GHG Management Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GHG Management Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: GHG Management Institute Address: Greenhouse Gas Management Institute 9215 View Avenue NW Seattle, WA USA 98117 Place:...

  3. Hitachi Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hitachi Research Institute Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 101-8010 Product: Hitachi Research Institute is the think tank of the Hitachi...

  4. UC Berkeley- Energy Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Berkeley- Energy Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UC Berkeley- Energy Institute Name: UC Berkeley- Energy Institute Address: 2547 Channing Way Place: Berkeley,...

  5. Technical Meeting on the Software Framework for Transactive Energy: VOLTTRON’

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR TRANSACTIVE ENERGY: VOLTTRON(tm) 1 Hosted by the Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute 900 Glebe Rd., Arlington, VA 22203 July 23-24, 2015 Technical Meeting on the Software Framework for Transactive Energy: VOLTTRON(tm) T h e D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y O f f i c e o f E n e r g y E f f i c i e n c y a n d R e n e w a b l e E n e r g y B U I L D I N G T E C H N O L O G I E S O F F I C E SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR TRANSACTIVE ENERGY: VOLTTRON(tm) 2 Welcome The

  6. Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The first step in the institutional change process is defining your federal agency's sustainability goals. That is, decide what outcomes are desired (or required) over what period of time. Behavioral, organizational, and institutional changes typically are means to achieve desired energy, resource, or greenhouse gas emission outcomes. They are not ends in and of themselves.

  7. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  8. Sample Business Plan Framework 5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 5: A program that establishes itself as a government entity, then operates using a fee-based structure.

  9. Sample Business Plan Framework 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  10. Sample Business Plan Framework 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 4: A program seeking to continue in the post-grant period as a marketing contractor to a utility.

  11. Sample Business Plan Framework 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 3: A government entity running a Commercial PACE program in the post-grant period.

  12. Sample Business Plan Framework 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  13. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, suchmore » as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed« less

  14. ORISE: Environmental assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental assessments An ORISE technicians performs an environmental assessment The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective environmental assessments to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, these environmental assessments provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of

  15. Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gas Technology Institute Place: Des Plaines, IL Website:...

  16. Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Smart Manufacturing: Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation Institute for Smart Manufacturing: Advanced Sensors, Controls, Platforms, and Modeling for Manufacturing Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Smart Manufacturing: ...

  17. Denver University - International Institute for Environment and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - International Institute for Environment and Enterprise Name: Denver University - International Institute for Environment and Enterprise Address: 2199 S. University Blvd....

  18. Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. .........32 Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls ...

  19. Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. .........49 Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls ...

  20. Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. .........52 Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls ...

  1. Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. .........34 Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls ...

  2. Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. .........33 Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls ...

  3. Plumbing Manufacturer's Institute Ex Parte Communication Regarding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plumbing Manufacturer's Institute Ex Parte Communication Regarding Showerheads Plumbing Manufacturer's Institute Ex Parte Communication Regarding Showerheads Letter to Department ...

  4. Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites Materials and Structures Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites Materials and Structures ...

  5. Officials Establish Training Institute, Creating Enterprise Solution for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Worker Safety | Department of Energy Officials Establish Training Institute, Creating Enterprise Solution for Worker Safety Officials Establish Training Institute, Creating Enterprise Solution for Worker Safety March 31, 2016 - 12:50pm Addthis Pictured, front row, left to right, EM Assistant Secretary Monica Regalbuto and DOE Independent Enterprise Assessments Director Glenn Podonsky; back row, left to right: Evan Dunne, National Training Center, Special Projects; Ted Giltz, HAMMER/Mission

  6. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  7. International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Expert meetings in Romania May 28, 2014 - 12:37pm Addthis International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation ...

  8. ICF Program Framework | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Program Framework 2016 Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Framework, U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security ...

  9. A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Conceptual Framework for...

  10. Site Transition Framework | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Transition Framework (April 2004) PDF icon Site Transition Framework More Documents & Publications Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title ...

  11. Multiple Motivations Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The multiple motivations principle suggests that a portfolio approach—rather than a single strategy—may be required to achieve change. Research demonstrates that people and institutions adopt new...

