National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for aspen populus tremuloides

  1. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  2. ASPEN costing manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwint, K.J.

    1986-07-25

    The ASPEN program contains within it a Cost Estimation System (CES) which estimates the purchase cost and utility consumption rates for major pieces of equipment in a process flowsheet as well as installed equipment costs. These estimates are ''preliminary-study grade'' with an accuracy of plus or minus 30%. The ASPEN program also contains within it an Economic Evaluation System (EES) which estimates overall capital investment costs, annual operating expenses and profitability indices for a chemical plant. This ASPEN costing manual has been written as a guide for those inexperienced in the use of ASPEN and unfamiliar with standard cost estimating techniques who want to use the ASPEN CES and EES. The ASPEN Costing Manual is comprised of the following sections: (1) Introduction, (2) ASPEN Input Language, (3) ASPEN Cost Estimation System (CES), (4) ASPEN Cost Blocks; and (5) ASPEN Economic Evaluation System (EES).

  3. Aspen Pipeline | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Aspen Pipeline Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77057 Product: US firm which acquires, builds and owns pipelines, gathering systems and distribution systems....

  4. Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge April 27, 2016 'Solving the Rubik's Cube 2.0' includes 3D simulation LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 26, 2016-Andy Corliss, Phillip Ionkov and Ming Lo of Aspen Elementary, and Max Corliss of Los Alamos Middle School won first place in the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge for their project, "Solving the Rubik's Cube 2.0," Tuesday at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They created a

  5. City of Aspen- Renewable Energy Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: As of September 2015, Aspen obtains 100% of its electricity from renewable sources (46% hydroelectric, 53% wind, 1% landfill gas).

  6. Reaching 100% Renewable Energy, City of Aspen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    This brochure describes the analysis and process used by NREL to assist the City of Aspen in attaining its 100% renewable energy goal.

  7. City of Aspen- Energy Assessment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Aspen encourages interested residents and businesses to increase the energy efficiency of homes and offices through the Energy Assessment Program. Participating homes and offices must...

  8. Aspen Environmental Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:www.aspeneg.comhome.shtml The Mission "Aspen Environmental Group is dedicated to continuous improvement in the understanding of the relationships between human activities...

  9. City of Aspen, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aspen, Colorado (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Aspen Place: Colorado Phone Number: 970- 920-5148 Website: www.aspenpitkin.comDepartment Outage...

  10. Aspen, Colorado: Community Energy Strategic Planning Process | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Aspen, Colorado: Community Energy Strategic Planning Process Aspen, Colorado: Community Energy Strategic Planning Process This presentation features Lee Ledesma, utilities operations manager with the City of Aspen, Colorado. Ledesma provides an overview of the City of Aspen's experience in putting together a financing strategy for meeting community energy goals. View the presentation above or read the transcript.

  11. Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0305)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that a variety of basic models of split-system air conditioning heat pumps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  12. Updraft Fixed Bed Gasification Aspen Plus Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-09-27

    The updraft fixed bed gasification model provides predictive modeling capabilities for updraft fixed bed gasifiers, when devolatilization data is available. The fixed bed model is constructed using Aspen Plus, process modeling software, coupled with a FORTRAN user kinetic subroutine. Current updraft gasification models created in Aspen Plus have limited predictive capabilities and must be "tuned" to reflect a generalized gas composition as specified in literature or by the gasifier manufacturer. This limits the applicability of the process model.

  13. Updraft Fixed Bed Gasification Aspen Plus Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-09-27

    The updraft fixed bed gasification model provides predictive modeling capabilities for updraft fixed bed gasifiers, when devolatilization data is available. The fixed bed model is constructed using Aspen Plus, process modeling software, coupled with a FORTRAN user kinetic subroutine. Current updraft gasification models created in Aspen Plus have limited predictive capabilities and must be "tuned" to reflect a generalized gas composition as specified in literature or by the gasifier manufacturer. This limits the applicability ofmore » the process model.« less

  14. Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SE-1602)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that indoor unit model AEW244 and outdoor unit model NCPC-424-3010 of residential split system central air conditioning system do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  15. Automated Design Space Exploration with Aspen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Spafford, Kyle L.; Vetter, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Architects and applications scientists often use performance models to explore a multidimensional design space of architectural characteristics, algorithm designs, and application parameters. With traditional performance modeling tools, these explorations forced users to first develop a performance model and then repeatedly evaluate and analyze the model manually. These manual investigations proved laborious and error prone. More importantly, the complexity of this traditional process often forced users to simplify their investigations. To address this challenge of design space exploration, we extend our Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation) language with three new language constructs: user-defined resources, parameter ranges, and a collection ofmore » costs in the abstract machine model. Then, we use these constructs to enable automated design space exploration via a nonlinear optimization solver. We show how four interesting classes of design space exploration scenarios can be derived from Aspen models and formulated as pure nonlinear programs. The analysis tools are demonstrated using examples based on Aspen models for a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform, the CoMD molecular dynamics proxy application, and the DARPA Streaming Sensor Challenge Problem. Our results show that this approach can compose and solve arbitrary performance modeling questions quickly and rigorously when compared to the traditional manual approach.« less

  16. Reaching 100% Renewable Energy, City of Aspen (Fact Sheet), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REACHING 100% RENEWABLE ENERGY City of Aspen and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory develop and implement a strategy to cost-effectively reach a ground- breaking goal In...

  17. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Shaw Construction, Aspen...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Shaw Construction Burlingame Ranch Phase 1 | Aspen, CO PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: New home Type: Single- and multi-family Builder: Shaw Construction, Grand Junction, CO, ...

  18. Epigenomics of Development in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, Steve; Freitag, Michael; Mockler, Todd

    2013-01-10

    We conducted research to determine the role of epigenetic modifications during tree development using poplar (Populus trichocarpa), a model woody feedstock species. Using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) or chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), followed by high-throughput sequencing, we are analyzed DNA and histone methylation patterns in the P. trichocarpa genome in relation to four biological processes: bud dormancy and release, mature organ maintenance, in vitro organogenesis, and methylation suppression. Our project is now completed. We have 1) produced 22 transgenic events for a gene involved in DNA methylation suppression and studied its phenotypic consequences; 2) completed sequencing of methylated DNA from eleven target tissues in wildtype P. trichocarpa; 3) updated our customized poplar genome browser using the open-source software tools (2.13) and (V2.2) of the P. trichocarpa genome; 4) produced summary data for genome methylation in P. trichocarpa, including distribution of methylation across chromosomes and in and around genes; 5) employed bioinformatic and statistical methods to analyze differences in methylation patterns among tissue types; and 6) used bisulfite sequencing of selected target genes to confirm bioinformatics and sequencing results, and gain a higher-resolution view of methylation at selected genes 7) compared methylation patterns to expression using available microarray data. Our main findings of biological significance are the identification of extensive regions of the genome that display developmental variation in DNA methylation; highly distinctive gene-associated methylation profiles in reproductive tissues, particularly male catkins; a strong whole genome/all tissue inverse association of methylation at gene bodies and promoters with gene expression; a lack of evidence that tissue specificity of gene expression is associated with gene methylation; and evidence that genome methylation is a significant impediment to tissue

  19. Aspen Clean Fuels Ltd ACF Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd) Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC4M 7BA Product: UK mother company of Aspen Invest AB. Coordinates: 51.506325, -0.127144 Show Map Loading map......

  20. Aspen: A Domain Specific Language for Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spafford, Kyle L; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach to analytical performance modeling using Aspen, a domain specific language. Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation) fills an important gap in existing performance modeling techniques and is designed to enable rapid exploration of new algorithms and architectures. It includes a formal specification of an application's performance behavior and an abstract machine model. We provide an overview of Aspen's features and demonstrate how it can be used to express a performance model for a three dimensional Fast Fourier Transform. We then demonstrate the composability and modularity of Aspen by importing and reusing the FFT model in a molecular dynamics model. We have also created a number of tools that allow scientists to balance application and system factors quickly and accurately.

  1. City of Aspen and Pitkin County- Renewable Energy Mitigation Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Aspen and Pitkin County have adopted both the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)—with some amendments—and an Efficient Building Code. 

  2. City of Aspen- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Aspen encourages interested residents and businesses to increase the energy efficiency of homes and offices through rebates and incentives for both single-family and multi-family...

  3. Aspen Hill, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Aspen Hill is a census-designated place in Montgomery County, Maryland.1 References US Census Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA...

  4. The genome of black cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa (Torr.&Gray)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, G.A.; DiFazio, S.; Jansson, S.; Bohlmann, J.; Grigoriev,I.; Hellsten, U.; Putnam, N.; Ralph, S.; Rombauts, S.; Salamov, A.; Schein, J.; Sterck, L.; Aerts, A.; Bhalerao, R.R.; Bhalerao, R.P.; Blaudez, D.; Boerjan, W.; Brun, A.; Brunner, A.; Busov, V.; Campbell, M.; Carlson, J.; Chalot, M.; Chapman, J.; Chen, G.-L.; Cooper, D.; Coutinho,P.M.; Couturier, J.; Covert, S.; Cronk, Q.; Cunningham, R.; Davis, J.; Degroeve, S.; Dejardin, A.; dePamphillis, C.; Detter, J.; Dirks, B.; Dubchak, I.; Duplessis, S.; Ehiting, J.; Ellis, B.; Gendler, K.; Goodstein, D.; Gribskov, M.; Grimwood, J.; Groover, A.; Gunter, L.; Hamberger, B.; Heinze, B.; Helariutta, Y.; Henrissat, B.; Holligan, D.; Holt, R.; Huang, W.; Islam-Faridi, N.; Jones, S.; Jones-Rhoades, M.; Jorgensen, R.; Joshi, C.; Kangasjarvi, J.; Karlsson, J.; Kelleher, C.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Kirst, M.; Kohler, A.; Kalluri, U.; Larimer, F.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Leple, J.-C.; Locascio, P.; Lou, Y.; Lucas, S.; Martin,F.; Montanini, B.; Napoli, C.; Nelson, D.R.; Nelson, D.; Nieminen, K.; Nilsson, O.; Peter, G.; Philippe, R.; Pilate, G.; Poliakov, A.; Razumovskaya, J.; Richardson, P.; Rinaldi, C.; Ritland, K.; Rouze, P.; Ryaboy, D.; Schmutz, J.; Schrader, J.; Segerman, B.; Shin, H.; Siddiqui,A.; Sterky, F.; Terry, A.; Tsai, C.; Uberbacher, E.; Unneberg, P.; Vahala, J.; Wall, K.; Wessler, S.; Yang, G.; Yin, T.; Douglas, C.; Marra,M.; Sandberg, G.; Van der Peer, Y.; Rokhsar, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. Over 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event, with approximately 8,000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event surviving in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially slower in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average between 1.4-1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with disease resistance, meristem development, metabolite transport and lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis.

  5. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  6. Fungal diversity within the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Fungal diversity within the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere Fungal diversity within the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere This presentation was given by Gerald Tuskan at the Symbiosis Conference. symbiosis_conference_tuskan.pdf (1.76 MB) More Documents & Publications Symbiosis Conference Speaker and Attendee List Consent Order, UT-Battelle, LLC Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System Audits

  7. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial). We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.

  8. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial).more » We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.« less

  9. ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. White III

    2003-09-30

    ASPEN Plus simulations have been created for a CO{sub 2} capture process based on adsorption by monoethanolamine (MEA). Three separate simulations were developed, one each for the flue gas scrubbing, recovery, and purification sections of the process. Although intended to work together, each simulation can be used and executed independently. The simulations were designed as template simulations to be added as a component to other more complex simulations. Applications involving simple cycle or hybrid power production processes were targeted. The default block parameters were developed based on a feed stream of raw flue gas of approximately 14 volume percent CO{sub 2} with a 90% recovery of the CO{sub 2} as liquid. This report presents detailed descriptions of the process sections as well as technical documentation for the ASPEN simulations including the design basis, models employed, key assumptions, design parameters, convergence algorithms, and calculated outputs.

  10. 2012 Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy and Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John; Olivier, Dore; Fox, Patrick; Furic, Ivan; Halkiadakis, Eva; Schmidt, Fabian; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick M; Whiteson, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DE-SC0007313 Budget Period: 1/1/2012 to 12/31/2012 The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 11 to February 17, 2012. Sixty-seven participants from nine countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies. There were 53 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The weeks events included a public lecture-Hunting the Dark Universe given by Neal Weiner from New York University) and attended by 237 members of the public, and a physics cafe geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Spencer Chang (University of Oregon), Matthew Reece (Harvard University) and Julia Shelton (Yale University) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by John Campbell (Fermilab), Patrick Fox (Fermilab), Ivan Furic (University of Florida), Eva Halkiadakis (Rutgers University) and Daniel Whiteson (University of California Irvine). Additional information is available at http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=143360. Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era. It was held from January 30 to February 4, 2012. The 62 participants came from 7 countries and attended 43 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow

  11. Simple Dynamic Gasifier Model That Runs in Aspen Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, P.J.; Luyben, W.L.

    2008-10-15

    Gasification (or partial oxidation) is a vital component of 'clean coal' technology. Sulfur and nitrogen emissions can be reduced, overall energy efficiency is increased, and carbon dioxide recovery and sequestration are facilitated. Gasification units in an electric power generation plant produce a fuel for driving combustion turbines. Gasification units in a chemical plant generate gas, which can be used to produce a wide spectrum of chemical products. Future plants are predicted to be hybrid power/chemical plants with gasification as the key unit operation. The widely used process simulator Aspen Plus provides a library of models that can be used to develop an overall gasifier model that handles solids. So steady-state design and optimization studies of processes with gasifiers can be undertaken. This paper presents a simple approximate method for achieving the objective of having a gasifier model that can be exported into Aspen Dynamics. The basic idea is to use a high molecular weight hydrocarbon that is present in the Aspen library as a pseudofuel. This component should have the same 1:1 hydrogen-to-carbon ratio that is found in coal and biomass. For many plantwide dynamic studies, a rigorous high-fidelity dynamic model of the gasifier is not needed because its dynamics are very fast and the gasifier gas volume is a relatively small fraction of the total volume of the entire plant. The proposed approximate model captures the essential macroscale thermal, flow, composition, and pressure dynamics. This paper does not attempt to optimize the design or control of gasifiers but merely presents an idea of how to dynamically simulate coal gasification in an approximate way.

  12. Characterization of DWARF14 Genes in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Weighill, Deborah A.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Xie, Meng; Yang, Yongil; Yang, Jun; Wang, Shucai; Jacobson, Daniel A.; Guo, Hong; et al

    2016-02-15

    Strigolactones are a new class of plant hormones regulating shoot branching and symbiotic interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Studies of branching mutants in herbaceous plants have identified several key genes involved in strigolactone biosynthesis or signaling. The strigolactone signal is perceived by a member of the α/β-fold hydrolase superfamily, known as DWARF14 (D14). However, little is known about D14 genes in the woody perennial plants. Here we report the identification of D14 homologs in the model woody plant Populus trichocarpa. We showed that there are two D14 homologs in P. trichocarpa, designated as PtD14a and PtD14b that are over 95%more » similar at the amino acid level. Expression analysis indicated that the transcript level of PtD14a is generally more abundant than that of PtD14b. However, only PtD14a was able to complement Arabidopsis d14 mutants, suggesting that PtD14a is the functional D14 ortholog. Amino acid alignment and structural modeling revealed substitutions of several highly conserved amino acids in the PtD14b protein including a phenylalanine near the catalytic triad of D14 proteins. Ultimately, we find this study lays a foundation for further characterization of strigolactone pathway and its functions in the woody perennial plants.« less

  13. ASPEN PLUS modeling of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Task 19: modeling support activities report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-28

    The APCI version of ASPEN PLUS was maintained and enhanced in order to support the requirements of the simulation effort described in the earlier tasks. The support effort is conveniently divided into systems support and technical support in the areas of flowsheeting and thermophysical properties. Systems support required installation of the fourth release of ASPEN PLUS, installation of AspenTech's updates to correct program errors, and several general maintenance tasks unique to the APCI version of ASPEN PLUS. Technical support in the area of flowsheeting consisted of the organization of training courses, consultation in solving simulation problems, and identifying and resolving problems resulting from bugs in ASPEN PLUS. Thermodynamic technical support consisted of developing a few new models, implementing the coal-fluid thermophysical models into ASPEN PLUS, providing convenient access to the physical properties through INSERTs, and consultation to resolve simulation problems resulting from the nonideality of the properties. All software enhancements to ASPEN PLUS have been described and delivered so that APCI's version of the program may be duplicated and maintained at other sites. 16 references.

  14. Support and enhancement of ASPEN Plus for the steady state simulation of the SRC-I process. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fais, B.D.; Tomkinson, W.S.; Kradel, R.H.

    1983-10-01

    The ASPEN computer program was developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE). ASPEN provides steady state simulation of certain fossil fuel conversion processes at the steady state. As part of its contract with DOE to design, build and operate the SRC-I Coal Refinery, International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) was asked to evaluate the ASPEN program to determine its usefulness in simulating the steady state performance of coal conversion processes. ICRC performed a preliminary technical assessment of ASPEN in 1981 and concluded that it could be readily upgraded for simulation of the SRC-I process. In 1983, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) licensed ASPEN Plus, an upgraded version of ASPEN from ASPEN Technology, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for ICRC. ICRC commissioned APCI to maintain, support and enhance ASPEN Plus in 1983 and this report documents the work performed with ASPEN Plus during 1983. Two versions of the program have been installed and installation of a third version is pending. System support, maintenance, system tuning and validation, technical support and training are part of the work performed with ASPEN Plus. System tuning included modifying the execution of ASPEN Plus to increase its efficiency. The method of installation of two unit models developed at APCI are described. Conclusions and recommendations are included in the report.

  15. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming; Gunter, Lee E; Blaudez, D

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  16. City of Aspen and Pitkin County- Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With final approval coming from the Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners and the Aspen City Council, the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) periodically awards funding to wort...

  17. Best Practices Case Study: Shaw Construction Burlingame Ranch Ph.1, Aspen, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Shaw Construction built 84 energy efficient, affordable condominiums forthe City of Aspen that achieved HERS scores of less than 62 with help from Building America’s research team lead Building Science Corporation.

  18. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Aspen FACE Experiment (FACTS II)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ring maps, lists of publications, data from the experiments, newsletters, protocol and performance information, and links to other FACTS and FACE information are provided at the ASPEN FACE website.

