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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

aspen populus tremuloides: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design of Linear Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Stirling Engines Final Report E FILE COpy I DO NOT | REMOVE Report Prepared by ASPEN SYSTEMS,...

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen populus tremula Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tremula Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A Populus EST resource for plant functional genomics Fredrik Sterky* Summary: (Populus tremula), a hybrid aspen (P. tremula tremuloides...

3

Impacts of elevated CO2 and/or O3 on leaf ultrastructure of aspen (Populus tremuloides) and birch (Betula papyrifera) in the Aspen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Wisconsin (USA) prior to sampling for ultrastructural investigations on 19 June 1999. In the aspen clones the proportion of vacuoles, the amount of condensed vacuolar tan- nins and the number of plastoglobuli. Ozone concentrations, antioxidant activities and gas exchange in Norway spruce (Picea abies) after one growing season

4

Genetic adaptation of aspen (Populus tremuloides) populations to spring risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in populations from the central boreal plains of Saskatchewan and Alberta, and populations from Minnesota exhibit therefore caution against long- distance seed transfer of Minnesota provenances to the boreal plains exigences e´leve´es en sommes de tempe´rature ont e´te´ note´es pour les popula- tions des plaines bore

Hamann, Andreas

5

A simple and efficient transient transformation for hybrid aspen (Populus tremula P. tremuloides)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

received support from the Kempe Foundation. MEE is a VINNMER Marie Curie International Qualification Fellow funded by the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (VINNOVA) and the European Union assisted with grants from Ume University...

Takata, Naoki; Eriksson, Maria E

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen homolog pttcel9a1 Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Populus tremula) and local environmental conditions explain their distribution... bark pH and nutrient content (Kuusinen 1996) without affecting the host tree vitality. Aspen...

7

VAX/ASPEN installation guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information necessary to install the ASPEN computerized simulation program on the VAX system is provided.

Williams, K.E.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed ConiferAssumptions Mixed conifer forests are a collection of different species, each with different ecologic requirements

9

City of Aspen- Green Power Purchasing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2005, the City of Aspen set a goal to purchase 75% of the city government's energy from renewable sources by 2010. As of December 2006, Aspen had accomplished its goal to provide 75% non-carbon...

10

Aspen, Colorado: Community Energy Strategic Planning Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation features Lee Ledesma, utilities operations manager with the City of Aspen, Colorado. Ledesma provides an overview of the City of Aspen's experience in putting together a financing...

11

The Prairie Naturalist 46:2133; 2014 Multi-scale Habitat Use of Male Ruffed Grouse in the Black Hills National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hills National Forest CASSANDRA L. MEHLS1 , KENT C. JENSEN, MARK A. RUMBLE, and MICHAEL C. WIMBERLY) for aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Black Hills National Forest (Black Hills). Our objective increased stem densities. KEY WORDS aspen, Black Hills National Forest, Bonasa umbellus, display areas

12

City of Aspen- Energy Assessment Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Aspen encourages interested residents and businesses to increase the energy efficiency of homes and offices through the Energy Assessment Program. Participating homes and offices must...

13

aspens: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design of Linear Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Stirling Engines Final Report E FILE COpy I DO NOT | REMOVE Report Prepared by ASPEN SYSTEMS,...

14

Aspen Aerogels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation, search Name:

15

Aspen Pipeline | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation,

16

Aspen Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation,Solar Jump to:

17

Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0305)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that a variety of basic models of split-system air conditioning heat pumps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

18

Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 12 to February 18, 2011. Ninety-four participants from ten countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, ?New Data From the Energy Frontier.? There were 54 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The week?s events included a public lecture (?The Hunt for the Elusive Higgs Boson? given by Ben Kilminster from Ohio State University) and attended by 119 members of the public, and a physics caf? geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists. The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was ?Indirect and Direct Detection of Dark Matter.? It was held from February 6 to February 12, 2011. The 70 participants came from 7 countries and attended 53 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Blas Cabrera of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled ?What Makes Up Dark Matter.? There were 183 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 45 people attended the physics caf? to discuss dark matter. This report provides the attendee lists, programs, and announcement posters for each event.

multiple speakers, presenters listed on link below

2011-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Aspen: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SE-1602)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Aspen Manufacturing finding that indoor unit model AEW244 and outdoor unit model NCPC-424-3010 of residential split system central air conditioning system do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder alnus incana Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

collected from Populus angustifolia James, Populus tremuloides Michx., ... Source: Stiller, Volker - Department of Biological Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Epigenomics of Development in Populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted research to determine the role of epigenetic modifications during tree development using poplar (Populus trichocarpa), a model woody feedstock species. Using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) or chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), followed by high-throughput sequencing, we are analyzed DNA and histone methylation patterns in the P. trichocarpa genome in relation to four biological processes: bud dormancy and release, mature organ maintenance, in vitro organogenesis, and methylation suppression. Our project is now completed. We have 1) produced 22 transgenic events for a gene involved in DNA methylation suppression and studied its phenotypic consequences; 2) completed sequencing of methylated DNA from eleven target tissues in wildtype P. trichocarpa; 3) updated our customized poplar genome browser using the open-source software tools (2.13) and (V2.2) of the P. trichocarpa genome; 4) produced summary data for genome methylation in P. trichocarpa, including distribution of methylation across chromosomes and in and around genes; 5) employed bioinformatic and statistical methods to analyze differences in methylation patterns among tissue types; and 6) used bisulfite sequencing of selected target genes to confirm bioinformatics and sequencing results, and gain a higher-resolution view of methylation at selected genes 7) compared methylation patterns to expression using available microarray data. Our main findings of biological significance are the identification of extensive regions of the genome that display developmental variation in DNA methylation; highly distinctive gene-associated methylation profiles in reproductive tissues, particularly male catkins; a strong whole genome/all tissue inverse association of methylation at gene bodies and promoters with gene expression; a lack of evidence that tissue specificity of gene expression is associated with gene methylation; and evidence that genome methylation is a significant impediment to tissue dedifferentiation and redifferentiation in vitro.

Strauss, Steve; Freitag, Michael; Mockler, Todd

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Aspen and Pitkin County- Renewable Energy Mitigation Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Aspen and Pitkin County have adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), with some amendments, as their official energy code effective March 9, 2010. The [http:/...

23

Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

2012 Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy and Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DE-SC0007313 Budget Period: 1/1/2012 to 12/31/2012 The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 11 to February 17, 2012. Sixty-seven participants from nine countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, The Hunt for New Particles, from the Alps to the Plains to the Rockies. There were 53 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The weeks events included a public lecture-Hunting the Dark Universe given by Neal Weiner from New York University) and attended by 237 members of the public, and a physics cafe geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Spencer Chang (University of Oregon), Matthew Reece (Harvard University) and Julia Shelton (Yale University) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by John Campbell (Fermilab), Patrick Fox (Fermilab), Ivan Furic (University of Florida), Eva Halkiadakis (Rutgers University) and Daniel Whiteson (University of California Irvine). Additional information is available at http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=143360. Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was Inflationary Theory and its Confrontation with Data in the Planck Era.? It was held from January 30 to February 4, 2012. The 62 participants came from 7 countries and attended 43 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Shamit Kachru of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled The Small (and Large) Scale Structure of Space-Time.There were 237 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 65 people attended the physics cafe to discuss the current topic with Matthew Kleban (New York University) and Chao-Lin Kuo (Stanford University). This workshop was organized by Olivier Dore (Jet Propulsion Lab), Fabian Schmidt (Caltech), Leonardo Senatore (Stanford University), and Kendrick Smith (Princeton University).

Campbell, John; Olivier, Dore; Fox, Patrick; Furic, Ivan; Halkiadakis, Eva; Schmidt, Fabian; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick M; Whiteson, Daniel

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen winter conference Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-Tuning and Little Hierarchy Problems In the NMSSM NMSSM LHC and Tevatron Phenomenology Aspen Winter Conference... : Gauge coupling unification works very ... Source:...

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen cancer conference Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cancer conference Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aspen cancer conference Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Edited November 11, 2011...

27

Simple Dynamic Gasifier Model That Runs in Aspen Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification (or partial oxidation) is a vital component of 'clean coal' technology. Sulfur and nitrogen emissions can be reduced, overall energy efficiency is increased, and carbon dioxide recovery and sequestration are facilitated. Gasification units in an electric power generation plant produce a fuel for driving combustion turbines. Gasification units in a chemical plant generate gas, which can be used to produce a wide spectrum of chemical products. Future plants are predicted to be hybrid power/chemical plants with gasification as the key unit operation. The widely used process simulator Aspen Plus provides a library of models that can be used to develop an overall gasifier model that handles solids. So steady-state design and optimization studies of processes with gasifiers can be undertaken. This paper presents a simple approximate method for achieving the objective of having a gasifier model that can be exported into Aspen Dynamics. The basic idea is to use a high molecular weight hydrocarbon that is present in the Aspen library as a pseudofuel. This component should have the same 1:1 hydrogen-to-carbon ratio that is found in coal and biomass. For many plantwide dynamic studies, a rigorous high-fidelity dynamic model of the gasifier is not needed because its dynamics are very fast and the gasifier gas volume is a relatively small fraction of the total volume of the entire plant. The proposed approximate model captures the essential macroscale thermal, flow, composition, and pressure dynamics. This paper does not attempt to optimize the design or control of gasifiers but merely presents an idea of how to dynamically simulate coal gasification in an approximate way.

Robinson, P.J.; Luyben, W.L. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Tank SY-102 remediation project summary report: ASPEN modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. As a part of this program, personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flow sheet to remediate tank SY-102, which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. In the conceptual design report issued earlier, an ASPEN plus{trademark} computer model of the flow sheet was presented. This report documents improvements in the flow sheet model after additional thermodynamic data for the actinide species were incorporated.

Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Yarbro, S.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Aspen Clean Fuels Ltd ACF Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation, search Name:Clean

30

Aspen Hill, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation, search

31

Aspen Park, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation, searchColorado:

32

The seasonal water and energy exchange above and within a boreal aspen forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The seasonal water and energy exchange above and within a boreal aspen forest P.D. Blankena,*, T 2001; accepted 2 February 2001 Abstract The seasonal water and energy exchange of a boreal aspen forest: Biometeorology; Boreal forest; Deciduous forest; Transpiration; Radiation; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction

Lee, Xuhui

33

NATIVE MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI WITH ASPEN ON SMELTER-IMPACTED SITES IN THE NORTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by extensive aspen stands on the East Ridge of Butte, MT (inactive copper smelter), adjacent to the smelter stack at Anaconda, MT (inactive copper smelter), at the (removed) lead smelter at Kellogg, ID, and alongNATIVE MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI WITH ASPEN ON SMELTER- IMPACTED SITES IN THE NORTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS

Cripps, Cathy

34

Aqueous electrolyte modeling in ASPEN PLUS{trademark}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of electrolytes in aqueous solutions has long been recognized as contributing to significant departures from thermodynamic ideality. The presence of ions in process streams can greatly add to the difficulty of predicting process behavior. The difficulties are increased as temperatures and pressures within a process are elevated. Because many chemical companies now model their processes with chemical process simulators it is important that such codes be able to accurately model electrolyte behavior under a variety of conditions. Here the authors examine the electrolyte modeling capability of ASPEN PLUS{trademark}, a widely used simulator. Specifically, efforts to model alkali metal halide and sulfate systems are presented. The authors show conditions for which the models within the code work adequately and how they might be improved for conditions where the simulator models fail.

Bloomingburg, G.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Simonson, J.M.; Moore, R.C.; Mesmer, R.E.; Cochran, H.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium sp. PDO1-076, a bacterium isolated from Populus deltoides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rhizobium sp. strain PDO1-076 is a plant-associated bacterium isolated from Populus deltoides, and its draft genome sequence is reported.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Aspen FACE Experiment (FACTS II)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Ring maps, lists of publications, data from the experiments, newsletters, protocol and performance information, and links to other FACTS and FACE information are provided at the ASPEN FACE website.

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen lung conference Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains (Thilenius 1972). Quaking aspen, paper birch, and Black Hills... habitat type wa rosa pine types s the most common they identified. of the seven...

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen sociedad americana Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains (Thilenius 1972). Quaking aspen, paper birch, and Black Hills... habitat type wa rosa pine types s the most common they identified. of the seven...

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen computer models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 71 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: Acute O3 damage...

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspen trees final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 82 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: ) concentration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 185 Do Pine Trees in Aspen Stands Increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suppression and successional processes. Al- though the Black Hills National Forest is removing conifers ago (Severson and Thilenius 1976). Currently, aspen comprises 4% of the Black Hills National Forest and Resource Man- agement Plan, Black Hills National Forest, Custer, SD, 1996). Many aspen stands are old

42

Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOEs Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

43

Physical property parameter set for modeling ICPP aqueous wastes with ASPEN electrolyte NRTL model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aqueous waste evaporators at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are being modeled using ASPEN software. The ASPEN software calculates chemical and vapor-liquid equilibria with activity coefficients calculated using the electrolyte Non-Random Two Liquid (NRTL) model for local excess Gibbs free energies of interactions between ions and molecules in solution. The use of the electrolyte NRTL model requires the determination of empirical parameters for the excess Gibbs free energies of the interactions between species in solution. This report covers the development of a set parameters, from literature data, for the use of the electrolyte NRTL model with the major solutes in the ICPP aqueous wastes.

Schindler, R.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Growth and crown architecture of two aspen genotypes exposed to interacting ozone and carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth and crown architecture of two aspen genotypes exposed to interacting ozone and carbon to O3, atmos- pheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing rapidly (Keeling et al., 1995 concentrations may offset the detrimental effects of increasing O3 (Allen, 1990). Some studies have shown that CO

45

Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen Stefan G. Schreiber1 , Uwe G. Hacke2 , Andreas Hamann1 and Barb R. Thomas1,3 1 Department of Renewable of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 442 Earth Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E3; 3

Hacke, Uwe

46

Snow ablation modelling in a mature aspen stand of the boreal forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of components of energy transfer at the forest ¯oor. Our previous work successfully predicted snow ablationSnow ablation modelling in a mature aspen stand of the boreal forest J. P. Hardy,1* R. E. Davis,1 R below forest canopies. This work represents a second test of our basic modelling scenario by predict

Ni-Meister, Wenge

47

Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

Mark E. Kubiske

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

Tuskan, Gerry

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

Tuskan, Gerry

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 2:  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

Camp, D W

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 1:  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

Camp, D W

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

The obscure events contributing to the evolution of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus A retrospective working hypothesis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genetic determination of gender is a fundamental developmental and evolutionary process in plants. Although it appears that dioecy in Populus is partially genetically controlled, the precise gender-determining systems remain unclear. The recently-released second draft assembly and annotated gene set of the Populus genome provided an opportunity to re-visit this topic. We hypothesized that over evolutionary time, selective pressure has reformed the genome structure and gene composition in the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX which has resulted in a distinctive genome structure and cluster of genes contributing to gender determination in Populus. Multiple lines of evidence support this working hypothesis. First, the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX contains significantly fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms than the rest of Populus genome and has a distinct evolutionary history. Second, the peritelomeric end of chromosome XIX contains the largest cluster of the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of disease resistances genes in the entire Populus genome. Third, there is a high occurrence of small microRNAs on chromosome XIX coincident to the region containing the putative gender-determining locus and the major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. Further, by analyzing the metabolomic profiles of floral bud in male and female Populus trees using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found there are gender-specific accumulations of phenolic glycosides. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the genetic control of gender determination in Populus.

Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Dynamics of light interception, leaf area and biomass production in Populus clones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of light interception, leaf area and biomass production in Populus clones-Forest Service, Rhinelander, WI 54501,U.S.A. Introduction Biomass production in agricultural crops is directly that a linear relation- ship between solar radiation capture and biomass production also exists for forest

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

55

Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

RepPop: A Database for Repetitive Elements in Populus Trichocarpa  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The populus was selected as the first tree with the genome to be sequenced, mainly due to its small genome size, the wide deployment worldwide (30+ species), and its short juvenile period. Its rich content of cellulose, which is one of the most important source for biofuel. A female clone of P. trichocarpa was chosen to be sequenced. The current assembly of Populus genome is release 1.0, whose small insert end-sequence coverage is 7.5X, and it was released in June 2004. It consists of 22,012 sequences (including the 19 chromosomes) and the total length is 485,510,911 bps. The data was downloaded from the offical site of the Populus trichocarpa genome sequencing project. The latest version of the genome can be found at the Poplar Genome Project at JGI Eukaryotic Genomics. Duplication regions introduce significant difficulties into the correct assemblying of sequence contigs. We identified all the repetitive elements in the populus genome. We further assign each of them as different classes of repetitive elements, including DNA transposons, RNA retrotransposons, Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE), Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), and Segmental Duplications (SD), etc. We organized the annotations into this easily browsable, searchable, and blastable database, RepPop, for the whole community.[From website for RepPop at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/~ffzhou/RepPop/

Zhou, Fengfeng; Xu, Ying

57

Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Label-free in situ imaging of lignification in the cell wall of low lignin transgenic Populus trichocarpa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cell wall of low lignin transgenic Populus trichocarpaand 1,700 cm 1 , diVerences in lignin signal intensity andSpatial heterogeneity in the lignin composition, in particu-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development of an ASPEN PLUS physical property database for biofuels components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical property data for many of the key components used in the simulation for the ethanol from lignocellulose process are not available in the standard ASPEN PLUS property databases. Indeed, many of the properties necessary to successfully simulate this process are not available anywhere. In addition, inputting the available properties into each simulation is awkward and tedious, and mistakes can be easily introduced when a long list of physical property equation parameters is entered. Therefore, one must evaluate the literature, estimate properties where necessary, and determine a set of consistent physical properties for all components of interest. The components must then be entered into an in-house NREL ASPEN PLUS database so they can be called on without being retyped into each specific simulation. The first phase of this work is complete. A complete set of properties for the currently identifiable important compounds in the ethanol process is attached. With this as the starting base the authors can continue to search for and evaluate new properties or have properties measured in the laboratory and update the central database.

Wooley, R.J.; Putsche, V.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

Muchero, Wellington [ORNL] [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL] [ORNL; Priya, Ranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University, Morgantown] [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Genome resequencing reveals multiscale geographic structure and extensive linkage disequilibrium in the forest tree Populus trichocarpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Population genomics of forest trees provides crucial information for breeding, conservation, and bioenergy feedstock development. As part of a large-scale association study, we resequenced 16 genomes of the model tree Populus trichocarpa to an average depth of 39 . Analyses of the resulting data revealed surprisingly extensive population genetic structure and decay of linkage disequilibrium over much larger physical distances than the expected based on previous, smaller-scale studies. Rates of recombination varied widely across the genome but were largely predictable based on DNA sequence and methylation patterns. Our results suggest that genomewide association studies and accurate prediction of phenotypes from DNA data are more feasible in Populus than previously assumed, thereby laying the foundation for a step change in our understanding of tree biology.

Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Martin, Joel R [ORNL; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Rodgers-Melnick, Eli [West Virginia University; Lipphardt, Mindie [West Virginia University; Pennacchio, Christa [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hellsten, Uffe [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gunter, Lee [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Strauss, Steven [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Rokhsar, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Twenty-One Genome Sequences from Pseudomonas Species and 19 Genome Sequences from Diverse Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere and Endosphere of Populus deltoides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To aid in the investigation of the Populus deltoides microbiome we generated draft genome sequences for twenty one Pseudomonas and twenty one other diverse bacteria isolated from Populus deltoides roots. Genome sequences for isolates similar to Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Burkholderia, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Novosphingobium, Pantoea, Phyllobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhizobium, Sphingobium and Variovorax were generated.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Martin, Stanton [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparison of selected fuel and chemical content values for seven Populus hybrid clones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel and chemical content values were determined for seven Populus clones by component (wood, bark, and wood/bark specimens) and tissue age (1 to 8 years old). The fuel and chemical content values obtained included: gross heat of combustion, extractives, holocellulose, alpha-cellulose, lignin and ash. In general, analysis of the data for the wood, bark, and wood/bark specimens indicated that: 1) wood was higher in holocellulose and alpha-cellulose content than bark; 2) bark was higher in gross heat of combustion, lignin, extractive, and ash content values than wood; and 3) combined wood/bark fuel and chemical content values were usually between the individual values for the wood and bark. Statistical analyses indicated that significant differences existed within and among clones. Within the wood, bark, and wood/bark specimens, tissue age influenced the chemical content values more than the parentage. Potential chemical yields derived from the seven Populus hybrid clones investigated will depend on component and age with limited parentage effects. 15 references.

Blankenhorn, P.R.; Bowersox, T.W.; Kuklewski, K.M.; Stimely, G.L.; Murphey, W.K.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Differential detection of genetic loci underlying stem and root lignin content in Populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For simultaneous applications directed towards improved pulp yields, enhanced bioethanol production and increased carbon sequestration, it would be desirable to reduce lignin in the harvested stem while increasing the lignin content in nonharvested roots. In this study, we established a comprehensive genetic map with a large number of progeny from a three-generation hybrid Populus intercross, and phenotyped the lignin content, S/G ratio and 28 cell wall subcomponents both in stems and roots for the mapping individuals. Phenotypic analysis revealed that lignin content and syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) ratio using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectroscopy (pyMBMS) varied among mapping individuals. Phenotypic analysis revealed that stem lignin content is significantly higher than that in root and the quantified traits can be classified into four distinct groups, with strong correlations observed among components within organs. Altogether, 179 coordinating QTLs were detected, and they were co-localized into 49 genetic loci, 27 of which appear to be pleiotropic. Many of the detected genetic loci were detected differentially in stem and root. This is the first report of separate genetic loci controlling cell wall phenotypes above and below ground. These results suggest that it may be possible to modify lignin content and composition via breed and/or engineer as a means of simultaneously improving Populus for cellulosic ethanol production and carbon sequestration.

Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Sykes, Robert [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Population genomics of Populus trichocarpa identifies signatures of selection and adaptive trait associations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forest trees are dominant components of terrestrial ecosystems that have global ecological and economic importance. Despite distributions that span wide environmental gradients, many tree populations are locally adapted, and mechanisms underlying this adaptation are poorly understood. Here we use a combination of whole-genome selection scans and association analyses of 544 Populus trichocarpa trees to reveal genomic bases of adaptive variation across a wide latitudinal range. Three hundred ninety-seven genomic regions showed evidence of recent positive and/or divergent selection and enrichment for associations with adaptive traits that also displayed patterns consistent with natural selection. These regions also provide unexpected insights into the evolutionary dynamics of duplicated genes and their roles in adaptive trait variation.

Evans, Luke M [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Rodgers-Melnick, Eli [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Difazio, Stephen P. [West Virginia University, Morgantown

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

Influence of irrigation and fertilization on transpiration and hydraulic properties of Populus deltoides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary Long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability was explored in 3-year-bld Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. clones by examining transpiration. leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (GL), canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) and leaf to sapwood area ratio (AL:Asi)n response to imgation (13 and 551 mm year in addition to ambient precipitation) and fertilization (0 and 120 kg N ha-' year-'). Sap flow was measured continuously over one growing season with thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization had a greater effect on growth and hydraulic properties than imgation, and fertilization effects were independent of irrigation treatment. Transpiration on a ground area basis (E) ranged between 0.3 and 1.8 mm day-', and increased 66% and 90% in response to imgation and fertilization, respectively. Increases in GL, Gs at a reference vapor pressure deficit of 1 kPa, and transpiration per unit leaf areain response to increases in resource availability were associated with reductions in AL:As and consequently a minimal change in the water potential gradient from soil to leaf. Imgation and fertilization increased leaf area index similarly, from an average 1.16 in control stands to 1.45, but sapwood area was increased from 4.0 to 6.3 m ha-' by irrigation and from 3.7 to 6.7 m2 ha-' by fertilization. The balance between leaf area and sapwood area was important in understanding long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability and mechanisms controlling maximum productivity in Populus deltoides.

Samuelson, Lisa, J.; Stokes, Thomas, A.; Coleman, Mark, D.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. Despite the declining costs of genotyping by sequencing, for most studies, the use of large SNP genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution for large-scale targeted genotyping. Here we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species range. Due to the rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium in P. trichocarpa we adopted a candidate gene approach to the array design that resulted in the selection of 34,131 SNPs, the majority of which are located in, or within 2 kb, of 3,543 candidate genes. A subset of the SNPs (539) was selected based on patterns of variation among the SNP discovery accessions. We show that more than 95% of the loci produce high quality genotypes and that the genotyping error rate for these is likely below 2%, indicating that high-quality data are generated with this array. We demonstrate that even among small numbers of samples (n=10) from local populations over 84% of loci are polymorphic. We also tested the applicability of the array to other species in the genus and found that due to ascertainment bias the number of polymorphic loci decreases rapidly with genetic distance, with the largest numbers detected in other species in section Tacamahaca (P. balsamifera and P. angustifolia). Finally, we provide evidence for the utility of the array for intraspecific studies of genetic differentiation and for species assignment and the detection of natural hybrids.