  12. Hydraulic Institute Mission and Vision:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institute Mission and Vision: Vision: To be a global authority on pumps and pumping systems. Mission: To be a value-adding resource to member companies and pump users worldwide by: * Developing and delivering comprehensive industry standards. * Expanding knowledge by providing education and tools for the effective application, testing, installation, operation and maintenance of pumps and pumping systems. * Serving as a forum for the exchange of industry information. The Hydraulic Institute is a

  13. Institutional Support | Grid Modernization | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) Institutional Research & Development Functions The Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D, a program office part of the NNSA Office of Defense Programs, advocates for and manages NNSA's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and Site Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Programs, with SDRD work performed at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This includes providing strategic R&D guidance and support,

  14. Latest News | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News News releases CMI in the news News archive CMI social media Latest News News about CMI: Critical Materials Institute, Oddello Industries pursue recovery of rare-earth magnets from used hard drives, August 16, 2016 Solar panels power materials exhibit at Geology Museum, August 2, 2016 New alloy promises to boost rare earth production while improving energy efficiency of engines, June 3, 2016 Critical Materials Institute gains ten industrial and research affiliates, April 11, 2016 On

  15. Creating an Ethical Framework for Studies That Involve the Worker Community

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) DOE Resources » Creating an Ethical Framework for Studies That Involve the Worker Community Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP) HSPP Home About Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) Education and Resources CITI Courses DOE Resources Ethical Framework Informed Consent Special Research Categories Community IRB Member Resources Other Resources Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD) IRB7 Regulations and Requirements Glossary Abbreviations Contact BER Home

  16. NIST Releases Test Framework for Upgrading of Smart Meters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Releases Test Framework for Upgrading of Smart Meters NIST Releases Test Framework for Upgrading of Smart Meters July 12, 2012 - 10:46am Addthis The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has released a draft set of guidelines that will help utilities test their procedures for upgrading their smart meters securely from a remote location and determine whether their procedures conform with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Standard for Smart Grid

  17. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such asmore » time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.« less

  18. Institutional Change for Sustainability | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Change » Institutional Change for Sustainability Institutional Change for Sustainability Inspire Change with an Awards Program Inspire Change with an Awards Program Report shares 22 stories of FEMP Federal Energy and Water Management Award winners whose projects fostered institutional change in agencies. Read more Promote Institutional Change Promote Institutional Change This magazine article provides practical, evidence-based strategies to promote institutional change. Read more

  19. Align Your Lessons to the Energy Literacy Framework and NGSS | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Align Your Lessons to the Energy Literacy Framework and NGSS Align Your Lessons to the Energy Literacy Framework and NGSS Use our Energy Literacy Alignment Tool to assess how many Fundamental Concepts your activity or curriculum addresses, or use it as a tool for building a curriculum that addresses the entire range of Fundamental Concepts. You can also see how the Energy Literacy Framework's principles and concepts align with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

  20. Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance The Site Transition Framework (STF) provides a framework ...

  1. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework February 2012 Presentation that outlines the rules, policies and orders that comprise the Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework (438.96 KB) More Documents & Publications Summary Pamphlet, Nuclear Safety at the Department of Energy CX-014643: Categorical Exclusion Determination Notice of Violation, UChicago Argonne, LLC - WEA-2009-04

  2. QER - Comment of Electric Power Research Institute 3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Research Institute 3 QER - Comment of Electric Power Research Institute 3 From: Wayland, Karen Sent: Friday, November 07, 2014 11:43 AM To: QERcomments Subject: FW: EPRI's Integrated Grid Attachment: EPRI Integrated Grid021014.pdf; EPRI Integrated Grid Benefit-Cost Framework 08 29 2014.pdf From: Tyran, Barbara [mailto:BTyran@epri.com] Sent: Friday, October 03, 2014 12:34 PM To: Wayland, Karen Subject: FW: EPRI's Integrated Grid Karen: Thanks very much for your public outreach.

  3. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Laboratories' Strategic Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategic Framework Vision, Mission, and Values Strategic Framework Mission Areas Laboratories Foundation Strategic Objectives and Crosscuts About Strategic Framework strategic framework Sandia continues to be engaged in the significant demands of the nation's nuclear weapons modernization program while conducting a whole range of activities in broader national security. The Laboratories' strategic framework drives strategic decisions about the totality of our work and has positioned our

  5. Institutional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Marketing Resources Reports, Publications, and Research Agricultural Commercial Consumer...

  6. Category:Academic Institutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    title"Alternative Energy Institute">Alternative Energy Institute","title":"Alternative Energy Institute","link":null,"lat":34.9848017,"lon":-101.9100121,"alt":0,"add...

  7. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Garth; Long, Darrell; Honeyman, Peter; Grider, Gary; Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Roth, Philip; Felix, Evan; Ward, Lee

    2013-07-01

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability.The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools.The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  8. Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evaluate public and private sector capacity (e.g., institutional, governance, financial) to support initiatives Assess biophysical and economic potential for these...

  9. Australian Solar Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Australian Solar Institute Place: Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Zip: 2300 Sector: Solar Product: New South Wales-based institute providing support...

  10. International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by working collaboratively with other institutions -building long term strategic alliances, while retaining the institutional agility necessary to confront the challenges of...