  19. Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Andy Corliss, Phillip Ionkov and Ming Lo of Aspen Elementary, and Max Corliss of Los Alamos Middle School won first place in the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge. April 27, 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop

  20. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA): Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo cooperative program for the ASPEN flowsheet simulator: Status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, T.T.

    1987-01-01

    On June 20, 1983, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the US Department of Energy, and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that established a program of cooperation between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the IMP. This report describes the work done under Annex II of the MOU, which set up a program in the area of process simulation using the ASPEN flowsheet simulator. As a part of this program, two IMP engineers were trained at Los Alamos: one as an ASPEN system administrator and the other as an ASPEN applications engineer. After returning to Mexico, these engineers installed ASPEN on the IMP VAX computer and trained 30 other IMP engineers and scientists to use ASPEN. To date, IMP used ASPEN to simulate four major process plants. In addition, engineers from Los Alamos and IMP worked together during the summer of 1986 to develop an implementation of the UNIFAC method for predicting liquid-phase activity coefficients. The code was written and installed in ASPEN and has passed a series of initial test cases. The UNIFAC model will be released to the public domain when testing is complete. IMP has also developed and shared with Los Alamos some enhancements to a computer code that predicts physical property correlation constants for petroleum fractions. The success of the Los Alamos/IMP cooperative program for the ASPEN flowsheet simulator demonstrates that technology transfer can work in both directions. 18 refs.

  1. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  2. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOEs Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  3. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE’s Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  4. How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 1:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camp, D W

    2000-10-27

    The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

  5. How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 2:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camp, D W

    2000-10-27

    The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

  6. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  7. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  8. MODELING THE UREX-PLUS-3A PROCESS USING ASPEN PLUS COUPLED WITH AMUSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F; Richard Dimenna, R

    2008-01-11

    A plant level simulation of the UREX+3a separations process has been developed using AMUSE for solvent extraction calculations coupled with Aspen Plus for other operations. AMUSE, an Excel based application developed at Argonne National Laboratory [1], performs a rigorous calculation of countercurrent solvent extraction processes using thermodynamically based distribution coefficients specifically designed for nuclear separations. Aspen Plus [2] models simulate other separations plant operations such as head end assembly chopping and dissolution, product solidification, acid recovery, off-gas treatment and waste water treatment. The model predicts that 55 feed streams and 14 output streams will be generated by separations plant operation. On the basis of one metric ton of initial reactor fuel, the model predicts a plant throughput of approximately 200 metric tonnes of material. Approximately half is treated waste water. Another 30% is gas emissions arising from feed to the calcination furnaces. The gas stream is treated for discharge to the environment. About 5% of the throughput is product material. Another 10% is recovered organics and acid that may be recycled. The remaining 5% is contaminated waste that requires disposal. While these results are preliminary, the model has successfully simulated operation of the UREX+3a separations process. Coupling AMUSE to Aspen Plus provides rigorous solvent extraction calculations directly within the plant simulation, greatly increasing the accuracy of the model. Many areas, such as acid recycle, can be optimized to improve performance and reduce material usage and waste generation. The rigorous plant simulation model resulting from this work provides a framework to conduct such studies. The model is easily modified to simulate other variations of the UREX+ process.

  9. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Aspen FACE Experiment (FACTS II)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOE’s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. FACTS II, the Aspen FACE Experiment is a multidisciplinary study to assess the effects of increasing tropospheric ozone and carbon dioxide levels on the structure and function of northern forest ecosystems. The Aspen FACE facility is located at the Harshaw Experimental Forest near Rhinelander, Wisconsin. It consists of twelve 30m rings in which the concentrations of carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone can be controlled. The design provides the ability to assess the effects of these gasses alone, and in combination, on many ecosystem attributes, including growth, leaf development, root characteristics, and soil carbon. Each ring consists of a series of vertical ventpipes which disperse carbon dioxide, ozone or normal air into the center of the ring. This computer controlled system uses signal feedback technology to adjust gas release each second in order to maintain a stable, elevated concentration of carbon dioxide and/or ozone throughout the experimental plot. Because there is no confinement, there is no significant change in the natural, ambient environment other than elevating these trace gas concentrations. [copied from http://aspenface.mtu.edu/index.html] Ring maps, lists of publications, data from the experiments, newsletters, protocol and performance

  10. Mass transport parameters of aspen wood chip beds via stimulus-response tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Wunderlich, T.K. Jr. )

    1993-02-05

    A stimulus-response tracer technique has been used to characterize packed beds of untreated, as well as acid prehydrolyzed, and enzymatically hydrolyzed aspen wood chips. Glucose was used as the trace. Bulk liquid phase dispersion, interphase mass transfer, and intraparticle diffusion coefficients were determined for these materials as well as effective porosities and tortuosities. The untreated and prehydrolyzed aspen wood chips were found to have effective void fractions of ca. 0.8, while the enzymatically hydrolyzed wood chips exhibited a void fraction of 0.37. Intraparticle diffusion was approximately twice as rapid in the prehydrolyzed and enzymatically hydrolyzed wood chips as in the untreated wood chips. Also, under the current experimental conditions, intraparticle diffusional transport resistance accounted for roughly half of the total tracer pulse dispersion. It is demonstrated that stimulus-response tracer techniques can be useful and convenient probes for beds of lignocellulosic, or other porous materials, which vary in character with extent of conversion and/or treatment.

  11. Development of an ASPEN PLUS physical property database for biofuels components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooley, R.J.; Putsche, V.

    1996-04-01

    Physical property data for many of the key components used in the simulation for the ethanol from lignocellulose process are not available in the standard ASPEN PLUS property databases. Indeed, many of the properties necessary to successfully simulate this process are not available anywhere. In addition, inputting the available properties into each simulation is awkward and tedious, and mistakes can be easily introduced when a long list of physical property equation parameters is entered. Therefore, one must evaluate the literature, estimate properties where necessary, and determine a set of consistent physical properties for all components of interest. The components must then be entered into an in-house NREL ASPEN PLUS database so they can be called on without being retyped into each specific simulation. The first phase of this work is complete. A complete set of properties for the currently identifiable important compounds in the ethanol process is attached. With this as the starting base the authors can continue to search for and evaluate new properties or have properties measured in the laboratory and update the central database.

  12. The obscure events contributing to the evolution of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus A retrospective working hypothesis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Genetic determination of gender is a fundamental developmental and evolutionary process in plants. Although it appears that dioecy in Populus is partially genetically controlled, the precise gender-determining systems remain unclear. The recently-released second draft assembly and annotated gene set of the Populus genome provided an opportunity to re-visit this topic. We hypothesized that over evolutionary time, selective pressure has reformed the genome structure and gene composition in the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX which has resulted in a distinctive genome structure and cluster of genes contributing to gender determination in Populus. Multiple lines of evidence support this working hypothesis. First, the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX contains significantly fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms than the rest of Populus genome and has a distinct evolutionary history. Second, the peritelomeric end of chromosome XIX contains the largest cluster of the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of disease resistances genes in the entire Populus genome. Third, there is a high occurrence of small microRNAs on chromosome XIX coincident to the region containing the putative gender-determining locus and the major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. Further, by analyzing the metabolomic profiles of floral bud in male and female Populus trees using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found there are gender-specific accumulations of phenolic glycosides. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the genetic control of gender determination in Populus.

  13. Genome structure and emerging evidence of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Tongming; DiFazio, Stephen P; Gunter, Lee E; Zhang, Xinye; Sewell, Mitchell; Woolbright, Dr. Scott; Allan, Dr. Gery; Kelleher, Colin; Douglas, Carl; Wang, Prof. Mingxiu; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus consists of dioecious woody species with largely unknown genetic mechanisms for gender determination. We have discovered genetic and genomic features in the peritelomeric region of chromosome XIX that suggest this region of the Populus genome is in the process of developing characteristics of a sex chromosome. We have identified a gender-associated locus that consistently maps to this region. Furthermore, comparison of genetic maps across multiple Populus families reveals consistently distorted segregation within this region. We have intensively characterized this region using an F1 interspecific cross involving the female genotype that was used for genome sequencing. This region shows suppressed recombination and high divergence between the alternate haplotypes, as revealed by dense map-based genome assembly using microsatellite markers. The suppressed recombination, distorted segregation, and haplotype divergence were observed only for the maternal parent in this cross. Furthermore, the progeny of this cross showed a strongly male-biased sex ratio, in agreement with Haldane's rule that postulates that the heterogametic sex is more likely to be absent, rare, or sterile in interspecific crosses. Together, these results support the role of chromosome XIX in sex determination and suggest that sex determination in Populus occurs through a ZW system in which the female is the heterogametic gender.

  14. RepPop: A Database for Repetitive Elements in Populus Trichocarpa

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zhou, Fengfeng; Xu, Ying

    The populus was selected as the first tree with the genome to be sequenced, mainly due to its small genome size, the wide deployment worldwide (30+ species), and its short juvenile period. Its rich content of cellulose, which is one of the most important source for biofuel. A female clone of P. trichocarpa was chosen to be sequenced. The current assembly of Populus genome is release 1.0, whose small insert end-sequence coverage is 7.5X, and it was released in June 2004. It consists of 22,012 sequences (including the 19 chromosomes) and the total length is 485,510,911 bps. The data was downloaded from the offical site of the Populus trichocarpa genome sequencing project. The latest version of the genome can be found at the Poplar Genome Project at JGI Eukaryotic Genomics. Duplication regions introduce significant difficulties into the correct assemblying of sequence contigs. We identified all the repetitive elements in the populus genome. We further assign each of them as different classes of repetitive elements, including DNA transposons, RNA retrotransposons, Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE), Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), and Segmental Duplications (SD), etc. We organized the annotations into this easily browsable, searchable, and blastable database, RepPop, for the whole community.[From website for RepPop at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/~ffzhou/RepPop/

  15. Computer-aided industrial process design. The ASPEN project. Fourth annual report for the period, June 1, 1979 to May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-15

    The ASPEN system has been implemented and tested quite extensively during the past year. Although ASPEN runs well now for many types of problems, users continue to uncover errors and to find problems that need to be corrected. This is expected in any large software system such as ASPEN. Benchmark testing of ASPEN has been completed. Process and economic simulations were completed of the coal liquefaction/solvent hydrogenation sections of the Exxon Donor Solvent Process. Also, a process simulation of a petroleum hydrodesulfurization process was completed. A preliminary User's Manual of about 1000 pages has been prepared and has been revised three times. Training materials have been developed for an introductory four-day user course. Four courses have been held and 104 users have attended. A number of enhancements, determined to be of high priority for ASPEN users, have been developed and implemented. Discussions and plans have been started to transfer ASPEN technology and deliver the ASPEN computer code to a number of DOE sites. Two sites most interested are Morgantown (METC) and Oak Ridge (ORNL). Others include Laramie (LETC) and Grand Forks (GFETC).

  16. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; Sykes, Robert; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations inmore » primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.« less

  17. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; Sykes, Robert; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations in primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.

  18. Consolidated bioprocessing of Populus using Clostridium (Ruminiclostridium) thermocellum: a case study on the impact of lignin composition and structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Akinosho, Hannah; Rodriguez, Miguel; Meng, Xianzhi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Natzke, Jace; Engle, Nancy L.; Sykes, Robert W.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Muchero, Wellington; et al

    2016-02-04

    Background: Higher ratios of syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) lignin components of Populus were shown to improve sugar release by enzymatic hydrolysis using commercial blends. Cellulolytic microbes are often robust biomass hydrolyzers and may offer cost advantages; however, it is unknown whether their activity can also be significantly influenced by the ratio of different monolignol types in Populus biomass. Hydrolysis and fermentation of autoclaved, but otherwise not pretreated Populus trichocarpa by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was compared using feedstocks that had similar carbohydrate and total lignin contents but differed in S/G ratios. Results: Populus with an S/G ratio of 2.1 was converted moremore » rapidly and to a greater extent compared to similar biomass that had a ratio of 1.2. For either microbes or commercial enzymes, an approximate 50% relative difference in total solids solubilization was measured for both biomasses, which suggests that the differences and limitations in the microbial breakdown of lignocellulose may be largely from the enzymatic hydrolytic process. Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially processed biomass was similar (17–18%) irrespective of S/G ratio, pointing to a similar mechanism of solubilization that proceeded at different rates. Fermentation metabolome testing did not reveal the release of known biomass-derived alcohol and aldehyde inhibitors that could explain observed differences in microbial hydrolytic activity. Biomass-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid was up to ninefold higher in low S/G ratio biomass fermentations, but was not found to be inhibitory in subsequent test fermentations. Cellulose crystallinity and degree of polymerization did not vary between Populus lines and had minor changes after fermentation. However, lignin molecular weights and cellulose accessibility determined by Simons’ staining were positively correlated to the S/G content. Conclusions: Higher

  19. Simulation of integrated pollutant removal (IPR) water-treatment system using ASPEN Plus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harendra, Sivaram; Oryshcyhn, Danylo [U.S. DOE Ochs, Thomas [U.S. DOE Gerdemann, Stephen; Clark, John

    2013-01-01

    Capturing CO2 from fossil fuel combustion provides an opportunity for tapping a significant water source which can be used as service water for a capture-ready power plant and its peripherals. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process—Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR®)—that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO2 stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Water condensed from oxy-combustion flue gas via the IPR system has been analyzed for composition and an approach for its treatment—for in-process reuse and for release—has been outlined. A computer simulation model in ASPEN Plus has been developed to simulate water treatment of flue gas derived wastewater from IPR systems. At the field installation, water condensed in the IPR process contains fly ash particles, sodium (largely from spray-tower buffering) and sulfur species as well as heavy metals, cations, and anions. An IPR wastewater treatment system was modeled using unit operations such as equalization, coagulation and flocculation, reverse osmosis, lime softening, crystallization, and pH correction. According to the model results, 70% (by mass) of the inlet stream can be treated as pure water, the other 20% yields as saleable products such as gypsum (CaSO4) and salt (NaCl) and the remaining portion is the waste. More than 99% of fly ash particles are removed in the coagulation and flocculation unit and these solids can be used as filler materials in various applications with further treatment. Results discussed relate to a slipstream IPR installation and are verified experimentally in the coagulation/flocculation step.

  20. Comparative genome analysis of Pseudomonas genomes including Populus-associated isolates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Se Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren John; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam L.; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A; Ussery, David W

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants influencing phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity. In this study, comparative genome analysis was performed on over one thousand Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides. Based on average amino acid identity, genomic clusters were identified within the Pseudomonas genus, which showed agreements with clades by NCBI and cliques by IMG. The P. fluorescens group was organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. The species P. aeruginosa showed clear distinction in their genomic relatedness compared to other Pseudomonas species groups based on the pan and core genome analysis. The 19 isolates of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the P. fluorescens major group, supported by pathway profiles analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to P. chlororaphis and P. putida. The specific genes to Populus-associated subgroups were identified where genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems such as proteins which act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor; specific genes to subgroup 2 contain unique hypothetical genes; and genes specific to subgroup 3 organisms have a different hydrolase activity. IMPORTANCE The comparative genome analyses of the genus Pseudomonas that included Populus-associated isolates resulted in novel insights into high diversity of Pseudomonas. Consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity were identified, which resolved species-clades that are not clearly defined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis alone. The genomic clusters may be reflective of distinct ecological niches to which the organisms have adapted, but this

  1. Comparative genome analysis of Pseudomonas genomes including Populus-associated isolates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jun, Se Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren John; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam L.; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Doktycz, Mitchel John; et al

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants influencing phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity. In this study, comparative genome analysis was performed on over one thousand Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides. Based on average amino acid identity, genomic clusters were identified within the Pseudomonas genus, which showed agreements with clades by NCBI and cliques by IMG. The P. fluorescens group was organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. The speciesmore » P. aeruginosa showed clear distinction in their genomic relatedness compared to other Pseudomonas species groups based on the pan and core genome analysis. The 19 isolates of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the P. fluorescens major group, supported by pathway profiles analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to P. chlororaphis and P. putida. The specific genes to Populus-associated subgroups were identified where genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems such as proteins which act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor; specific genes to subgroup 2 contain unique hypothetical genes; and genes specific to subgroup 3 organisms have a different hydrolase activity. IMPORTANCE The comparative genome analyses of the genus Pseudomonas that included Populus-associated isolates resulted in novel insights into high diversity of Pseudomonas. Consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity were identified, which resolved species-clades that are not clearly defined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis alone. The genomic clusters may be reflective of distinct ecological niches to which the organisms have adapted, but

  2. Multi-omics approach identifies molecular mechanisms of plant-fungus mycorrhizal interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larsen, Peter E.; Sreedasyam, Avinash; Trivedi, Geetika; Desai, Shalaka D.; Dai, Yang; Cseke, Leland; Collart, Frank R.

    2016-01-19

    In mycorrhizal symbiosis, plant roots form close, mutually beneficial interactions with soil fungi. Before this mycorrhizal interaction can be established however, plant roots must be capable of detecting potential beneficial fungal partners and initiating the gene expression patterns necessary to begin symbiosis. To predict a plant root – mycorrhizal fungi sensor systems, we analyzed in vitro experiments of Populus tremuloides (aspen tree) and Laccaria bicolor (mycorrhizal fungi) interaction and leveraged over 200 previously published transcriptomic experimental data sets, 159 experimentally validated plant transcription factor binding motifs, and more than 120-thousand experimentally validated protein-protein interactions to generate models of pre-mycorrhizal sensormore » systems in aspen root. These sensor mechanisms link extracellular signaling molecules with gene regulation through a network comprised of membrane receptors, signal cascade proteins, transcription factors, and transcription factor biding DNA motifs. Modeling predicted four pre-mycorrhizal sensor complexes in aspen that interact with fifteen transcription factors to regulate the expression of 1184 genes in response to extracellular signals synthesized by Laccaria. Predicted extracellular signaling molecules include common signaling molecules such as phenylpropanoids, salicylate, and, jasmonic acid. Lastly, this multi-omic computational modeling approach for predicting the complex sensory networks yielded specific, testable biological hypotheses for mycorrhizal interaction signaling compounds, sensor complexes, and mechanisms of gene regulation.« less

  3. Fermentation of dilute acid pretreated Populus by Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yee, Kelsey L.; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Thompson, Olivia A.; Elkins, James G.; Davison, Brian H.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.