Geraldes, Armando [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Hannemann, Jan [University of Victoria, Canada; Grassa, Chris [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Farzaneh, Nima [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Porth, Ilga [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; McKown, Athena [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Skyba, Oleksandr [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Li, Eryang [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mike, Fujita [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Friedmann, Michael [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Wasteneys, Geoffrey [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Guy, Robert [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; El-Kassaby, Yousry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mansfield, Shawn [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Cronk, Quentin [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Ehlting, Juergen [University of Victoria, Canada; Douglas, Carl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Wymore, Ann [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Christa [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rokhsar, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

2012 Aspen Winter Conference New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials, February 5-10, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Center for Physics Project Summary DOE Budget Period: 10/1/2011 to 9/30/2012 Contract # DE-SC0007479 New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials The 2012 Aspen Winter Conference on Condensed Matter Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 5 to 10, 2012. Seventy-four participants from seven countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, ???¢????????New Paradigms for Low-Dimensional Electronic Materials.???¢??????? There were 34 formal talks, and a number of informal discussions held during the week. Talks covered a variety of topics related to DOE BES priorities, including, for example, advanced photon techniques (Hasan, Abbamonte, Orenstein, Shen, Ghosh) and predictive theoretical modeling of materials properties (Rappe, Pickett, Balents, Zhang, Vanderbilt); the full conference schedule is provided with this report. The week???¢????????s events included a public lecture (???¢????????Quantum Matters???¢??????? given by Chetan Nayak from Microsoft Research) and attended by 234 members of the public, and a physics caf???????© geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists conducted by Kathryn Moler (Stanford University) and Andrew M. Rappe (University of Pennsylvania) and attended by 67 locals and visitors. While there were no published proceedings, some of the talks are posted online and can be Googled. The workshop was organized by Joel Moore (University of California Berkeley), Chetan Nayak (Microsoft Research), Karin Rabe (Rutgers University), and Matthias Troyer (ETH Zurich). Two organizers who did not attend the conference were Gabriel Aeppli (University College London & London Centre for Nanotechnology) and Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford University & Max Planck Hamburg).

Moore, Joel; Rabe, Karin; Nayak, Chetan; Troyer, Matthias

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A genomics investigation of partitioning into and among flavonoid-derived condensed tannins for carbon sequestration in Populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project set out to use comparative (genotype and treatment) and transgenic approaches to investigate the determinants of condensed tannin (CT) accrual and chemical variability in Populus. CT type and amount are thought to effect the decomposition of plant detritus in the soil, and thereby the sequestering of carbon in the soil. The stated objectives were: 1. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling (microarrays) to analyze structural gene, transcription factor and metabolite control of CT partitioning; 2. Transcriptomic (microarray) and chemical analysis of ontogenetic effects on CT and PG partitioning; and 3. Transgenic manipulation of flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes to modify the control of CT composition. Objective 1: A number of approaches for perturbing CT content and chemistry were tested in Objective 1, and those included nitrogen deficit, leaf wounding, drought, and salicylic acid spraying. Drought had little effect on CTs in the genotypes we used. Plants exhibited unpredictability in their response to salicylic acid spraying, leading us to abandon its use. Reduced plant nitrogen status and leaf wounding caused reproducible and magnitudinally striking increases in leaf CT content. Microarray submissions to NCBI from those experiments are the following: GSE ID 14515: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 1979. Public on Jan 04, 2010; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 14893: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 3200. Public on Feb 19, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16783 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 1 week; clone RM5. Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16785 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 90 hours; clone RM5 Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C Although CT amount changed in response to treatments, CT composition was essentially conserved. Overall phenylpropanoid composition exhibited changes due to large effects on phenolic glycosides containing a salicin moiety. There were no effects on lignin content. Efforts to publish this work continue, and depend on additional data which we are still collecting. This ongoing work is expected to strengthen our most provocative metabolic profiling data which suggests as yet unreported links controlling the balance between the two major leaf phenylpropanoid sinks, the CTs and the salicin-PGs. Objective 2: Ontogenic effects on leaf CT accrual and phenylpropanoid complexity (Objective 2) have been reported in the past and we contributed two manuscripts on how phenylpropanoid sinks in roots and stems could have an increasing effect on leaf CT as plants grow larger and plant proportions of stem, root and leaf change. Tsai C.-J., El Kayal W., Harding S.A. (2006) Populus, the new model system for investigating phenylpropanoid complexity. International Journal of Applied Science and Engineering 4: 221-233. We presented evidence that flavonoid precursors of CT rapidly decline in roots under conditions that favor CT accrual in leaves. Harding SA, Jarvie MM, Lindroth RL, Tsai C-J (2009) A comparative analysis of phenylpropanoid metabolism, N utilization and carbon partitioning in fast- and slow-growing Populus hybrid clones. Journal of Experimental Botany. 60:3443-3452. We presented evidence that nitrogen delivery to leaves as a fraction of nitrogen taken up by the roots is lower in high leaf CT genotypes. We presented a hypothesis from our data that N was sequestered in proportion to lignin content in stem tissues. Low leaf N content and high leaf CT in genotypes with high stem lignin was posited to be a systemic outcome of N demand in lignifiying stem tissues. Thereby, stem lignin and leaf CT accrual might be systemically linked, placing control of leaf phenylpropanoids under systemic rather than solely organ specific determinants. Analyses of total structural and non-structural carbohydrates contributed to the model presented. Harding SA, Xue L, Du L, Nyamd

Harding, Scott, A; Tsai, Chung-jui; Lindroth, Richard, L

2013-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Molecular and biochemical characterization of the jasmonic acid methyltransferase gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methyl jasmonate is a metabolite known to be produced by many plants and has roles in diverse biological processes. It is biosynthesized by the action of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT), which belongs to the SABATH family of methyltransferases. Herein is reported the isolation and biochemical characterization of a JMT gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). The genome of P. trichocarpa contains 28 SABATH genes (PtSABATH1 to PtSABATH28). Recombinant PtSABATH3 expressed in Escherichia coli showed the highest level of activity with jasmonic acid (JA) among carboxylic acids tested. It was therefore renamed PtJMT1. PtJMT1 also displayed activity with benzoic acid (BA), with which the activity was about 22% of that with JA. PtSABATH2 and PtSABATH4 were most similar to PtJMT1 among all PtSABATHs. However, neither of them had activity with JA. The apparent Km values of PtJMT1 using JA and BA as substrate were 175 lM and 341 lM, respectively. Mutation of Ser-153 and Asn-361, two residues in the active site of PtJMT1, to Tyr and Ser respectively, led to higher specific activity with BA than with JA. Homology-based structural modeling indicated that substrate alignment, in which Asn-361 is involved, plays a role in determining the substrate specificity of PtJMT1. In the leaves of young seedlings of black cottonwood, the expression of PtJMT1 was induced by plant defense signal molecules methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and a fungal elicitor alamethicin, suggesting that PtJMT1 may have a role in plant defense against biotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that PtJMT1 shares a common ancestor with the Arabidopsis JMT, and functional divergence of these two apparent JMT orthologs has occurred since the split of poplar and Arabidopsis lineages.

Zhao, Nan [ORNL; Yao, Jianzhuang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chaiprasongsuk, Minta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Guanglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guan, Ju [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Guo, Hong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Feng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Genome anchored QTLs for biomass productivity in Hybrid Populus: Heterosis and detection across Contrasting Environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traits related to biomass production were analyzed for the presence of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in an interspecific F2 population derived from an outbred Populus trichocarpa P. deltoides parental cross. Three years of phenotypic data for stem growth traits (height and diameter) were collected from two parental, two F1 and 339 F2 trees in a clonal trial replicated both within and among two environmentally contrasting sites in the North American Pacific Northwest. A genetic linkage map comprised of 841 SSR, AFLP, and RAPD markers and phenotypic data from 310 progeny were used to identify genomic regions harboring QTL using the Multiple-QTL Model (MQM) package of the statistical program MapQTL 6. A total of twelve QTLs, nine putative and three suggestive, were identified with eight of these being identified at both sites in at least one experiment. Of these, three putative QTL BM-1, BM-2, BM-7, on LGs I, II, and XIV, respectively, were identified in all three years for both height and diameter. Two QTLs BM-2 and BM-7, on LG II and XIV, respectively, exhibited significant evidence of over-dominance in all three years for both traits. Conversely a QTL on BM-6 LG XIII exhibited out-breeding depression in two years for both height and diameter. The remaining nine QTLs showed difference levels of dominance and additive effects. Seven of the nine QTL were successfully anchored and QTL peak positions were estimated for each one on the P. trichocarpa genome assembly using flanking SSR markers with known physical positions positions. QTL BM-7 on LG XIV had been anchored on the genome assembly in a previous study, therefore eight QTLs identified in this study were assigned genome assembly positions. Physical distances encompassed by each QTL regions ranged from 1.3 to 8.8 Mb.

Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Sewell, Mitchell [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

75

IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems? From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch photosynthesis increased with elevated CO2 and tended to decrease with elevated O3, compared to the control. In contrast to aspen and birch, maple photosynthesis was not enhanced by elevated CO2. Elevated O3 did not cause significant reductions in maximum photosynthesis in birch or maple. In addition, photosynthesis in ozone sensitive clones was affected to a much greater degree than that in ozone tolerant aspen clones. Treatment effects on photosynthesis contributed to CO2 stimulation of aboveground and belowground growth that was species and genotype dependent, with birch and aspen being most responsive and maple being least responsive. The positive effects of elevated CO2 on net primary productivity NPP were sustained through the end of the experiment, but negative effects of elevated O3 on NPP had dissipated during the final three years of treatments. The declining response to O3 over time resulted from the compensatory growth of O3-tolerant genotypes and species as the growth of O3-sensitive individuals declined over time. Cumulative NPP over the entire experiment was 39% greater under elevated CO2 and 10% lower under elevated O3. Enhanced NPP under elevated CO2 was sustained by greater root exploration of soil for growth-limiting N, as well as more rapid rates of litter decomposition and microbial N release during decay. Results from Aspen FACE clearly indicate that plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, regardless of community type or ozone level, obtained significantly greater amounts of soil N. These results indicate that greater plant growth under elevated carbon dioxide has not led to progressive N limitation. If similar forests growing throughout northeastern North America respond in the same manner, then enhanced forest NPP under elevated CO2 may be sustained for a longer duration than previously thought, and the negative effect of elevated O3 may be diminished by compensatory growth of O3-tolerant plants as they begin to dominate forest communities. By the end of the experiment, elevated CO2 increased ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas

Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Aspen Code Development Collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wyoming has a wealth of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming?s coal and gas resources are exported from the state in unprocessed form rather than as refined higher value products. Wyoming?s leadership recognizes the opportunity to broaden the state?s economic base energy resources to make value-added products such as synthetic vehicle fuels and commodity chemicals. Producing these higher value products in an environmentally responsible manner can benefit from the use of clean energy technologies including Wyoming?s abundant wind energy and nuclear energy such as new generation small modular reactors including the high temperature gas-cooled reactors.

none,; Cherry, Robert S. [INL] INL; Richard, Boardman D. [INL] INL

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

77

Gender determination in populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

McLetchie, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermodynamic Phase And Chemical Equilibrium At 0-110C For The H+-K+-Na+-Cl--H2O System Up To 16 Molal And The HNO3-H2O System Up To 20 Molal Using An Association-Based Pitzer Model Compatible With ASPEN Plus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A status is presented of the parameterization during FY2003 of an association-based Pitzer model to simulate chemical and phase equilibria of acid-chloride-nitrate-mercury aqueous electrolyte systems at 0-100 C within the industry-standard process simulator, ASPEN Plus. Compatibility with ASPEN Plus requires that the Pitzer model used be limited to the third virial coefficient and have the values of b and a1 as originally proposed by Pitzer. Two aqueous models for 0-110 C at atmospheric pressure were parameterized in FY03. The model for the aqueous H+-K+-Na+-Cl- system is applicable for 0-16 molal, and the HNO3-H2O for 0-20 molal. An association-based Pitzer activity coefficient model is combined with Henry.s law to predict activity/osmotic coefficient and VLE. The chloride model also predicts KCl and NaCl solubility, while the nitric acid model has the unique capability of predicting extent of dissociation with an average absolute deviation of 1.43%. The association-based approach presented here extends the utility of the molality-based Pitzer model past 6 molal to predict activity/osmotic coefficients up to 16-20 molal. The association-based approach offers the additional benefits of predicting extent of dissociation and of allowing the Pitzer model to be fully utilized in commercial simulators, such as ASPEN Plus, that require accounting for association to implement Henrys law. The Pitzer models presented here provide the chemical process simulation engineer with a superior alternative to the Electrolyte NRTL model that can easily be used in ASPEN Plus.

Todd T. Nichols; Dean D. Taylor

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermodynamic Phase And Chemical Equilibrium At 0-110 C For The H+-K+-Na+-Cl--H2O System Up To 16 Molal And The HNO3-H2O System Up To 20 Molal Using An Association-Based Pitzer Model Compatible With ASPEN Plus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A status is presented of the parameterization during FY2003 of an association-based Pitzer model to simulate chemical and phase equilibria of acid-chloride-nitrate-mercury aqueous electrolyte systems at 0-100 C within the industry-standard process simulator, ASPEN Plus. Compatibility with ASPEN Plus requires that the Pitzer model used be limited to the third virial coefficient and have the values of b and a1 as originally proposed by Pitzer. Two aqueous models for 0-110 C at atmospheric pressure were parameterized in FY03. The model for the aqueous H+-K+-Na+-Cl- system is applicable for 0-16 molal, and the HNO3-H2O for 0-20 molal. An association-based Pitzer activity coefficient model is combined with Henry's law to predict activity/osmotic coefficient and VLE. The chloride model also predicts KCl and NaCl solubility, while the nitric acid model has the unique capability of predicting extent of dissociation with an average absolute deviation of 1.43%. The association-based approach presented here extends the utility of the molality-based Pitzer model past 6 molal to predict activity/osmotic coefficients up to 16-20 molal. The association-based approach offers the additional benefits of predicting extent of dissociation and of allowing the Pitzer model to be fully utilized in commercial simulators, such as ASPEN Plus, that require accounting for association to implement Henry's law. The Pitzer models presented here provide the chemical process simulation engineer with a superior alternative to the Electrolyte NRTL model that can easily be used in ASPEN Plus.

Nichols,T.T.; Taylor,D.D.

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Aspen, Colorado: Community Energy Strategic Planning Process...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

gas and 2 percent nuclear. So for next year we will be bringing online the Ridgway hydroelectric plant. We've partnered with tri-county on this and we will be adding another 14...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Aspen Aerogels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio EnergyInstitute Name:

82

Aspen, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio EnergyInstitute Name:Colorado: Energy Resources

83

Microsoft Word - AspenMEAReport.doc  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuringInformation 9StructureContactWind Power

84

aspen model development: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brian Scassellati 2001-01-01 119 Development of Models for Optical Instrument Transformers. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Optical Instrument Transformers...

85

Aspen, 28 April 2005 Final Results of RUNJOB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Webber, ApJ, 1989) diffusion + reacceleration (Seo and Ptuskin., ApJ, 1994) #12;RUssia-Nippon JOint/2 and = 1/3 Gupta and Webber, ApJ, 1989 Standard Leaky Box Model, = 0.6 Seo and Ptuskin., ApJ, 1994

86

csep_transcript_aspen.doc | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications highperformanceleasingstrategiesforstateandlocalgovernments.doc Using Social Media to Engage the Community in Energy Efficiency Projects.doc...

87

aspen pulp mill: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 161 Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: :www.epa.govradiation...

88

Factors affecting white spruce and aspen survival after partial harvest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prescriptions. 2. We conducted an operational-scale experiment broadly representative of western North Ameri

Hamann, Andreas

89

1. Aspen Plus KOH , DMC 98.5% (EC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 5m (1/4" 4.5m ) #12;2) Binary Parameters(NRTL) in Activity coefficient i MeOH MeOH MeOH DMC DMC EC

Hong, Deog Ki

90

aspen wood chips: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT APPROACHES FOR THE SIMULATION OF BOILERS USING OIL, GAS, PELLETS OR WOOD CHIPS CiteSeer Summary: A detailed model for the simulation of boilers using...

91

aspen economic model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(1826) play an important role in urban studies, while Hotelling-type models of locational competition get a reasonable degree of attention in industrial organization. On the...

92

Aqueous Electrolyte Modeling in Aspen Plus G. E  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2 (CRAC 2 period)Office2

93

City of Aspen Climate Action Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy InformationLake SouthChroma ATEEnergy LLCAlpha,CityClimate Action

94

City of Aspen, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy InformationLake SouthChroma ATEEnergy LLCAlpha,CityClimate

95

Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) Interdisciplinary Science Workshop: Decadal Climate Prediction; Aspen, CO; June 22-28, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decadal prediction lies between seasonal/interannual forecasting and longer-term climate change projections, and focuses on time-evolving regional climate conditions over the next 10?30 yr. Numerous assessments of climate information user needs have identified this time scale as being important to infrastructure planners, water resource managers, and many others. It is central to the information portfolio required to adapt effectively to and through climatic changes.

Katzenberger, John

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fungal diversity within the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Symbiosis Conference Speaker and Attendee List Integrating Environmental, Safety, and Quality Management System Audits NYC Taxi Drive Cycle Development and Simulation Study...

97

Lignin content in natural Populus variants affects sugar release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sugars in high quantities at low costs from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks (4, 5

California at Riverside, University of

98

Fungal diversity within the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQualityAUGUSTPart 3 of3.2.103 Fungal

99

Effect of acetate and other cell wall components on enzymatic hydrolysis of aspen wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or OAc was the only component reacting with such a dilute KOH solution and consumed KOH. OAc is the easiest 25 '0 ~O Wlo QMI0GOCO IOV Q0ICOIAmO 4 cPOcv 0 O O Yl III Vl Vl Vl O IOIOd COOM III Yl H Pl ~ ~ O O 0 0 0 QOt l IAIAV)Q O O ~ l III O 4...

Kong, Fanran

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ecology & Management Effect of Simulated Browsing on Aspen Regeneration: Implications for Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

no se ramoneo la hoja terminal y se removio # 25% de la biomasa de las ramas. El menor crecimiento se presento cuando el 90% de la longitud de la hoja terminal y el 50% de la biomasa de las ramas fue removido

Tate, Kenneth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ASSESSMENT OF ASPEN AND NORTHERN HARDWOODS EXTENT IN THIRTY THREE COUNTIES OF UPPER/LOWER MICHIGAN.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The importance of the United States' wood and wood byproducts as biomass feedstocks is increasing as the concern about security and sustainability of global (more)

Alian, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Computer-aided industrial process design; the ASPEN Project. First annual report for the period.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work during the first year of this contract concentrated on acquiring the project staff, development of a prototype simulator, the simulation of three coal conversion processes, a survey of software for acquisition, the ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Energy Laboratory.

1977-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

OFermilab OFF-SITE SHORT-TERM HOUSING-2013--2014 Housing Office/Aspen East  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |NavyNuclearLifeOFermilab OFF-SITE

104

New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Shaw Construction, Aspen CO  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S iPartnership Program |Million DOE AwardCDCPineS&A Homes,07,

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - arabidopsis populus vitis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Universiteit - Department of Plant Systems Biology, Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Genomics Division Collection: Biology and Medicine 2 Expansion and Diversification of the...

106

Response of six clones of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) to nutrients in sand culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, evidence suggests that substantial amounts of genotypic variation within our native cottonwood population does exist. The species' wide intraspecific genetic variation in growth potential and wide ranging responses to various cultural practices have... in August and then decreased. Information such as is illustrated in the preceding paragraph only indicates that seasonal progression does have a role in changing foliar nutrient conCentrations; a point on which Wells (1967) is also in complete agreement...

Isbell, Robert Reid

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Summary Cottonwoods (Populus spp.) are dioecious phre-atophytes of hydrological and ecological importance in ripar-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation between Amax and gs (r2 = 0.89), so that photosynthetic wa- ter-use efficiency (WUE; Amax/E depth (Zgw) declined by 1.6 m, but neither mean daily light-sat- urated net photosynthetic rate (Amax) nor stomatal conductance (gs) was correlated with this change. Both Amax and gs followed a parabolic

Letts, Matthew

108

Manipulation Of Lignin Biosynthesis To Maximize Ethanol Production From Populus Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research focuses on transgenic strategies for modifying lignification to improve biomass quality, without leading to deleterious effects on plant performance. In order to accomplish this objective, we designed molecular strategies and selected appropriate transgenes for manipulating the expression of lignification-associated genes; we generated poplar engineered for altered lignin content and/or monomer composition, and field-tested them for fitness; we analyzed the impact of these transgenic strategies on metabolism in general and lignin biosynthesis in particular; and evaluated the ease with which cell wall deconstruction can be accomplished using both chemical and enzymatic means using wild-type and high syringyl poplar.

Dr. Clint Chapple; Dr. Rick Lindroth; Dr. Burce Dien; Dr. Glen Stanosz; Dr. Alex Wiedenhoeft; Dr. Fu Zhao; Dr. Duane Wegener; Dr. Janice Kelly; Dr. Leigh Raymond; Dr. Wallace Tyner

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Sexual reproduction in Populus II. Information molecules of the pollen grain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). They were stained with uranyl acetate/lead citrate (Reynolds, 1963), and observed at 80 kV with the Hitachi. Grids were then stained (uranyl acetate/lead citrate; Reynolds, 1963) and observed by TEM. Biochemical-gel, according to Laemmli's procedure (Laemmli, 1970). After running, proteins were stained with silver nitrate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Direct effects of acidic wet deposition on photosynthesis and stomatal conductance of two Populus clones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a greenhouse in plastic containers (11.2 1) and exposed to simu- lated acidic rain of pH 4.0 or to a control effects of acid precipitation. The interactive effects of leaf age and expo- sure to acid rain on leaf gas significant differ- ences between the two pH treatments. Results Net photosynthesis was decreased by acid rain

Boyer, Edmond

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - angustifolia como material Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

angustifolia, P. tremuloides, Helianthus annuus stems, and Aesculus ... Source: Stiller, Volker - Department of Biological Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University...

112

Label-free in situ imaging of lignification in the cell wall of low lignin transgenic Populus trichocarpa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dixon and Reddy 2003; Fukushima 2001; Ralph et al. 2007).Atalla and Agarwal 1985, 1986; Fukushima 2001). Ana- lyticalBoerjan et al. 2003; Fukushima 2001; Ralph et al. 2007).

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Integrated Approach to Revamping Heat Exchangers Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geometry configurations for a given set of process conditions. Develop simulation model (in Aspen Plus) incorporating rigorous heat exchanger (Aspen Hetran) models for the 1) Validate existing preheat train performance & evaluate the existing and de...-bottlenecked cases de-bottlenecked performance Initiate pinch analysis (using Aspen Pinch) directly 2) Determine feasible energy saving from (Aspen Plus) simulation results Heat exchanger network pinch analysis (using Aspen Pinch) incorporating rigorous (Aspen...

Glass, K. E.; Dhole, V.; Wang, Y.

114

Solar Phase I Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

...15 Figure 2: Thermal Conductivity of Aerogel Insulation (Aspen Aerogels, Inc.)...16 Figure 3: Constant...

115

April, 30 2005 Aspen, Colorado Andreas Haungs KASCADE-Grande Collaboration `Physics from the Knee to the Ankle Investigating the 2nd Knee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Knee to the Ankle´ Investigating the 2nd Knee: KASCADE-Grande Andreas Haungs haungs ­ KASCADE-Grande Collaboration `Physics from the Knee to the Ankle´ Cosmic Rays around the knee: What-Grande Collaboration `Physics from the Knee to the Ankle´ Measurements of air showers in the energy range E0 = 100 Te

116

\\talks and writings\\Aspen Forum REVISED FOR PARTICIPANTS 9-01 Discussion draft for Forum participants. Do not quote or copy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participants. Do not quote or copy. The Century-Long Challenge of Fossil-Carbon Sequestration Robert Socolow (can be "sequestered" from) the atmosphere. Fossil-carbon sequestration is conceptually entirely different from biological-carbon sequestration, yet, unfortunately, both kinds of sequestration are usually

117

The influence of fertilizer placed in bands on root development, foliar nutrient content, and dry matter production of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(&9) ?ayre E. &uebinger& Z. S. F. & Lcuisiana Btete University Directed by: Dr. Fobert G. ?errif ield The study consisted of six treatnents repre enting three levels of ertilization and t&-o placenent. "& t. -noes of the fertilize- band . Foots;:ore erc... snail sj;ell frs. gments; few wormho'les and casts, ' strongly calcare- ous; clear boundary. Reddish 'brown (5Y. '. ? 4/4 moi t) clav; moderate fine irregular and subangular blocky; hard; sticky snd. plastic, wet; strongly calcsz eous; abrupt 'bound z...