    2015-07-25

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which merges enzyme production, biomass hydrolysis, and fermentation into a single step, has the potential to become an efficient and economic strategy for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to transportation fuels or chemicals. In this study, we evaluated Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, three , thermophilic,cellulolytic, mixed-acid fermenting candidate CBP microorganisms, for their fermentation capabilities using dilute acid pretreated Populus as a model biomass feedstock. Under pH controlled, anaerobic fermentation conditions, each candidate successfully digested a minimum of 75% of the cellulose from dilute acid pretreated Populus, as indicated by an increase in planktonic cellsmore » and end-product metabolites and a concurrent decrease in glucan content. C. thermocellum, which employs a cellulosomal approach to biomass degradation, required 120 hours to achieve 75% cellulose utilization. In contrast, the non-cellulosomal, secreted hydrolytic enzyme system of the Caldicellulosiruptor sp. required 300 hours to achieve similar results. End-point fermentation conversions for C. thermocellum, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis were determined to be 0.29, 0.34, and 0.38 grams of total metabolites per gram of loaded glucan, respectively. This data provide a starting point for future strain engineering efforts that can serve to improve the biomass fermentation capabilities of these three promising candidate CBP platforms.« less

  4. Identification of candidate genes in Populus cell wall biosynthesis using text-mining, co-expression network and comparative genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Bisaria, Anjali; Tuskan, Gerald A; Kalluri, Udaya C

    2011-01-01

    Populus is an important bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. A greater understanding of cell wall biosynthesis processes is critical in reducing biomass recalcitrance, a major hindrance in efficient generation of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we report the identification of candidate cell wall biosynthesis genes through the development and application of a novel bioinformatics pipeline. As a first step, via text-mining of PubMed publications, we obtained 121 Arabidopsis genes that had the experimental evidences supporting their involvement in cell wall biosynthesis or remodeling. The 121 genes were then used as bait genes to query an Arabidopsis co-expression database and additional genes were identified as neighbors of the bait genes in the network, increasing the number of genes to 548. The 548 Arabidopsis genes were then used to re-query the Arabidopsis co-expression database and re-construct a network that captured additional network neighbors, expanding to a total of 694 genes. The 694 Arabidopsis genes were computationally divided into 22 clusters. Queries of the Populus genome using the Arabidopsis genes revealed 817 Populus orthologs. Functional analysis of gene ontology and tissue-specific gene expression indicated that these Arabidopsis and Populus genes are high likelihood candidates for functional genomics in relation to cell wall biosynthesis.

  5. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2013-01-22

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  6. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2012-03-22

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  7. Towards a holistic understanding of the beneficial interactions across the Populus microbiome

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Schadt, Christopher W.

    2014-11-24

    Interactions between trees and microorganisms are extremely complex and the multispecies networks resulting from these associations have consequences for plant growth and productivity. However, a more holistic view is needed to better understand trees as ecosystems and superorganisms, where many interacting species contribute to the overall stability of the system. While much progress has been made on microbial communities associated with individual tree niches and the molecular interactions between model symbiotic partners, there is still a lack of knowledge of the multi-component interactions necessary for holistic ecosystem-level understanding. Finally, we review recent studies in Populus to emphasize the importance ofmore » such holistic efforts across the leaf, stem and rooting zones, and discuss prospects for future research in these important ecosystems.« less

  8. Integration of genetic, genomic and transcriptomic information identifies putative regulators of adventitious root formation in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ribeiro, Cintia L.; Silva, Cynthia M.; Drost, Derek R.; Novaes, Evandro; Novaes, Carolina R. D. B.; Dervinis, Christopher; Kirst, Matias

    2016-03-16

    In this study, adventitious roots (AR) develop from tissues other than the primary root, in a process physiologically regulated by phytohormones. Adventitious roots provide structural support and contribute to water and nutrient absorption, and are critical for commercial vegetative propagation of several crops. Here we quantified the number of AR, root architectural traits and root biomass in cuttings from a pseudo-backcross population of Populus deltoides and Populus trichocarpa. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and whole-transcriptome analysis of individuals with alternative QTL alleles for AR number were used to identify putative regulators of AR development. As a result, parental individuals andmore » progeny showed extensive segregation for AR developmental traits. Quantitative trait loci for number of AR mapped consistently in the same interval of linkage group (LG) II and LG XIV, explaining 7–10 % of the phenotypic variation. A time series transcriptome analysis identified 26,121 genes differentially expressed during AR development, particularly during the first 24 h after cuttings were harvested. Of those, 1929 genes were differentially regulated between individuals carrying alternative alleles for the two QTL for number of AR, in one or more time point. Eighty-one of these genes were physically located within the QTL intervals for number of AR, including putative homologs of the Arabidopsis genes SUPERROOT2 (SUR2) and TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHASE ALPHA CHAIN (TSA1), both of which are involved in the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis pathway. In conclusion, this study suggests the involvement of two genes of the tryptophan-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway, SUR2 and TSA1, in the regulation of a critical trait for the clonal propagation of woody species. A possible model for this regulation is that poplar individuals that have poor AR formation synthesize auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) primarily through the tryptophan (Trp) pathway. Much of

  9. A genomics investigation of partitioning into and among flavonoid-derived condensed tannins for carbon sequestration in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, Scott, A; Tsai, Chung-jui; Lindroth, Richard, L

    2013-03-24

    The project set out to use comparative (genotype and treatment) and transgenic approaches to investigate the determinants of condensed tannin (CT) accrual and chemical variability in Populus. CT type and amount are thought to effect the decomposition of plant detritus in the soil, and thereby the sequestering of carbon in the soil. The stated objectives were: 1. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling (microarrays) to analyze structural gene, transcription factor and metabolite control of CT partitioning; 2. Transcriptomic (microarray) and chemical analysis of ontogenetic effects on CT and PG partitioning; and 3. Transgenic manipulation of flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes to modify the control of CT composition. Objective 1: A number of approaches for perturbing CT content and chemistry were tested in Objective 1, and those included nitrogen deficit, leaf wounding, drought, and salicylic acid spraying. Drought had little effect on CTs in the genotypes we used. Plants exhibited unpredictability in their response to salicylic acid spraying, leading us to abandon its use. Reduced plant nitrogen status and leaf wounding caused reproducible and magnitudinally striking increases in leaf CT content. Microarray submissions to NCBI from those experiments are the following: GSE ID 14515: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 1979. Public on Jan 04, 2010; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 14893: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 3200. Public on Feb 19, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16783 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 1 week; clone RM5. Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16785 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 90 hours; clone RM5 Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C Although CT amount changed in response to treatments, CT composition was essentially

  10. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Timm, Collin M.; Campbell, Alicia G.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Jun, Se Ran; Parales, Rebecca E.; Tan, Mesa; Robeson, Michael S.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Jawdy, Sara; Schadt, Christopher Warren; et al

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with ~1000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with any individual plant. In this work we investigate how 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains representing a single OTU isolated from Populus deltoides rhizosphere and endosphere differ using phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for bacterial-plant interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes and growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased towards endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have more metabolic pathwaysmore » for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways important for bacterial-plant interactions but show metabolic bias towards chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria that are enriched in event he most closely related isolates.« less

  11. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timm, Collin M.; Campbell, Alicia G.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Jun, Se Ran; Parales, Rebecca E.; Tan, Mesa; Robeson, Michael S.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Jawdy, Sara; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Weston, David; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with ~1000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with any individual plant. In this work we investigate how 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains representing a single OTU isolated from Populus deltoides rhizosphere and endosphere differ using phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for bacterial-plant interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes and growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased towards endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have more metabolic pathways for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways important for bacterial-plant interactions but show metabolic bias towards chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria that are enriched in event he most closely related isolates.

  12. On the modeling of a single-stage, entrained-flow gasifier using Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasule, J.; Turton, R.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Zitney, S.

    2010-01-01

    Coal-fired gasifiers are the centerpiece of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The gasifier produces synthesis gas that is subsequently converted into electricity through combustion in a gas turbine. Several mathematical models have been developed to study the physical and chemical processes taking place inside the gasifier. Such models range from simple one-dimensional (1D) steady-state models to sophisticated dynamic 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that incorporate turbulence effects in the reactor. The practical operation of the gasifier is dynamic in nature but most 1D and some higher-dimensional models are often steady state. On the other hand, many higher order CFD-based models are dynamic in nature, but are too computationally expensive to be used directly in operability and controllability dynamic studies. They are also difficult to incorporate in the framework of process simulation software such as Aspen Plus Dynamics. Thus lower-dimensional dynamic models are still useful in these types of studies. In the current study, a 1D dynamic model for a single-stage, downward-firing, entrained-flow GE-type gasifier is developed using Aspen Custom Modeler{reg_sign} (ACM), which is a commercial equation-based simulator for creating, editing, and re-using models of process units. The gasifier model is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances for the solid and gas phases. The physical and chemical reactions considered in the model are drying, devolatilization/pyrolysis, gasification, combustion, and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. The dynamic gasifier model is being developed for use in a plant-wide dynamic model of an IGCC power plant. For dynamic simulation, the resulting highly nonlinear system of partial differential algebraic equations (PDAE) is solved in ACM using the well-known Method of Lines (MoL) approach. The MoL discretizes the space domain and leaves the time domain continuous, thereby converting the PDAE to

  13. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; et al

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore » factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.« less

  14. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; Ziebell, Angela L.; Klapste, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Skyba, Oleksandr; Unda, Faride; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Douglas, Carl; Mansfield, Shawn; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Evans, Luke M.; Czarnecki, Olaf; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  15. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Guo, Jianjun [ORNL; Difazio, Stephen P. [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Bryan, Anthony C [ORNL; Sykes, Robert [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Ziebell, Angela L [ORNL; Porth, Ilga [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Skyba, Oleksandr [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Unda, Faride [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; El-Kassaby, Yousry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Douglas, Carl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mansfield, Shawn [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Evans, Luke M [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  16. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Andrew J.; Zak, Donald R.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  17. Enhancing digestibility and ethanol yield of Populus wood via expression of an engineered monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Yuanheng; Zhang, Kewei; Kim, Hoon; Hou, Guichuan; Zhang, Xuebin; Yang, Huijun; Feng, Huan; Miller, Lisa; Ralph, John; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2016-06-28

    Producing cellulosic biofuels and bio-based chemicals from woody biomass is impeded by the presence of lignin polymer in the plant cell wall. Manipulating the monolignol biosynthetic pathway offers a promising approach to improved processability, but often impairs plant growth and development. Here, we show that expressing an engineered 4-O-methyltransferase that chemically modifies the phenolic moiety of lignin monomeric precursors, thus preventing their incorporation into the lignin polymer, substantially alters hybrid aspens’ lignin content and structure. Woody biomass derived from the transgenic aspens shows a 62% increase in the release of simple sugars and up to a 49% increase in themore » yield of ethanol when the woody biomass is subjected to enzymatic digestion and yeast-mediated fermentation. Furthermore, the cell wall structural changes do not affect growth and biomass production of the trees. Our study provides a useful strategy for tailoring woody biomass for bio-based applications.« less

  18. Aspen Code Development Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,; Cherry, Robert S.; Richard, Boardman D.

    2013-10-03

    Wyoming has a wealth of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming?s coal and gas resources are exported from the state in unprocessed form rather than as refined higher value products. Wyoming?s leadership recognizes the opportunity to broaden the state?s economic base energy resources to make value-added products such as synthetic vehicle fuels and commodity chemicals. Producing these higher value products in an environmentally responsible manner can benefit from the use of clean energy technologies including Wyoming?s abundant wind energy and nuclear energy such as new generation small modular reactors including the high temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  19. Global transcriptome analysis of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 during growth on dilute acid pretreated Populus and switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Charlotte M; Rodriguez Jr, Miguel; Johnson, Courtney M; Martin, S L.; Chu, Tzu Ming; Wolfinger, Russ; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Background The thermophilic anaerobe Clostridium thermocellum is a candidate consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biocatalyst for cellulosic ethanol production. The aim of this study was to investigate C. thermocellum genes required to ferment biomass substrates and to conduct a robust comparison of DNA microarray and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analytical platforms. Results C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 fermentations were conducted with a 5 g/L solid substrate loading of either pretreated switchgrass or Populus. Quantitative saccharification and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-ES) for elemental analysis revealed composition differences between biomass substrates, which may have influenced growth and transcriptomic profiles. High quality RNA was prepared for C. thermocellum grown on solid substrates and transcriptome profiles were obtained for two time points during active growth (12 hours and 37 hours postinoculation). A comparison of two transcriptomic analytical techniques, microarray and RNA-seq, was performed and the data analyzed for statistical significance. Large expression differences for cellulosomal genes were not observed. We updated gene predictions for the strain and a small novel gene, Cthe_3383, with a putative AgrD peptide quorum sensing function was among the most highly expressed genes. RNAseq data also supported different small regulatory RNA predictions over others. The DNA microarray gave a greater number (2,351) of significant genes relative to RNA-seq (280 genes when normalized by the kernel density mean of M component (KDMM) method) in an analysis of variance (ANOVA) testing method with a 5 % false discovery rate (FDR). When a 2-fold difference in expression threshold was applied, 73 genes were significantly differentially expressed in common between the two techniques. Sulfate and phosphate uptake/utilization genes, along with genes for a putative efflux pump system were some of the most differentially regulated transcripts

  20. Downregulation of GAUT12 in Populus deltoides by RNA silencing results in reduced recalcitrance, increased growth and reduced xylan and pectin in a woody biofuel feedstock

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Hao, Zhangying; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Yang, Xiaohan; Winkeler, Kim; Collins, Cassandra; Mohanty, Sushree S.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Gelineo-Albersheim, Ivana; Hunt, Kimberly; et al

    2015-03-12

    The inherent recalcitrance of woody bioenergy feedstocks is a major challenge for their use as a source of second-generation biofuel. Secondary cell walls that constitute the majority of hardwood biomass are rich in cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The interactions among these polymers prevent facile accessibility and deconstruction by enzymes and chemicals. Plant biomass that can with minimal pretreatment be degraded into sugars is required to produce renewable biofuels in a cost-effective manner. The following are the results: GAUT12/IRX8 is a putative glycosyltransferase proposed to be involved in secondary cell wall glucuronoxylan and/or pectin biosynthesis based on concomitant reductions of bothmore » xylan and the pectin homogalacturonan (HG) in Arabidopsis irx8 mutants. Two GAUT12 homologs exist in Populus trichocarpa, PtGAUT12.1 and PtGAUT12.2. Knockdown expression of both genes simultaneously has been shown to reduce xylan content in Populus wood. We tested the proposition that RNA interference (RNAi) downregulation of GAUT12.1 alone would lead to increased sugar release in Populus wood, that is, reduced recalcitrance, based on the hypothesis that GAUT12 synthesizes a wall structure required for deposition of xylan and that cell walls with less xylan and/or modified cell wall architecture would have reduced recalcitrance. Using an RNAi approach, we generated 11 Populus deltoides transgenic lines with 50 to 67% reduced PdGAUT12.1 transcript expression compared to wild type (WT) and vector controls. Ten of the eleven RNAi lines yielded 4 to 8% greater glucose release upon enzymatic saccharification than the controls. The PdGAUT12.1 knockdown (PdGAUT12.1-KD) lines also displayed 12 to 52% and 12 to 44% increased plant height and radial stem diameter, respectively, compared to the controls. Knockdown of PdGAUT12.1 resulted in a 25 to 47% reduction in galacturonic acid and 17 to 30% reduction in xylose without affecting total lignin content, revealing that in

  1. AmeriFlux CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCaughey, Harry [Queen's University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.. Site Description - Groundhog River (FCRN or CCP site "ON-OMW") is situated in a typical boreal mixedwood forest in northeastern Ontario (48.217 degrees north and 82.156 degrees west) about 80 km southwest of Timmins in Reeves Twp. near the Groundhog River. Rowe (1972) places the site in the Missinaibi-Cabonga Section of the Boreal Forest Region. In terms of ecoregion and ecozone, the site is in the Lake Timiskaming Lowlands of the Boreal Shield. The forest developed after high-grade logging in the 1930's. The average age in 2013 is estimated at beteen 75 and 80 years. The forest is dominated by five species characteristic of Ontario boreal mixedwoods: trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss.), white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.). The surficial geology is a lacustrine deposit of varved or massive clays, silts and silty sands. The soil is an orthic gleysol with a soil moisture regime classified as fresh to very fresh. Plonski (1974) rates it as a site class 1. The topography is simple and flat with an overall elevation of 340 m ASL.

  2. A multifactor analysis of fungal and bacterial community structure of the root microbiome of mature Populus deltoides trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakya, Migun; Gottel, Neil R; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Yang, Zamin; Gunter, Lee E; Labbe, Jessy L; Muchero, Wellington; Bonito, Gregory; Vilgalys, Rytas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Podar, Mircea; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal communities associated with plant roots are central to the host- health, survival and growth. However, a robust understanding of root-microbiome and the factors that drive host associated microbial community structure have remained elusive, especially in mature perennial plants from natural settings. Here, we investigated relationships of bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere and root endosphere of the riparian tree species Populus deltoides, and the influence of soil parameters, environmental properties (host phenotype and aboveground environmental settings), host plant genotype (Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers), season (Spring vs. Fall) and geographic setting (at scales from regional watersheds to local riparian zones) on microbial community structure. Each of the trees sampled displayed unique aspects to it s associated community structure with high numbers of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) specific to an individual trees (bacteria >90%, fungi >60%). Over the diverse conditions surveyed only a small number of OTUs were common to all samples within rhizosphere (35 bacterial and 4 fungal) and endosphere (1 bacterial and 1 fungal) microbiomes. As expected, Proteobacteria and Ascomycota were dominant in root communities (>50%) while other higher-level phylogenetic groups (Chytridiomycota, Acidobacteria) displayed greatly reduced abundance in endosphere compared to the rhizosphere. Variance partitioning partially explained differences in microbiome composition between all sampled roots on the basis of seasonal and soil properties (4% to 23%). While most variation remains unattributed, we observed significant differences in the microbiota between watersheds (Tennessee vs. North Carolina) and seasons (Spring vs. Fall). SSR markers clearly delineated two host populations associated with the samples taken in TN vs. NC, but overall genotypic distances did not have a significant effect on corresponding communities that could be

  3. Aspen Process Flowsheet Simulation Model of a Battelle Biomass-Based Gasification, Fischer-Tropsch Liquefaction and Combined-Cycle Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-30

    This study was done to support the research and development program of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels using current state-of-the-art technology. The Mitretek study investigated the use of two biomass gasifiers; the RENUGAS gasifier being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology, and the indirectly heated gasifier being developed by Battelle Columbus. The Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio indirectly heated biomass gasifier was selected for this model development because the syngas produced by it is better suited for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with an iron-based catalyst for which a large amount of experimental data are available. Bechtel with Amoco as a subcontractor developed a conceptual baseline design and several alternative designs for indirect coal liquefaction facilities. In addition, ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation models were developed for each of designs. These models were used to perform several parametric studies to investigate various alternatives for improving the economics of indirect coal liquefaction.