Huebinger, Wayne Emerson

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Characterization of leaf resistance to water loss in two clones of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) with respect to light intensity, leaf water potential, and drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and S7C1) (aj ove- cycles 1 and 2 where PAR is & 115nE m s and (b) for cycles 3 and 4 when PAR was & 115 nE m s 39 40 FIGURE PAGE Relationship of average tree leaf resistance with time since sunup at high SW (& 30%) for clones S708 and S7015 (a...) in cycles 3 and 4 and (b) cyles 1 and 2, when PAR was & 115 nE m 2 s 1 . . 42 Relationship of average tree leaf resistance with time since sunup at low SW (& 20%) for clone S7C8 and S7015 (a) in cycles 3 and 4 and (b) cycles 1 and 2 when PAR was & 115 n...

Dougherty, Phillip Merle

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Purdue Theatre Summer 2014 Professional and Research Activity Allinder Kevin MFA-Lighting Design Master Electrician Arkansas Shakespeare Theatre Conway, Arkansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master Electrician Arkansas Shakespeare Theatre Conway, Arkansas Aplin Mercer MFA - Audio Technology Head Audio Engineer Theatre Aspen Aspen, Colorado Baker Emma UG-Acting Apprentice Company Actor Shakespeare Freeman Greg MFA - Lighting Design Master Electrician Arkansas Shakespeare Theatre Conway, Arkansas

Ginzel, Matthew

120

Solvent Reclaiming by Crystallization of Potassium Sulfate Qing Xu, B. S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= - - . The solubility data were also correlated with the electrolyte-NRTL model in Aspen Plus. Potassium sulfate

Rochelle, Gary T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 273 1University of Wisconsin, Madison,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Adaptations of Quaking Aspen for Defense Against Damage by Herbivores and Related Environmental Agents Richard damage by environmental agents: chemical defense and tolerance. Aspen accumulates appreciable quantities, physiological, and physical defenses against damage by environmental agents. For aspen, a growing body

122

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hexose cofermentation using recombinant Zymomonas mobilis. Aspen Plus chemical process simulation software 2 was used to compute material and energy balances for a biorefinery...

123

A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of petroleum refineries, considering crude slates, desired product slates, and refinery configuration. * Aspen Plus - a process simulator extensively used to model heat and...

124

CX-011232: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

line. Western crews immediately responded to this emergency and removed an aspen tree from the downed conductors using ropes and chainsaws, and restored electrical service...

125

Probabilistic Modeling and Evaluation of the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of Texaco Gasifier-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Systems Using ASPEN Prepared by: H. Christopher Frey Naveen................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Overview of Gasification Systems.............................................................. 2 1.1.1 Gasification

Frey, H. Christopher

126

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Martin Aspen. 2006. Demand Response Enabling TechnologiesDon. 2007. Pricing for Demand Response from Residential andthe Level of Demand Response, Power Point Presentation, 24

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Aspen FACE (Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) Experiment Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ;...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptation and use of bituminous materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Aspen FACE (Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) Experiment Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ;...

129

Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Efficient Appliance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who...

130

Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation May 01, 2013 Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation) is a domain specific language for performance modeling...

131

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

very hot temperatures. Here, the insulation is held over a flame. | Courtesy of Aspen Aerogels. Saving Energy and Money with Aerogel Insulation The Energy Department is investing...

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic energy of canada ltd Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

can add your company Summary: Boveri Inc. ASI Group Ltd. Aspen Technology Canada Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Bantrel, Inc. Bayer... Incorporated Collins & Aikman Plastics...

133

Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6 Re-direct Destination: The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical...

134

Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999 Aspen/Pitkin Energy Conservation Code, as Amendments toand the Return of Energy Conservation Jeffrey Harris, Rickand the Return of Energy Conservation Jeffrey Harris,

Harris, Jeffrey; Diamond, Rick; Iyer, Maithili; Payne, Christopher; Blumstein, Carl; Siderius, Hans-Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999 Aspen/Pitkin Energy Conservation Code, as Amendments toFederal Regulations, (2002). Energy Conservation Program forand the Return of Energy Conservation Jeffrey Harris, Rick

Harris, Jeff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Age-dependent variation in the biophysical properties of boreal forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000) Increased carbon sequestration by a boreal deciduouson the annual carbon sequestration by a boreal aspen forest.1996) Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddy

McMillan, Andrew M. S.; Goulden, M. L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute non-variceal upper Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tulane University Collection: Biology and Medicine 80 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: )....

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscisic acid-dependent stomatal Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biotechnology ; Biology and Medicine 80 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: expanding...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the ascorbate-glutathione Source: Michigan Technological University, School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Aspen FACE (Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment)...

140

Energy Department to Invest up to $5.2 million to Advance Basic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Lab: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project: Land Reclamation for Bioenergy: Genomics of Adaptation of Populus to Marginal Sites DOE Lab: Los Alamos National Laboratory...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - arabidopsis reveals correlation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 3 A Populus EST resource for plant functional genomics Fredrik Sterky* Summary: to Arabidopsis proteins (Fig. 1). For sequences exceeding...

142

NREL Support for a Functional Genomics Approach to Investigate Regulation of Phenolic Glycoside: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00218  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL and MTU collaborated on a proposal 'A Functional Genomics Approach to Investigate Regulation of Phenolic Glycoside Metabolism in Populus' funded by the National Science Foundation.

Davis, M.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - arizona alder trees Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shrub stand dominated by Alnus tenuifolia (thinleaf alder). The fast-growing deciduous tree Populus... , and growth dynamics of Alnus tenuifolia (thinleaf alder) and...

144

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

feedstock uniformity, and reduce production risk and the cost of supplying biomass feedstocks for the production of alternative fuels. Whereas, Populus is a top priority...

145

Better Buildings Residential Network Workforce/Business Partners...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Rates in Energy Efficiency Programs Sally Lambert, Program Manager, Populus * Energy Smart in Boulder County * Denver Energy Challenge in the City & County of Denver...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting early enzymatic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute of Technology, Delhi Collection: Biotechnology ; Biology and Medicine 5 Lignin content in natural Populus variants affects sugar release Summary: affects enzymatic...

147

Marcus Douglas Hilliard Thermodynamics of Aqueous Piperazine/Potassium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Potassium Carbonate/Carbon Dioxide Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within Aspen Plus by Marcus Douglas Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within Aspen Plus APPROVED BY SUPERVISING COMMITTEE of Aqueous Piperazine/Potassium Carbonate/Carbon Dioxide Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within

Rochelle, Gary T.

148

Historical Range of Variability and Current Landscape Condition Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forests 2. Cool-Moist or Cold-Wet Mixed Conifer Forests 3. Other Agents Of Disturbance In Mixed Conifer Structure, and Genetic Variability 2. Stable vs. Seral Aspen Communities 3. Aspen and Wildlife B. Reference. Vegetation Structure and Composition ... p 150 B. Reference Conditions ... p 154 1. Warm-Dry Mixed Conifer

149

G)Copyright1991by TheHumanaPressInc. Allrightsofanynaturewhatsoeverreserved.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. tremuloides, and Sweetgum Liquidambar styraciflua) were pretreated by dilute sulfuric acid and evaluated with petroleum-derived fuels, hydrolysis yields must be further increased, enzyme costs must be reduced are presently underway to address some of these challenges. A recent economic analysis (3) of the SSF process

California at Riverside, University of

150

ECOLOGY ABIO 320 FALL 2013 DR. CARACO BIOLOGY 253  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ECOLOGY ABIO 320 FALL 2013 DR. CARACO BIOLOGY 253 Course Web Page: www Scores Links to Lectures #12;2 Texts Gotelli, NJ. A Primer of Ecology. 4 th Edit., 2008 (Required ) Alstad, D. Basic Populus Models of Ecology. 2001 [Rec ] Link to Download Populus on Course Web Page

Caraco, Thomas

151

A reverse osmosis treatment process for produced water: optimization, process control, and renewable energy application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources (wind and solar) are analyzed as potential power sources for the process, and an overview of reverse osmosis membrane fouling is presented. A computer model of the process was created using a dynamic simulator, Aspen Dynamics, to determine energy...

Mareth, Brett

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Microsoft Word - INL_EXT-13-30173 simulation of air-cooled ORC...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Heat Transfer Engineering Data Book III," 2010. Online. Available: http:www.wlv.comproductsdatabookdb3DataBookIII.pdf. Accessed 10 May 2013. 18 19 Appendix I Aspen Plus...

153

Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An advanced process control application, using DMCplus (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system...

Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

design of an advanced heat-exchange reactor system, evaluation of the optimized pellets in a simulated bench-scale TCES system over multiple cycles, and Aspen modeling and...

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing youth risk Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

forms for every youth and leader to the Aspen Grove office Leave the contact person's cell phone... Edited November 11, 2011 Winter Youth Conference Timeline 1. Book your Youth...

156

agriculture project fact: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NIR) Characterization.fl. ) 12;Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences www.slu.se Heat treated biomass into green' bio-coal 176 FACTS II (Aspen FACE) Facility and Harshaw...

157

July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Traczyk, P.A. (1994) 535 > ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 165 > Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A....

158

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 628 ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) 343 Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation Leeper, S.A....

159

Climate Model Intercomparisons: Preparing for the Next Phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article reports on the Aspen Global Change Institute workshopthat provided an input on scenarios. Our group is continuing to work on a number of aspects of scenarios for the next research cycle.

Meehl, J.; Moss, Richard H.; Taylor, K. E.; Eyring, Veronika; Stouffer, R. J.; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, B.

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

Eric D. Isaacs | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

seed the industries of tomorrow? Additional content Video: 2013 Aspen Ideas Festival - What is the right energy mix? Downloadable images High-res image 1 High-res image 2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Annual Report on DOE Technology Transfer FY 2007 and 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

began in 2000 with a four- year CRADA with Fluent, AspenTech, Alstom Power, and West Virginia University. A U.S.- U.K. Memorandum of Understanding and Implementing Agreement was...

162

A Directory of Dedicated Commemorative Groves, Trees and Display Plantings (sorted by common name)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) University of Idaho Arboretum Botanical Garden Paul Warnick Common Name Scientific Name Commemorating Ash North America Fraxinus pennsylvanica, americana etc. Idaho Public Utilities Executives' Course Aspen Groves, Trees and Display Plantings (sorted by common name) University of Idaho Arboretum Botanical

Waits, Lisette

163

Utility Systems Management and Operational Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simultaneously within the context of an integrated utilities management objective. Aspen Utilities provides a single environment to optimize business processes relating to utilities management and substantially improves financial performance typically equivalent...

Dhole, V.; Seillier, D.; Garza, K.

164

The following are appendices A, B1 and B2 of our paper, "Integrated Process Modeling and Product Design of Biodiesel Manufacturing", that appears in the Industrial and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of Biodiesel Manufacturing", that appears in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research a Biodiesel Process Model To access NIST TDE Data Engine in Aspen Plus version 2006.5 or V7.0 Step 1. Enter

Liu, Y. A.

165

Large interannual CO 2 and energy exchange variability in a freshwater marsh under consistent environmental conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the annual carbon sequestration by a boreal aspen forest,tions into wetland carbon sequestration as remediation forin order to assess its carbon sequestration potential. 5.2.

Rocha, Adrian V.; Goulden, Michael L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates cisplatin-induced acute Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 24 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: and larger leaf...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute ozone injury Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 50 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: is more...

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute necrotizing encephalopathy Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medical School Collection: Biology and Medicine 76 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: Acute O3 damage...

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute diffuse phlegmonous Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 61 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: Acute O3 damage...

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorating oxidative damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arizona State University Collection: Engineering 20 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: in acute O3...

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - aba-mediated stomatal closure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 65 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: .rsc.orgjem...

172

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates lps-induced acute Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Columbia University Collection: Biology and Medicine 67 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: and larger leaf...

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects stomatal conductance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 53 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: the leaves were...

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - aba-induced stomatal closure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 92 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: .rsc.orgjem...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-dependent stomatal closure Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 59 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: .rsc.orgjem...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute fulminant necrotizing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 63 Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment Summary: Acute O3 damage...

177

A techno-economic and environmental assessment of hydroprocessed renewable distillate fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a model to quantify the economic costs and environmental impacts of producing fuels from hydroprocessed renewable oils (HRO) process. Aspen Plus was used to model bio-refinery operations and supporting ...

Pearlson, Matthew Noah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Integrating Safety Issues in Optimizing Solvent Selection and Process Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICAS-ProCAMD, and consequence models were integrated into Aspen Plus simulator using a calculator sheet. Upon integrating flammable and toxic hazard modeling, solvents such as 5-nonanone, 2-nonanone and 5-methyl-2-hexanone provide inherently safer...

Patel, Suhani Jitendra

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

179

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management Annelize Victor Michael Brodkorb Sr. Business Consultant Business Development Manager Aspen Technology, Inc. Aspen Technology Espaa, S.A. Houston, TX Barcelona, Spain ABSTRACT To remain... competitive, manufacturers must capture opportunities to increase bottom-line profitability. The goal of this paper is to present a new methodology for reducing energy costs Demand-Side Energy Management. Learn how process manufacturers assess energy...

Victor, A.; Brodkorb, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

An evaluation of water quality in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico: a comparison of 1958 and 1990 water signatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(proportionate relationship), flow dilution (inverse relationship), and dilution plus flow driven (initially inverse, changing to proportionate). Singh (1976) examined the solute yields of two small (&10km2) subalpine basins in Alberta, Canada, an aspen... sheets: Aspen Basin (1977), Cowles (1961), El Valle (1964), Jicarita Peak (1964), McClure Reservoir (1953), Pecos Falls (1963), Sierra Mosca (1977), and Truchas Peak (1963). The study area is accessible from the south through Cowles, New Mexico, via...

Wilkins, David Evan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Integrated Thermal and Hydraulic Analysis of Distillation Columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant additional insights to help screen the options for distillation column revamps. Column Targeting Aspen Plus Column Targeting tool offers capabilities for thermal and hydraulic analysis of distillation columns. During design or retrofit analysis...). Aspen Plus Column Targeting Tool generates the CGCCs based on the Practical Near-Minimum Thermodynamic Condition (PNMTC) approximation (Dhole and Linnhoff). The enthalpies used in plotting the CGCCs are calculated at a given stage of the column...

Samant, K.; Sinclair, I.; Keady, G.

182

Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 64, No. 8, pp. 22832293, 2013 doi:10.1093/jxb/ert096 Advance Access publication 18 April, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laur and Uwe G. Hacke* University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, 4­42 Earth Sciences a study was conducted to determine how roots of hybrid poplar plants (Populus trichocarpa

Hacke, Uwe

183

Summary Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a promising criterion for identifying trees with high drought tolerance, but  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a promising criterion for identifying trees with high drought tolerance, but traditional techniques for measuring cavitation resistance are unsuitablefor throughput screening of cavitation resistance in five poplar (Populus spp.) andfour willow (Salix spp

Mencuccini, Maurizio

184

analysis reveals potential: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Page Topic Index 1 Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of...

185

Interactions of Lignin and Hemicellulose and Effects on Biomass Deconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cellulase to cellulose and lignin for poplar solids producedB, Keller M, et al. Lignin content in natural Populus15):6300-5. Chen F, Dixon RA. Lignin modification improves

Li, Hongjia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arwa K, Renata B, Tu M. Weak Lignin-Binding Enzymes. Appl.Vinzant TB. Deposition of Lignin Droplets Produced DuringM, Tuskan GA, Wyman CE. Lignin Content in Natural Populus

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Aerogel-Based Insulation for Industrial Steam Distribution Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal losses in industrial steam distribution systems account for 977 trillion Btu/year in the US, more than 1% of total domestic energy consumption. Aspen Aerogels worked with Department of Energys Industrial Technologies Program to specify, develop, scale-up, demonstrate, and deliver Pyrogel XT, an aerogel-based pipe insulation, to market to reduce energy losses in industrial steam systems. The product developed has become Aspens best selling flexible aerogel blanket insulation and has led to over 60 new jobs. Additionally, this product has delivered more than ~0.7 TBTU of domestic energy savings to date, and could produce annual energy savings of 149 TBTU by 2030. Pyrogel XTs commercial success has been driven by its 2-4X better thermal performance, improved durability, greater resistance to corrosion under insulation (CUI), and faster installation times than incumbent insulation materials.

John Williams

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-lived radioactive components. Safe: no catastrophic accidents; Low-risk for nuclear materials proliferation WhyMike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths to Climate Stabilization Aspen, 9 July 2003 Fusion Energy: "Pipe Dream or Panacea" #12;Mike Mauel Columbia University Energy Options & Paths

Mauel, Michael E.

189

Elevated CO2 and O3 Alter Soil Nitrogen Transformations beneath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elevated CO2 and O3 Alter Soil Nitrogen Transformations beneath Trembling Aspen, Paper Birch, North Carolina 27695, USA ABSTRACT Nitrogen cycling in northern temperate forest ecosystems could change to a negative feed- back on N availability. Key words: Acer saccharum; Betula papyrifera; Carbon dioxide; FACE

190

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Atmospheric change alters foliar quality of host trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract This study examined the independent and interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2 on aspen than birch. Interestingly, elevated CO2 largely offset decreased herbivore performance under of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) (IPCC 2007). Concentrations of carbon dioxide

191

John R. Jones and Wayne D. Shepperd Harvesting is the removal of produce from the forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Time of Logging Season of logging is influenced by many factors, in- cluding mill capacity, markets and other markets sometimes taking smaller material. Aspen fuelwood harvests, which utilize considerably be easy to move from stand to stand and ordinarily does not require a high produc- tion capacity. Groff

192

CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a first year salary. 9 (11%) Will take time off before continuing their job search 31 (37 grad school 12 have found employment (Avg. Salary: $21,250) · Aspen Ski Company · C Lazy U Ranch · EMS · Peace Corps · Pingree Park · Steamboat Resort · Steamboat Snowmobile Tow Company · Stevens

193

Optical Sensing of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Solar Induced Fluorescence (peaks at 690 and 735 nm) #12;GEP = ! fAPAR PARin Where: GEP is the gross and absorbed carbon - In existing models ! is assigned a maximum value based on cover type and downregulated Calibration panel AMSPEC FUSION #12;SK-Old Aspen Seasonality: NDVI, EVI, GEP Data from T. Hilker, T.A. Black

194

Integration of Industrial Scale Processes using Biomass Feedstock in the Petrochemical Complex ofBiomass Feedstock in the Petrochemical Complex of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Industrial Scale Processes using Biomass Feedstock in the Petrochemical Complex ofBiomass;Introduction · Introduction to Sustainable Development · Research Vision · Biomass conversion processes, Aspen Costs + Sustainable (Credits ­ Costs) #12;Research Vision · Propose biomass based processes integrated

Pike, Ralph W.

195

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 47 1North Central Research Station,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-termsoilproductivity (LTSP) (Powers et al. 1990; Tiarks et al. 1993), we are evaluating effects of soil the northern Lake States region and in northeastern British Columbia (Kabzems 1996; Stone and Elioff 1998 Service, Grand Rapids, MN. Sustaining Aspen Productivity in the Lake States Douglas M. Stone1 Abstract

196

Use of Simulation To Optimize NOx Abatement by Absorption and Selective Catalytic Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of Simulation To Optimize NOx Abatement by Absorption and Selective Catalytic Reduction Andrew This paper describes the development of an ASPEN PLUS simulation model for a commercial NOx abatement system nitric acid production and the abatement of NOx- laden effluent streams for environmental protection.1

Liu, Y. A.

197

ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH ONCE-THROUGH COOLING AT CALIFORNIA'S COASTAL POWER PLANTS In Support of the 2005 Environmental Performance Report and 2005 Integrated Principal Authors Dr. Noel Davis, Chambers Group James Schoonmaker, Aspen Environmental Group Robert

198

CMTC CMTC-151075-PP Dynamic Response of Monoethanolamine (MEA) CO2 Capture Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the dynamic characteristics of the capture plant for load following by simulating various ramp rates of flue to understand the dynamic response of coal-plants with CCS. A variety of engineering studies have been published model of an MEA capture plant was developed using Aspen Dynamics®. The model is used to determine

199

Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation March 17 encompasses a newly developed clay-polymer aerogel composite material (developed and patented by Dr. David Aerogel ~22 > 2,500 Silica Aerogel Blanket 10 1,800 (Aspen Aerogel) Silica Aerogel / PP Evacuated Panel 50

Rollins, Andrew M.

200

WOOD UTILIZATION Eugene M. Wengert, Dennis M. Donnelly, Donald C. Markstrom, and Harold E. Worth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WOOD UTILIZATION Eugene M. Wengert, Dennis M. Donnelly, Donald C. Markstrom, and Harold E. Worth to utilization of quaking aspen have not been well understood. Unfavorable economic factors, such as harvesting and wood processors in the West have found it difficult to identify and evaluate viable utilization

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ORNL/Sub/84-05907/1 ^_~C ~Preliminary Design of Linear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stirling Engines Final Report E FILE COpy I DO NOT | REMOVE Report Prepared by ASPEN SYSTEMS, INC. 275 for Free Piston Stirling Engines Final Report Date Published - June 1985 Report Prepared by K. P. Lee W. M dynamometer for Free Piston Stirling Engines. The work was performed under the following three separate

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

202

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 377 1Pike and San Isabel National Forests,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 377 1Pike and San Isabel National Forests, USDA Forest Service, Pueblo, CO. Aspen Regeneration in South-Central Colorado, San Isabel National Forest Tim regeneration. Following harvest, the Douglas-fir and some Engelmann spruce stands in the Arkansas Hills area

203

International Exergy, Life Cycle Assessment, and Sustainability Workshop & Symposium (ELCAS3) 07 -09 July, 2013, NISYROS -GREECE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from CAPSIS are included in a "soil to power" model under Aspen Plus, a process-oriented software3rd International Exergy, Life Cycle Assessment, and Sustainability Workshop & Symposium (ELCAS3 hal-00858490,version1-6Sep2013 Author manuscript, published in "3rd International Exergy, Life Cycle

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

204

Biomass to Jetfuel-Solvent Optimization in Biphasic Maheen Khan, Doctor Geoff Tompsett, Professor George Huber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass to Jetfuel- Solvent Optimization in Biphasic Reaction Maheen Khan, Doctor Geoff Tompsett to simulate reactor conditions · Run dehydration reaction with solvents and determine whether partition. REACTOR DECANTOR SEPARATEFEED PRODUCT AQUEOUS ORGANIC SOLVENT MAKE-UP FURFURAL Figure 5. Aspen

Mountziaris, T. J.

205

JOURNAL OF OPTIMIZATION THEORY AND APPLICATIONS: Vol. 99, No. 3. pp. 723 757, DECEMBER 1998 Application of Interior-Point Methods to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-basedstrategy that uses a plant model to predict the effect of an input profile on the evolving state of the plant.At each isimplemented until another plant measurement becomes available. The updated plant 1This work was supported and Technology Research, U.S. Depart- ment of Energy, under Contract W-31-l09-Eng-38, and a grant from Aspen

Wright, Steve

206

Career Development: Statistics: 2010 Of the 44 May 2010 graduates, 84 percent (37 people) reported by October 15, 2010, that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Energy Institute, University of Wisconsin­Madison Private Sector · Aspen Institute · Epic · Wisconsin Legislative Audit Bureau · Wisconsin Legislative Fiscal Bureau · Public Service Commission of Wisconsin Nonprofit or Education Sector · Institute for Research on Poverty · IRIS Center, University of Maryland

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

207

Hydrogen Related Analytical Studies Office of Fossil Energy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal with co-production of electric power · Centralized production of liquid fuel hydrogen carriers to ASPEN. Simulations included production of power, liquids, syngas and hydrogen from coal. · In the mid current baseline · Centralized production of hydrogen from coal · Centralized production of hydrogen from

208

Project Award Spreadsheets 2010 12 21 1232.xlsx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Act Funding* Asheville ** NC NC-011 500,000 209,940 Aspen CO CO-003 5,902 59,193 Aurora CO CO-007 319,057 151,800 Baltimore MD MD-002 636,919 200,000 Baton Rouge LA LA-6...

209

of Colorado's Special Issue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Special Issue 2005 Aspen Forests #12;2005 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests February 2006 The 2005 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests highlights Colorado's central mountains. Both sections of the Report underscore the need to address forest management

210

ORIGINAL PAPER ITS-based comparison of endophytic mycota in twigs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER ITS-based comparison of endophytic mycota in twigs of native Populus nigra is to describe and compare the endophytic mycota in twigs from native poplar (P. nigra) and hybrid poplar plantations (P. x euramericana clone I-214). & Methods Twig endophytes were isolated from three native

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

211

-Structure and composition of edges next to regenerating clear-cuts in mixed-wood boreal forest -535 Journal of Vegetation Science 13: 535-546, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant primary responses to edge creation including increased tree mortality, snag breakage and amount: Edge influence; Forest structure; Mortality; Populus; Succession; Understory. Nomenclature: Moss (1983 directly from wind and microclimate effects causing canopy tree dam- age and death (Laurance & Yensen 1991

Macdonald, Ellen

212

Influence of evaporative demand on aquaporin expression and root hydraulics of hybrid poplarpce_2331 1318..1331  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of evaporative demand on aquaporin expression and root hydraulics of hybrid poplarpce_2331 1318..1331 ADRIANA M. ALMEIDA-RODRIGUEZ, UWE G. HACKE & JOAN LAUR Department of Renewable (Y), allowing continued gas exchange in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa ¥ deltoides) saplings

Hacke, Uwe

213

Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy October 06 Sequencing the Populus Genome mechanistic ecosystem responses to global climate change. #12;Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department:1596-1603. #12;Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy October 06 #12;

214

PHOTOSYNTHETICA 16 (3): 321-333, 1982 Autumnal Photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 m plots in late April and early May 1977 at the Michigan State University Tree Research Center Cultured Populus Clones* N.D. NELSON**, D. I. DICKMANN*** and K. W. GOTTSCHALK+ USDA Forest Senice, Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Rhinelander, WI. 54501, U.S.A.** Department of Forestry, Michigan State

215

Plant, Cell and Environment (2002) 25, 17291737 2002 Blackwell Publishing Ltd 1729  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and night-time warming on photosynthetic capacity in Populus deltoides M. H. TURNBULL1 , R. MURTHY2 & K. L%) in light-saturated photosynthetic capacity (Amax) during the day (1000­1300 h) over the 6 C range increased from 15 C (0·36 mmmmmol m----2 s----1 ) to 25 C (0·64 mmmmmol m----2 s----1 ). Amax responded

Saleska, Scott

216

INNOVATIVE, DIVERSIFIED AGROFORESTRY PLANTINGS IN SUPPORT OF ENERGY SECURITY, ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be able to provide feedstocks to support the development of alternative energy industries and also create sustainable agroecosystems. Such systems could provide long-term carbon storage, habitat for wildlife and non willow clones were planted Poplar clone NM6 (Populus maximowiczii x P. nigra) Characteristics Cold

Weiblen, George D

217

Establishment phase greenhouse gas emissions in short rotation woody biomass plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to short-rotation woody biomass crops (SRWC) for bioenergy in the Northern U.S. Lake States. GHG debts-rotation woody bio- energy crops (SRWC), specifically hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.), being in the Northern Lake States, USA Marin M. Palmer a, *, Jodi A. Forrester a , David E. Rothstein b , David J

Turner, Monica G.

218

Climate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along a Mediterranean Basin river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Populus nigra (Salicaceae) In-channel gravel mining Climate change Dynamic fluvial processes strongly controls on soil depth. Climate in the Drôme basin and in the Mediterranean region is trendingClimate and local geomorphic interactions drive patterns of riparian forest decline along

Stella, John C.

219

GREET Pretreatment Module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. This report documents the material and energy flows that occur when fermentable sugars from four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar) are produced via dilute acid pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion. These flows are documented for inclusion in the pretreatment module of the Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. Process simulations of each pretreatment technology were developed in Aspen Plus. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in the GREET pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

Adom, Felix K.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Identification of data gaps found during the development of a zero-order model for a fluidized-bed retort/combustion process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical note (TN) reports on the development of a zero-order ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) model for the fluidized-bed retort/combustion of an eastern oil shale. The objective of the work described was to identify data needs and to create a structure for future, more definitive models. New Albany shale was the initial reference eastern shale at the Department of Energy (DOE)/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). A literature search on this shale was conducted to find the physical property data required for the ASPEN model. This TN discusses the types of missing or incomplete data, the process being modeled, and how process variables are affected by varying input parameters. The TN also presents recommendations for increasing the reliability of the simulation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Ammer, J.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modeling energy in an Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) system with CO{sub 2} capture integrated with oxy-fuel combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxy-coal combustion is one of the technical solutions for mitigating CO{sub 2} in thermal power plants. Many processes have been evolved in past the decade to capture CO{sub 2} from process industries. Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have patented a process, integrated pollutant removal (IPR), that uses off the shelf technology to produce a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. The IPR process as it is realized at the Jupiter Oxygen Burner Test Facility is a spray tower (direct-contact heat exchanger) followed by four stages of compression with intercooling. To study the energy flows of the oxy-combustion process, a 15 MW{sub t}h oxy-combustion pulverized-coal-fired plant integrated with the IPR system was simulated and analyzed using ASPEN Plus and ASPEN energy analyzer. This paper discusses flue-gas recycle, energy flow, recovery, and optimization of IPR systems. ASPEN models of heat- and mass-transfer processes in aflue-gas-condensing heat-exchanger system were developed to predict the heat transferred from flue gas to cooling water. The flue-gas exit temperature, cooling water outlet temperature, and energy flows of IPR streams were computed using ASPEN models. Pinch principles are deployed for targeting design and operation-guiding purposes and balancing the heat and mass transfer in the IPR system. The results are expected to support sophistication of the IPR system design, improving its application in a variety of settings. They open the door for valuable IPR efficiency improvements and generalization of methodology for simultaneous management of energy resources.

Harendra, Sivaram [ORISE; Oryshchyn, Danylo B. [U.S. DOE; Gerdemann, Stephen J. [U.S. DOE

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Americas dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Countrys electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

September 2012 CCE One-time Service Projects Transportation Provided | Sign Up on CougSync!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society of the Palouse 2PM-4PM Bishop Place Wii and Games 2PM-4PM Aspen Park Senior Center Games 6:30 PM Senior Center Games 6 PM ­ 7:30 Franklin PT Association Childcare 6:30 PM ­ 8:15 PM 12 Palouse of the Palouse 2PM-4PM Palouse-Clearwater Environmental Institute 3PM-5PM Tomason Time Mentoring 4 PM ­ 5:30 PM

Collins, Gary S.

224

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-SeparationUnit........................................................................18 3.4.3SyngasGeneration..........................................................................18 3.4.4Fischer-Tropsch(FT)Synthesis.....................................................20 viii CHAPTER Page 3.4.5Product...Description TherearethreestagesinvolvedintheconversionofnaturalgasintoGTLfuels-Syngas generation,Fischer-Tropsch(FT)synthesis,andProductupgrade.Adetailedresultofthe processmodelinginAspenPlusisincludedinAppendixB,whiletheactualprocessmap isshowninFigureA1inAppendixAandFigure3.1below. 17...

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessing Thermo-Hydrodynamic-Chemical Processes at the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:

226

Association of Brazilian Energy Service Companies ABESCO | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump

227

Atchison County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels

228

Atlantic County, New Jersey ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It

229

Auburn, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.

230

Audubon County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen

231

Augusta County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania: Energy

232

Augusta County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:

233

Aurora County, South Dakota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,

234

Aurora, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°,

235

Supplemental Material to Cryogenic Roadmap Current Commercial Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplemental Material to Cryogenic Roadmap Current Commercial Technology Refrigeration Approximate,500 Brayton Turbine $800,000 $69.57 167 14.5 18.94% Liquid Air Plants Cosmodyne GF-1 80 N2 4 T/Day 8,400 Brayton Turbine $700,000 $83.33 372 44.3 6.21% Cosmodyne Aspen 1000 80 N2 1000 nM3 /Hr 64,969 Brayton

236

Development and Testing of a Screw Compressor Supermarket Refrigeration System. Phase I Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Systems, Inc. has completed the design and performance evaluation for a screw compressor refrigeration system for supermarket application. A major advantage of such a system is its ability to exactly match the compressor capacity to the refrigeration load. The capacity modulation of the compressor is performed by the repositioning of an infinitely adjustable slide valve. Another advantage of this system is its compatibility with vapor injection which is an inexpensive and reliable method of liquid subcooling and compressor intercooling.

Borhanian, H.H.; Toscano, W.M.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Data Overlay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the design of advanced power generation facilities, process simulation tools are being utilized to model plant behavior and quickly analyze results. While such tools enable investigation of crucial aspects of plant design, typical commercial process simulators still do not explore some plant design information, including high-fidelity data from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics data used for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated for facilitating accurate and effective plant design. At the Department of Energys (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., FLUENT). In this paper, the integration of the high-fidelity CFD data with overall process data in a virtual power simulation environment will be described. More specifically, we will highlight VE-Suite, an open-source virtual engineering (VE) software toolkit, and its support of Aspen Plus Hierarchy blocks via the VE-AspenUnit.

McCorkel, Doug (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Bivins, Gerrick (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Jordan, Terry; Bryden, Mark (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Zitney, S.E.; Widmann, John (ANSYS, Lebanon, NH); Osawe, Maxwell

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for data overlay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the design of advanced power generation facilities, process simulation tools are being utilized to model plant behavior and quickly analyze results. While such tools enable investigation of crucial aspects of plant design, typical commercial process simulators still do not explore some plant design information, including high-fidelity data from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena, economics data used for policy decisions, operational data after the plant is constructed, and as-built information for use in as-designed models. Software tools must be created that allow disparate sources of information to be integrated for facilitating accurate and effective plant design. At the Department of Energys (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) has been developed as an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulation (e.g., FLUENT). In this paper, the integration of the high-fidelity CFD data with overall process data in a virtual power simulation environment will be described. More specifically, we will highlight VE-Suite, an open-source virtual engineering (VE) software toolkit, and its support of Aspen Plus Hierarchy blocks via the VE-AspenUnit.

McCorkel, D.; Bivins, G.; Jordan, T.; Bryden, M.; Zitney, S.; Widmann, J.; Osawe, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral meristem identity gene (APETALA1 or AP1), auxin response factor gene (ETTIN), the gene encoding transcriptional factor of WD40 family (TRANSPARENTTESTAGLABRA1 or TTG1), and the auxin efflux carrier (PIN-FORMED2 or PIN2) gene. More than 220 transgenic lines of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd generations were analyzed for RNAi suppression phenotypes (Filichkin et. al., manuscript submitted). A total of 108 constructs were supplied by ORNL, UF and OSU and used to generate over 1,881 PCR verified transgenic Populus and over 300 PCR verified transgenic Arabidopsis events. The Populus transgenics alone required Agrobacterium co-cultivations of 124.406 explants.

Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

REBUILD AMERICA PROGRAM SCOPE OF WORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities carried out by Aspen Systems Corporation in support of the Department of Energy's Rebuild America program during the period from October 9, 1999 to October 31, 2004. These activities were in accordance with the Scope of Work contained in a GSA MOBIS schedule task order issued by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report includes descriptions of activities and results in the following areas: deployment/delivery model; program and project results; program representative support activities; technical assistance; web site development and operation; business/strategic partners; and training/workshop activities. The report includes conclusions and recommendations. Five source documents are also provided as appendices.

Jeffrey Brown; Bruce Exstrum

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mixed methods evaluation of a randomized control pilot trial targeting sugar-sweetened beverage behaviors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was funded, in part, by National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute 1R01CA154364-01A1 (Zoellner, PI). REFERENCES [1] Duffey, K.J. and Popkin, B.M. (2007) Shifts in patterns and consumption of beverages between 1965 and 2002. Obesity, 15..., D. (2006) Ad- vancing health literacy: A framework for understanding and action. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. [15] Aufderheide, P. (1993) Part II: Conference Proceedings and Next Steps. Communications and Society Program of the Aspen Institute...

Zoellner, Jamie; Cook, Emily; Chen, Yi-Chun Yvonnes; You, Wen; Davy, Brenda; Estabrooks, Paul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. A rigorous thermodynamic model has been developed with a stand-alone FORTRAN code to represent the CO{sub 2} vapor pressure and speciation of the new solvent. Parameters have been developed for use of the electrolyte NRTL model in AspenPlus. Analytical methods have been developed using gas chromatography and ion chromatography. The heat exchangers for the pilot plant have been ordered.

Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; J. Tim Cullinane; Marcus Hilliard; Terraun Jones

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Ecology of the predator assemblage affecting nest success of passerines in Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were surveyed since 1997 (15 from 1997 to 2006, plus 6 added in 2003). My study areas were located in montane meadows in central Sierra Nevada, California, USA, including El Dorado, Placer, Nevada, and Sierra counties. The area presents a... the line intercept method (Bonham 1989), using a pole (200 cm tall ? 1.25 cm diameter). I took measurements every 3 meters, including vegetation type, as each species of plant that touched the pole (willow, other shrub species, grass/forbs, aspen, alder...

Cocimano, Maria C.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Aspinwall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation,Solar Jump

247

Assam Energy Development Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation,Solar JumpAssam

248

Assam Power Project Development Co Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to: navigation,Solar

249

Assess Oportunities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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250

Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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251

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:Continental United States |

252

Assessment of Exploitable Geothermal Resources Using Magmatic Heat Transfer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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253

Assessment of Geothermal Resources of the United States - 1978 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:Continental United

254

Assessment of Inferred Geothermal Resource: Longavi Project, Chile | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:Continental UnitedEnergy

255

Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:Continental UnitedEnergyUnited

256

Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract new  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:Continental

257

Asset Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:ContinentalCarbon Place:

258

Associated Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels Jump to:ContinentalCarbon

259

Association of Renewable Energy Producers Spain | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable Energy Producers Spain

260

Assumption Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable Energy Producers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assumption Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable Energy

262

Assured Power and Communications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured Power and

263

Aster Watches The World'S Volcanoes- A New Paradigm For Volcanological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured Power

264

Astha Projects India Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured PowerAstha

265

Aston Solar LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured

266

Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured| Open

267

Astra KCMP Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured| OpenAstra

268

Astraeus Wind Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured|

269

AstroKorea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable EnergyAssured|AstroKorea

270

AstroPower Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewable

271

AstroWatt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWatt Jump to:

272

Astrum Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWatt Jump to:Astrum

273

At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Toyoda, Et Al., 1995)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWatt Jump to:Astrum|

274

Atascocita, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWatt Jump

275

Atascosa County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWatt

276

Atascosa County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWattAtascosa County

277

Atchison County, Kansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels JumpRenewableAstroWattAtascosa

278

Atchison County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006

279

Atchison-Holt Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is classified as ASHRAE

280

Athens County, Ohio ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is classified as ASHRAEAthens

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Athens, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is classified as

282

Athens, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is classified as330224°,

283

Atherton, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is classified

284

Athol, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is classifiedAthol,

285

Atkinson County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is

286

Atkinson County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623° Loading map...

287

Atkinson, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623° Loading

288

Atkinson, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623° Loading384221°,

289

Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623°

290

Atlanta, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623°Atlanta, GA) Jump to:

291

Atlantic Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623°Atlanta, GA) Jump

292

Atlantic Biodiesel Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623°Atlanta, GA)

293

Atlantic Biomass Conversions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623°Atlanta, GA)Biomass

294

Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623°Atlanta,

295

Atlantic City Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. It is640623°Atlanta,(Redirected

296

Atlantic Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to: navigation, search Name:

297

Atlantic Ethanol Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to: navigation, search

298

Atlantic Wind Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to: navigation, search&

299

Atlantis Resources Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to: navigation,

300

Atlantis, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to: navigation,Atlantis,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Atlantisstrom | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to:

302

Atlas Solar Innovations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to:Atlas Solar Innovations

303

Atmosfair | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to:Atlas Solar

304

Atoka County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump to:Atlas

305

Atoka County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJump

306

Atraverda Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd Jump to:

307

Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co Ang Li Tiansheng | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd Jump

308

Attala County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd

309

Attala County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd° Loading

310

Auburn Board of Public Works | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd° LoadingWorks

311

Auburn Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd°

312

Auburn Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd°Auburn Hills,

313

Auburn Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd°Auburn

314

Auburn University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda Ltd°AuburnAuburn,

315

Auburn, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05. ItJumpAtraverda

316

Auburn, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°, -71.8356271° Loading map...

317

Auburn, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°, -71.8356271° Loading

318

Auburn, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°, -71.8356271°

319

Auburndale, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°, -71.8356271°Auburndale,

320

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann, Et Al., 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°, -71.8356271°Auburndale,Open

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Audio-Magnetotellurics At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°,

322

Audrain County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°,Information

323

Audrain County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°,InformationAudrain County,

324

Audubon County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspen Aerogels05.385°,InformationAudrain

325

Audubon, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:

326

Aufwind Schmack Neue Energien GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump

327

Auglaize County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources

328

August, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesAugust,

329

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:Augusta Mountains

330

Auli Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:Augusta MountainsAuli

331

Ault, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:Augusta MountainsAuliAult,

332

Aura Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:Augusta

333

Aurica Motors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:AugustaAurica Motors Jump

334

Auriga Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:AugustaAurica Motors

335

Auro Mira Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:AugustaAurica MotorsAuro

336

Aurobindo Agro Energy Pvt Ltd AAEPL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon, Pennsylvania:AugustaAurica

337

Aurora County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°, -98.5721016° Loading map...

338

Aurora Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°, -98.5721016° Loading map...Co

339

Aurora Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°, -98.5721016° Loading

340

Aurora Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°, -98.5721016°

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Aurora Photovoltaics Manufacturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°, -98.5721016°Manufacturing

342

Aurora, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°,Aurora, Colorado: Energy

343

Aurora, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°,Aurora, Colorado: Energy849°,

344

Aurora, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°,Aurora, Colorado:

345

Aurora, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°,Aurora, Colorado:0606784°,

346

Austin Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: Energy Resources JumpAspenAudubon,983477°,Aurora,

347

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Shaw Construction,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruaryResistance HeatingPower of ZeroInc.,Burien,Aspen,

348

ISPE: A knowledge-based system for fluidization studies. 1990 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical engineers use mathematical simulators to design, model, optimize and refine various engineering plants/processes. This procedure requires the following steps: (1) preparation of an input data file according to the format required by the target simulator; (2) excecuting the simulation; and (3) analyzing the results of the simulation to determine if all ``specified goals`` are satisfied. If the goals are not met, the input data file must be modified and the simulation repeated. This multistep process is continued until satisfactory results are obtained. This research was undertaken to develop a knowledge based system, IPSE (Intelligent Process Simulation Environment), that can enhance the productivity of chemical engineers/modelers by serving as an intelligent assistant to perform a variety tasks related to process simulation. ASPEN, a widely used simulator by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) was selected as the target process simulator in the project. IPSE, written in the C language, was developed using a number of knowledge-based programming paradigms: object-oriented knowledge representation that uses inheritance and methods, rulebased inferencing (includes processing and propagation of probabilistic information) and data-driven programming using demons. It was implemented using the knowledge based environment LASER. The relationship of IPSE with the user, ASPEN, LASER and the C language is shown in Figure 1.

Reddy, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ISPE: A knowledge-based system for fluidization studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical engineers use mathematical simulators to design, model, optimize and refine various engineering plants/processes. This procedure requires the following steps: (1) preparation of an input data file according to the format required by the target simulator; (2) excecuting the simulation; and (3) analyzing the results of the simulation to determine if all specified goals'' are satisfied. If the goals are not met, the input data file must be modified and the simulation repeated. This multistep process is continued until satisfactory results are obtained. This research was undertaken to develop a knowledge based system, IPSE (Intelligent Process Simulation Environment), that can enhance the productivity of chemical engineers/modelers by serving as an intelligent assistant to perform a variety tasks related to process simulation. ASPEN, a widely used simulator by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) was selected as the target process simulator in the project. IPSE, written in the C language, was developed using a number of knowledge-based programming paradigms: object-oriented knowledge representation that uses inheritance and methods, rulebased inferencing (includes processing and propagation of probabilistic information) and data-driven programming using demons. It was implemented using the knowledge based environment LASER. The relationship of IPSE with the user, ASPEN, LASER and the C language is shown in Figure 1.

Reddy, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

Ali T-Raissi

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: 1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; 2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and 3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Wood, Richard Arthur; Barnes, Charles Marshall

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: (1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; (2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and (3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.; Wood, R.A.; Barnes, C.M.

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Towards the Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Virtual Power Plant Co-Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process modeling and simulation tools are widely used for the design and operation of advanced power generation systems. These tools enable engineers to solve the critical process systems engineering problems that arise throughout the lifecycle of a power plant, such as designing a new process, troubleshooting a process unit or optimizing operations of the full process. To analyze the impact of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena on overall power plant performance, the Department of Energys (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has developed the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The APECS system is an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulations such as those based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD), together with advanced analysis capabilities including case studies, sensitivity analysis, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and multi-objective optimization. In this paper we discuss the initial phases of the integration of the APECS system with the immersive and interactive virtual engineering software, VE-Suite, developed at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. VE-Suite uses the ActiveX (OLE Automation) controls in the Aspen Plus process simulator wrapped by the CASI library developed by Reaction Engineering International to run process/CFD co-simulations and query for results. This integration represents a necessary step in the development of virtual power plant co-simulations that will ultimately reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing advanced power generation systems.

Zitney, S.E.; McCorkle, D. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Yang, C. (Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT); Jordan, T.; Swensen, D. (Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT); Bryden, M. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, Next generation climate change experiments needed to advance knowledge and for assessment of CMIP6, on August 4-9, 2013 in Aspen, CO. Jerry Meehl (NCAR), Richard Moss (PNNL), and Karl Taylor (LLNL) served as co-chairs for the workshop which included the participation of 32 scientists representing most of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 160 participant days. In August 2013, AGCI gathered a high level meeting of representatives from major climate modeling centers around the world to assess achievements and lessons learned from the most recent generation of coordinated modeling experiments known as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) as well as to scope out the science questions and coordination structure desired for the next anticipated phase of modeling experiments called CMIP6. The workshop allowed for reflection on the coordination of the CMIP5 process as well as intercomparison of model results, such as were assessed in the most recent IPCC 5th Assessment Report, Working Group 1. For example, this slide from Masahiro Watanabe examines performance on a range of models capturing Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).

Katzenberger, John [AGCI; Arnott, James [AGCI; Wright, Alyson [AGCI

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Brief history for the search and discovery of the Higgs particle - A personal perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1964, a new particle was proposed by several groups to answer the question of where the masses of elementary particles come from; this particle is usually referred to as the Higgs particle or the Higgs boson. In July 2012, this Higgs particle was finally found experimentally, a feat accomplished by the ATLAS Collaboration and the CMS Collaboration using the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is the purpose of this review to give my personal perspective on a brief history of the experimental search for this particle since the '80s and finally its discovery in 2012. Besides the early searches, those at the LEP collider at CERN, the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab, and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN are described in some detail. This experimental discovery of the Higgs boson is often considered to be the most important advance in particle physics in the last half a century, and some of the possible implications are briefly discussed. This review is partially based on a talk presented by the author at the conference ``Higgs Quo Vadis,'' Aspen Center for Physics, Aspen, CO, USA, March 10-15, 2013.

Sau Lan Wu

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Selection of Steady-State Process Simulation Software to Optimize Treatment of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process used for selecting a steady-state process simulator under conditions of high uncertainty and limited time is described. Multiple waste forms, treatment ambiguity, and the uniqueness of both the waste chemistries and alternative treatment technologies result in a large set of potential technical requirements that no commercial simulator can totally satisfy. The aim of the selection process was two-fold. First, determine the steady-state simulation software that best, albeit not completely, satisfies the requirements envelope. And second, determine if the best is good enough to justify the cost. Twelve simulators were investigated with varying degrees of scrutiny. The candidate list was narrowed to three final contenders: ASPEN Plus 10.2, PRO/II 5.11, and CHEMCAD 5.1.0. It was concluded from ''road tests'' that ASPEN Plus appears to satisfy the project's technical requirements the best and is worth acquiring. The final software decisions provide flexibility: they involve annual rather than multi-year licensing, and they include periodic re-assessment.