  4. Integrating mRNA and protein sequencing enables the detection and quantitative profiling of natural protein sequence variants of Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, Paul E.; Wang, Xiaojing; Ranjan, Priya; Zhang, Bing; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Robert L. Hettich; Nookaew, Intawat

    2015-10-20

    The availability of next-generation sequencing technologies has rapidly transformed our ability to link genotypes to phenotypes, and as such, promises to facilitate the dissection of genetic contribution to complex traits. Although discoveries of genetic associations will further our understanding of biology, once candidate variants have been identified, investigators are faced with the challenge of characterizing the functional effects on proteins encoded by such genes. Here we show how next-generation RNA sequencing data can be exploited to construct genotype-specific protein sequence databases, which provide a clearer picture of the molecular toolbox underlying cellular and organismal processes and their variation in a natural population. For this study, we used two individual genotypes (DENA-17-3 and VNDL-27-4) from a recent genome wide association (GWA) study of Populus trichocarpa, an obligate outcrosser that exhibits tremendous phenotypic variation across the natural population. This strategy allowed us to comprehensively catalogue proteins containing single amino acid polymorphisms (SAAPs) and insertions and deletions (INDELS). Based on large-scale identification of SAAPs, we profiled the frequency of 128 types of naturally occurring amino acid substitutions, with a subset of SAAPs occurring in regions of the genome having strong polymorphism patterns consistent with recent positive and/or divergent selection. In addition, we were able to explore the diploid landscape of Populus at the proteome-level, allowing the characterization of heterozygous variants.

  5. Integrating mRNA and protein sequencing enables the detection and quantitative profiling of natural protein sequence variants of Populus trichocarpa

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abraham, Paul E.; Wang, Xiaojing; Ranjan, Priya; Zhang, Bing; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Robert L. Hettich; Nookaew, Intawat

    2015-10-20

    The availability of next-generation sequencing technologies has rapidly transformed our ability to link genotypes to phenotypes, and as such, promises to facilitate the dissection of genetic contribution to complex traits. Although discoveries of genetic associations will further our understanding of biology, once candidate variants have been identified, investigators are faced with the challenge of characterizing the functional effects on proteins encoded by such genes. Here we show how next-generation RNA sequencing data can be exploited to construct genotype-specific protein sequence databases, which provide a clearer picture of the molecular toolbox underlying cellular and organismal processes and their variation in amore » natural population. For this study, we used two individual genotypes (DENA-17-3 and VNDL-27-4) from a recent genome wide association (GWA) study of Populus trichocarpa, an obligate outcrosser that exhibits tremendous phenotypic variation across the natural population. This strategy allowed us to comprehensively catalogue proteins containing single amino acid polymorphisms (SAAPs) and insertions and deletions (INDELS). Based on large-scale identification of SAAPs, we profiled the frequency of 128 types of naturally occurring amino acid substitutions, with a subset of SAAPs occurring in regions of the genome having strong polymorphism patterns consistent with recent positive and/or divergent selection. In addition, we were able to explore the diploid landscape of Populus at the proteome-level, allowing the characterization of heterozygous variants.« less

  6. Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They won for their project "Yavanchlan: Creating Optimal Strategies for Artificial Intelligence to Play Against Humans." They studied techniques to enable efficient computer play ...

  7. Aspen Aerogels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 01532 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Buildings Product: Energy efficiency insulation for buildings Website: www.aerogel.com Coordinates: 42.347872, -71.63034 Show...

  8. Aspen Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Solar Product: Design, installation & maintenance of active, passive, and photovoltaic energy systems Website: www.aspensolar.com Coordinates: 39.649755, -106.617574...

  9. Downregulation of GAUT12 in Populus deltoides by RNA silencing results in reduced recalcitrance, increased growth and reduced xylan and pectin in a woody biofuel feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Hao, Zhangying; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Yang, Xiaohan; Winkeler, Kim; Collins, Cassandra; Mohanty, Sushree S.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Gelineo-Albersheim, Ivana; Hunt, Kimberly; Ryno, David; Sykes, Robert W.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Ziebell, Angela; Gjersing, Erica; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Davis, Mark F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mohnen, Debra

    2015-03-12

    The inherent recalcitrance of woody bioenergy feedstocks is a major challenge for their use as a source of second-generation biofuel. Secondary cell walls that constitute the majority of hardwood biomass are rich in cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The interactions among these polymers prevent facile accessibility and deconstruction by enzymes and chemicals. Plant biomass that can with minimal pretreatment be degraded into sugars is required to produce renewable biofuels in a cost-effective manner. The following are the results: GAUT12/IRX8 is a putative glycosyltransferase proposed to be involved in secondary cell wall glucuronoxylan and/or pectin biosynthesis based on concomitant reductions of both xylan and the pectin homogalacturonan (HG) in Arabidopsis irx8 mutants. Two GAUT12 homologs exist in Populus trichocarpa, PtGAUT12.1 and PtGAUT12.2. Knockdown expression of both genes simultaneously has been shown to reduce xylan content in Populus wood. We tested the proposition that RNA interference (RNAi) downregulation of GAUT12.1 alone would lead to increased sugar release in Populus wood, that is, reduced recalcitrance, based on the hypothesis that GAUT12 synthesizes a wall structure required for deposition of xylan and that cell walls with less xylan and/or modified cell wall architecture would have reduced recalcitrance. Using an RNAi approach, we generated 11 Populus deltoides transgenic lines with 50 to 67% reduced PdGAUT12.1 transcript expression compared to wild type (WT) and vector controls. Ten of the eleven RNAi lines yielded 4 to 8% greater glucose release upon enzymatic saccharification than the controls. The PdGAUT12.1 knockdown (PdGAUT12.1-KD) lines also displayed 12 to 52% and 12 to 44% increased plant height and radial stem diameter, respectively, compared to the controls. Knockdown of PdGAUT12.1 resulted in a 25 to 47% reduction in galacturonic acid and 17 to 30% reduction in xylose without affecting total lignin content, revealing that in Populus

  10. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls themore » access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  11. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bible, Amber; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Jawdy, Sara; Weston, David; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; et al

    2016-04-18

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically-important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. Tomore » better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343.« less

  12. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls the access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.

  13. Enhancing a Pathway-Genome Database (PGDB) to Capture Subcellular Localization of Metabolites and Enzymes: The Nucleotide-Sugar Biosynthetic Pathways of Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nag, A.; Karpinets, T. V.; Chang, C. H.; Bar-Peled, M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how cellular metabolism works and is regulated requires that the underlying biochemical pathways be adequately represented and integrated with large metabolomic data sets to establish a robust network model. Genetically engineering energy crops to be less recalcitrant to saccharification requires detailed knowledge of plant polysaccharide structures and a thorough understanding of the metabolic pathways involved in forming and regulating cell-wall synthesis. Nucleotide-sugars are building blocks for synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. The biosynthesis of nucleotide-sugars is catalyzed by a multitude of enzymes that reside in different subcellular organelles, and precise representation of these pathways requires accurate capture of this biological compartmentalization. The lack of simple localization cues in genomic sequence data and annotations however leads to missing compartmentalization information for eukaryotes in automatically generated databases, such as the Pathway-Genome Databases (PGDBs) of the SRI Pathway Tools software that drives much biochemical knowledge representation on the internet. In this report, we provide an informal mechanism using the existing Pathway Tools framework to integrate protein and metabolite sub-cellular localization data with the existing representation of the nucleotide-sugar metabolic pathways in a prototype PGDB for Populus trichocarpa. The enhanced pathway representations have been successfully used to map SNP abundance data to individual nucleotide-sugar biosynthetic genes in the PGDB. The manually curated pathway representations are more conducive to the construction of a computational platform that will allow the simulation of natural and engineered nucleotide-sugar precursor fluxes into specific recalcitrant polysaccharide(s).

  14. Biomass particle models with realistic morphology and resolved microstructure for simulations of intraparticle transport phenomena

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ciesielski, Peter N.; Crowley, Michael F.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Sanders, Aric W.; Wiggins, Gavin M.; Robichaud, David; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Foust, Thomas D.

    2014-12-09

    Biomass exhibits a complex microstructure of directional pores that impact how heat and mass are transferred within biomass particles during conversion processes. However, models of biomass particles used in simulations of conversion processes typically employ oversimplified geometries such as spheres and cylinders and neglect intraparticle microstructure. In this study, we develop 3D models of biomass particles with size, morphology, and microstructure based on parameters obtained from quantitative image analysis. We obtain measurements of particle size and morphology by analyzing large ensembles of particles that result from typical size reduction methods, and we delineate several representative size classes. Microstructural parameters, includingmore » cell wall thickness and cell lumen dimensions, are measured directly from micrographs of sectioned biomass. A general constructive solid geometry algorithm is presented that produces models of biomass particles based on these measurements. Next, we employ the parameters obtained from image analysis to construct models of three different particle size classes from two different feedstocks representing a hardwood poplar species (Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen) and a softwood pine (Pinus taeda, loblolly pine). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the models and the effects explicit microstructure by performing finite-element simulations of intraparticle heat and mass transfer, and the results are compared to similar simulations using traditional simplified geometries. In conclusion, we show how the behavior of particle models with more realistic morphology and explicit microstructure departs from that of spherical models in simulations of transport phenomena and that species-dependent differences in microstructure impact simulation results in some cases.« less

  15. Thermodynamic Phase And Chemical Equilibrium At 0-110 C For The H+-K+-Na+-Cl--H2O System Up To 16 Molal And The HNO3-H2O System Up To 20 Molal Using An Association-Based Pitzer Model Compatible With ASPEN Plus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols,T.T.; Taylor,D.D.

    2003-09-26

    A status is presented of the parameterization during FY2003 of an association-based Pitzer model to simulate chemical and phase equilibria of acid-chloride-nitrate-mercury aqueous electrolyte systems at 0-100 C within the industry-standard process simulator, ASPEN Plus. Compatibility with ASPEN Plus requires that the Pitzer model used be limited to the third virial coefficient and have the values of b and a1 as originally proposed by Pitzer. Two aqueous models for 0-110 C at atmospheric pressure were parameterized in FY03. The model for the aqueous H+-K+-Na+-Cl- system is applicable for 0-16 molal, and the HNO3-H2O for 0-20 molal. An association-based Pitzer activity coefficient model is combined with Henry's law to predict activity/osmotic coefficient and VLE. The chloride model also predicts KCl and NaCl solubility, while the nitric acid model has the unique capability of predicting extent of dissociation with an average absolute deviation of 1.43%. The association-based approach presented here extends the utility of the molality-based Pitzer model past 6 molal to predict activity/osmotic coefficients up to 16-20 molal. The association-based approach offers the additional benefits of predicting extent of dissociation and of allowing the Pitzer model to be fully utilized in commercial simulators, such as ASPEN Plus, that require accounting for association to implement Henry's law. The Pitzer models presented here provide the chemical process simulation engineer with a superior alternative to the Electrolyte NRTL model that can easily be used in ASPEN Plus.

  16. Thermodynamic Phase And Chemical Equilibrium At 0-110°C For The H+-K+-Na+-Cl--H2O System Up To 16 Molal And The HNO3-H2O System Up To 20 Molal Using An Association-Based Pitzer Model Compatible With ASPEN Plus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd T. Nichols; Dean D. Taylor

    2003-09-01

    A status is presented of the parameterization during FY2003 of an association-based Pitzer model to simulate chemical and phase equilibria of acid-chloride-nitrate-mercury aqueous electrolyte systems at 0-100° C within the industry-standard process simulator, ASPEN Plus. Compatibility with ASPEN Plus requires that the Pitzer model used be limited to the third virial coefficient and have the values of b and a1 as originally proposed by Pitzer. Two aqueous models for 0-110° C at atmospheric pressure were parameterized in FY03. The model for the aqueous H+-K+-Na+-Cl- system is applicable for 0-16 molal, and the HNO3-H2O for 0-20 molal. An association-based Pitzer activity coefficient model is combined with Henry.s law to predict activity/osmotic coefficient and VLE. The chloride model also predicts KCl and NaCl solubility, while the nitric acid model has the unique capability of predicting extent of dissociation with an average absolute deviation of 1.43%. The association-based approach presented here extends the utility of the molality-based Pitzer model past 6 molal to predict activity/osmotic coefficients up to 16-20 molal. The association-based approach offers the additional benefits of predicting extent of dissociation and of allowing the Pitzer model to be fully utilized in commercial simulators, such as ASPEN Plus, that require accounting for association to implement Henry’s law. The Pitzer models presented here provide the chemical process simulation engineer with a superior alternative to the Electrolyte NRTL model that can easily be used in ASPEN Plus.

  17. Fermentation of dilute acid pretreated Populus by Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, Kelsey L.; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Thompson, Olivia A.; Elkins, James G.; Davison, Brian H.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.

    2015-07-25

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which merges enzyme production, biomass hydrolysis, and fermentation into a single step, has the potential to become an efficient and economic strategy for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to transportation fuels or chemicals. In this study, we evaluated Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, three , thermophilic,cellulolytic, mixed-acid fermenting candidate CBP microorganisms, for their fermentation capabilities using dilute acid pretreated Populus as a model biomass feedstock. Under pH controlled, anaerobic fermentation conditions, each candidate successfully digested a minimum of 75% of the cellulose from dilute acid pretreated Populus, as indicated by an increase in planktonic cells and end-product metabolites and a concurrent decrease in glucan content. C. thermocellum, which employs a cellulosomal approach to biomass degradation, required 120 hours to achieve 75% cellulose utilization. In contrast, the non-cellulosomal, secreted hydrolytic enzyme system of the Caldicellulosiruptor sp. required 300 hours to achieve similar results. End-point fermentation conversions for C. thermocellum, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis were determined to be 0.29, 0.34, and 0.38 grams of total metabolites per gram of loaded glucan, respectively. This data provide a starting point for future strain engineering efforts that can serve to improve the biomass fermentation capabilities of these three promising candidate CBP platforms.

  18. Aspen Aerogels Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc has developed and patented an aerogel for the production of flexible blanket insulation. Coordinates: 42.310129, -71.655451 Show Map Loading map......

  19. Aspen, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fork Valley - Energy Efficient Appliance Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program (Colorado) References US Census Bureau...

  20. Consolidated bioprocessing of Populus using Clostridium (Ruminiclostri...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially processed biomass was similar (17-18%) irrespective of SG ratio, pointing to a similar ...

  1. Consolidated bioprocessing of Populus using Clostridium (Ruminiclostri...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially ... observations are possible for other plant species. less Authors: Dumitrache, ...

  2. Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They won for their project "Yavanchlan: Creating Optimal Strategies for Artificial Intelligence to Play Against Humans." They studied techniques to enable efficient computer play ...

  3. City of Aspen Climate Action Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, Biomass - Biofuels, Biomass, Geothermal, Water Power, Biomass - Landfill Gas, Solar, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar Pv, Wind Phase Create a Vision, Determine Baseline,...

  4. Aqueous Electrolyte Modeling in Aspen Plus G. E

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... If no such parameters are available they may be regressed from experimental data. If more flexibility is needed, the user may enter Fortran code into the simulation input file. ...

  5. csep_transcript_aspen.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications highperformanceleasingstrategiesforstateandlocalgovernments.doc Using Social Media to Engage the Community in Energy Efficiency Projects.doc ...

  6. Aqueous Electrolyte Modeling in Aspen Plus G. E

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The Dielectric Constant of Water and Debye-Huckel limiting Law Slopes, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. ... Dissolved gases are modeled using Henry's Law. Chemical reaction equilibrium is modeled ...

  7. ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GENERATION; PURIFICATION; SCRUBBING; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; A CODES; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; MATERIALS RECOVERY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview...

  8. ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PURIFICATION; SCRUBBING; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; A CODES; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; MATERIALS RECOVERY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File ...

  9. Aspen Park, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.539155, -105.2947148 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  10. 2012 Aspen Winter Conference New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The workshopmore was organized by Joel Moore (University of California Berkeley), ... Authors: Moore, Joel ; Rabe, Karin ; Nayak, Chetan ; Troyer, Matthias Publication Date: ...

  11. 2012 Aspen Winter Conference New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    given by Chetan Nayak from Microsoft Research) and attended by 234 members of ... of California Berkeley), Chetan Nayak (Microsoft Research), Karin Rabe (Rutgers ...

  12. Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) Interdisciplinary Science Workshop: Decadal Climate Prediction; Aspen, CO; June 22-28, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John

    2010-03-12

    Decadal prediction lies between seasonal/interannual forecasting and longer-term climate change projections, and focuses on time-evolving regional climate conditions over the next 10?30 yr. Numerous assessments of climate information user needs have identified this time scale as being important to infrastructure planners, water resource managers, and many others. It is central to the information portfolio required to adapt effectively to and through climatic changes.

  13. Fungal diversity within the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Symbiosis Conference Speaker and Attendee List Consent Order, UT-Battelle, LLC Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System Audits

  14. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Shaw Construction, Aspen, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This builder worked with Building Science Corporation to design affordable HERS-54 townhouses with central solar radiator space heating, PV, R-28 closed-cell spray foam under slab and R-26 in advanced framed walls, and rigid polyiso on inside of basement walls

  15. Manipulation Of Lignin Biosynthesis To Maximize Ethanol Production From Populus Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Clint Chapple; Dr. Rick Lindroth; Dr. Burce Dien; Dr. Glen Stanosz; Dr. Alex Wiedenhoeft; Dr. Fu Zhao; Dr. Duane Wegener; Dr. Janice Kelly; Dr. Leigh Raymond; Dr. Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-15

    Our research focuses on transgenic strategies for modifying lignification to improve biomass quality, without leading to deleterious effects on plant performance. In order to accomplish this objective, we designed molecular strategies and selected appropriate transgenes for manipulating the expression of lignification-associated genes; we generated poplar engineered for altered lignin content and/or monomer composition, and field-tested them for fitness; we analyzed the impact of these transgenic strategies on metabolism in general and lignin biosynthesis in particular; and evaluated the ease with which cell wall deconstruction can be accomplished using both chemical and enzymatic means using wild-type and high syringyl poplar.