Nichols, T. T.; Barnes, C. M.; Lauerhass, L.; Taylor, D. D.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Biotechnology and genetic optimization of fast-growing hardwoods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A biotechnology research program was initiated to develop new clones of fast-growing Populus clones resistant to the herbicide glyphosate and resistant to the leaf-spot and canker disease caused by the fungus Septoria musiva. Glyphosate-resistant callus was selected from stem segments cultured in vitro on media supplemented with the herbicide. Plants were regenerated from the glyphosate-resistant callus tissue. A portion of plants reverted to a glyphosate susceptible phenotype during organogenesis. A biologically active filtrate was prepared from S. musiva and influenced fresh weight of Populus callus tissue. Disease-resistant plants were produced through somaclonal variation when shoots developed on stem internodes cultured in vitro. Plantlets were screened for disease symptoms after spraying with a suspension of fungal spores. A frequency of 0.83 percent variant production was observed. Genetically engineered plants were produced after treatment of plant tissue with Agrobacterium tumefasciens strains carrying plasmid genes for antibiotic resistance. Transformers were selected on media enriched with the antibiotic, kanamycin. Presence of foreign DNA was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Protoplasts of popular were produced but did not regenerate into plant organs. 145 refs., 12 figs., 36 tabs.

Garton, S.; Syrkin-Wurtele, E.; Griffiths, H.; Schell, J.; Van Camp, L.; Bulka, K. (NPI, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline , diesel and jet range blendstocks . Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Achieving the Security, Environmental, and Economic Potential of Bioenergy. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A group of business, government, environmental and academic leaders convened in a dialogue by the Aspen Institute proposed a series of actions to promote the widespread commercialization of both corn and cellulosic ethanol to improve energy security, the environment, and the economy. Co-chaired by Booz Allen Hamilton Vice President and former CIA Director R. James Woolsey and former Congressman Tom Ewing (R. IL), they developed a series of recommendations involving improved crop yields, processing of biomass into ethanol, manufacture of more cars that can burn either ethanol or gasoline, and the provision of ethanol pumps at more filling stations. Their report, "A High Growth Strategy for Ethanol, includes a discussion of the potential of ethanol, the group's recommendations, and a series of discussion papers commissioned for the dialogue.

Riggs, John A

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Power Grid Delivery: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

Diana K. Grauer

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Identifying features in biological sequences: Sixth workshop report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the sixth of an annual series of workshops held at the Aspen Center for Physics concentrating particularly on the identification of features in DNA sequence, and more broadly on related topics in computational molecular biology. The workshop series originally focused primarily on discussion of current needs and future strategies for identifying and predicting the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians.

Burks, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Myers, E. [Univ. of Arizona (United States); Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

EFFECT OF ELECTROLYZER CONFIGURATION AND PERFORMANCE ON HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS NET THERMAL EFFICIENCY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid Sulfur cycle is gaining popularity as a possible means for massive production of hydrogen from nuclear energy. Several different ways of carrying out the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis step are being pursued by a number of researchers. These alternatives are evaluated with complete flowsheet simulations and on a common design basis using Aspen Plus{trademark}. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assess the performance potential of each configuration, and the flowsheets are optimized for energy recovery. Net thermal efficiencies are calculated for the best set of operating conditions for each flowsheet and the results compared. This will help focus attention on the most promising electrolysis alternatives. The sensitivity analyses should also help identify those features that offer the greatest potential for improvement.

Gorensek, M

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Field evaluation of the lignin-degrading fungus 'phanerochaete sordida' to treat creosote-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol and creosote was performed at a wood treating facility in south central Mississippi in the Autumn of 1991. The study was designed to evaluate 7 fungal treatments and appropriate control treatments. Soil concentrations of 14 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of creosote were measured over time to determine treatment efficacies. Fungal treatments involved mixing fungal inocula and aspen chips into the contaminated soil and maintaining moisture by irrigation and aeration by tillage. PAHs of more than 4 rings persisted at their original concentrations during the 8 wk course of the study for all treatments and controls.

Davis, M.W.; Glaser, J.A.; Evans, J.W.; Lamar, R.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Characterization and air drying of chunkwood and chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chunkwood was found to be composed of a few large particles and many small particles with the large particles constituting almost half the total weight. More than 75% of the chunk weight was composed of particles weighing more than 100 grams (ovendry), while 85% of the chip weight was composed of particles weighing 3 grams or less. Energy densities ranged from 89,675 Btu/ft/sup 3/ for green aspen chips to 162,520 Btu/ft/sup 3/ for dried sugar maple chunks. Chunks and chips were air-dried from July through October in eight covered cribs. For both species tested, the chunks dried faster than the chips to about 20% moisture content.

Sturos, J.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Electrical Power Grid Delivery Dynamic Analysis: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

Diana K. Grauer; Michael E. Reed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to report the final result of techno-economic analysis for the proposed 550MWe integrated pressurized chemical looping combustion combined cycle process. An Aspen Plus based model is delivered in this report along with the results from three sensitivity scenarios including the operating pressure, excess air ratio and oxygen carrier performance. A process flow diagram and detailed stream table for the base case are also provided with the overall plant energy balance, carbon balance, sulfur balance and water balance. The approach to the process and key component simulation are explained. The economic analysis (OPEX and CAPX) on four study cases via DOE NETL Reference Case 12 are presented and explained.

Liu, Kunlei; Chen, Liangyong; Zhang, Yi; Richburg, Lisa; Simpson, James; White, Jay; Rossi, Gianalfredo

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. Technical progress report number 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of the computer models for slurry carbonization have begun and were based upon the collected data (mass balances, yield, temperatures, and pressures) from the previous pilot plant campaigns. All computer models are being developed with Aspen`s SpeedUp{trademark} software. The primary flow sheet with major alternatives has been developed and the majority of equipment descriptions and models, cost algorithms, and baseline parameters have been input to SpeedUp. The remaining modeling parameters will be input in the next reporting period and the initial flow sheet skeleton and model will be completed. The computer models will focus on optimizing capital and operating costs, and evaluating alternative waste water recycling technologies. The weaknesses of the previous pilot plant data and the data required for design of the commercial demonstration facility were identified. The identified weaknesses of the existing data included mass balance precision and accuracy, reactor residence time control (i.e. reactor level control), reactor temperature variations, and air entrainment in the feed RDF slurry. To improve mass balance precision and accuracy, an alternative carbonization gas flow meter will be designed and installed on the pilot plant. EnerTech`s carbonization gas flow meter design has been submitted to the EERC for final approval. In addition, an appropriate number of feed RDF samples will be characterized for moisture content just prior to the next pilot plant run to estimate incoming moisture variation. A pumping test also will be performed with the feed RDF slurry to determine the amount of air entrainment with the feed slurry.

Klosky, M.

1996-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nitrogen and Sulfur Requirements for Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii on Cellulosic Substrates in Minimal Nutrient Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth media for cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii bacteria usually contain excess nutrients that would increase costs for consolidated bioprocessing for biofuel production and create a waste stream with nitrogen, sulfur and phosphate. C. thermocellum was grown on crystalline cellulose with varying concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and growth rate and alcohol production response curves were determined. Both bacteria assimilated sulfate in the presence of ascorbate reductant, increasing the ratio of oxidized to reduced fermentation products. From these results, a low ionic strength, defined minimal nutrient medium with decreased nitrogen, sulfur, phosphate and vitamin supplements was developed for the fermentation of cellobiose, cellulose and acid-pretreated Populus. Carbon and electron balance calculations indicate the unidentified residual fermentation products must include highly reduced molecules. Both bacterial populations were maintained in co-cultures with substrates containing xylan or hemicellulose in defined medium with sulfate and basal vitamin supplements.

Kridelbaugh, Donna M [ORNL; Nelson, Josh C [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Discovery and annotation of small proteins using genomics, proteomics and computational approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small proteins (10 200 amino acids aa in length) encoded by short open reading frames (sORF) play important regulatory roles in various biological processes, including tumor progression, stress response, flowering, and hormone signaling. However, ab initio discovery of small proteins has been relatively overlooked. Recent advances in deep transcriptome sequencing make it possible to efficiently identify sORFs at the genome level. In this study, we obtained 2.6 million expressed sequence tag (EST) reads from Populus deltoides leaf transcriptome and reconstructed full-length transcripts from the EST sequences. We identified an initial set of 12,852 sORFs encoding proteins of 10 200 aa in length. Three computational approaches were then used to enrich for bona fide protein-coding sORFs from the initial sORF set: (1) codingpotential prediction, (2) evolutionary conservation between P. deltoides and other plant species, and (3) gene family clustering within P. deltoides. As a result, a high-confidence sORF candidate set containing 1469 genes was obtained. Analysis of the protein domains, non-protein-coding RNA motifs, sequence length distribution, and protein mass spectrometry data supported this high-confidence sORF set. In the high-confidence sORF candidate set, known protein domains were identified in 1282 genes (higher-confidence sORF candidate set), out of which 611 genes, designated as highest-confidence candidate sORF set, were supported by proteomics data. Of the 611 highest-confidence candidate sORF genes, 56 were new to the current Populus genome annotation. This study not only demonstrates that there are potential sORF candidates to be annotated in sequenced genomes, but also presents an efficient strategy for discovery of sORFs in species with no genome annotation yet available.

Yang, Xiaohan; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Jawdy, Sara; Abraham, Paul E.; Lankford, Patricia K.; Adams, Rachel M.; Shah, Manesh B.; Hettich, Robert L.; Lindquist, Erika; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Gunter, Lee E.; Pennacchio, Christa; Tuskan, Gerald A.

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

384

Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2013)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and leverages the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories core strengths in modeling and simulation, bringing together the best capabilities at NETL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The CCSIs industrial partners provide representation from the power generation industry, equipment manufacturers, technology providers and engineering and construction firms. The CCSIs academic participants (Carnegie Mellon University, Princeton University, West Virginia University, Boston University and the University of Texas at Austin) bring unparalleled expertise in multiphase flow reactors, combustion, process synthesis and optimization, planning and scheduling, and process control techniques for energy processes. During Fiscal Year (FY) 13, CCSI announced the initial release of its first set of computational tools and models during the October 2012 meeting of its Industry Advisory Board. This initial release led to five companies licensing the CCSI Toolset under a Test and Evaluation Agreement this year. By the end of FY13, the CCSI Technical Team had completed development of an updated suite of computational tools and models. The list below summarizes the new and enhanced toolset components that were released following comprehensive testing during October 2013. 1. FOQUS. Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity. Package includes: FOQUS Graphic User Interface (GUI), simulation-based optimization engine, Turbine Client, and heat integration capabilities. There is also an updated simulation interface and new configuration GUI for connecting Aspen Plus or Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) simulations to FOQUS and the Turbine Science Gateway. 2. A new MFIX-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to predict particle attrition. 3. A new dynamic reduced model (RM) builder, which generates computationally efficient RMs of the behavior of a dynamic system. 4. A completely re-written version of the algebraic surrogate model builder for optimization (ALAMO). The new version is several orders of magnitude faster than the initial release and eliminates the MATLAB dependency. 5. A new suite of high resolution filtered models for the hydrodynamics associated with horizontal cylindrical objects in a flow path. 6. The new Turbine Science Gateway (Cluster), which supports FOQUS for running multiple simulations for optimization or UQ using a local computer or cluster. 7. A new statistical tool (BSS-ANOVA-UQ) for calibration and validation of CFD models. 8. A new basic data submodel in Aspen Plus forma

Miller, David C; Syamlal, Madhava; Cottrell, Roger; Kress, Joel D; Sundaresan, S; Sun, Xin; Storlie, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Tong, Charles; Zitney, Stephen E; Dale, Crystal; Engel, Dave; Agarwal, Deb; Calafiura, Paolo; Shinn, John

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Package Equivalent Reactor Networks as Reduced Order Models for Use with CAPE-OPEN Compliant Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering simulations of coal gasifiers are typically performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, where a 3-D representation of the gasifier equipment is used to model the fluid flow in the gasifier and source terms from the coal gasification process are captured using discrete-phase model source terms. Simulations using this approach can be very time consuming, making it difficult to imbed such models into overall system simulations for plant design and optimization. For such system-level designs, process flowsheet software is typically used, such as Aspen Plus [1], where each component where each component is modeled using a reduced-order model. For advanced power-generation systems, such as integrated gasifier/gas-turbine combined-cycle systems (IGCC), the critical components determining overall process efficiency and emissions are usually the gasifier and combustor. Providing more accurate and more computationally efficient reduced-order models for these components, then, enables much more effective plant-level design optimization and design for control. Based on the CHEMKIN-PRO and ENERGICO software, we have developed an automated methodology for generating an advanced form of reduced-order model for gasifiers and combustors. The reducedorder model offers representation of key unit operations in flowsheet simulations, while allowing simulation that is fast enough to be used in iterative flowsheet calculations. Using high-fidelity fluiddynamics models as input, Reaction Designs ENERGICO [2] software can automatically extract equivalent reactor networks (ERNs) from a CFD solution. For the advanced reduced-order concept, we introduce into the ERN a much more detailed kinetics model than can be included practically in the CFD simulation. The state-of-the-art chemistry solver technology within CHEMKIN-PRO allows that to be accomplished while still maintaining a very fast model turn-around time. In this way, the ERN becomes the basis for high-fidelity kinetics simulation, while maintaining the spatial information derived from the geometrically faithful CFD model. The reduced-order models are generated in such a way that they can be easily imported into a process flowsheet simulator, using the CAPE-OPEN architecture for unit operations. The ENERGICO/CHEMKIN-PRO software produces an ERN-definition file that is read by a dynamically linked library (DLL) that can be easily linked to any CAPE-OPEN compliant software. The plug-in unitoperation module has been successfully demonstrated for complex ERNs of coal gasifiers, using both Aspen Plus and COFE process flowsheet simulators through this published CAPE-OPEN interface.

Meeks, E.; Chou, C. -P.; Garratt, T.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Development of a Conceptual Process for Selective CO{sub 2} Capture from Fuel Gas Streams Using [hmim][Tf2N] Ionic Liquid as a Physical Solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ionic Liquid (IL) [hmim][Tf2N] was used as a physical solvent in an Aspen Plus simulation, employing the Peng-Robinson Equation of State (P-R EOS) with Boston-Mathias (BM) alpha function and standard mixing rules, to develop a conceptual process for CO{sub 2} capture from a shifted warm fuel gas stream produced from Pittsburgh # 8 coal for a 400 MWe power plant. The physical properties of the IL, including density, viscosity, surface tension, vapor pressure and heat capacity were obtained from literature and modeled as a function of temperature. Also, available experimental solubility values for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, CO, and CH{sub 4} in this IL were compiled and their binary interaction parameters ({delta}{sub ij} and l{sub ij}) were optimized and correlated as functions of temperature. The Span-Wager Equation-of-State EOS was also employed to generate CO{sub 2} solubilities in [hmim][Tf2N] at high pressures (up to 10 MPa) and temperatures (up to 510 K). The conceptual process developed consisted of 4 adiabatic absorbers (2.4 m ID, 30 m high) arranged in parallel and packed with Plastic Pall Rings of 0.025 m for CO{sub 2} capture; 3 flash drums arranged in series for solvent (IL) regeneration with the pressure-swing option; and a pressure-intercooling system for separating and pumping CO{sub 2} up to 153 bar to the sequestration sites. The compositions of all process streams, CO{sub 2} capture efficiency, and net power were calculated using Aspen Plus simulator. The results showed that, based on the composition of the inlet gas stream to the absorbers, 95.67 mol% of CO{sub 2} was captured and sent to sequestration sites; 99.5 mol% of H{sub 2} was separated and sent to turbines; the solvent exhibited a minimum loss of 0.31 mol%; and the net power balance of the entire system was 30.81 MW. These results indicated that [hmim][Tf2N] IL could be used as a physical solvent for CO{sub 2} capture from warm shifted fuel gas streams with high efficiency.

Basha, Omar M.; Keller, Murphy J.; Luebke, David R.; Resnik, Kevin; P Morsi, Badie I.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced F-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics simulation and integrated with MATLAB for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Techno-Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This techno-economic study investigates the production of ethanol and a higher alcohols coproduct by conversion of lignocelluosic biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas-to-liquids synthesis over a precommercial heterogeneous catalyst. The design specifies a processing capacity of 2,205 dry U.S. tons (2,000 dry metric tonnes) of woody biomass per day and incorporates 2012 research targets from NREL and other sources for technologies that will facilitate the future commercial production of cost-competitive ethanol. Major processes include indirect steam gasification, syngas cleanup, and catalytic synthesis of mixed alcohols, and ancillary processes include feed handling and drying, alcohol separation, steam and power generation, cooling water, and other operations support utilities. The design and analysis is based on research at NREL, other national laboratories, and The Dow Chemical Company, and it incorporates commercial technologies, process modeling using Aspen Plus software, equipment cost estimation, and discounted cash flow analysis. The design considers the economics of ethanol production assuming successful achievement of internal research targets and nth-plant costs and financing. The design yields 83.8 gallons of ethanol and 10.1 gallons of higher-molecular-weight alcohols per U.S. ton of biomass feedstock. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance.

Abhijit Dutta; Michael Talmadge; Jesse Hensley; Matt Worley; Doug Dudgeon; David Barton; Peter Groenendijk; Daniela Ferrari; Brien Stears; Erin Searcy; Christopher Wright; J. Richard Hess

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biofuels Production Based on Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares capital and production costs of two biomass-to-liquid production plants based on gasification. The first biorefinery scenario is an oxygen-fed, low-temperature (870?C), non-slagging, fluidized bed gasifier. The second scenario is an oxygen-fed, high-temperature (1,300?C), slagging, entrained flow gasifier. Both are followed by catalytic Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and hydroprocessing to naphtha-range (gasoline blend stock) and distillate-range (diesel blend stock) liquid fractions. Process modeling software (Aspen Plus) is utilized to organize the mass and energy streams and cost estimation software is used to generate equipment costs. Economic analysis is performed to estimate the capital investment and operating costs. Results show that the total capital investment required for nth plant scenarios is $610 million and $500 million for high-temperature and low-temperature scenarios, respectively. Product value (PV) for the high-temperature and low-temperature scenarios is estimated to be $4.30 and $4.80 per gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE), respectively, based on a feedstock cost of $75 per dry short ton. Sensitivity analysis is also performed on process and economic parameters. This analysis shows that total capital investment and feedstock cost are among the most influential parameters affecting the PV.

Swanson, R. M.; Platon, A.; Satrio, J. A.; Brown, R. C.; Hsu, D. D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Control system design for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture in IGCC power plants while loading-following  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load-following requirements for future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with precombustion CO{sub 2} capture are expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. In this work, loadfollowing studies are performed using a comprehensive dynamic model of an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture developed in Aspen Engineering Suite (AES). Considering multiple single-loop controllers for power demand load following, the preferred IGCC control strategy from the perspective of a power producer is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. The syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant time delay mainly because of the large piping and equipment volumes between the gasifier and the GT inlet. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for IGCC syngas pressure control. The desired CO{sub 2} capture rate must be maintained while the IGCC plant follows the load. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate, the control performance of PID control is compared with linear model predictive control (LMPC). The results show that the LMPC outperforms PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Modeling CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S solubility in MDEA and DEA: Design implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} in aqueous alkanolamines affects solution capacity and the required circulation rate for acid gas absorption. These thermodynamics also determine the relationship of steam rate and the lean loading of the solution which in turn sets the leak of acid gas from the top of the absorber. Finally, the mechanisms of mass transfer and the role of kinetics, especially in stripping, depend on the vapor/liquid equilibria. Published measurements of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S solubility in methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) are not in general agreement, especially at low loading of acid gas. The available sets of solubility data have been regressed with the AspenPlus electrolyte/NRTL model. All of the parameters and constants that make up this model have been carefully evaluated. Independent thermodynamic data such as freezing point and heat of mixing have been included in the regression to strengthen the estimates of model parameters. The parameters for each set of solubility data have been evaluated in an attempt to determine which set is correct. Each evaluated model has been used to calculate the acid gas capacity and minimum stripping steam rate for several industrial cases of acid gas absorption/stripping.

Rochelle, G.T.; Posey, M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Inertial fusion energy power reactor fuel recovery system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design is proposed to support the recovery of un-expended fuel, ash, and associated post-detonation products resident in plasma exhaust from a {approx}2 GWIFE direct drive power reactor. The design includes systems for the safe and efficient collection, processing, and purification of plasma exhaust fuel components. The system has been conceptually designed and sized such that tritium bred within blankets, lining the reactor target chamber, can also be collected, processed, and introduced into the fuel cycle. The system will nominally be sized to process {approx}2 kg of tritium per day and is designed to link directly to the target chamber vacuum pumping system. An effort to model the fuel recovery system (FRS) using the Aspen Plus engineering code has commenced. The system design supports processing effluent gases from the reactor directly from the exhaust of the vacuum pumping system or in batch mode, via a buffer vessel in the Receiving and Analysis System. Emphasis is on nuclear safety, reliability, and redundancy as to maximize availability. The primary goal of the fuel recovery system design is to economically recycle components of direct drive IFE fuel. The FRS design is presented as a facility sub-system in the context of supporting the larger goal of producing safe and economical IFE power. (authors)

Gentile, C. A.; Kozub, T.; Langish, S. W.; Ciebiera, L. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Nobile, A.; Wermer, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Sessions, K. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Characterization of interim reference shales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as interim reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Anvil Points mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, kerogen concentrates, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. The measured properties of the interim reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western interim reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern interim reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the interim reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. The experimental determination of many of the shale oil properties was beyond the scope of this study. Therefore, direct comparison between calculated and measured values of many properties could not be made. However, molecular weights of the shale oils were measured. In this case, there was poor agreement between measured molecular weights and those calculated from API and other published correlations. 23 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Miknis, F.P.; Sullivan, S.; Mason, G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Recognizing genes and other components of genomic structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aspen Center for Physics (ACP) sponsored a three-week workshop, with 26 scientists participating, from 28 May to 15 June, 1990. The workshop, entitled Recognizing Genes and Other Components of Genomic Structure, focussed on discussion of current needs and future strategies for developing the ability to identify and predict the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians. No participant stayed for less than one week, and most attended for two or three weeks. Computers, software, and databases were available for use as electronic blackboards'' and as the basis for collaborative exploration of ideas being discussed and developed at the workshop. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

Burks, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Myers, E. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Stormo, G.D. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparisons of amine solvents for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture: A multi-objective analysis approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amine solvents are of great interest for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture applications. Although the development of new solvents is predominantly conducted at the laboratory scale, the ability to assess the performance of newly developed solvents at the process scale is crucial to identifying the best solvents for CO{sub 2} capture. In this work we present a methodology to evaluate and objectively compare the process performance of different solvents. We use Aspen Plus, with the electrolyte-NRTL thermodynamic model for the solvent CO{sub 2} interactions, coupled with a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization to determine the best process design and operating conditions for each solvent. This ensures that the processes utilized for the comparison are those which are best suited for the specific solvent. We evaluate and compare the process performance of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) in a 90% CO{sub 2} capture process from a 550 MW coal fired power plant. From our analysis the best process specifications are amine specific and with those specific, optimized specifications DEA has the potential to be a better performing solvent than MEA, with a lower energy penalty and lower capital cost investment.

Lee, Anita S.; Eslick, John C.; Miller, David C.; Kitchin, John R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data Management System  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The DOE Biological and Environmental Research Program (BER) is responsible for four "core" FACE sites and projects. These are known as Aspen FACE, Duke FACE, ORNL FACE, and Nevada Deseret FACE. Brookhaven provides operational support to some of these sites, while The FACE Data Management System at ORNL and CDIAC serves as a data repository. In addition, DOE supports OTC experiments in conjunction with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in Maryland and Florida. There are also FACE experiments ongoing in other countries. [Quoted from the home page of the FACE Data Management System and other pages within the web site.] The FACE Data Management System at ORNL provides links to all the FACE and SERC sites and to the data (both the data archived at CDIAC and data still residing on site-specific pages). Users are also given in-depth information on the concept, provided with a full, linked list of international projects, and guided to related research. The FACE projects were part of the CO2 research network fostered by the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Results from the experiment contribute to the Terrestrial Ecosystem Response to Atmospheric and Climatic Change (TERACC) project, a 5-year initiative integrating experimental data and global change modeling.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

Rogers, R. III

1994-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

HYBRID SULFUR FLOWSHEETS USING PEM ELECTROLYSIS AND A BAYONET DECOMPOSITION REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design is presented for a Hybrid Sulfur process for the production of hydrogen using a high-temperature nuclear heat source to split water. The process combines proton exchange membrane-based SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer technology being developed at Savannah River National Laboratory with silicon carbide bayonet decomposition reactor technology being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Both are part of the US DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The flowsheet otherwise uses only proven chemical process components. Electrolyzer product is concentrated from 50 wt% sulfuric acid to 75 wt% via recuperative vacuum distillation. Pinch analysis is used to predict the high-temperature heat requirement for sulfuric acid decomposition. An Aspen Plus{trademark} model of the flowsheet indicates 340.3 kJ high-temperature heat, 75.5 kJ low-temperature heat, 1.31 kJ low-pressure steam, and 120.9 kJ electric power are consumed per mole of H{sub 2} product, giving an LHV efficiency of 35.3% (41.7% HHV efficiency) if electric power is available at a conversion efficiency of 45%.

Gorensek, M; William Summers, W

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

Gorensek, M.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Rating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the performance of contract DE-FC26-00-NT40998, entitled ''Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Value'', research was conducted at Aspen Aerogels, Inc. to develop new transparent aerogel materials suitable for window insulation applications. The project requirements were to develop a formulation or multiple formulations that have high transparency (85-90%) in the visible region, are hydrophobic (will not opacify with exposure to water vapor or liquid), and have at least 2% resiliency (interpreted as recoverable 2% strain and better than 5% strain to failure in compression). Results from an unrelated project showed that silica aerogels covalently bonded to organic polymers exhibit excellent mechanical properties. At the outset of this project, we believed that such a route is the best to improve mechanical properties. We have applied Design of Experiment (DOE) techniques to optimize formulations including both silica aerogels and organically modified silica aerogels (''Ormosils''). We used these DOE results to optimize formulations around the local/global optimization points. This report documents that we succeeded in developing a number of formulations that meet all of the stated criteria. We successfully developed formulations utilizing a two-step approach where the first step involves acid catalyzed hydrolysis and the second step involves base catalyzed condensation to make the gels. The gels were dried using supercritical CO{sub 2} and we were able to make 1 foot x 1 foot x 0.5 inch panels that met the criteria established.

Jenifer Marchesi Redouane Begag; Je Kyun Lee; Danny Ou; Jong Ho Sonn; George Gould; Wendell Rhine

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

"Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Modeling Offgas Systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To augment steady-state design calculations, dynamic models of three offgas systems that will be used in the Waste Treatment Plant now under construction at the Hanford Site were developed using Aspen Custom Modeler{trademark}. The offgas systems modeled were those for the High Level Waste (HLW) melters, Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters and HLW Pulse Jet Ventilation (PJV) system. The models do not include offgas chemistry but only consider the two major species in the offgas stream which are air and water vapor. This is sufficient to perform material and energy balance calculations that accurately show the dynamic behavior of gas pressure, temperature, humidity and flow throughout the systems. The models are structured to perform pressure drop calculations across the various unit operations using a combination of standard engineering calculations and empirical data based correlations for specific pieces of equipment. The models include process controllers, gas ducting, control valves, exhaust fans and the offgas treatment equipment. The models were successfully used to analyze a large number of operating scenarios including both normal and off-normal conditions.

Smith, Frank G., III

2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Dynamic simulation of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic simulation of a Brayton cryocooler is presented as a partial effort of a Korean governmental project to develop 1?3 km HTS cable systems at transmission level in Jeju Island. Thermodynamic design of a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler was completed, and a prototype construction is underway with a basis of steady-state operation. This study is the next step to investigate the transient behavior of cryocooler for two purposes. The first is to simulate and design the cool-down process after scheduled or unscheduled stoppage. The second is to predict the transient behavior following the variation of external conditions such as cryogenic load or outdoor temperature. The detailed specifications of key components, including plate-fin heat exchangers and cryogenic turbo-expanders are incorporated into a commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) to estimate the temporal change of temperature and flow rate over the cryocooler. An initial cool-down scenario and some examples on daily variation of cryocooler are presented and discussed, aiming at stable control schemes of a long cable system.

Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Chan Woo [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si Dole [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-760 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gasoline from Wood via Integrated Gasification, Synthesis, and Methanol-to-Gasoline Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) assessment of the feasibility of making gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline route using syngas from a 2,000 dry metric tonne/day (2,205 U.S. ton/day) biomass-fed facility. A new technoeconomic model was developed in Aspen Plus for this study, based on the model developed for NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007). The necessary process changes were incorporated into a biomass-to-gasoline model using a methanol synthesis operation followed by conversion, upgrading, and finishing to gasoline. Using a methodology similar to that used in previous NREL design reports and a feedstock cost of $50.70/dry ton ($55.89/dry metric tonne), the estimated plant gate price is $16.60/MMBtu ($15.73/GJ) (U.S. $2007) for gasoline and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) produced from biomass via gasification of wood, methanol synthesis, and the methanol-to-gasoline process. The corresponding unit prices for gasoline and LPG are $1.95/gallon ($0.52/liter) and $1.53/gallon ($0.40/liter) with yields of 55.1 and 9.3 gallons per U.S. ton of dry biomass (229.9 and 38.8 liters per metric tonne of dry biomass), respectively.

Phillips, S. D.; Tarud, J. K.; Biddy, M. J.; Dutta, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles: A technical and economic comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All fuel cells currently being developed for near term use in vehicles require hydrogen as a fuel. Hydrogen can be stored directly or produced onboard the vehicle by reforming methanol, ethanol or hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil (e.g., Diesel, gasoline or middle distillates). The vehicle design is simpler with direct hydrogen storage, but requires developing a more complex refueling infrastructure. In this paper, the authors compare three leading options for fuel storage onboard fuel cell vehicles: compressed gas hydrogen storage; onboard steam reforming of methanol; onboard partial oxidation (POX) of hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil. Equilibrium, kinetic and heat integrated system (ASPEN) models have been developed to estimate the performance of onboard steam reforming and POX fuel processors. These results have been incorporated into a fuel cell vehicle model, allowing us to compare the vehicle performance, fuel economy, weight, and cost for various fuel storage choices and driving cycles. A range of technical and economic parameters were considered. The infrastructure requirements are also compared for gaseous hydrogen, methanol and hydrocarbon fuels from crude oil, including the added costs of fuel production, storage, distribution and refueling stations. Considering both vehicle and infrastructure issues, the authors compare hydrogen to other fuel cell vehicle fuels. Technical and economic goals for fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen technologies are discussed. Potential roles for hydrogen in the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles are sketched.

Ogden, J.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Methane conversion for application in fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional steam reformers are large and expensive for small scale fuel cell installations. But also the high endothermicity of the reforming reaction for the production of synthesis gas is a drawback. An alternative to conventional steam reforming is the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. This process is slightly exothermic. The flexibility of the process makes small scale application possible. However, the partial oxidation process seems especially attractive for application within a high temperature fuel cell, because of relatively high CO/H{sub 2}-ratio for the output gases. In this paper the results of the study on the mechanism of the partial oxidation to synthesis gas on silica-supported nickel catalysts are discussed. Moreover, a process for the partial oxidation is proposed in which air instead of oxygen can be used. Based on the results of the mechanistic study two processes for the catalytic partial oxidation are proposed and simulated using the Aspen Plus flowsheeting program with which the mass and heat balances were optimized.

Mulder, A. [Gastec N.V., Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Looy, F. van [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Waveren, A. van; Wingerden, A.J.M. van

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Process and economic model of in-field heavy oil upgrading using aqueous pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process and economic model for aqueous pyrolysis in-field upgrading of heavy oil has been developed. The model has been constructed using the ASPEN PLUS chemical process simulator. The process features cracking of heavy oil at moderate temperatures in the presence of water to increase oil quality and thus the value of the oil. Calculations with the model indicate that for a 464 Mg/day (3,000 bbl/day) process, which increases the oil API gravity of the processed oil from 13.5{degree} to 22.4{degree}, the required value increase of the oil would need to be at least $2.80/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API($0.40/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API) to make the process economically attractive. This level of upgrading has been demonstrated in preliminary experiments with candidate catalysts. For improved catalysts capable of having the coke make and increasing the pyrolysis rate, a required price increase for the oil as low as $1.34/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API ($0.21/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API)has been calculated.

Thorsness, C. B., LLNL

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Dynamic Modeling and Control Studies of a Two-Stage Bubbling Fluidized Bed Adsorber-Reactor for Solid-Sorbent CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model has been developed for a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor for solid-sorbent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture using Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM). The BFB model for the flow of gas through a continuous phase of downward moving solids considers three regions: emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake. Both the upper and lower reactor stages are of overflow-type configuration, i.e., the solids leave from the top of each stage. In addition, dynamic models have been developed for the downcomer that transfers solids between the stages and the exit hopper that removes solids from the bottom of the bed. The models of all auxiliary equipment such as valves and gas distributor have been integrated with the main model of the two-stage adsorber reactor. Using the developed dynamic model, the transient responses of various process variables such as CO{sub 2} capture rate and flue gas outlet temperatures have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the incoming flue gas from pulverized coal-fired power plants. In control studies, the performance of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, feedback-augmented feedforward controller, and linear model predictive controller (LMPC) are evaluated for maintaining the overall CO{sub 2} capture rate at a desired level in the face of typical disturbances.

Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Process modeling for the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process modeling done in support of the integrated thermal treatment system (ITTS) study, Phases 1 and 2. ITTS consists of an integrated systems engineering approach for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for treatment of the contact-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) currently stored in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. In the overall study, 19 systems were evaluated. Preconceptual designs were developed that included all of the various subsystems necessary for a complete installation, from waste receiving through to primary and secondary stabilization and disposal of the processed wastes. Each system included the necessary auxiliary treatment subsystems so that all of the waste categories in the complex were fully processed. The objective of the modeling task was to perform mass and energy balances of the major material components in each system. Modeling of trace materials, such as pollutants and radioactive isotopes, were beyond the present scope. The modeling of the main and secondary thermal treatment, air pollution control, and metal melting subsystems was done using the ASPEN PLUS process simulation code, Version 9.1-3. These results were combined with calculations for the remainder of the subsystems to achieve the final results, which included offgas volumes, and mass and volume waste reduction ratios.

Liebelt, K.H.; Brown, B.W.; Quapp, W.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Life-Cycle Assessment of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part ofthe Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials' Phase I life-cycle assessments ofbiofuels, lifecycle inventory burdens from the production of bio-oil were developed and compared with measures for residual fuel oil. Bio-oil feedstock was produced using whole southern pine (Pinus taeda) trees, chipped, and converted into bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. Input parameters and mass and energy balances were derived with Aspen. Mass and energy balances were input to SimaPro to determine the environmental performance of bio-oil compared with residual fuel oil as a heating fuel. Equivalent functional units of 1 MJ were used for demonstrating environmental preference in impact categories, such as fossil fuel use and global warming potential. Results showed near carbon neutrality of the bio-oil. Substituting bio-oil for residual fuel oil, based on the relative carbon emissions of the two fuels, estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions by 0.075 kg CO2 per MJ of fuel combustion or a 70 percent reduction in emission over residual fuel oil. The bio-oil production life-cycle stage consumed 92 percent of the total cradle-to-grave energy requirements, while feedstock collection, preparation, and transportation consumed 4 percent each. This model provides a framework to better understand the major factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions related to bio-oil production and conversion to boiler fuel during fast pyrolysis.

Steele, Philp; Puettmann, Maureen E.; Penmetsa, Venkata Kanthi; Cooper, Jerome E.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Root-derived CO2 efflux via xylem stream rivals soil CO2 efflux.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Respiration consumes a large portion of annual gross primary productivity in forest ecosystems and is dominated by belowground metabolism. Here, we present evidence of a previously unaccounted for internal CO2 flux of large magnitude from tree roots through stems. If this pattern is shown to persist over time and in other forests, it suggests that belowground respiration has been grossly underestimated. Using an experimental Populus deltoides plantation as a model system, we tested the hypothesis that a substantial portion of the CO2 released from belowground autotrophic respiration remains within tree root systems and is transported aboveground through the xylem stream rather than diffusing into the soil atmosphere. On a daily basis, the amount of CO2 that moved upward from the root system into the stem via the xylem stream (0.26 mol CO2 m?2 d?1) rivalled that which diffused from the soil surface to the atmosphere (0.27 mol CO2 m?2 d?1). We estimated that twice the amount of CO2 derived from belowground autotrophic respiration entered the xylem stream as diffused into the soil environment. Our observations indicate that belowground autotrophic respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized and challenge the paradigm that all root-respired CO2 diffuses into the soil atmosphere.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Teskey, Robert, O.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO{sub 2} capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (5.1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (5.2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification; (5.3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratoryscale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability; and (5.4) the identification of kinetic data for copper-based oxygen carriers as well as the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material. Subtask 5.1 focused on the development of kinetic expressions for the Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU) process and validating them with reported literature data. The kinetic expressions were incorporated into a process model for determination of reactor size and oxygen carrier circulation for the CLOU process using ASPEN PLUS. An ASPEN PLUS process model was also developed using literature data for the CLC process employing an iron-based oxygen carrier, and the results of the process model have been utilized to perform a relative economic comparison. In Subtask 5.2, the investigators studied the trade-off between modeling approaches and available simulations tools. They quantified uncertainty in the high-performance computing (HPC) simulation tools for CLC bed applications. Furthermore, they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the DOEs Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to shift the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal consumption by 66% using electrolysis and nuclear power as the hydrogen source. In addition, nuclear integration decreases CO2 emissions by 84% if sequestration is assumed and 96% without sequestration, when compared to conventional CTL. The preliminary economic assessment indicates that the incorporation of 11 HTGRs and the associated HTSEs impacts the expected return on investment, when compared to conventional CTL with or without sequestration. However, in a carbon constrained scenario, where CO2 emissions are taxed and sequestration is not an option, a reasonable CO2 tax would equate the economics of the nuclear assisted CTL case with the conventional CTL case. The economic results are preliminary, as they do not include economies of scale for multiple HTGRs and are based on an uncertain reactor cost estimate. Refinement of the HTGR cost estimate is currently underway. To reduce well to wheel (WTW) GHG emissions below baseline (U.S. crude mix) or imported crude derived diesel, integration of an HTGR is necessary. WTW GHG emissions decrease 8% below baseline crude with nuclear assisted CTL. Even with CO2 sequestration, conventional CTL WTW GHG emissions are 24% higher than baseline crude emissions. Current efforts are underway to investigate the incorporation of nuclear integrated steam methane reforming for the production of hydrogen, in place of HTSE. This will likely reduce the number of HTGRs required for the process.

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Process/Engineering Co-Simulation of Oxy-Combustion and Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, the DOE has sponsored various funded programs, collectively referred to as Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) programs, which have targeted the development of a steady-state simulator for advanced power plants. The simulator allows the DOE and its contractors to systematically evaluate various power plant concepts, either for preliminary conceptual design or detailed final design. One of the novel and powerful characteristics of the simulator is that it is designed to couple a hierarchy of plant-level and equipment-level models that have varying levels of fidelity and computational speed suitable. For example, the simulator may be used to couple the cycle analysis software Aspen Plus? (marketed by Aspen Technology, Inc.) with an equipment item on the process flowsheet modeled with the FLUENT? computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (marketed by ANSYS Inc.). An important enhancement to the APECS toolkit has been the creation of computationally efficient reduced-order models (ROMs) based on information generated from high-fidelity CFD models. The overarching goal of the present DOE program has been to advance and apply APECS to an overlapping advanced carbon capture technology applications area and a dense-phase, chemical looping (CL) applications area. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) develop ROMs for dense-phase computations using the ROM Builder (based on the regression ROM methodology plus principal component analysis (PCA) for contour plots), and (2) demonstrate commercial-scale, oxyfired (OF), circulating fluidized bed (CFB) co-simulations, as well as CL combustion cosimulations, using the ROM and APECS tool kit. The overall intent of the program is to enhance the APECS toolkit so that it is capable of providing dense-phase riser co-simulations using a CAPEOPEN (CO)-compliant ROM, constructed using the ROM Builder, for CL and oxy-fired CFB systems. As the prime contractor, Alstom Power has the responsibility to demonstrate the capabilities of the enhanced APECS tool to simulate commercial-scale OF CFB and CL combustion co-simulations, both of which involve the time-dependent, dense-phase submodels in the FLUENT? code. ANSYS Inc., as a subcontractor, bears the responsibility to enhance the APECS tool kit for the dense-phase submodel applications, and to assist in the development of specific User-Defined Functions (UDFs) necessary for the particle-phase reactions. In April of 2012, Alstom was notified that the workscope would be curtailed after the end of the budget period. Alstom and the DOE agreed to a revised workscope. The technical work was originally encompassed by Tasks 3 and 4. Task 3, associated with the OF CFB applications area, was curtailed, and Task 4, associated with the CL applications area, was eliminated. Only a portion of Task 3 has been completed. Consequently, this report constitutes a final report for that body of work that was accomplished through May of 2012, in accordance with the workscope revisions.

Sloan, David

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

FY-09 Summary Report to the Office of Petroleum Reserves on the Western Energy Corridor Initiative Activities and Accomplishments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet its programmatic obligations under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the Office of Naval Petroleum and Shale Oil Reserves (NPSOR) has initiated the Western Energy Corridor Initiative (WECI). The WECI will implement the Unconventional Strategic Fuels Task Force recommendations for accelerating and promoting the development of domestic unconventional fuels to help meet the nations energy needs. The mission of the WECI is to bolster Americas future fuel security by facilitating socially and environmentally responsible development of unconventional fuels resources in the Western Energy Corridor, using sound engineering principles and science-based methods to define and assess benefits, impacts, uncertainties, and mitigation options and to resolve impediments. The Task Force proposed a three-year program in its commercialization plan. The work described herein represents work performed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of the DOEs WECI. This effort represents an interim phase of work, designed to initiate only select portions of the initiative, limited by available funding resources within NPOSR. Specifically, the work presented here addresses what was accomplished in FY-09 with the remaining carryover (~$420K) from NPOSR FY-08 funds. It was the intent of the NPOSR program to seek additional funding for full implementation of the full scope of work; however, the original tasks were reduced in scope, terminated, or eliminated (as noted below). An effort is ongoing to obtain funding to continue the tasks initiated under this project. This study will focus on the integrated development of multiple energy resources in a carbon-neutral and environmentally acceptable manner. Emphasis will be placed on analyses of the interrelationships of various energy-resource development plans and the infrastructure, employment, training, fiscal, and economic demands placed on the region as a result of various development scenarios. The interactions at build-out during the design, permitting, and construction of individual and multiple energy developments are not fully considered at the local, state, regional, or national levels. The net impacts to the Western Energy Corridor cannot be understood and the design optimized under the current approach. A regional development plan is needed to model cumulative impacts, determine the carrying capacity of the basin, and provide valuable technically based information to both skeptics and advocates. The INL scope of work for FY-09 involved six tasks: 1. Evaluation of the ASPEN Code as a dynamic systems model for application and use under the WECI and communications with Alberta Oil Sands Research Institutions as an analog resource development in the Western Energy Corridor 2. Application of the Aspen Plus computer model to several oil shale processes to consider energy balances and inputs and outputs (e.g. water consumption, CO2 production, etc.) 3. Development of a regulatory roadmap for oil shale developments 4. Defining of the physiographic extent of the natural resource reserves that comprise the Western Energy Corridor 5. A review of the Unconventional Fuels Task Force Report to Congress for ideas, concepts and recommendations that crosscutting plans 6. Program development with stakeholders, including industry, academics, state and federal agencies, and non government organizations. This task also includes project management, strategic development and reporting.

Thomas R. Wood

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

Alptekin, Gokhan

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hydrogen and electricity from coal with carbon dioxide separation using chemical looping reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern about global climate change has led to research on low CO{sub 2} emission in the process of the energy conversion of fossil fuel. One of the solutions is the conversion of fossil fuel into carbon-free energy carriers, hydrogen, and electricity with CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper, the main purpose is to investigate the thermodynamics performance of converting coal to a hydrogen and electricity system with chemical-looping reactors and to explore the influences of operating parameters on the system performance. Using FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an oxygen carrier, we propose a carbon-free coproduction system of hydrogen and electricity with chemical-looping reactors. The performance of the new system is simulated using ASPEN PLUS software tool. The influences of the chemical-looping reactor's temperature, steam conversion rate, and O{sub 2}/coal quality ratio on the system performance, and the exergy performance are discussed. The results show that a high-purity of H{sub 2} (99.9%) is reached and that CO{sub 2} can be separated. The system efficiency is 57.85% assuming steam reactor at 815 C and the steam conversion rate 37%. The system efficiency is affected by the steam conversion rate, rising from 53.17 to 58.33% with the increase of the steam conversion rate from 28 to 41%. The exergy efficiency is 54.25% and the losses are mainly in the process of gasification and HRSG. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Xiang Wenguo; Chen Yingying [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

A model of vapor-liquid equilibria for acid gas-alkanolamine-water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A physico-chemical model was developed for representing liquid phase chemical equilibria and vapor-liquid (phase) equilibria of H{sub 2}SCO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water systems. The equilibrium composition of the liquid phase is determined by minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Activity coefficients are represented with the Electrolyte-NRTL equation treating both long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range binary interactions between liquid phase species. Vapor phase fugacity coefficients are calculated using the Redlich-Kwong-Soave Equation of State. Adjustable parameters of the model, binary interaction parameters and carbamate stability constants, were fitted on published binary system alkanolamine-water and ternary system (H{sub 2}S-alkanolamine-water, CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water) VLE data. The Data Regression System of ASPEN PLUS, based upon the Maximum Likelihood Principle, was used to estimate adjustable parameters. Ternary system measurements used in parameter estimation ranged in temperature from 25 to 120{degree}C in alkanolamine concentration from 1 to 5 M, in acid gas loading from 0 to 1.5 moles per mole alkanolamine, and in acid gas partial pressure from 0.1 to 1,000 kPa. Maximum likelihood estimates of ternary system H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} equilibrium partial pressures and liquid phase concentrations were found to be in good agreement with measurements for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diglycolamine (DGA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) indicating that the model successfully represents ternary system data. The model was extended to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous mixtures of MDEA with MEA or DEA. The solubility was measured at 40 and 80{degree}C over a wide range of CO{sub 2} partial pressures. These measurements were used to estimate additional binary parameters of the mixed solvent systems.

Austgen, D.M. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

Sullivan, John

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Characterization of DOE reference oil shales: Mahogany Zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation Oil Shale, and Clegg Creek Member, New Albany Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Exxon Colony mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. Kerogen concentrates were prepared from both shales. The measured properties of the reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. There was poor agreement between measured and calculated molecular weights for the total shale oil produced from each shale. However, measured and calculated molecular weights agreed reasonably well for true boiling point distillate fractions in the temperature range of 204 to 399/sup 0/C (400 to 750/sup 0/F). Similarly, measured and calculated viscosities of the total shale oils were in disagreement, whereas good agreement was obtained on distillate fractions for a boiling range up to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F). Thermal and dielectric properties were determined for the shales and shale oils. The dielectric properties of the reference shales and shale oils decreased with increasing frequency of the applied frequency. 42 refs., 34 figs., 24 tabs.

Miknis, F. P.; Robertson, R. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus(R) with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH{sub 3} mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., k{sub NH3}< 410{sup -3} m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}). The effect of the CO{sub 2} mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., k{sub CO2}<410{{sup -6} m/s).

Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table 1 shows that the systems efficiency, coal (HHV) to power, is 35%. Table 2 summarizes the auxiliary power consumption within the plant. Thermoflex was used to simulate the power block and Aspen Plus the balance of plant. The overall block flow diagram is presented in Figure A1.3-1 and the key unit process flow diagrams are shown in subsequent figures. Stream data are given in Table A1.3-1. Equipment function specifications are provided in Tables A1.3-2 through 17. The overall plant scheme consists of a cryogenic air separation unit supplying 95% purity O{sub 2} to GE type high pressure (HP) total quench gasifiers. The raw gas after scrubbing is treated in a sour shift unit to react the CO with H{sub 2}O to form H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The gas is further treated to remove Hg in a sulfided activated carbon bed. The syngas is desulfurized and decarbonized in a Selexol acid gas removal unit and the decarbonized syngas after humidification and preheat is fired in GE 7H type steam cooled gas turbines. Intermediate pressure (IP) N{sub 2} from the ASU is also supplied to the combustors of the gas turbines as additional diluent for NOx control. A portion of the air required by the ASU is extracted from the gas turbines. The plant consists of the following major process units: (1) Air Separation Unit (ASU); (2) Gasification Unit; (3) CO Shift/Low Temperature Gas Cooling (LTGC) Unit; (4) Acid Gas Removal Unit (AGR) Unit; (5) Fuel Gas Humidification Unit; (6) Carbon Dioxide Compression/Dehydration Unit; (7) Claus Sulfur Recovery/Tail Gas Treating Unit (SRU/TGTU); and (8) Power Block.