  16. Key gene regulating cell wall biosynthesis and recalcitrance in Populus, gene Y

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jay; Engle, Nancy; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-12-08

    This disclosure provides methods and transgenic plants for improved production of renewable biofuels and other plant-derived biomaterials by altering the expression and/or activity of Gene Y, an O-acetyltransferase. This disclosure also provides expression vectors containing a nucleic acid (Gene Y) which encodes the polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 and is operably linked to a heterologous promoter.

  17. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Sykes, Robert W.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.

    2014-10-07

    UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) is a sugar-metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and UTP. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. Moreover, the functional role of UGPase in perennial woody plants is poorly understood.

  18. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (San Francisco, CA: Aspen Environmental Group) Aspen Environmental Group 2011b Topaz Solar Farm Conditional Use Permit: Final Environmental Impact Report (DRC2008-00009) (San...

  19. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Shaw Constructio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Shaw Construction, Aspen, Colorado Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Shaw Construction, Aspen, Colorado Case study of Shaw Construction who worked with Building ...

  20. Pitkin County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    7 Climate Zone Subtype B. Registered Energy Companies in Pitkin County, Colorado Aspen Solar Energy Incentives for Pitkin County, Colorado Aspen & Pitkin County - Renewable...

  1. How chip size impacts steam pretreatment effectiveness for biological conversion of poplar wood into fermentable sugars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMartini, Jaclyn D.; Foston, Marcus; Meng, Xianzhi; Jung, Seokwon; Kumar, Rajeev; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Wyman, Charles E.

    2015-12-09

    We report that woody biomass is highly recalcitrant to enzymatic sugar release and often requires significant size reduction and severe pretreatments to achieve economically viable sugar yields in biological production of sustainable fuels and chemicals. However, because mechanical size reduction of woody biomass can consume significant amounts of energy, it is desirable to minimize size reduction and instead pretreat larger wood chips prior to biological conversion. To date, however, most laboratory research has been performed on materials that are significantly smaller than applicable in a commercial setting. As a result, there is a limited understanding of the effects that larger biomass particle size has on the effectiveness of steam explosion pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of wood chips. To address these concerns, novel downscaled analysis and high throughput pretreatment and hydrolysis (HTPH) were applied to examine whether differences exist in the composition and digestibility within a single pretreated wood chip due to heterogeneous pretreatment across its thickness. Heat transfer modeling, Simons’ stain testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to probe the effects of pretreatment within and between pretreated wood samples to shed light on potential causes of variation, pointing to enzyme accessibility (i.e., pore size) distribution being a key factor dictating enzyme digestibility in these samples. Application of these techniques demonstrated that the effectiveness of pretreatment of Populus tremuloides can vary substantially over the chip thickness at short pretreatment times, resulting in spatial digestibility effects and overall lower sugar yields in subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Finally, these results indicate that rapid decompression pretreatments (e.g., steam explosion) that specifically alter accessibility at lower temperature conditions are well suited for larger wood

  2. How chip size impacts steam pretreatment effectiveness for biological conversion of poplar wood into fermentable sugars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    DeMartini, Jaclyn D.; Foston, Marcus; Meng, Xianzhi; Jung, Seokwon; Kumar, Rajeev; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Wyman, Charles E.

    2015-12-09

    We report that woody biomass is highly recalcitrant to enzymatic sugar release and often requires significant size reduction and severe pretreatments to achieve economically viable sugar yields in biological production of sustainable fuels and chemicals. However, because mechanical size reduction of woody biomass can consume significant amounts of energy, it is desirable to minimize size reduction and instead pretreat larger wood chips prior to biological conversion. To date, however, most laboratory research has been performed on materials that are significantly smaller than applicable in a commercial setting. As a result, there is a limited understanding of the effects that largermore » biomass particle size has on the effectiveness of steam explosion pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of wood chips. To address these concerns, novel downscaled analysis and high throughput pretreatment and hydrolysis (HTPH) were applied to examine whether differences exist in the composition and digestibility within a single pretreated wood chip due to heterogeneous pretreatment across its thickness. Heat transfer modeling, Simons’ stain testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to probe the effects of pretreatment within and between pretreated wood samples to shed light on potential causes of variation, pointing to enzyme accessibility (i.e., pore size) distribution being a key factor dictating enzyme digestibility in these samples. Application of these techniques demonstrated that the effectiveness of pretreatment of Populus tremuloides can vary substantially over the chip thickness at short pretreatment times, resulting in spatial digestibility effects and overall lower sugar yields in subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Finally, these results indicate that rapid decompression pretreatments (e.g., steam explosion) that specifically alter accessibility at lower temperature conditions are well suited for larger

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Schmidt, Fabian ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Smith, Kendrick M ; Whiteson, Daniel Aspen ... (Stanford University), and Kendrick Smith (Princeton University). less Full Text ...

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Shaw Construction,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aspen, Colorado | Department of Energy Shaw Construction, Aspen, Colorado Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Shaw Construction, Aspen, Colorado Case study of Shaw Construction who worked with Building America research partner Building Science Corporation to design affordable HERS-54 townhouses with central solar radiator space heating, PV, R-28 closed-cell spray foam under slab and R-26 in advanced framed walls, and rigid polyiso on inside of basement walls. Shaw

  5. Colorado/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Building Energy Code (Colorado) Building Energy Code Yes City and County of Denver - Solar Panel Permitting (Colorado) SolarWind Permitting Standards Yes City of Aspen -...

  6. Burlingame Ranch Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-17

    This case study describes the construction of energy efficient community-scale, affordable housing for Aspen, Colorado, residents meeting a 40% energy-savings target.

  7. Enabling Small-Scale Biomass Gasification for Liquid Fuel Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    interconnects, 50+ experienced PhDMSBS engineers and operators, 247 operations, Autocad and Aspen Modeling * Pilot plant experience >30,000 hrs Environment and Energy Group ...

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The process components have not yet been fully inte- grated at this scale, though a detailed model has been developed via Auburn University's Aspen Plus simulator. Whole Algae ...

  9. Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reactor system, evaluation of the optimized pellets in a simulated bench-scale TCES system over multiple cycles, and Aspen modeling and costing of commercial system embodiment. ...

  10. University Research & National Labs | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Russia External link Institute for High Energy Physics, Beijing, China External link Other Research Institutions: Aspen Center For ...

  11. Prediction of Heat Capacities of Solid Inorganic Salts from Group

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... developed by Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA, uses the following finctional form ... Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cambridge, Massachusetts, June, 1984. Kanacke, 0.; ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... determined using AspenPlus and NREL's Solar Advisory Model. ... other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation ... deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a ...

  13. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Shaw Construction, Aspen, Colorado Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Conway Street Apartments - ...

  14. Texas's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agribiofuels LLC Air and Liquid Advisors ALA American Electric Technologies Inc American Photovoltaics American Photovoltaics LP Arctas Capital Group Aspen Pipeline BP Wind...

  15. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution ASPEN Plus Simulation ... (1982) 18 Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar ...

  16. NREL Support for a Functional Genomics Approach to Investigate Regulation of Phenolic Glycoside: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00218

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.

    2010-07-01

    NREL and MTU collaborated on a proposal 'A Functional Genomics Approach to Investigate Regulation of Phenolic Glycoside Metabolism in Populus' funded by the National Science Foundation.

  17. BEST: Biochemical Engineering Simulation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1996-01-01

    The idea of developing a process simulator that can describe biochemical engineering (a relatively new technology area) was formulated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the late 1980s. The initial plan was to build a consortium of industrial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners to enhance a commercial simulator with biochemical unit operations. DOE supported this effort; however, before the consortium was established, the process simulator industry changed considerably. Work on the first phase of implementing various fermentation reactors into the chemical process simulator, ASPEN/SP-BEST, is complete. This report will focus on those developments. Simulation Sciences, Inc. (SimSci) no longer supports ASPEN/SP, and Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech) has developed an add-on to its ASPEN PLUS (also called BioProcess Simulator [BPS]). This report will also explain the similarities and differences between BEST and BPS. ASPEN, developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for DOE in the late 1970s, is still the state-of-the-art chemical process simulator. It was selected as the only simulator with the potential to be easily expanded into the biochemical area. ASPEN/SP, commercially sold by SimSci, was selected for the BEST work. SimSci completed work on batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation reactors in 1993, just as it announced it would no longer commercially support the complete ASPEN/SP product. BEST was left without a basic support program. Luckily, during this same time frame, AspenTech was developing a biochemical simulator with its version of ASPEN (ASPEN PLUS), which incorporates most BEST concepts. The future of BEST will involve developing physical property data and models appropriate to biochemical systems that are necessary for good biochemical process design.

  18. CX-006441: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado State Energy Program, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - City of Aspen, Geothermal Power Feasibility StudyCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1Date: 08/03/2011Location(s): Aspen, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  19. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the gravity separation equipment models available in the Coal Cleaning Simulator developed by Aspen Technology, Inc. This flowsheet simulator was developed in collaboration with ICF Kaiser Engineers, a subcontractor to Aspen Technology, Inc., and CQ Inc., a subcontractor to ICF Kaiser Engineers. The algorithms and FORTRAN programs for modeling gravity separation, which include calculations for predicting process performance, and calculations for equipment sizing and costing, were developed by ICF Kaiser Engineers. Aspen Technology integrated these and other models into the ASPEN PLUS system to provide a simulator specifically tailored for modeling coal cleaning plants. ICF Kaiser Engineers also provided basic documentation for these models; Aspen Technology, Inc. has incorporated the information into this topical report. The report documents both the use and the design bases for the models, and provides to the user a good understanding of their range of applicability and limitations.

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... from Aspen models and formulated as pure nonlinear programs. ... of GPUs with other computing systems, e.g. FPGAs and CPUs. ... Extensive simulation results have shown that on average, for ...

  1. Climate Model Intercomparisons: Preparing for the Next Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meehl, J.; Moss, Richard H.; Taylor, K. E.; Eyring, Veronika; Stouffer, R. J.; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, B.

    2014-03-04

    The article reports on the Aspen Global Change Institute workshopthat provided an input on scenarios. Our group is continuing to work on a number of aspects of scenarios for the next research cycle.

  2. EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines December 23, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Aspen Cass, a relative of ...

  3. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid ...aspen-plus.cfm. 4. Tao, L.; Aden, A. "The Economics of Current and Future Biofuels." ...

  4. CX-000404: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aspen Environmental GroupCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): San Francisco, CaliforniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. NAABB-5-Sustainability-fin.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability Technical Accomplishments, Progress and Results Presented by James Richardson, NAABB Sustainability Team Co-Leader Slide 2 Slide 2 Sustainability Task Framework Slide 3 Slide 3 Biomass Assessment Tool Aspen Tech Modeling Software Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Farm-level Algal Risk Model Applied Production Analysis Computable General Equilibrium Global Simulation Model PNNL ANL TAMU NMSU TAMU Various BAT GREET FARM APA CGE ASPEN Measures of

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

    2001-01-23

    To complete project planning, various project groups conducted several meetings and teleconferences. As a result a draft project management plan was written and circulated. The plan will be finalized in a project kick off meeting to be held on January 16, 2001 in Lebanon, NH, which will be attended by all project participants (Task 1.0). Various project personnel have been trained in the use of Fluent and Aspen Plus, which completes all the training tasks except for Aspen Plus and IDL training for Alstom Power (Task 2.1). A preliminary version of User Requirements Document (preURD) was written. This document will be sent to key users of Aspen Plus and FLUENT and their responses will be collected in January (Task 2.3). A prototype of Fluent integration with Aspen Plus was constructed for understanding the required software design. The development of a general architecture for the integrated software suite has been started (Task 2.6). Invitation letters for participation in an Advisory Board were sent out to several Vision 21 contractors. Their responses will be used to form an Advisory Board in January (Task 5.0). Fluent has awarded subcontracts to Alstom Power, CERC, and Aspen Tech and negotiations with Intergraph are underway. Aspen Plus and FLUENT were installed on a computer at CERC. The design of a project web site was completed, and the site setup was started (Task 7.0).

  7. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Utah | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Administration Current Projects Transwest Express Zephyr Populus to Ben Lomand Sigurd to Red Butte No. 2 345kV Transmission Project Print PDF RAPID-State-Summary Retrieved from...

  8. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes. ASPEN can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations. It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computationmore » of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The ASPEN Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.« less

  9. Economic and Technical Assessment of Wood Biomass Fuel Gasification for Industrial Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia M. Gribik; Ronald E. Mizia; Harry Gatley; Benjamin Phillips

    2007-09-01

    This project addresses both the technical and economic feasibility of replacing industrial gas in lime kilns with synthesis gas from the gasification of hog fuel. The technical assessment includes a materials evaluation, processing equipment needs, and suitability of the heat content of the synthesis gas as a replacement for industrial gas. The economic assessment includes estimations for capital, construction, operating, maintenance, and management costs for the reference plant. To perform these assessments, detailed models of the gasification and lime kiln processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The material and energy balance outputs from the Aspen Plus model were used as inputs to both the material and economic evaluations.

  10. Microsoft Word - R10008 Final_Report 10-13-11

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aspen Aerogels, Inc. DE- EE0003488 Final Report AAI # R-10008 Page 1 of 37 Final Technical Report Date of Report: October 13, 2011 Award Number: DE-EE0003488 Project Title: Aerogel Based Insulation for High Temperature Industrial Processes Project Period: 08/16/2010 - 08/15/2011 Recipient Organization: Aspen Aerogels, Inc. 30 Forbes Road, Building B Northborough, MA 01532 Partner(s): NextEra Energy Inc. (Florida Power & Light) Bernie C. Noble 700 Universe Boulevard Juno Beach, FL 33408 Tel:

  11. Experimental Design for CMIP6: Aerosol, Land Use, and Future Scenarios Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnott, James

    2015-10-30

    The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, “Experimental design for CMIP6: Aerosol, Land Use, and Future Scenarios,” on August 3-8, 2014 in Aspen, CO. Claudia Tebaldi (NCAR) and Brian O’Neill (NCAR) served as co-chairs for the workshop. The Organizing committee also included Dave Lawrence (NCAR), Jean-Francois Lamarque (NCAR), George Hurtt (University of Maryland), & Detlef van Vuuren (PBL Netherlands Environmental Change). The meeting included the participation of 22 scientists representing many of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 110 participant days.

  12. Process simulation of a circulating fluidized bed coal combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legros, R.; Sotudeh-Gharebaagh, R.; Paris, J.; Chaouki, J.; Preto, F.

    1995-12-31

    The focus of this work is the development of a process simulator for a Circulating Fluidized Bed coal Combustor (CFBC). The development of a simple comprehensive model for coal combustion in a CFBC is based on existing work reported in the literature. The model combines the hydrodynamic features of a CFBC riser with the different reaction steps involved during coal combustion, including the sulphur capture by limestone particles. The commercial process simulation program ASPEN PLUS was chosen as a framework for the development of the CFBC process simulator. ASPEN PLUS has been widely accepted in the chemical industry as a design tool because of its ability to simulate various chemical processes, including power generation cycles. In ASPEN PLUS, several ideal chemical reactor models involving solids are available for simulation purposes. The CFBC process simulator is constructed using several ASPEN PLUS unit operation blocks. The information required for each block is obtained from the combustion and hydrodynamic models, which are inserted into the simulation flowsheet as subroutines or internal programs. The resulting CFBC process simulator is used to predict the performance of the CFBC pilot plant at Energy Research laboratories, CANMET in Ottawa.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

    2001-10-20

    DOE Vision 21 project requirements for the support of Global CAPE-OPEN Reaction Kinetics interfaces in Aspen Plus 12 was written (Task 2.4). The software design document was written and posted on the project web site. Intergraph started work on a proof of concept demo of the physical domain software (Task 2.6). The COM-side (Aspen Plus) and CORBA-side (Fluent) pieces of the Vision 21 controller code were written and independently verified. The two pieces of the code were then combined. Debugging of the combined code is underway (Task 2.7). Papers on fuel cell processes were read in preparation for developing an example based on a fuel cell process (Task 2.8). The INDVU code has been used to replace the boiler component in the Aspen Plus flowsheet of the RP&L power plant. The INDVU code receives information from Aspen Plus and iterates on the split backpass LTSH bypass and excess air quantities until the stipulated superheat outlet temperature is satisfied. The combined INDVU-Aspen Plus model has been run for several load conditions (Task 2.14). Work on identifying a second demonstration case involving an advanced power cycle has been started (Task 3.2). Plans for the second Advisory Board meeting in November were made (Task 5.0). Intergraph subcontract was signed and work on a physical domain software demo was started. A second teleconference with Norsk Hydro was conducted to discuss Global CAPE-OPEN standards and issues related to COM-CORBA Bridge (Task 7.0).

  14. GREET Pretreatment Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adom, Felix K.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. This report documents the material and energy flows that occur when fermentable sugars from four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar) are produced via dilute acid pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion. These flows are documented for inclusion in the pretreatment module of the Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. Process simulations of each pretreatment technology were developed in Aspen Plus. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in the GREET pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

  15. AmeriFlux CA-SF3 Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1998.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Amiro, Brian [University of Manitoba; Canadian Forest Service

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-SF3 Saskatchewan - Western Boreal, forest burned in 1998.. Site Description - The 1998 burn site (F98) was in the east part of Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, in the Waskesiu Fire, ignited by lightning that burned about 1700 ha in July 1998. The pre-fire forest consisted of jack pine and black spruce stands, with some intermixed aspen. The fire was severe, consuming much of the top layer of organic soil and killing all trees. In 2001, much of the regenerating vegetation consisted of aspen saplings about 1 m tall and shorter jack pine and black spruce seedlings. An overstory of dead, leafless jack pine trees dominated at a height of 18 m. Sparse grass and herbs, such as fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium L.) covered the ground. There were a large number of fallen dead trees, mostly perched above the ground and not decomposing quickly.

  16. AmeriFlux US-UMd UMBS Disturbance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Peter; Gough, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-UMd UMBS Disturbance. Site Description - The UMBS Disturbance site is an artificial disturbance site that has recently been created as part of the Forest Accelerate Succession ExperimenT (FASET). In Spring 2008, every aspen and birch tree (>6,700, ~35% canopy LAI), the dominant early successional trees, were girdled over 39 ha of the FASET treatment plot to stimulate a disturbance that will move the forest into a later successional stage, dominated by maples, oaks, and white pine. This treatment caused aspen and birch mortality within 2 - 3 years. As a result of the changed canopy structure, there is a divergence in net ecosystem exchange between the control plot (enhanced carbon uptake) and the treatment plot (reduced carbon uptake).