A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; H. Liao; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation: Engineering of Syringyl Lignin in Softwood Species Through Xylem-Specific Expression of Hardwood Syringyl Monolignol Pathway Genes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: Our long-term goal is to genetically engineer higher value raw materials with desirable wood properties to promote energy efficiency, international competitiveness, and environmental responsiveness of the U.S. forest products industry. The immediate goal of this project was to produce the first higher value softwood raw materials engineered with a wide range of syringyl lignin quantities. Summary: The most important wood property affecting directly the levels of energy, chemical and bleaching requirements for kraft pulp production is lignin. Softwoods contain almost exclusively chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin, whereas hardwoods have more reactive or easily degradable lignins of the guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) type. It is also well established that the reactive S lignin component is the key factor that permits much lower effective alkali and temperature, shorter pulping time and less bleaching stages for processing hardwoods than for softwoods. Furthermore, our pulping kinetic study explicitly demonstrated that every increase in one unit of the lignin S/G ratio would roughly double the rate of lignin removal. These are clear evidence that softwoods genetically engineered with S lignin are keys to revolutionizing the energy efficiency and enhancing the environmental performance of this industry. Softwoods and hardwoods share the same genetic mechanisms for the biosynthesis of G lignin. However, in hardwoods, three additional genes branch out from the G-lignin pathway and become specifically engaged in regulating S lignin biosynthesis. In this research, we simultaneously transferred aspen S-specific genes into a model softwood, black spruce, to engineer S lignin.

Chandrashekhar P. Joshi; Vincent L. Chiang

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

429

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT TO PREPARE AND CHARACTERIZE ROBUST COAL/BIOMASS MIXTURES FOR DIRECT CO-FEEDING INTO GASIFICATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated on October 1, 2010 and utilizes equipment and research supported by the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Award Number DE- FE0005349. It is also based upon previous work supported by the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Award Numbers DOE-DE-FG36-01GOl1082, DE-FG36-02G012011 or DE-EE0000272. The overall goal of the work performed was to demonstrate and assess the economic viability of fast hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) for transforming lignocellulosic biomass into a densified, friable fuel to gasify like coal that can be easily blended with ground coal and coal fines and then be formed into robust, weather-resistant pellets and briquettes. The specific objectives of the project include: Demonstration of the continuous production of a uniform densified and formed feedstock from loblolly pine (a lignocellulosic, short rotation woody crop) in a hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process development unit (PDU). Demonstration that finely divided bituminous coal and HTC loblolly pine can be blended to form 90/10 and 70/30 weight-percent mixtures of coal and HTC biomass for further processing by pelletization and briquetting equipment to form robust weather resistant pellets and/or briquettes suitable for transportation and long term storage. Characterization of the coal-biomass pellets and briquettes to quantify their physical properties (e.g. flow properties, homogeneity, moisture content, particle size and shape), bulk physical properties (e.g. compressibility, heat transfer and friability) and assess their suitability for use as fuels for commercially-available coal gasifiers. Perform economic analyses using Aspen-based process simulations to determine the costs for deploying and operating HTC processing facilities for the production of robust coal/biomass fuels suitable for fueling commercially-available coal-fired gasifiers. This Final Project Scientific/Technical Report discusses and documents the project work required to meet each of these objectives.

Felix, Larry; Farthing, William; Hoekman, S. Kent

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

Sullivan, John

431

Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Conversion of municipal solid waste to hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen via the steps of hydrothermal pretreatment, gasification and purification. LLNL`s focus has been on hydrothermal pretreatment of MSW in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. The project has evolved along 3 parallel paths: laboratory scale experiments, pilot scale processing, and process modeling. Initial laboratory-scale MSW treatment results (e.g., viscosity, slurry solids content) over a range of temperatures and times with newspaper and plastics will be presented. Viscosity measurements have been correlated with results obtained at MRL. A hydrothermal treatment pilot facility has been rented from Texaco and is being reconfigured at LLNL; the status of that facility and plans for initial runs will be described. Several different operational scenarios have been modeled. Steady state processes have been modeled with ASPEN PLUS; consideration of steam injection in a batch mode was handled using continuous process modules. A transient model derived from a general purpose packed bed model is being developed which can examine the aspects of steam heating inside the hydrothermal reactor vessel. These models have been applied to pilot and commercial scale scenarios as a function of MSW input parameters and have been used to outline initial overall economic trends. Part of the modeling, an overview of the MSW gasification process and the modeling of the MSW as a process material, was completed by a DOE SERS (Science and Engineering Research Semester) student. The ultimate programmatic goal is the technical demonstration of the gasification of MSW to hydrogen at the laboratory and pilot scale and the economic analysis of the commercial feasibility of such a process.

Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energy??s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process ?? High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

Howard Meyer

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

HyPEP FY-07 Report: Initial Calculations of Component Sizes, Quasi-Static, and Dynamics Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) coupled to the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) process is one of two reference integrated systems being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory for the production of hydrogen. In this concept a VHTR outlet temperature of 900 C provides thermal energy and high efficiency electricity for the electrolysis of steam in the HTSE process. In the second reference system the Sulfur Iodine (SI) process is coupled to the VHTR to produce hydrogen thermochemically. This report describes component sizing studies and control system strategies for achieving plant production and operability goals for these two reference systems. The optimal size and design condition for the intermediate heat exchanger, one of the most important components for integration of the VHTR and HTSE plants, was estimated using an analytic model. A partial load schedule and control system was designed for the integrated plant using a quasi-static simulation. Reactor stability for temperature perturbations in the hydrogen plant was investigated using both a simple analytic method and a dynamic simulation. Potential efficiency improvements over the VHTR/HTSE plant were investigated for an alternative design that directly couples a High Temperature Steam Rankin Cycle (HTRC) to the HTSE process. This work was done using the HYSYS code and results for the HTRC/HTSE system were compared to the VHTR/HTSE system. Integration of the VHTR with SI process plants was begun. Using the ASPEN plus code the efficiency was estimated. Finally, this report describes planning for the validation and verification of the HYPEP code.

Chang Oh

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Interactive Effects of Climate Change and Decomposer Communities on the Stabilization of Wood-Derived Carbon Pools: Catalyst for a New Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, forest soils store ~two-thirds as much carbon (C) as the atmosphere. Although wood makes up the majority of forest biomass, the importance of wood contributions to soil C pools is unknown. Even with recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of soil processes, integrative studies tracing C input pathways and biological fluxes within and from soils are lacking. Therefore, our research objectives were to assess the impact of different fungal decay pathways (i.e., white-rot versus brown-rot)in interaction with wood quality, soil temperature, wood location (i.e., soil surface and buried in mineral soil), and soil textureon the transformation of woody material into soil CO2 efflux, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil C pools. The use of 13C-depleted woody biomass harvested from the Rhinelander, WI free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (Aspen-FACE) experiment affords the unique opportunity to distinguish the wood-derived C from other soil C fluxes and pools. We established 168 treatment plots across six field sites (three sand and three loam textured soil). Treatment plots consisted of full-factorial design with the following treatments: 1. Wood chips from elevated CO2, elevated CO2 + O3, or ambient atmosphere AspenFACE treatments; 2. Inoculated with white rot (Bjerkandera adusta) or brown rot (Gloeophyllum sepiarium) pure fungal cultures, or the original suite of endemic microbial community on the logs; and 3. Buried (15cm in soil as a proxy for coarse roots) or surface applied wood chips. We also created a warming treatment using open-topped, passive warming chambers on a subset of the above treatments. Control plots with no added wood (no chip control) were incorporated into the research design. Soils were sampled for initial ?13C values, CN concentrations, and bulk density. A subset of plots were instrumented with lysimeters for sampling soil water and temperature data loggers for measuring soil temperatures. To determine the early pathways of decomposition, we measured soil surface CO2 efflux, dissolved organic C (DOC), and DO13C approximately monthly over two growing seasons from a subsample of the research plots. To determine the portion of soil surface CO2 efflux attributable to wood-derived C, we used Keeling plot techniques to estimate the associated ?13C values of the soil CO2 efflux. We measured the ?13CO2 once during the peak of each growing season. Initial values for soil ?13C values and CN concentrations averaged across the six sites were -26.8 (standard error = 0.04), 2.46% (se = 0.11), and 0.15% (se = 0.01), respectively. The labeled wood chips from the Aspen FACE treatments had an average ?13C value of -39.5 (se 0.10). The >12 isotopic difference between the soil and wood chip ?13C values provides the basis for tracking the wood-derived C through the early stages of decomposition and subsequent storage in the soil. Across our six research sites, average soil surface CO2 efflux ranged from 1.04 to 2.00 g CO2 m-2 h-1 for the first two growing seasons. No wood chip controls had an average soil surface CO2 efflux of 0.67 g CO2 m-2 h-1 or about half of that of the wood chip treatment plots. Wood-derived CO2 efflux was higher for loam textured soils relative to sands (0.70 and 0.54 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; p = 0.045)), for surface relative to buried wood chip treatments (0.92 and 0.39 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; p < 0.001), for warmed relative to ambient temperature treatments (0.99 and 0.78 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; 0.004), and for natural rot relative to brown and white rots (0.93, 0.82, and 0.78 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; p = 0.068). Our first two growing seasons of soil surface CO2 efflux data show that wood chip location (i.e., surface vs. buried chip application) is very important, with surface chips loosing twice the wood-derived CO2. The DOC data support this trend for greater loss of ecosystem C from surface chips. This has strong implications for the importance of root and buried wood for ecosystem C retention. This strong chip location effect

Resh, Sigrid C. [Michigan Technological University

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Edwards, Nelson T [ORNL; Walker, Ashley V [ORNL; O'Hara, Keiran H [ORNL; Campion, Christina M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering. Furthermore, with little effort the modeling capabilities described in this report can be extended to support other DOE programs, such as ultra super critical boiler development, oxy-combustion boiler development or modifications to existing plants to include CO2 capture and sequestration.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

439

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is designed followed by the supervisory control layer. Finally, an optimization layer is designed. In this paper, the proposed two-stage control system design approach is applied to the AGR unit for an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Aspen Plus Dynamics is used to develop the dynamic AGR process model while MATLAB is used to perform the control system design and for implementation of model predictive control (MPC).

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasifiction combined sycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) system is proposed to effectively capture CO2 from existing PC power plants. The work during the past three years has led to an oxygen carrier particle with satisfactory performance. Moreover, successful laboratory, bench scale, and integrated demonstrations have been performed. The proposed project further advanced the novel CDCL technology to sub-pilot scale (25 kWth). To be more specific, the following objectives attained in the proposed project are: 1. to further improve the oxygen carrying capacity as well as the sulfur/ash tolerance of the current (working) particle; 2. to demonstrate continuous CDCL operations in an integrated mode with > 99% coal (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite) conversion as well as the production of high temperature exhaust gas stream that is suitable for steam generation in existing PC boilers; 3. to identify, via demonstrations, the fate of sulfur and NOx; 4. to conduct thorough techno-economic analysis that validates the technical and economical attractiveness of the CDCL system. The objectives outlined above were achieved through collaborative efforts among all the participants. CONSOL Energy Inc. performed the techno-economic analysis of the CDCL process. Shell/CRI was able to perform feasibility and economic studies on the large scale particle synthesis and provide composite particles for the sub-pilot scale testing. The experience of B&W (with boilers) and Air Products (with handling gases) assisted the retrofit system design as well as the demonstration unit operations. The experience gained from the sub-pilot scale demonstration of the Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process at OSU was able to ensure the successful handling of the solids. Phase 1 focused on studies to improve the current particle to better suit the CDCL operations. The optimum operating conditions for the reducer reactor such as the temperature, char gasification enhancer type, and flow rate were identified. The modifications of the existing bench scale reactor were completed in order to use it in the next phase of the project. In Phase II, the optimum looping medium was selected, and bench scale demonstrations were completed using them. Different types of coal char such as those obtained from bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite were tested. Modifications were made on the existing sub-pilot scale unit for coal injection. Phase III focused on integrated CDCL demonstration in the sub-pilot scale unit. A comprehensive ASPEN simulations and economic analysis was completed by CONSOL t is expected that the CDCL process will be ready for further demonstrations in a scale up unit upon completion of the proposed project.

Zeng, Liang; Li, Fanxing; Kim, Ray; Bayham, Samuel; McGiveron, Omar; Tong, Andrew; Connell, Daniel; Luo, Siwei; Sridhar, Deepak; Wang, Fei; Sun, Zhenchao; Fan, Liang-Shih

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients Dan Wendt, Greg Mines Idaho National Laboratory The use of mixed working fluids in binary power plants can provide significant increases in plant performance, provided the heat exchangers are designed to take advantage of these fluids non-isothermal phase changes. In the 1980's testing was conducted at DOE's Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) where mixtures of different compositions were vaporized at supercritical pressures and then condensed. This testing had focused on using the data collected to verify that Heat Transfer Research Incorporated (HTRI) codes were suitable for the design of heat exchangers that could be used with mixtures. The HCRF data includes mixture compositions varying from 0% to 40% isopentane and condenser tube orientations of 15{sup o}, 60{sup o}, and 90{sup o} from horizontal. Testing was performed over a range of working fluid and cooling fluid conditions. Though the condenser used in this testing was water cooled, the working fluid condensation occurred on the tube-side of the heat exchanger. This tube-side condensation is analogous to that in an air-cooled condenser. Tube-side condensing heat transfer coefficient information gleaned from the HCRF testing is used in this study to assess the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs for use with mixtures. Results of an air-cooled binary plant process model performed with Aspen Plus indicate that that the optimal mixture composition (producing the maximum net power for the scenario considered) is within the range of compositions for which data exist. The HCRF data is used to assess the impact of composition, tube orientation, and process parameters on the condensing heat transfer coefficients. The sensitivity of the condensing coefficients to these factors is evaluated and the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs with mixtures is assessed. This paper summarizes the evaluation of the HCRF data and discusses the next steps in the project evaluation of air-cooled condenser designs that can take advantage of the performance gains possible with these fluids.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Preliminary Assessment of Overweight Mainline Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration requested information regarding overweight and oversized vehicle traffic entering inspection stations (ISs) in order to develop strategies for future research efforts and possibly help guide regulatory issues involving overweight commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). For a period of one month, inspection stations in Knox County and Greene County, Tennessee, recorded overweight and oversized vehicles that entered these ISs. During this period, 435 CMVs were recorded using an electronic form filled out by enforcement personnel at the IS. Of the 435 CMVs recorded, 381 had weight information documented with them. The majority (52.2%) of the vehicles recorded were five-axle combination vehicles, and 50.6% of all the vehicles were permitted to operate above the legal weight limit in Tennessee, which is 80,000 lb for vehicles with five or more axles. Only 16.8% of the CMVs recorded were overweight gross (11.5% of permitted vehicles) and 54.1% were overweight on an axle group. The low percentage of overweight gross CMVs was because only 45 of the vehicles over 80,000 lb. were not permitted. On average, axles that were overweight were 2,000 lb. over the legal limit for an axle or group of axles. Of the vehicles recorded, 172 vehicles were given a North American Standard (NAS) inspection during the assessment. Of those, 69% of the inspections were driver-only inspections (Level III) and only 25% of the inspections had a vehicle component (such as a Level I or Level II). The remaining 6% of inspections did not have valid Aspen numbers; the type of was inspection unknown. Data collected on the types of trailers of each vehicle showed that about half of the recorded CMVs could realistically be given a Level I (full vehicle and driver) inspection; this estimate was solely based on trailer type. Enforcement personnel at ISs without an inspection pit have difficulty fully inspecting certain vehicles due to low clearance below the trailer. Because of this, overweight and oversized vehicles were normally only given a Level III (driver) inspection; thus, little is known about the safety of these vehicles. The out-of-service (OOS) rate of all the inspected vehicles (driver and vehicle inspections) was 18.6%, while the OOS rate for vehicle inspections (Level I and II) was 52.4%. Future work will focus on performing Level I inspections on five-axle combination tractor-trailers and the types of violations that overweight vehicles may have. This research will be conducted in Tennessee and possibly in other states as well.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Analysis of the Production Cost for Various Grades of Biomass Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process flow sheets were developed for the thermal treatment of southern pine wood chips at four temperatures (150, 180, 230, and 270 degrees C) and two different scales (20 and 100 ton/hour). The larger capacity processes had as their primary heat source hot gas assumed to be available in quantity from an adjacent biorefinery. Mass and energy balances for these flow sheets were developed using Aspen Plus process simulation software. The hot gas demands in the larger processes, up to 1.9 million lb/hour, were of questionable feasibility because of the volume to be moved. This heat was of low utility because the torrefaction process, especially at higher temperatures, is a net heat producer if the organic byproduct gases are burned. A thermal treatment flow sheet using wood chips dried in the biorefinery to 10% moisture content (rather than 30% for green chips) with transfer of high temperature steam from the thermal treatment depot to the biorefinery was also examined. The equipment size information from all of these cases was used in several different equipment cost estimating methods to estimate the major equipment costs for each process. From these, factored estimates of other plant costs were determined, leading to estimates (+ / - 30% accuracy) of total plant capital cost. The 20 ton/hour processes were close to 25 million dollars except for the 230 degrees C case using dried wood chips which was only 15 million dollars because of its small furnace. The larger processes ranged from 64-120 million dollars. From these capital costs and projections of several categories of operating costs, the processing cost of thermally treated pine chips was found to be $28-33 per ton depending on the degree of treatment and without any credits for steam generation. If the excess energy output of the two 20 ton/hr depot cases at 270 degrees C can be sold for $10 per million BTU, the net processing cost dropped to $13/ton product starting with green wood chips or only $3 per ton if using dried chips from the biorefinery. Including a 12% return on invested capital raised all of the operating cost results by about $20/ton.

Robert S Cherry; Rick A. Wood; Tyler L Westover

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-Up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington University in St. Louis and its project partners are developing a unique pressurized oxy-combustion process that aims to improve efficiency and costs by reducing the recycling of flue gas to near zero. Normally, in the absence of recycled flue gas or another inert gas, combustion of fuel and oxygen results in a dramatic increase in temperature of the combustion products and radiant energy, as compared to combustion in air. High heat flux to the boiler tubes may result in a tube surface temperatures that exceed safe operating limits. In the Staged Pressurized Oxy-Combustion (SPOC) process, this problem is addressed by staging the delivery of fuel and by novel combustion design that allows control of heat flux. In addition, the main mode of heat transfer to the steam cycle is by radiation, as opposed to convection. Therefore, the requirement for recycling large amounts of flue gas, for temperature control or to improve convective heat transfer, is eliminated, resulting in a reduction in auxiliary loads. The following report contains a detailed summary of scientific findings and accomplishments for the period of Oct. 1, 2013 to Sept 30, 2014. Results of ASPEN process and CFD modelling activities aimed at improving the SPOC process and boiler design are presented. The effects of combustion pressure and fuel moisture on the plant efficiency are discussed. Combustor pressure is found to have only a minor impact beyond 16 bar. For fuels with moisture content greater than approx 30%, e.g. coal/water slurries, the amount of latent heat of condensation exceeds that which can be utilized in the steam cycle and plant efficiency is reduced significantly. An improved boiler design is presented that achieves a more uniform heat flux profile. In addition, a fundamental study of radiation in high-temperature, high-pressure, particle-laden flows is summarized which provides a more complete understanding of heat transfer in these unusual conditions and to allow for optimization. The results reveal that for the SPOC design, absorption and emission due to particles is the dominant factor for determining the wall heat flux. The mechanism of radiative trapping of energy within the high-temperature flame region and the approach to utilizing this mechanism to control wall heat flux are described. This control arises, by design, from the highly non-uniform (non-premixed) combustion characteristics within the SPOC boiler, and the resulting gradients in temperature and particle concentration. Finally, a simple method for estimating the wall heat flux in pressurized combustion systems is presented.

Axelbaum, Richard; Xia, Fei; Gopan, Akshay; Kumfer, Benjamin

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

CO2-Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Full Technology Feasibility Study B1 - Solvent-based Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL, Fluor Corporation and Queens University (Kingston, ON) successfully completed a three year comprehensive study of the CO2BOL water-lean solvent platform with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed solvent synthesis, characterization, environmental toxicology, physical, thermodynamic and kinetic property measurements, Aspen Plus modeling and bench-scale testing of a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule. Key Program Findings The key program findings are summarized as follows: PSAR favorably reduced stripper duties and reboiler temperatures with little/no impact to absorption column >90% CO2 capture was achievable at reasonable liquid-gas ratios in the absorber High rich solvent viscosities (up to 600 cP) were successfully demonstrated in the bench-scale system. However, the projected impacts of high viscosity to capital cost and operational limits compromised the other levelized cost of electricity benefits. Low thermal conductivity of organics significantly increased the required cross exchanger surface area, and potentially other heat exchange surfaces. CO2BOL had low evaporative losses during bench-scale testing There was no evidence of foaming during bench scale testing Current CO2BOL formulation costs project to be $35/kg Ecotoxicity (Water Daphnia) was comparable between CO2BOL and MEA (169.47 versus 103.63 mg/L) Full dehydration of the flue gas was determined to not be economically feasible. However, modest refrigeration (13 MW for the 550 MW reference system) was determined to be potentially economically feasible, and still produce a water-lean condition for the CO2BOLs (5 wt% steady-state water loading). CO2BOLs testing with 5 wt% water loading did not compromise anhydrous performance behavior, and showed actual enhancement of CO2 capture performance. Mass transfer of CO2BOLs was not greatly impeded by viscosity Facile separation of antisolvent from lean CO2BOL was demonstrated on the bench cart No measurable solvent degradation was observed over 4 months of testing even with 5 wt% water present

Heldebrant, David J

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Energy, Environmental, and Economic Analyses of Design Concepts for the Co-Production of Fuels and Chemicals with Electricity via Co-Gasification of Coal and Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to quantify the energy, environmental, and economic performance of industrial facilities that would coproduce electricity and transportation fuels or chemicals from a mixture of coal and biomass via co-gasification in a single pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier, with capture and storage of CO{sub 2} (CCS). The work sought to identify plant designs with promising (Nth plant) economics, superior environmental footprints, and the potential to be deployed at scale as a means for simultaneously achieving enhanced energy security and deep reductions in U.S. GHG emissions in the coming decades. Designs included systems using primarily already-commercialized component technologies, which may have the potential for near-term deployment at scale, as well as systems incorporating some advanced technologies at various stages of R&D. All of the coproduction designs have the common attribute of producing some electricity and also of capturing CO{sub 2} for storage. For each of the co-product pairs detailed process mass and energy simulations (using Aspen Plus software) were developed for a set of alternative process configurations, on the basis of which lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, Nth plant economic performance, and other characteristics were evaluated for each configuration. In developing each set of process configurations, focused attention was given to understanding the influence of biomass input fraction and electricity output fraction. Self-consistent evaluations were also carried out for gasification-based reference systems producing only electricity from coal, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification solid-oxide fuel cell (IGFC) systems. The reason biomass is considered as a co-feed with coal in cases when gasoline or olefins are co-produced with electricity is to help reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems. Storing biomass-derived CO{sub 2} underground represents negative CO{sub 2} emissions if the biomass is grown sustainably (i.e., if one ton of new biomass growth replaces each ton consumed), and this offsets positive CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the coal used in these systems. Different coal:biomass input ratios will produce different net lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for these systems, which is the reason that attention in our analysis was given to the impact of the biomass input fraction. In the case of systems that produce only products with no carbon content, namely electricity, ammonia and hydrogen, only coal was considered as a feedstock because it is possible in theory to essentially fully decarbonize such products by capturing all of the coal-derived CO{sub 2} during the production process.

Eric Larson; Robert Williams; Thomas Kreutz; Ilkka Hannula; Andrea Lanzini; Guangjian Liu

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

449

Preliminary assessment of potential CDM early start projects in Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Brazil/US Aspen Global Forum on Climate Change Policies and Programs has facilitated a dialogue between key Brazil and US public and private sector leaders on the subject of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). With support from the US government, a cooperative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Sao Paulo conducted an assessment of a number of projects put forth by Brazilian sponsors. Initially, we gathered information and conducted a screening assessment for ten projects in the energy sector and six projects in the forestry sector. Some of the projects appeared to offer greater potential to be attractive for CDM, or had better information available. We then conducted a more detailed assessment of 12 of these projects, and two other projects that were submitted after the initial screening. An important goal was to assess the potential impact of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) on the financial performance of projects. With the exception of the two forestry-based fuel displacement projects, the impact of CERs on the internal rate of return (IRR) is fairly small. This is true for both the projects that displace grid electricity and those that displace local (diesel-based) electricity production. The relative effect of CERs is greater for projects whose IRR without CERs is low. CERs have a substantial effect on the IRR of the two short-rotation forestry energy substitution projects. One reason is that the biofuel displaces coke and oil, both of which are carbon-intensive. Another factor is that the product of these projects (charcoal and woodfuel, respectively) is relatively low value, so the revenue from carbon credits has a strong relative impact. CERs also have a substantial effect on the NPV of the carbon sequestration projects. Financial and other barriers pose a challenge for implementation of most of the projects. In most cases, the sponsor lacks sufficient capital, and loans are available only at high interest rate and with substantial guarantee. A few of the projects might go ahead without the benefit of CERs, but most probably would not. Whether the projected revenue from CERs would be sufficient to induce sponsors to proceed with the projects is an important issue that requires further investigation. All of the projects contribute to economic development in Brazil. The forestry projects in particular would create a significant number of rural jobs, and contribute income to rural communities. Some of the carbon sequestration projects would provide environmental benefits with respect to protection of biodiversity and soil.

Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.; Lehman, B.; Schumacher, K.; van Vliet, O.; Moreira, J.R.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set of biomass samples imaged with all three methods, and using common analytical software to quantify parameters from the three dimensional images. In addition to the proposed experiments, we conducted imaging studies with a novel TOF-SIMS instrument available through collaborations with the AMOLF goup led by Ron Heeren at the FOM Institute in Amersterdam, Netherlands. ToF-SIMS was used to image intact cross sections of Populus stems with high spatial resolution, chemically selectivity. ToF-SIMS images were correlated with fluorescence microscopy which allowed for more positive ion identification.

PETER, GARY F. [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA] [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

451

VEGETATION MEDIATED THE IMPACTS OF POSTGLACIAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON FIRE REGIMES IN THE SOUTHCENTRAL BROOKS RANGE, ALASKA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine direct and indirect impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes in the southcentral Brooks Range, Alaska, using four lake-sediment records and existing paleoclimate interpretations. New techniques are introduced to identify charcoal peaks semi-objectively and detect statistical differences in fire regimes. Peaks in charcoal accumulation rates (CHARs) provide estimates of fire return intervals (FRIs) which are compared between vegetation zones described by fossil pollen and stomata. Climatic warming from ca 15-9 ka BP (calendar years before CE 1950) coincides with shifts in vegetation from herb tundra to shrub tundra to deciduous woodlands, all novel species assemblages relative to modern vegetation. Two sites cover this period and show increased CHARs and decreased FRIs with the transition from herb to shrub tundra ca 13.3-14.3 ka BP. Short FRIs in the Betula-dominated shrub tundra (mean [m] FRI 144 yr; 95% CI 119-170) primarily reflect the effects of flammable, continuous fuels on the fire regime. FRIs increased significantly with the transition to Populus-dominated deciduous woodlands ca 10.5 ka BP (mFRI 251 yr [158-352]), despite evidence of warmer- and drier-than-present summers. We attribute reduced fire activity under these conditions to low flammability of deciduous fuels. Three sites record the mid to late Holocene, when cooler and moister conditions allowed Picea glauca forest-tundra and P. mariana boreal forests to establish ca 8 and 5.5 ka BP. Forest-tundra FRIs did not differ significantly from the previous period (mFRIs range from 131-238 yr), but FRIs decreased with the transition to boreal forest (mFRI 145 yr [129-163]). Overall, fire-regime shifts in the study area showed greater correspondence with vegetation characteristics than with inferred climate, and we conclude that vegetation mediated the impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes by modifying landscape flammability. Our findings emphasize the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in determining the response of arctic and subarctic ecosystems to past, and by inference, future climatic change.

Higuera, P E; Brubaker, L B; Anderson, P M; Hu, F S; Brown, T A

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while satisfying constraints such as durability, cost, user acceptance, size limits, and environmental safety concerns. The energy efficient daylighting window will consist of a translucent and resilient aerogel panel sandwiched between glass panes in double glazed windows. Compared to the best windows available today, the double glazed translucent windows with 1/2-inch aerogel inserts will have a U-value of 1.2 W/m{sup 2} K (0.211 BTU/ft{sup 2} h F) without any coating or low conductivity fill gases. These windows will be more effective than the windows with an Energy Star rating of U-2 W/m{sup 2} K and could be made even more efficient by using low-e coated glass glazings and inert gas fills. This report summarizes the work accomplished on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41950. During this project, Aspen Aerogels made transparent and translucent aerogels from TMOS and TEOS. We characterized the transparency of the aerogels, reinforced the transparent aerogels with fibers and prepared large translucent aerogel panels and blankets. We also conducted an initial market study for energy efficient translucent windows. A lab-scale process was developed that could be scaled-up to manufacture blankets of these translucent aerogels. The large blankets prepared were used to fabricate prototype translucent windows and skylights. The primary goal of this project was to develop transparent, resilient, hydrophobic silica aerogels that have low thermal conductivities (R-10/inch) to be used to produce aerogel insulated double-glazing windows with a U value of 0.6 W/m{sup 2}K. To meet this objective we developed a process and equipment to produce blankets of translucent, hydrophobic aerogel. We focused on silica, organically-modified silica aerogels (Ormosils), and fiber reinforced silica aerogels due to the appreciable expertise in silica sol-gel processing available with the personnel at Aspen Aerogels, and also due to the quantity of knowledge available in the scientific literature. The project was conducted in three budget periods, herein called BP1, BP2 and BP3.

Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fundamental Chemical Kinetic And Thermodynamic Data For Purex Process Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support either the continued operations of current reprocessing plants or the development of future fuel processing using hydrometallurgical processes, such as Advanced Purex or UREX type flowsheets, the accurate simulation of Purex solvent extraction is required. In recent years we have developed advanced process modeling capabilities that utilize modern software platforms such as Aspen Custom Modeler and can be run in steady state and dynamic simulations. However, such advanced models of the Purex process require a wide range of fundamental data including all relevant basic chemical kinetic and thermodynamic data for the major species present in the process. This paper will summarize some of these recent process chemistry studies that underpin our simulation, design and testing of Purex solvent extraction flowsheets. Whilst much kinetic data for actinide redox reactions in nitric acid exists in the literature, the data on reactions in the diluted TBP solvent phase is much rarer. This inhibits the accurate modelization of the Purex process particularly when species show a significant extractability in to the solvent phase or when cycling between solvent and aqueous phases occurs, for example in the reductive stripping of Pu(IV) by ferrous sulfamate in the Magnox reprocessing plant. To support current oxide reprocessing, we have investigated a range of solvent phase reactions: - U(IV)+HNO{sub 3}; - U(IV)+HNO{sub 2}; - U(IV)+HNO{sub 3} (Pu catalysis); - U(IV)+HNO{sub 3} (Tc catalysis); - U(IV)+ Np(VI); - U(IV)+Np(V); - Np(IV)+HNO{sub 3}; - Np(V)+Np(V); Rate equations have been determined for all these reactions and kinetic rate constants and activation energies are now available. Specific features of these reactions in the TBP phase include the roles of water and hydrolyzed intermediates in the reaction mechanisms. In reactions involving Np(V), cation-cation complex formation, which is much more favourable in TBP than in HNO{sub 3}, also occurs and complicates the redox chemistry. Whilst some features of the redox chemistry in TBP appear similar to the corresponding reactions in aqueous HNO{sub 3}, there are notable differences in rates, the forms of the rate equations and mechanisms. Secondly, to underpin the development of advanced single cycle flowsheets using the complexant aceto-hydroxamic acid, we have also characterised in some detail its redox chemistry and solvent extraction behaviour with both Np and Pu ions. We find that simple hydroxamic acids are remarkably rapid reducing agents for Np(VI). They also reduce Pu(VI) and cause a much slower reduction of Pu(IV) through a complex mechanism involving acid hydrolysis of the ligand. AHA is a strong hydrophilic and selective complexant for the tetravalent actinide ions as evidenced by stability constant and solvent extraction data for An(IV), M(III) and U(VI) ions. This has allowed the successful design of U/Pu+Np separation flowsheets suitable for advanced fuel cycles. (authors)

Taylor, R.J.; Fox, O.D.; Sarsfield, M.J.; Carrott, M.J.; Mason, C.; Woodhead, D.A.; Maher, C.J. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Steele, H. [Nexia Solutions, inton House, Risley, Warrington, WA3 6AS (United Kingdom); Koltunov, V.S. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Institute of Inorganic Materials, VNIINM, PO Box 369, Moscow 123060 (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Dynamic modeling and control of a solid-sorbent CO{sub 2} capture process with two-stage bubbling fluidized bed adsorber reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-sorbent-based CO{sub 2} capture processes have strong potential for reducing the overall energy penalty for post-combustion capture from the flue gas of a conventional pulverized coal power plant. However, the commercial success of this technology is contingent upon it operating over a wide range of capture rates, transient events, malfunctions, and disturbances, as well as under uncertainties. To study these operational aspects, a dynamic model of a solid-sorbent-based CO{sub 2} capture process has been developed. In this work, a one-dimensional (1D), non-isothermal, dynamic model of a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor system with overflow-type weir configuration has been developed in Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM). The physical and chemical properties of the sorbent used in this study are based on a sorbent (32D) developed at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Each BFB is divided into bubble, emulsion, and cloud-wake regions with the assumptions that the bubble region is free of solids while both gas and solid phases coexist in the emulsion and cloud-wake regions. The BFB dynamic model includes 1D partial differential equations (PDEs) for mass and energy balances, along with comprehensive reaction kinetics. In addition to the two BFB models, the adsorber-reactor system includes 1D PDE-based dynamic models of the downcomer and outlet hopper, as well as models of distributors, control valves, and other pressure-drop devices. Consistent boundary and initial conditions are considered for simulating the dynamic model. Equipment items are sized and appropriate heat transfer options, wherever needed, are provided. Finally, a valid pressure-flow network is developed and a lower-level control system is designed. Using ACM, the transient responses of various process variables such as flue gas and sorbent temperatures, overall CO{sub 2} capture, level of solids in the downcomer and hopper have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the flue gas. To maintain the overall CO{sub 2} capture at a desired level in face of the typical disturbances, two control strategies were considereda proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-based feedback control strategy and a feedforward-augmented feedback control strategy. Dynamic simulation results show that both the strategies result in unacceptable overshoot/undershoot and a long settling time. To improve the control system performance, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is designed. In summary, the overall results illustrate how optimizing the operation and control of carbon capture systems can have a significant impact on the extent and the rate at which commercial-scale capture processes will be scaled-up, deployed, and used in the years to come.

Modekurti, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the worldâ??s hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements - around 530 oC and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and reactions going to completion without side reactions, and lower demands on materials of construction. Three university research groups from PSU, USC, and TU as well as a group from ANL have been collaborating on the development of enabling technologies for the Cu-Cl cycle, including experimental work on the Cu-Cl cycle reactions, modeling and simulation, and particularly electrochemical reaction for hydrogen production using a CuCl electrolyzer. The Consortium research was distributed over the participants and organized in the following tasks: (1) Development of CuCl electrolyzer (PSU), (2) Thermodynamic modeling of anolyte solution (PSU), (3) Proton conductive membranes for CuCl electrolysis (PSU), (4) Development of an analytical method for online analysis of copper compounds in highly concentrated aqueous solutions (USC), (5) Electrodialysis as a means for separation and purification of the streams exiting the electrolyzer in the Cu-Cl cycle (USC), (6) Development of nanostructured electrocatalysts for the Cu-Cl electrolysis (USC), (7) Cu-Cl electrolyzer modeling (USC), (8) Aspen Plus modeling of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (TU), (9) International coordination of research on the development of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle (ANL). The results obtained in the project clearly demonstrate that the Cu-Cl alternative thermochemical cycle is a promising and viable technology to produce hydrogen efficiently.

The Pennsylvania State Univeristy: Serguei Lvov, Mike Chung, Mark Fedkin, Victor Balashov, Elena, Chalkova, Nikolay Akinfiev; University of South Carolina: Carol Stork, Thomas Davis, Francis Gadala-Maria, Thomas Stanford, John Weidner; Tulane University: Victor Law, John Prindle; ANL: Michele Lewis

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dynamic modeling and transient studies of a solid-sorbent adsorber for CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is dedicated to accelerating the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. In this multi-lab initiative in partnership with academic and industrial institutions, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) leads the development of a multi-scale modeling and simulation toolset for rapid evaluation and deployment of carbon capture systems. One element of the CCSI is focused on optimizing the operation and control of carbon capture systems since this can have a significant impact on the extent and the rate at which commercial-scale capture processes will be scaled-up, deployed, and used in the years to come. Capture processes must be capable of operating over a wide range of transient events, malfunctions, and disturbances, as well as under uncertainties. As part of this work, dynamic simulation and control models, methods, and tools are being developed for CO{sub 2} capture and compression processes and their integration with a baseline commercial-scale supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) power plant. Solid-sorbent-based post-combustion capture technology was chosen as the first industry challenge problem for CCSI because significant work remains to define and optimize the reactors and processes needed for successful sorbent capture systems. Sorbents offer an advantage because they can reduce the regeneration energy associated with CO{sub 2} capture, thus reducing the parasitic load. In view of this, the current paper focuses on development of a dynamic model of a solid-sorbent CO{sub 2} adsorber-reactor and an analysis of its transient performance with respect to several typical process disturbances. A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model of a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor is developed in Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM). The BFB stages are of overflow-type configuration where the solids leave the stage by flowing over the overflow-weir. Each bed is divided into three regions, namely emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake regions. In all three regions, the model considers mass and energy balances. Along with the models of the BFB stages, models of other associated hardware are developed and integrated in a single flowsheet. A valid pressure-flow network is developed and a lower-level control system is designed so that the overall CO{sub 2} capture can be maintained at a desired level in face of the typical disturbances. The dynamic model is used for studying the transient responses of a number of important process variables as a result of the disturbances that are typical of post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture processes.

Modekurti, Srinivasarao [WVU; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu [WVU; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Improving the Estimates of Waste from the Recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel - 13410  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates are presented of wastes arising from the reprocessing of 50 GWD/tonne, 5 year and 50 year cooled used nuclear fuel (UNF) from Light Water Reactors (LWRs), using the 'NUEX' solvent extraction process. NUEX is a fourth generation aqueous based reprocessing system, comprising shearing and dissolution in nitric acid of the UNF, separation of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium using solvent extraction in a development of the PUREX process using tri-n-butyl phosphate in a kerosene diluent, purification of the plutonium and uranium-plutonium products, and conversion of them to uranium trioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium dioxides respectively. These products are suitable for use as new LWR uranium oxide and mixed oxide fuel, respectively. Each unit process is described and the wastes that it produces are identified and quantified. Quantification of the process wastes was achieved by use of a detailed process model developed using the Aspen Custom Modeler suite of software and based on both first principles equilibrium and rate data, plus practical experience and data from the industrial scale Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at the Sellafield nuclear site in the United Kingdom. By feeding this model with the known concentrations of all species in the incoming UNF, the species and their concentrations in all product and waste streams were produced as the output. By using these data, along with a defined set of assumptions, including regulatory requirements, it was possible to calculate the waste forms, their radioactivities, volumes and quantities. Quantification of secondary wastes, such as plant maintenance, housekeeping and clean-up wastes, was achieved by reviewing actual operating experience from THORP during its hot operation from 1994 to the present time. This work was carried out under a contract from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and, so as to enable DOE to make valid comparisons with other similar work, a number of assumptions were agreed. These include an assumed reprocessing capacity of 800 tonnes per year, the requirement to remove as waste forms the volatile fission products carbon-14, iodine-129, krypton-85, tritium and ruthenium-106, the restriction of discharge of any water from the facility unless it meets US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards, no intentional blending of wastes to lower their classification, and the requirement for the recovered uranium to be sufficiently free from fission products and neutron-absorbing species to allow it to be re-enriched and recycled as nuclear fuel. The results from this work showed that over 99.9% of the radioactivity in the UNF can be concentrated via reprocessing into a fission-product-containing vitrified product, bottles of compressed krypton storage and a cement grout containing the tritium, that together have a volume of only about one eighth the volume of the original UNF. The other waste forms have larger volumes than the original UNF but contain only the remaining 0.1% of the radioactivity. (authors)

Phillips, Chris; Willis, William; Carter, Robert [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)] [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States); Baker, Stephen [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)] [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

459

Trees Containing Built-In Pulping Catalysts - Final Report - 08/18/1997 - 08/18/2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several hardwood and softwood trees were analyzed for the presence of anthraquinone-type molecules. Low levels of anthraquinone (AQ) and anthrone components were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and sensitive selected-ion monitoring techniques. Ten out of seventeen hardwood samples examined contained AQ-type components; however, the levels were typically below {approximately}6 ppm. No AQs were observed in the few softwood samples that were examined. The AQs were more concentrated in the heartwood of teak than in the sapwood. The delignification of pine was enhanced by the addition of teak chips ({approximately}0.7% AQ-equivalence content) to the cook, suggesting that endogenous AQs can be released from wood during pulping and can catalyze delignification reactions. Eastern cottonwood contained AQ, methyl AQ, and dimethyl AQ, all useful for wood pulping. This is the first time unsubstituted AQ has been observed in wood extracts. Due to the presence of these pulping catalysts, rapid growth rates in plantation settings, and the ease of genetic transformation, eastern cottonwood is a suitable candidate for genetic engineering studies to enhance AQ content. To achieve effective catalytic pulping activity, poplar and cottonwood, respectively, require {approximately}100 and 1000 times more for pulping catalysts. A strategy to increase AQ concentration in natural wood was developed and is currently being tested. This strategy involves ''turning up'' isochorismate synthase (ICS) through genetic engineering. Isochorismate synthase is the first enzyme in the AQ pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway. In general, the level of enzyme activity at the first branch point or committed step controls the flux through a biosynthetic pathway. To test if the level of ICS regulates AQ biosynthesis in plant tissues, we proposed to over-express this synthase in plant cells. A partial cDNA encoding a putative ICS was available from the random cDNA sequencing project carried out with Arabidopsis thaliana. We used this putative plant ICS gene fragment to isolate and sequence a full-length ICS cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana. The putative full-length cDNA encodes for a 569 amino acid protein of {approximately}62kDa. This sequence represents the first full-length ICS cDNA isolated from a plant. When inserted into E. coli, our isolated cDNA over-expressed ICS protein in the insoluble inclusion bodies. A plant expression vector containing the ICS cDNA, NP II for selection on the antibiotic kanamycin, and duplicated 35S-cauliflower mosaic virus promoter were inserted into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101. Transformation experiments for insertion of these foreign genes into Populus deltoides 'C175' resulted in eight lines able to regenerate shoots and grow roots in the presence of kanamycin. Plants from these eight lines have acclimated to growth in sterile soil and will be moved to a greenhouse environment in spring 2001. Non rooted shoots from each line are currently being multiplied by shoot culture. When enough shoot tissue and/or greenhouse plant stem tissue is available, AQ analysis will be done and compared with non transformed control tissue.

Pullman, G.; Dimmel, D.; Peter, G.

2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

460

Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aspen populus tremuloides" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is presently the world's primary fuel for generating electrical power and, being more abundant and less expensive than oil or natural gas, is expected to continue its dominance into the future. Coal, however, is more carbon intensive than natural gas and oil and consequently coal-fired power plants are large point source emitters of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Since CO{sub 2} is a greenhouse gas, which may have an adverse impact on the world's climate/weather patterns, studies have been conducted to determine the feasibility and economic impact of capturing power plant CO{sub 2} emissions for pipeline transport to a sequestration/storage site. The stack gas that exhausts from a modern coal-fired power plant typically contains about 15% CO{sub 2} on a dry volume basis. Although there are numerous processes available for removing CO{sub 2} from gas streams, gas scrubbing with amine solvent is best suited for this application because of the large gas volumes and low CO{sub 2} concentrations involved. Unfortunately the energy required to regenerate the solvent for continued use as a capturing agent is large and imposes a severe energy penalty on the plant. In addition this ''back end'' or post combustion cleanup requires the addition of large vessels, which, in retrofit applications, are difficult to accommodate. As an alternative to post combustion scrubbing, Foster Wheeler (FW) has proposed that the combustion process be accomplished with oxygen rather than air. With all air nitrogen eliminated, a CO{sub 2}-water vapor rich flue gas will be generated. After condensation of the water vapor, a portion of the flue gas will be recirculated back to the boiler to control the combustion temperature and the balance of the CO{sub 2} will be processed for pipeline transport. This proposed oxygen-carbon dioxide (O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}) combustion process eliminates the need for CO{sub 2} removal/separation and reduces the cost of supplying a CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration. FW has developed a conceptual design of an O{sub 2} fired boiler to determine overall plant performance and economics. Five subtasks were conducted: (1) a literature review, (2) a system design and analysis, (3) a low NOx burner design and analysis, (4) a furnace and heat recovery area design analysis, and (5) an economic analysis. The objective of the literature search is to locate any data/information relevant to the Oxygen-Based PC Boiler conceptual design. The objective of the system design and analysis task is to optimize the PC boiler plant by maximizing system efficiency within practical considerations. Simulations of the oxygen-fired plant with CO{sub 2} sequestration were conducted using Aspen Plus and were compared to a reference air-fired 460 MW plant. Flue gas recycle is used in the O{sub 2}-fired PC to control the flame temperature. Parametric runs were made to determine the effect of flame temperature on system efficiency and required waterwall material and thickness. The degree of improvement on system efficiency of various modifications including hot gas recycle, purge gas recycle, flue gas feedwater recuperation, and recycle purge gas expansion were investigated. The selected O{sub 2}-fired design case has a system efficiency of 30.6% compared to the air-fired system efficiency of 36.7%. The design O{sub 2}-fired case requires T91 waterwall material and has a waterwall surface area of only 65% of the air-fired reference case. The objective of the low NOx burner design and analysis task is to optimize the burner design to ensure stable ignition, to provide safe operation, and to minimize pollutant formation. The burners were designed and analyzed using the Fluent CFD computer program. Four burner designs were developed: (1) with no OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (2) with 20% OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (3) with no OFG and 56% flue gas recycle and (4) with 20% OFG and 56% flue gas recycle. A 3-D Fluent simulation was made of a single wall-fired burner and horizontal portion of the furnace from the wall to the center. Without primary gas sw

Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project utilized an engineering-guided R&D approach, which involved the rapid down-selection of a large number of options (chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4}) to a smaller, more manageable number. The research began by conducting an extensive review of the technical and patent literature to identify all possible options. The down-selection was based on evaluation of the options against a set of metrics, and to a large extent occurred before experimentation was initiated. Given the vast amount of literature and patents that has evolved over the years, this approach helped to focus efforts and resources on the options with the highest technical and commercial probability of success. Additionally, a detailed engineering analysis methodology was developed for conducting the cost and energy-efficiency calculations. The methodology utilized a number of inputs and tools (Aspen PEA{trademark}, FCHTool, and H2A). The down-selection of chemical pathways to NaBH{sub 4} identified three options that were subsequently pursued experimentally. Metal reduction of borate was investigated in Dow's laboratories, research on electrochemical routes to NaBH{sub 4} was conducted at Pennsylvania State University, and Idaho National Laboratory researchers examined various carbothermal routes for producing NaBH{sub 4} from borate. The electrochemical and carbothermal studies did not yield sufficiently positive results. However, NaBH{sub 4} was produced in high yields and purities by an aluminum-based metal reduction pathway. Solid-solid reactive milling, slurry milling, and solution-phase approaches to metal reduction were investigated, and while both reactive milling and solution-phase routes point to fully recyclable processes, the scale-up of reactive milling processes to produce NaBH{sub 4} is expected to be difficult. Alternatively, a low-cost solution-phase approach to NaBH{sub 4} has been identified that is based on conventional process unit operations and should be amenable to scale-up. Numerous advances in AB synthesis have been made in recent years to improve AB yields and purities

Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z