  17. MULTIOBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS INVOLVING CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan M. Salazar; Urmila M. Diwekar; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using coal gasification is an important approach for future energy options. This work focuses on understading the system operation and optimizing it in the presence of uncertain operating conditions using ASPEN Plus and CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic simulation and multiobjective optimization capabilities developed by Vishwamitra Research Institute. The feasible operating surface for the IGCC system is generated and deterministic multiobjective optimization is performed. Since the feasible operating space is highly non-convex, heuristics based techniques that do not require gradient information are used to generate the Pareto surface. Accurate CFD models are simultaneously developed for the gasifier and chemical looping combustion system to characterize and quantify the process uncertainty in the ASPEN model.

  18. Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Support Task Order Modified March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Lynette Chafin, 513-246-0461 Lynette.Chafin@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a modification to a task order to Aspen Resources Limited, Inc. of Boulder, Colorado for support of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site. The modification increased the value of the

  19. DE-FE0013127 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bench Scale Development and Testing of Aerogel Sorbent for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0013127 Formation of aerogel pellets Formation of aerogel pellets Aspen Aerogels is developing and testing an innovative advanced aerogel solid sorbent for coal-fired power plants. The aerogel sorbents have high surface area and porosity, unique and tailored pore size distribution, highly-stable functionality, and excellent hydrophobicity for resisting degradation from flue gas and its contaminants over

  20. Porcess-industry CAPE-OPEN software standard overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    CAPE-OPEN (CAPE is short for Computer Aided Process Engineering) is a standard for writing computer software interfaces. It is mainly applied in process engineering where it enables a standardized communication between process simulators (e.g. Aspen Plus) and products developed by ourselves. The advantage of CAPE-OPEN is that these products are applicable to more than just one process simulator; they are aimed at all process simulators that are CAPE-OPEN compliant.

  1. Design of the OMEGA Laser Target Chamber Tritium Removal System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobile, Arthur; Reichert, Heidi; Janezic, Roger T.; Harding, David R.; Lund, Lance D.; Shmayda, Walter T.

    2003-06-15

    Preparations are currently underway at the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) to conduct direct drive laser implosion campaigns with inertial confinement fusion targets containing deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic ice layers. The OMEGA Cryogenic Target Handling System will fill plastic targets with high-pressure DT (150 MPa) at 300 to 500 K, cool them down to cryogenic temperature (<25 K), form the DT ice layer, and transport the targets to the OMEGA laser target chamber. Targets will then be shot with the 60-beam 30-kJ OMEGA laser. A tritium removal system has been designed to remove tritium from effluents associated with operation of the target chamber and its associated diagnostic antechambers, vacuum pumping systems, and target insertion systems. The design of the target chamber tritium removal system (TCTRS) is based on catalytic oxidation of DT and tritiated methane to tritiated water (DTO), followed by immobilization of DTO on molecular sieves. The design of the TCTRS presented a challenge due to the low tritium release limits dictated by the tritium license at UR/LLE. Aspen Plus, a commercial software package intended for the simulation and design of chemical processing systems operating at steady state, was used to simulate and design the TCTRS. A second commercial software package, Aspen ADSIM, was used to simulate and design the TCTRS molecular sieve beds, which operate at unsteady state. In this paper, we describe the design of the TCTRS and the benefits that were realized by use of the Aspen Plus and Aspen ADSIM software packages.

  2. Modeling energy in an Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) system with CO{sub 2} capture integrated with oxy-fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harendra, Sivaram; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Oxy-coal combustion is one of the technical solutions for mitigating CO{sub 2} in thermal power plants. Many processes have been evolved in past the decade to capture CO{sub 2} from process industries. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process, integrated pollutant removal (IPR), that uses off the shelf technology to produce a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. The IPR process as it is realized at the Jupiter Oxygen Burner Test Facility is a spray tower (direct-contact heat exchanger) followed by four stages of compression with intercooling. To study the energy flows of the oxy-combustion process, a 15 MW{sub t}h oxy-combustion pulverized-coal-fired plant integrated with the IPR system was simulated and analyzed using ASPEN Plus and ASPEN energy analyzer. This paper discusses flue-gas recycle, energy flow, recovery, and optimization of IPR systems. ASPEN models of heat- and mass-transfer processes in aflue-gas-condensing heat-exchanger system were developed to predict the heat transferred from flue gas to cooling water. The flue-gas exit temperature, cooling water outlet temperature, and energy flows of IPR streams were computed using ASPEN models. Pinch principles are deployed for targeting design and operation-guiding purposes and balancing the heat and mass transfer in the IPR system. The results are expected to support sophistication of the IPR system design, improving its application in a variety of settings. They open the door for valuable IPR efficiency improvements and generalization of methodology for simultaneous management of energy resources.

  3. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes Under this program, Aspen Aerogels has developed an industrial insulation called Pyrogel HT, which is 4-5 times more thermally efficient than current non-aerogel technology. Derived from nanoporous silica aerogels, Pyrogel HT was specifically developed to address a high temperature

  4. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08

    Americas dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Countrys electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  5. DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Violating Minimum Appliance Standards | Department of Energy Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards June 3, 2010 - 2:17pm Addthis Today, the Department of Energy announced that three manufacturers -- Aspen Manufacturing, Inc., Summit Manufacturing, and Advanced Distributor Products -- must stop distributing 61 heat

  6. Most Viewed Documents - Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information - Chemistry Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors. [249 refs] Zabetakis, M.G. (1964) Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A. (1995) Aqueous electrolyte modeling in ASPEN PLUS{trademark} Bloomingburg, G.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)];

  7. Most Viewed Documents - Power Generation and Distribution | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information - Power Generation and Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; et al. (1994) ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1993--December 1993

  8. Jennifer N. Markham | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jennifer N. Markham Jennifer N. Markham Engineer I, Biorefinery Process Engineer Jennifer.Markham@nrel.gov | 303-275-4154 Research Interests Techno-economic analysis Algae cultivation and separation Biomass conversion to fuels and higher values products Affiliated Research Programs Process Design, Modeling, and Economics Areas of Expertise Aspen Plus Process Modeling Algae cultivation Anaerobic digestion Hydrocarbon separation Ethylene oligomerization Excel economic modeling Discounted cash flow

  9. 2016 FOIA Request.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exhibitors 2016 Exhibitors The 2016 15th Annual DOE Small Business Forum &amp; Expo Logo 2016 Exhibitors 1Source Accurate C&S Services, Inc. Action Capital Corporation Advanced Computer Concepts AECOM Allegheny Science & Technology American Ecotech American Wind, Inc. ANACAPA Mirco Products, Inc. ARS International, LLC. Aspen Publishing Co., Inc. Astro Machine Works, Inc. AVANTech Inc. BCS Incorporated Bechtel National, Inc. BES Technologies, LLC. Boston Government Services, LLC.

  10. DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Violating Minimum Appliance Standards | Department of Energy Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards June 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Today, the Department of Energy announced that three manufacturers -- Aspen Manufacturing, Inc., Summit Manufacturing, and Advanced Distributor Products -- must

  11. Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Data Overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCorkel, Doug; Bivins, Gerrick; Jordan, Terry; Bryden, Mark; Zitney, S.E.; Widmann, John; Osawe, Maxwell

    2008-06-01

    In the design of advanced power generation facilities, process simulation tools are being utilized to model plant behavior and quickly analyze results. While such tools enable investigation of crucial aspects of plant design, typical commercial process simulators still do not explore some plant design information, including high-fidelity data from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics data used for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated for facilitating accurate and effective plant design. At the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus®) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., FLUENT®). In this paper, the integration of the high-fidelity CFD data with overall process data in a virtual power simulation environment will be described. More specifically, we will highlight VE-Suite, an open-source virtual engineering (VE) software toolkit, and its support of Aspen Plus® Hierarchy blocks via the VE-AspenUnit.

  12. Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for data overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCorkel, D.; Bivins, G.; Jordan, T.; Bryden, M.; Zitney, S.; Widmann, J.; Osawe, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the design of advanced power generation facilities, process simulation tools are being utilized to model plant behavior and quickly analyze results. While such tools enable investigation of crucial aspects of plant design, typical commercial process simulators still do not explore some plant design information, including high-fidelity data from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics data used for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated for facilitating accurate and effective plant design. At the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus®) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., FLUENT®). In this paper, the integration of the high-fidelity CFD data with overall process data in a virtual power simulation environment will be described. More specifically, we will highlight VE-Suite, an open-source virtual engineering (VE) software toolkit, and its support of Aspen Plus® Hierarchy blocks via the VE-AspenUnit.

  13. Coal-to-Liquids Process Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive Aspen Plus model has been developed to rigorously model coal-to-liquids processes. This portion was developed under Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. The model is built in a modular fashion to allow rapid reconfiguration for evaluation of process options. Aspen Plus is the framework in which the model is developed. The coal-to-liquids simulation package is an assemble of Aspen Hierarchy Blocks representing subsections of the plant. Each of these Blocks are considered individual components of the Copyright, which may be extracted and licensed as individual components, but which may be combined with one or more other components, to model general coal-conversion processes, including the following plant operations: (1) coal handling and preparation, (2) coal pyrolysis, combustion, or gasification, (3) syngas conditioning and cleanup, (4) sulfur recovery using Claus-SCOT unit operations, (5) Fischer-Tropsch liquid fuels synthesis, (6) hydrocracking of high molecular weight paraffin, (7) hydrotreating of low molecular weight paraffin and olefins, (8) gas separations, and (9) power generation representing integrated combined cycle technology.

  14. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-09-14

    PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes and has been ported to run on a PC. PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations.more » It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computation of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.« less

  15. Coal-to-Liquids Process Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive Aspen Plus model has been developed to rigorously model coal-to-liquids processes. This portion was developed under Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. The model is built in a modular fashion to allow rapid reconfiguration for evaluation of process options. Aspen Plus is the framework in which the model is developed. The coal-to-liquids simulation package is an assemble of Aspen Hierarchy Blocks representing subsections of the plant. Each of these Blocks are consideredmore » individual components of the Copyright, which may be extracted and licensed as individual components, but which may be combined with one or more other components, to model general coal-conversion processes, including the following plant operations: (1) coal handling and preparation, (2) coal pyrolysis, combustion, or gasification, (3) syngas conditioning and cleanup, (4) sulfur recovery using Claus-SCOT unit operations, (5) Fischer-Tropsch liquid fuels synthesis, (6) hydrocracking of high molecular weight paraffin, (7) hydrotreating of low molecular weight paraffin and olefins, (8) gas separations, and (9) power generation representing integrated combined cycle technology.« less

  16. Two poplar-associated bacterial isolates induce additive favorable responses in a constructed plant-microbiome system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jawdy, Sara S.; Gunter, Lee E.; Engle, Nancy L.; Yang, Zamin Koo; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A.; Weston, David J.; et al

    2016-04-26

    Here, the biological function of the plant-microbiome system is the result of contributions from the host plant and microbiome members. In this work we study the function of a simplified community consisting of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia bacterial strains isolated from Populus hosts and inoculated on axenic Populus cutting in controlled laboratory conditions. Inoculation individually with either bacterial isolate increased root growth relative to uninoculated controls. Root area, photosynthetic efficiency, gene expression and metabolite expression data in individual and dual inoculated treatments indicate that the effects of these bacteria are unique and additive, suggesting that the function of a microbiome communitymore » may be predicted from the additive functions of the individual members.« less

  17. Better Buildings Residential Network Workforce/Business Partners Peer Exchange Call Series: Trends in Contractor Conversion Rates Call Slides and Discussion Summary, December 5, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Call Series: Trends in Contractor Conversion Rates Call Slides and Discussion Summary December 5, 2013 Agenda  Call Logistics and Introductions  Peer Exchange Call Overview and Announcements  Lessons Learned: Featured Speakers  Populus (for Denver Energy Challenge & Energy Smart in Boulder County, CO)  NeighborWorks of Western Vermont  Discussion  What trends have you noticed in contractor conversion rates for your programs? Have they been stable, increasing, or

  18. Carbon nanofibers arrays: A novel tool for microdelivery of biomolecules to plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davern, Sandra M.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Standaert, Robert F.; Mirzadeh, Saed; Greenberg, Jean T.; Jelenska, Joanna; Shpak, Elena D.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.

    2016-04-27

    Effective methods for delivering bioprobes into the cells of intact plants are essential for investigating diverse biological processes. Increasing research on trees, such as Populus spp., for bioenergy applications is driving the need for techniques that work well with tree species. This report introduces vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) arrays as a new tool for microdelivery of labeled molecules to Populus leaf tissue and whole plants. We demonstrated that VACNFs penetrate the leaf surface to deliver sub-microliter quantities of solution containing fluorescent or radiolabeled molecules into Populus leaf cells. Importantly, VACNFs proved to be gentler than abrasion with carborundum, amore » common way to introduce material into leaves. Unlike carborundum, VACNFs did not disrupt cell or tissue integrity, nor did they induce production of hydrogen peroxide, a typical wound response. We show that femtomole to picomole quantities of labeled molecules (fluorescent dyes, small proteins and dextran), ranging from 0.5–500 kDa, can be introduced by VACNFs, and we demonstrate the use of the approach to track delivered probes from their site of introduction on the leaf to distal plant regions. VACNF arrays thus offer an attractive microdelivery method for the introduction of biomolecules and other probes into trees and potentially other types of plants.« less

  19. GENOME-ENABLED DISCOVERY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION GENES IN POPLAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS J M

    2007-10-11

    Plants utilize carbon by partitioning the reduced carbon obtained through photosynthesis into different compartments and into different chemistries within a cell and subsequently allocating such carbon to sink tissues throughout the plant. Since the phytohormones auxin and cytokinin are known to influence sink strength in tissues such as roots (Skoog & Miller 1957, Nordstrom et al. 2004), we hypothesized that altering the expression of genes that regulate auxin-mediated (e.g., AUX/IAA or ARF transcription factors) or cytokinin-mediated (e.g., RR transcription factors) control of root growth and development would impact carbon allocation and partitioning belowground (Fig. 1 - Renewal Proposal). Specifically, the ARF, AUX/IAA and RR transcription factor gene families mediate the effects of the growth regulators auxin and cytokinin on cell expansion, cell division and differentiation into root primordia. Invertases (IVR), whose transcript abundance is enhanced by both auxin and cytokinin, are critical components of carbon movement and therefore of carbon allocation. Thus, we initiated comparative genomic studies to identify the AUX/IAA, ARF, RR and IVR gene families in the Populus genome that could impact carbon allocation and partitioning. Bioinformatics searches using Arabidopsis gene sequences as queries identified regions with high degrees of sequence similarities in the Populus genome. These Populus sequences formed the basis of our transgenic experiments. Transgenic modification of gene expression involving members of these gene families was hypothesized to have profound effects on carbon allocation and partitioning.

  20. Uncertainty analysis of an IGCC system with single-stage entrained-flow gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shastri, Y.; Diwekar, U.; Zitney, S.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems using coal gasification is an attractive option for future energy plants. Consequenty, understanding the system operation and optimizing gasifier performance in the presence of uncertain operating conditions is essential to extract the maximum benefits from the system. This work focuses on conducting such a study using an IGCC process simulation and a high-fidelity gasifier simulation coupled with stochastic simulation and multi-objective optimization capabilities. Coal gasifiers are the necessary basis of IGCC systems, and hence effective modeling and uncertainty analysis of the gasification process constitutes an important element of overall IGCC process design and operation. In this work, an Aspen Plus{reg_sign} steady-state process model of an IGCC system with carbon capture enables us to conduct simulation studies so that the effect of gasification variability on the whole process can be understood. The IGCC plant design consists of an single-stage entrained-flow gasifier, a physical solvent-based acid gas removal process for carbon capture, two model-7FB combustion turbine generators, two heat recovery steam generators, and one steam turbine generator in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration. In the Aspen Plus process simulation, the gasifier is represented as a simplified lumped-parameter, restricted-equilibrium reactor model. In this work, we also make use of a distributed-parameter FLUENT{reg_sign} computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to characterize the uncertainty for the entrained-flow gasifier. The CFD-based gasifer model is much more comprehensive, predictive, and hence better suited to understand the effects of uncertainty. The possible uncertain parameters of the gasifier model are identified. This includes input coal composition as well as mass flow rates of coal, slurry water, and oxidant. Using a selected number of random (Monte Carlo) samples for the different parameters, the CFD model is

  1. Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

    2007-02-22

    The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral meristem identity gene (APETALA1 or

  2. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  3. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model. During the period of this report, a Topical Report summarizing the Baseline Case design was drafted and issued to DOE/PETC for review and release approval. Major effort was spent on the Alternate Upgrading and Refining Case. Its design specifications were finalized, and material and utility balances completed. Initial capital cost estimates were developed. A Topical Report, summarizing the Alternative (ZSM-5) Upgrading and Refining Case design, is being drafted. Under Task 4, some of the individual plant models were expanded and enhanced. An overall ASPEN/SP process simulation model was developed for the Baseline Design Case by combining the individual models of Areas 100, 200 and 300. In addition, a separate model for the simplified product refining area, Area 300, of the Alternate Upgrading and Refining case was developed. Under Task 7, cost and schedule control was the primary activity. A technical paper entitled ``Baseline Design/Economics for Advanced Fischer-Tropsch Technology`` was presented in the DOE/PETC`s Annual Contractors Review Conference, held at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on September 27-29, 1993. A contract amendment was submitted to include the Kerr McGee ROSE unit in the Baseline design case and to convert the PFS models from the ASPEN/SP to ASPEN/Plus software code.

  4. Towards the Integration of APECS with VE-Suite to Create a Comprehensive Virtual Engineering Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCorkle, D.; Yang, C.; Jordan, T.; Swensen, D.; Zitney, S.E.; Bryden, M.

    2007-06-01

    Modeling and simulation tools are becoming pervasive in the process engineering practice of designing advanced power generation facilities. These tools enable engineers to explore many what-if scenarios before cutting metal or constructing a pilot scale facility. While such tools enable investigation of crucial plant design aspects, typical commercial process simulation tools such as Aspen Plus®, gPROMS®, and HYSYS® still do not explore some plant design information, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics models for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated if environments are to be constructed where process simulation information can be accessed. At the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., Fluent® CFD), together with advanced analysis capabilities including case studies, sensitivity analysis, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and multi-objective optimization. In this paper, we discuss the initial phases of integrating APECS with the immersive and interactive virtual engineering software, VE-Suite, developed at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. VE-Suite utilizes the ActiveX (OLE Automation) controls in Aspen Plus wrapped by the CASI library developed by Reaction Engineering International to run the process simulation and query for unit operation results. This integration permits any application that uses the VE-Open interface to integrate with APECS co-simulations, enabling construction of the comprehensive virtual engineering environment needed for the

  5. Catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes - Towards an economically viable process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.; Brockmeier, F.E.

    1996-07-01

    The ultimate goal of our project is an economically viable pyrolysis process to recover useful fuels and/or chemicals from plastics- containing wastes. This paper reports the effects of various promoted and unpromoted binary oxide catalysts on yields and compositions of liquid organic products, as measured in a small laboratory pyrolysis reactor. On the basis of these results, a commercial scale catalytic pyrolysis reactor was simulated by the Aspen software and rough costs were estimated. The results suggest that such a process has potential economic viability.

  6. AmeriFlux US-UMB Univ. of Mich. Biological Station

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University; Gough, Christopher [Virginia Commonwealth University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-UMB Univ. of Mich. Biological Station. Site Description - The UMBS site is located within a protected forest owned by the University of Michigan. Arboreal composition of the forest consists of mid-aged northern hardwoods, conifer understory, aspen, and old growth hemlock. Logging of local white pines began in 1879. In successive years, several other species were harvested. Logging was discontinued in 1980 when the land became protected under the private ownership of the University of Michigan. Patchy low- to high-intensity wildfires occurred yearly from 1880 - 1920, essentially burning the entire region.

  7. INTEGRATED PROCESS GAS MODELING FOR TRITIUM SYSTEMS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hang, T; Anita Poore, A

    2007-08-30

    Significant savings are being realized from the consolidated tritium gas-processing operations at the Savannah River Site. However, the trade-off is some reduction of operational flexibility due to decreased storage capacity for process and waste gases. Savannah River National Laboratory researchers are developing an integrated process gas model for tritium processing using Aspen Custom Modeler{trademark} (ACM) software. The modeling involves fully characterizing process flow streams (gas composition, quantity), frequency of batch transfers, and availability of equipment in the flow stream. The model provides a valuable engineering tool to identify flow bottlenecks, thereby enabling adjustments to be made to improve process operations.

  8. REBUILD AMERICA PROGRAM SCOPE OF WORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Brown; Bruce Exstrum

    2004-12-01

    This report summarizes the activities carried out by Aspen Systems Corporation in support of the Department of Energy's Rebuild America program during the period from October 9, 1999 to October 31, 2004. These activities were in accordance with the Scope of Work contained in a GSA MOBIS schedule task order issued by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report includes descriptions of activities and results in the following areas: deployment/delivery model; program and project results; program representative support activities; technical assistance; web site development and operation; business/strategic partners; and training/workshop activities. The report includes conclusions and recommendations. Five source documents are also provided as appendices.

  9. Biomass to Hydrogen Production Detailed Design and Economics Utilizing the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Indirectly-Heated Gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spath, P.; Aden, A.; Eggeman, T.; Ringer, M.; Wallace, B.; Jechura, J.

    2005-05-01

    This analysis developed detailed process flow diagrams and an Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model, evaluated energy flows including a pinch analysis, obtained process equipment and operating costs, and performed an economic evaluation of two process designs based on the syngas clean up and conditioning work being performed at NREL. One design, the current design, attempts to define today's state of the technology. The other design, the goal design, is a target design that attempts to show the effect of meeting specific research goals.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

    2002-07-01

    A software design review meeting was held May 2-3 in Lebanon, NH. The work on integrating a reformer model based on CFD with a fuel cell flow sheet was completed (Task 2.0). The CFD database design was completed and the database API's finalized. A file -based CFD database was implemented and tested (Task 2.8). The task COM-CORBA Bridge-I was completed. The bridge now has CO interfaces for transferring reaction kinetics information from Aspen Plus to Fluent (Task 2.11). The capability for transferring temperature-dependent physical properties from Aspen Plus to Fluent was implemented (Task 2.12). Work on ''Model Selection'' GUI was completed. This GUI allows the process analyst to select models from the CFD database. Work on ''Model Edit'' GUI was started (Task 2.13). A version of Aspen Plus with the capability for using CO parameters in ''design spec'' analysis has become available. With this version being available, work on adding CO wrapper to INDVU code has been started (Task 2.15). A preliminary design for the Solution Strategy class was developed (Task 2.16). The requirements for transferring pressure data between Aspen Plus and Fluent were defined. The ability to include two CFD models in a flow sheet was successfully tested. The capability to handle multiple inlets and outlets in a CO block was tested (Task 2.17). A preliminary version of the Configuration Wizard, which helps a user to make any Fluent model readable from a process simulator, was developed and tested (Task 2.18). Work on constructing a flow sheet model for Demo Case 2 was started. The work on documenting Demo Case 2 is nearing completion (Task 3.2). A Fluent heat exchanger model was installed and tested. Work on calibrating the heat exchanger model was started (Task 4.1). An advisory board meeting was held in conjunction with the Fluent Users Group Meeting on Monday, June 10, 2002. The meeting minutes and presentations for the advisory board meeting have been posted on the project website

  11. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  12. Evaporation and NARS Nitric Acid Mass Balance Summary: 2000--2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Kreutzberg; R.L. Ames; K.M. Hansel

    2005-11-01

    A compilation of the historical nitric acid processing data for the evaporation and nitric acid recycle system (NARS) in TA-55 has provided general acid mass balance trends, as well as the location of missing information in both the evaporation system and NARS data logs. The data were accumulated during the calendar years 2000 to 2005. After making a number of processing assumptions, the empirical system information was used to create an interactive spreadsheet that predicts, with moderate accuracy, some of the various stream variables for the combined evaporation and acid recycle processes. Empirical data and interactive calculations were compared to an Aspen Plus{trademark} simulation of the process.

  13. Fundamentals of thermochemical biomass conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overend, R.P.; Milne, T.A.; Mudge, L.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Wood and biomass ultrastructure; Cellulose, hemicellulose and extractives; Lignin; Pretreatment of biomass for thermochemical biomass conversion; A kinetic isotope effect in the thermal dehydration of cellobiose; Gasification and liquefaction of forest products in supercritical water; Thermochemical fractionation and liquefaction of wood; The pyrolysis and gasification of wood in molten hydroxide eutectics; Influence of alkali carbonates on biomass volatilization; Flash pyrolysis of biomass with reactive and non-reactive gases; Pyrolytic reactions and biomass; Product formation in the pyrolysis of large wood particles; The pyrolysis under vacuum of aspen poplar; Simulation of kraft lignin pyrolysis; and Kinetics of wood gasification by carbon dioxide and steam.

  14. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 200 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A. (1981) 103 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 76 Feed-pump

  15. LE & ME n Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

     Oscillation Results W.C. Louis, Aspen Winter Conference, January 22, 2010 * MiniBooNE Introduction *  e Appearance Oscillation Results * NuMI Data Results *  e Appearance Oscillation Results * Global 3+1 fits to World Data *   &   Disappearance Oscillation Results * Conclusions MiniBooNE was designed to test the LSND signal m 13 2 = m 12 2 + m 23 2 A 3 neutrino picture requires m 12 2 = m 1 2 - m 2 2 m 23 2 = m 2 2 - m 3 2 increasing (mass) 2 The three

  16. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 719 Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 628 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 343 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and

  17. July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 535 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 165 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A. (1981) 154 Load flow

  18. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 118 Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 89 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 85 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and

  19. June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 504 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A. (1981) 240 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 160 Load flow

  20. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 112 Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 83 Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 68 Load flow analysis: Base cases, data, diagrams,

  1. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions Maimoni, A. (1980) 101 A kinetic study of methanol synthesis in a slurry reactor using a CuO/ZnO/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalyst Al-Adwani, H.A. (1992) 97 Aqueous electrolyte modeling in ASPEN PLUS{trademark} Bloomingburg, G.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical

  2. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information 5 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 317 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 254 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A. (1981) 234 Load flow analysis: Base

  3. Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation and Distribution: December 2014

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation and Distribution: December 2014 Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 133 Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 96 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 84 Load flow analysis: Base cases, data,

  4. Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation and Distribution: September 2014

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information for Power Generation and Distribution: September 2014 Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 96 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 73 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A. (1981) 70 Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

  5. QER - Comment of American Public Power Association 7 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 QER - Comment of American Public Power Association 7 From: Voyles, Seth [svoyles@publicpower.org] Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2014 9:43 AM To: QERcomments Subject: Comment on: QER Public Meeting in Denver, CO: Gas-Electricity Interdependence Attachment: AttachB_Aspen_GasStorage2012.pdf; APPA Statement for the Record nat gas forum 2013-06-10.pdf; APPA Statement for the Record nat gas VERs hearing final 2013-05-09.pdf Attached are several documents for consideration for the QER Public Meeting on

  6. Laurentian Bioenergy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berguson, William Evan; Buchman, Daniel; Rack, Jim; Gallagher, Tom; McMahon, Bernard; Hedke, Dale

    2015-03-30

    Work performed under this contract involves development of forest management guidelines related to removal of forest harvest residues from forested sites and brushlands in Minnesota, assessments of biomass availability from forests and brushlands and logistics and equipment associated with handling woody biomass with emphasis on evaluation of a trailer-mounted bundling system. Also, work on hybrid poplar breeding, field testing and yield analysis is included. Evaluation of the production of aspen and red pine along with opportunities to procure woody biomass through thinning operations in red pine is described. Finally, an assessment of issues related to increasing biomass usage at the Laurentian Energy Authority generation facilities is discussed.

  7. Using corngrass1 to engineer poplar as a bioenergy crop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meilan, Richard; Rubinelli, Peter Marius; Chuck, George

    2016-05-10

    Embodiments of the present invention relate generally to new bioenergy crops and methods of creating new bioenergy crops. For example, genes encoding microRNAs (miRNAs) are used to create transgenic crops. In some embodiments, over-expression of miRNA is used to produce transgenic perennials, such as trees, with altered lignin content or composition. In some embodiments, the transgenic perennials are Populus spp. In some embodiments, the miRNA is a member of the miR156 family. In some embodiments, the gene is Zea mays Cg1.

  8. Towards the Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Virtual Power Plant Co-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.; McCorkle, D.; Yang, C.; Jordan, T.; Swensen, D.; Bryden, M.

    2007-05-01

    Process modeling and simulation tools are widely used for the design and operation of advanced power generation systems. These tools enable engineers to solve the critical process systems engineering problems that arise throughout the lifecycle of a power plant, such as designing a new process, troubleshooting a process unit or optimizing operations of the full process. To analyze the impact of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena on overall power plant performance, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has developed the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The APECS system is an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulations such as those based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD), together with advanced analysis capabilities including case studies, sensitivity analysis, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and multi-objective optimization. In this paper we discuss the initial phases of the integration of the APECS system with the immersive and interactive virtual engineering software, VE-Suite, developed at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. VE-Suite uses the ActiveX (OLE Automation) controls in the Aspen Plus process simulator wrapped by the CASI library developed by Reaction Engineering International to run process/CFD co-simulations and query for results. This integration represents a necessary step in the development of virtual power plant co-simulations that will ultimately reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing advanced power generation systems.

  9. ISPE: A knowledge-based system for fluidization studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, S.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical engineers use mathematical simulators to design, model, optimize and refine various engineering plants/processes. This procedure requires the following steps: (1) preparation of an input data file according to the format required by the target simulator; (2) excecuting the simulation; and (3) analyzing the results of the simulation to determine if all specified goals'' are satisfied. If the goals are not met, the input data file must be modified and the simulation repeated. This multistep process is continued until satisfactory results are obtained. This research was undertaken to develop a knowledge based system, IPSE (Intelligent Process Simulation Environment), that can enhance the productivity of chemical engineers/modelers by serving as an intelligent assistant to perform a variety tasks related to process simulation. ASPEN, a widely used simulator by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) was selected as the target process simulator in the project. IPSE, written in the C language, was developed using a number of knowledge-based programming paradigms: object-oriented knowledge representation that uses inheritance and methods, rulebased inferencing (includes processing and propagation of probabilistic information) and data-driven programming using demons. It was implemented using the knowledge based environment LASER. The relationship of IPSE with the user, ASPEN, LASER and the C language is shown in Figure 1.

  10. ISPE: A knowledge-based system for fluidization studies. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, S.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical engineers use mathematical simulators to design, model, optimize and refine various engineering plants/processes. This procedure requires the following steps: (1) preparation of an input data file according to the format required by the target simulator; (2) excecuting the simulation; and (3) analyzing the results of the simulation to determine if all ``specified goals`` are satisfied. If the goals are not met, the input data file must be modified and the simulation repeated. This multistep process is continued until satisfactory results are obtained. This research was undertaken to develop a knowledge based system, IPSE (Intelligent Process Simulation Environment), that can enhance the productivity of chemical engineers/modelers by serving as an intelligent assistant to perform a variety tasks related to process simulation. ASPEN, a widely used simulator by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) was selected as the target process simulator in the project. IPSE, written in the C language, was developed using a number of knowledge-based programming paradigms: object-oriented knowledge representation that uses inheritance and methods, rulebased inferencing (includes processing and propagation of probabilistic information) and data-driven programming using demons. It was implemented using the knowledge based environment LASER. The relationship of IPSE with the user, ASPEN, LASER and the C language is shown in Figure 1.

  11. Simulation models and designs for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.; Tam, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Process designs and economics were developed for three grass-roots indirect Fischer-Tropsch coal liquefaction facilities. A baseline and an alternate upgrading design were developed for a mine-mouth plant located in southern Illinois using Illinois No. 6 coal, and one for a mine-mouth plane located in Wyoming using Power River Basin coal. The alternate design used close-coupled ZSM-5 reactors to upgrade the vapor stream leaving the Fischer-Tropsch reactor. ASPEN process simulation models were developed for all three designs. These results have been reported previously. In this study, the ASPEN process simulation model was enhanced to improve the vapor/liquid equilibrium calculations for the products leaving the slurry bed Fischer-Tropsch reactors. This significantly improved the predictions for the alternate ZSM-5 upgrading design. Another model was developed for the Wyoming coal case using ZSM-5 upgrading of the Fischer-Tropsch reactor vapors. To date, this is the best indirect coal liquefaction case. Sensitivity studies showed that additional cost reductions are possible.

  12. Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Wood, Richard Arthur; Barnes, Charles Marshall

    2002-08-01

    A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: 1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; 2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and 3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

  13. Selection of Steady-State Process Simulation Software to Optimize Treatment of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, T. T.; Barnes, C. M.; Lauerhass, L.; Taylor, D. D.

    2001-06-01

    The process used for selecting a steady-state process simulator under conditions of high uncertainty and limited time is described. Multiple waste forms, treatment ambiguity, and the uniqueness of both the waste chemistries and alternative treatment technologies result in a large set of potential technical requirements that no commercial simulator can totally satisfy. The aim of the selection process was two-fold. First, determine the steady-state simulation software that best, albeit not completely, satisfies the requirements envelope. And second, determine if the best is good enough to justify the cost. Twelve simulators were investigated with varying degrees of scrutiny. The candidate list was narrowed to three final contenders: ASPEN Plus 10.2, PRO/II 5.11, and CHEMCAD 5.1.0. It was concluded from ''road tests'' that ASPEN Plus appears to satisfy the project's technical requirements the best and is worth acquiring. The final software decisions provide flexibility: they involve annual rather than multi-year licensing, and they include periodic re-assessment.

  14. Rate-based process modeling study of CO{sub 2} capture with aqueous monoethanolamine solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, C.C.; Plaza, J.M.; Dugas, R.; Rochelle, G.T.

    2009-10-15

    Rate-based process modeling technology has matured and is increasingly gaining acceptance over traditional equilibrium-stage modeling approaches. Recently comprehensive pilot plant data for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture with aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) solution have become available from the University of Texas at Austin. The pilot plant data cover key process variables including CO{sub 2} concentration in the gas stream, CO{sub 2} loading in lean MEA solution, liquid to gas ratio, and packing type. In this study, we model the pilot plant operation with Aspen RateSep, a second generation rate-based multistage separation unit operation model in Aspen Plus. After a brief review of rate-based modeling, thermodynamic and kinetic models for CO{sub 2} absorption with the MEA solution, and transport property models, we show excellent match of the rate-based model predictions against the comprehensive pilot plant data and we validate the superiority of the rate-based models over the traditional equilibrium-stage models. We further examine the impacts of key rate-based modeling options, i.e., film discretization options and flow model options. The rate-based model provides excellent predictive capability, and it should be very useful for design and scale-up of CO{sub 2} capture processes.

  15. Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

    2010-09-01

    Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus® conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus® conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

  16. Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.; Wood, R.A.; Barnes, C.M.

    2002-08-15

    A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: (1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; (2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and (3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

  17. Evaluation of alternative thermochemical cycles-part III further development of the Cu-Cl cycle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M. A.; Ferrandon, M. S.; Tatterson, D. F.; Mathias, P.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers on alternative cycle evaluation. Part I described the evaluation methodology. Part II described the down-selection process where the most promising of the nine alternative cycles was determined. The Cu-Cl cycle was selected for further development because it alone meets the four criteria used. The current results indicate that the cycle is chemically viable, feasible with respect to engineering, energy-efficient, and capable of meeting DOE's timeline for an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) demonstration. All of the reactions have been proven and the remaining technical challenges should be met with current technologies. The maximum temperature requirement is around 550 C (823 K), which can be obtained with a variety of heat sources. The lower temperature should mitigate the demands on the materials of construction. This paper, Part III, describes the procedure used to develop the Cu-Cl cycle beyond the relatively simple Level 3 efficiency calculation completed by the universities. The optimization process consisted of (i) updating the thermodynamic database used in the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} simulation, (ii) developing a robust flowsheet and optimizing the energy usage therein, (iii) designing a conceptual process incorporating the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} mass and energy flows, and then (iv) estimating the hydrogen production costs. The results presented here are preliminary because further optimization is ongoing.

  18. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  19. Selection of Steady-State Process Simulation Software to Optimize Treatment of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Barnes, Charles Marshall; Lauerhass, Lance; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2001-06-01

    The process used for selecting a steady-state process simulator under conditions of high uncertainty and limited time is described. Multiple waste forms, treatment ambiguity, and the uniqueness of both the waste chemistries and alternative treatment technologies result in a large set of potential technical requirements that no commercial simulator can totally satisfy. The aim of the selection process was two-fold. First, determine the steady-state simulation software that best, albeit not completely, satisfies the requirements envelope. And second, determine if the best is good enough to justify the cost. Twelve simulators were investigated with varying degrees of scrutiny. The candidate list was narrowed to three final contenders: ASPEN Plus 10.2, PRO/II 5.11, and CHEMCAD 5.1.0. It was concluded from "road tests" that ASPEN Plus appears to satisfy the project's technical requirements the best and is worth acquiring. The final software decisions provide flexibility: they involve annual rather than multi-year licensing, and they include periodic re-assessment.

  20. Minimization of water consumption under uncertainty for PC process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, J.; Diwekar, U.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is becoming increasingly important for the development of advanced power generation systems. As an emerging technology different process configurations have been heuristically proposed for IGCC processes. One of these schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion for the CO2 removal prior the fuel gas is fed to the gas turbine reducing its size (improving economic performance) and producing sequestration-ready CO2 (improving its cleanness potential). However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be used to obtain optimal flowsheets and designs. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). For the alternative designs, large differences in the performance parameters (for instance, the utility requirements) predictions from AEA and AP were observed, suggesting the necessity of solving the HENS problem within the AP simulation environment and avoiding the AEA simplifications. A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case.

  1. Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John; Arnott, James; Wright, Alyson

    2014-10-30

    The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, Next generation climate change experiments needed to advance knowledge and for assessment of CMIP6, on August 4-9, 2013 in Aspen, CO. Jerry Meehl (NCAR), Richard Moss (PNNL), and Karl Taylor (LLNL) served as co-chairs for the workshop which included the participation of 32 scientists representing most of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 160 participant days. In August 2013, AGCI gathered a high level meeting of representatives from major climate modeling centers around the world to assess achievements and lessons learned from the most recent generation of coordinated modeling experiments known as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) as well as to scope out the science questions and coordination structure desired for the next anticipated phase of modeling experiments called CMIP6. The workshop allowed for reflection on the coordination of the CMIP5 process as well as intercomparison of model results, such as were assessed in the most recent IPCC 5th Assessment Report, Working Group 1. For example, this slide from Masahiro Watanabe examines performance on a range of models capturing Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).

  2. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  3. PRELIMINARY ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND VACUUM REGENERATION WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, David; Vidal, Rafael; Russell, Tania; Babcock, Doosan; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Whyatt, Greg; Liu, Kun; Frimpong, Reynolds; Lu, Kunlei; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan; Yarborough, Erin

    2014-12-31

    The results of the preliminary environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risk assessment for an enzyme-activated potassium carbonate (K2CO3) solution post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant, integrated with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant, are presented. The expected emissions during normal steady-state operation have been estimated utilizing models of the PCC plant developed in AspenTech’s AspenPlus® software, bench scale test results from the University of Kentucky, and industrial experience of emission results from a slipstream PCC plant utilizing amine based solvents. A review of all potential emission species and their sources was undertaken that identified two credible emission sources, the absorber off-gas that is vented to atmosphere via a stack and the waste removed from the PCC plant in the centrifuge used to reclaim enzyme and solvent. The conditions and compositions of the emissions were calculated and the potential EH&S effects were considered as well as legislative compliance requirements. Potential mitigation methods for emissions during normal operation have been proposed and solutions to mitigate uncontrolled releases of species have been considered. The potential emissions were found to pose no significant EH&S concerns and were compliant with the Federal legislation reviewed. The limitations in predicting full scale plant performance from bench scale tests have been noted and further work on a larger scale test unit is recommended to reduce the level of uncertainty.

  4. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)dimportant precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosolsdvary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typi-cally represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height vari-ation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homo-geneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting fo-liage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  5. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  6. FINAL SIMULATION RESULTS FOR DEMONSTRATION CASE 1 AND 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland

    2003-10-15

    The goal of this DOE Vision-21 project work scope was to develop an integrated suite of software tools that could be used to simulate and visualize advanced plant concepts. Existing process simulation software did not meet the DOE's objective of ''virtual simulation'' which was needed to evaluate complex cycles. The overall intent of the DOE was to improve predictive tools for cycle analysis, and to improve the component models that are used in turn to simulate equipment in the cycle. Advanced component models are available; however, a generic coupling capability that would link the advanced component models to the cycle simulation software remained to be developed. In the current project, the coupling of the cycle analysis and cycle component simulation software was based on an existing suite of programs. The challenge was to develop a general-purpose software and communications link between the cycle analysis software Aspen Plus{reg_sign} (marketed by Aspen Technology, Inc.), and specialized component modeling packages, as exemplified by industrial proprietary codes (utilized by ALSTOM Power Inc.) and the FLUENT{reg_sign} computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (provided by Fluent Inc). A software interface and controller, based on an open CAPE-OPEN standard, has been developed and extensively tested. Various test runs and demonstration cases have been utilized to confirm the viability and reliability of the software. ALSTOM Power was tasked with the responsibility to select and run two demonstration cases to test the software--(1) a conventional steam cycle (designated as Demonstration Case 1), and (2) a combined cycle test case (designated as Demonstration Case 2). Demonstration Case 1 is a 30 MWe coal-fired power plant for municipal electricity generation, while Demonstration Case 2 is a 270 MWe, natural gas-fired, combined cycle power plant. Sufficient data was available from the operation of both power plants to complete the cycle configurations. Three runs

  7. Carbonic Acid Retreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylor university

    2003-06-01

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. (1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. (2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. (3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. (4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. (5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

    2002-04-01

    A software review meeting was held at Fluent Inc. in Lebanon, NH on January 31-February 1, 2002. The team reviewed the current status of the software and its compliance with the software requirements (Task 2). Work on a fuel cell based power-plant flow sheet that incorporates a reformer CFD model was started. This test case includes more features (multiple ports, temperature dependent properties) than the mixing tank test case developed earlier and will be used for the further testing of the software (Task 2). The software development plan was finalized (Task 2.7). The design and implementation of a CFD database was commenced. The CFD database would store various models that a process analyst can use in the flowsheet model (Task 2.8). The COM-CORBA Bridge was upgraded to use the recently published version 0.9.3 CAPE-OPEN specifications. Work on transferring reaction kinetics data from Aspen Plus to Fluent was started (Task 2.11). The requirements for extending CAPE-OPEN interfaces in Aspen Plus to transfer temperature dependent properties to Fluent was written and communicated to the Aspen Tech developer of CAPE-OPEN interfaces (Task 2.12). A prototype of low-order model based on the Multiple Regression technique was written. A low-order model is required to speed up the calculations with the integrated model (Task 2.19). The Berkshire Power (Agawam, MA) combined-cycle power plant was selected as the Demonstration Case 2 (Task 3.2). A CFD model of the furnace in Demonstration Case 1 was developed. The furnace model will be incorporated into the flowsheet model already developed for this case (Task 4.1). A new hire joined the Fluent development team for this project. The project management plan was revised based on the software development plan. A presentation on the project status was made at the Clearwater Conference, March 4-7, 2002. The final manuscript for ESCAPE-12 conference was submitted (Task 7.0).

  9. GENOME ENABLED MODIFICATION OF POPLAR ROOT DEVELOPMENT FOR INCREASED CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    DR5 as a reporter system to study auxin response in Populus Plant Cell Reports 32:453-463 Auxin responsive promoter DR5 reporter system is functional in Populus to monitor auxin response in tissues including leaves, roots, and stems. We described the behavior of the DR5::GUS reporter system in stably transformed Populus plants. We found several similarities with Arabidopsis, including sensitivity to native and synthetic auxins, rapid induction after treatment in a variety of tissues, and maximal responses in root tissues. There were also several important differences from Arabidopsis, including slower time to maximum response and lower induction amplitude. Young leaves and stem sections below the apex showed much higher DR5 activity than did older leaves and stems undergoing secondary growth. DR5 activity was highest in cortex, suggesting high levels of auxin concentration and/or sensitivity in this tissue. Our study shows that the DR5 reporter system is a sensitive and facile system for monitoring auxin responses and distribution at cellular resolution in poplar. The Populus AINTEGUMENTA LIKE 1 homeotic transcription factor PtAIL1 controls the formation of adventitious root primordia. Plant Physiol. 160: 1996-2006 Adventitious rooting is an essential but sometimes rate-limiting step in the clonal multiplication of elite tree germplasm, because the ability to form roots declines rapidly with age in mature adult plant tissues. In spite of the importance of adventitious rooting, the mechanism behind this developmental process remains poorly understood. We have described the transcriptional profiles that are associated with the developmental stages of adventitious root formation in the model tree poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Transcriptome analyses indicate a highly specific temporal induction of the AINTEGUMENTA LIKE1 (PtAIL1) transcription factor of the AP2 family during adventitious root formation. Transgenic poplar samples that overexpressed PtAIL1 were able to

  10. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  11. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  12. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  13. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  14. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  15. Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

    2004-08-01

    We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

  16. Aerogel-Based Insulation for Industrial Steam Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Williams

    2011-03-30

    Thermal losses in industrial steam distribution systems account for 977 trillion Btu/year in the US, more than 1% of total domestic energy consumption. Aspen Aerogels worked with Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program to specify, develop, scale-up, demonstrate, and deliver Pyrogel XT®, an aerogel-based pipe insulation, to market to reduce energy losses in industrial steam systems. The product developed has become Aspen’s best selling flexible aerogel blanket insulation and has led to over 60 new jobs. Additionally, this product has delivered more than ~0.7 TBTU of domestic energy savings to date, and could produce annual energy savings of 149 TBTU by 2030. Pyrogel XT’s commercial success has been driven by it’s 2-4X better thermal performance, improved durability, greater resistance to corrosion under insulation (CUI), and faster installation times than incumbent insulation materials.

  17. HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

  18. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    All major tasks associated with the contract study have essentially been completed. Our activities during this quarter comprise mainly of project documentation, management and administration. Topical reports which document the accomplishments of the various tasks were issued. As a result of the current contract study, DOE/PETC is contemplating to modify the subject contract to include: replacing hydrocracking with FCC as an alternative scheme for F-T wax upgrading; enhancing the ZSM-5 reactor ASPEN modeling algorithm; incorporating the ZSM-5 reaction scheme to the Western Coal Case, and considering F-T synthesis using natural gas as feedstock. A detailed scope of work for the above tasks with a formal cost proposal was submitted to DOE/PETC for consideration.

  19. Refining and end use study of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, G.

    1998-05-01

    A conceptual design and ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation model was developed for a Battelle biomass-based gasification, Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquefaction and combined-cycle power plant. This model was developed in a similar manner to those coal liquefaction models that were developed under DOE contract DE-AC22-91PC90027. As such, this process flowsheet simulation model was designed to be a research guidance tool and not a detailed process design tool. However, it does contain some process design features, such as sizing the F-T synthesis reactors. This model was designed only to predict the effects of various process and operating changes on the overall plant heat and material balances, utilities, capital and operating costs.

  20. Development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture will be discussed. The IGCC reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power using Illinois No.6 coal as the feed. The plant includes an entrained, downflow, General Electric Energy (GEE) gasifier with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC), a two-stage water gas shift (WGS) conversion process, and two advanced 'F' class combustion turbines partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit (ASU). A subcritical steam cycle is considered for heat recovery steam generation. Syngas is selectively cleaned by a SELEXOL acid gas removal (AGR) process. Sulfur is recovered using a two-train Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. A multistage intercooled compressor is used for compressing CO2 to the pressure required for sequestration. Using Illinois No.6 coal, the reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power. The plant-wide steady-state and dynamic IGCC simulations have been generated using the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign} process simulators, respectively. The model is generated based on the Case 2 IGCC configuration detailed in the study available in the NETL website1. The GEE gasifier is represented with a restricted equilibrium reactor model where the temperature approach to equilibrium for individual reactions can be modified based on the experimental data. In this radiant-only configuration, the syngas from the Radiant Syngas Cooler (RSC) is quenched in a scrubber. The blackwater from the scrubber bottom is further cleaned in the blackwater treatment plant. The cleaned water is returned back to the scrubber and also used for slurry preparation. The acid gas from the sour water stripper (SWS) is sent to the Claus plant. The syngas from the scrubber passes through a sour shift process. The WGS reactors are modeled as adiabatic plug flow reactors with rigorous kinetics based on the mid

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

    2001-07-10

    The training of a new project team member was completed (Task 2.1). The Software Requirements Document was written (Task 2.3). It was determined that the CAPE-OPEN interfaces are sufficient for the communication between Fluent and V21 Controller (Task 2.4). The AspenPlus-Fluent prototype on allyl/triacetone alcohol production was further developed to assist the GUI and software design tasks. The prototype was also used to analyze the sensitivity of a process simulation result with respect to a parameter in a CFD model embedded in the process simulation. Thus the integration of process simulation and CFD provides additional process insights and enables the engineer to optimize overall process performance (e.g., product purity and yield) with respect to important CFD design and operation parameters (e.g., CSTR shaft speed). A top-level design of the V21 Controller was developed and discussed. A draft version of the Software Design Document was written (Task 2.5/2.6). A preliminary software development plan was outlined. At first the V21 Controller will be developed and tested in two parts--a part that communicates with Fluent and a part that communicates with Aspen Plus. Then the two parts will be combined and tested with the allyl/triacetone alcohol flow sheet simulation. Much progress was made in writing the code for the two parts (Task 2.7). A requirement for pre-configured models was identified and added to the software requirements document (Task 2.9). Alstom Power's INDVU code was ported to the PC platform and calibrated. Aspen Plus model of the RP&L unit was improved to reflect the latest information received on the unit. Thus the preparation for linking INDVU code with the Aspen Plus model of RP&L unit is complete (Task 2.14). A report describing Demo Case 1 was written and submitted to DOE for review and approval (Task 3.1). The first Advisory Board meeting was held at the Fluent Users Group Meeting on June 6th. At the Advisory Board meeting, the project was

  2. Using Process/CFD Co-Simulation for the Design and Analysis of Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-04-01

    In this presentation we describe the major features and capabilities of NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) and highlight its application to advanced energy systems, ranging from small fuel cell systems to commercial-scale power plants including the coal-fired, gasification-based electricity and hydrogen plant in the DOE’s $1 billion, 10-year FutureGen demonstration project. APECS is an integrated software suite which allows the process and energy industries to optimize overall plant performance with respect to complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena by combining process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus®) with high-fidelity equipment simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models (e.g., FLUENT®).

  3. Electrical Power Grid Delivery Dynamic Analysis: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diana K. Grauer; Michael E. Reed

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

  4. CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic modeling and reduced-order model computation capability for APECS system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwekar, Urmila; Shastri, Yogendra (Vishwamitra Research Institute Clarendon Hills, IL); Subrmanyan, Karthik; Zitney, S.E.

    2007-11-04

    APECS (Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator) is an integrated software suite that combines the power of process simulation with high-fidelity, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for improved design, analysis, and optimization of process engineering systems. The APECS system uses commercial process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and CFD (e.g., FLUENT) software integrated with the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (CO) interfaces. This breakthrough capability allows engineers to better understand and optimize the fluid mechanics that drive overall power plant performance and efficiency. The focus of this paper is the CAPE-OPEN complaint stochastic modeling and reduced order model computational capability around the APECS system. The usefulness of capabilities is illustrated with coal fired, gasification based, FutureGen power plant simulation. These capabilities are used to generate efficient reduced order models and optimizing model complexities.

  5. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

    2003-08-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

  6. Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Power Grid Delivery: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diana K. Grauer

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

  7. Technoeconomic Analysis of a Lignocellulosic Biomass Indirect Gasification Process to Make Ethanol via Mixed Alcohols Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    A technoeconomic analysis of a 2000 tonne/day lignocellulosic biomass conversion process to make mixed alcohols via gasification and catalytic synthesis was completed. The process, modeled using ASPEN Plus process modeling software for mass and energy calculations, included all major process steps to convert biomass into liquid fuels, including gasification, gas cleanup and conditioning, synthesis conversion to mixed alcohols, and product separation. The gas cleanup area features a catalytic fluidized-bed steam reformer to convert tars and hydrocarbons into syngas. Conversions for both the reformer and the synthesis catalysts were based on research targets expected to be achieved by 2012 through ongoing research. The mass and energy calculations were used to estimate capital and operating costs that were used in a discounted cash flow rate of return analysis for the process to calculate a minimum ethanol selling price of $0.267/L ($1.01/gal) ethanol (U.S.$2005).

  8. Application of polymer membrane technology in coal combustion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaldis, S.P.; Skodras, G.; Grammelis, P.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P.

    2007-03-15

    The energy efficiency and the environmental consequences of typical coal upgrading processes, such as combustion, depend to a large extent on the degree of gas separation, recovery, and recycle. Among the available methods used in chemical industry for a variety of gas separation tasks, the technology of polymer membranes offers several advantages such as low size, simplicity of operation and maintenance, compatibility, and use with a diversity of fuel sources. To examine the impact of membrane separation on coal upgrading processes, the Aspen Plus simulation software was used, in combination with developed membrane mathematical models. Energy analysis in coal combustion processes, where the main scope is CO{sub 2} removal, showed that very promising results can be attained. It is estimated that 95% of the emitted CO{sub 2} can be captured with a moderately low energy penalty (10%). This penalty can be further decreased if higher selectivity and/or permeability polymers can be developed.

  9. CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic modeling and reduced-order model coputation capaability for APECS system. ORIGINAL TITLE: CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic modeling capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwekar, U.; Shastri, Y.; Subramanayan, K.; Zitney, S.

    2007-01-01

    APECS (Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator) is an integrated software suite that combines the power of process simulation with high-fidelity, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for improved design, analysis, and optimization of process engineering systems. The APECS system uses commercial process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and CFD (e.g., FLUENT) software integrated with the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (CO) interfaces. This breakthrough capability allows engineers to better understand and optimize the fluid mechanics that drive overall power plant performance and efficiency. The focus of this paper is the CAPE-OPEN complaint stochastic modeling and reduced order model computational capability around the APECS system. The usefulness of capabilities is illustrated with coal fired, gasification based, FutureGen power plant simulation. These capabilities are used to generate efficient reduced order models and optimizing model complexities.

  10. Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.