National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ashrae standard ashrae

  1. ASHRAE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASHRAE Technology for a Better Environment 1791 Tullie Circle, NE Atlanta, GA 30329-2305 USA Tel 404.636.8400 Fax 404.321.5478 http:www.ashrae.org Lynn G. ...

  2. ASHRAE Standard 152 Spreadsheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ASHRAE Standard 152 quantifies the delivery efficiency of duct systems, based on factors including location, leakage, and insulation of ductwork. This spreadsheet tool developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and modified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, assists with the calculation of seasonal distribution system efficiency, This calculation is required by the House Simulation Protocols when the simulation tool being used does not permit detailed duct modeling.

  3. Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 specifies how much...

  4. A HISTORY OF ASHRAE STANDARDS 152P.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-10-31

    The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has been developing a standard test method for evaluating the efficiency of ducts and other types of thermal distribution systems in single-family residential buildings. This report presents an overview of the structure, function, and historical development of this test method.

  5. Property:ASHRAE 169 Standard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + ASHRAE 169-2006 + Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + ASHRAE 169-2006 + Adams County, Idaho...

  6. National Cost-effectiveness of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Halverson, Mark A.; Loper, Susan A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Richman, Eric E.

    2015-01-29

    The purpose of this analysis is to examine the cost-effectiveness of the 2013 edition of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES1 Standard 90.1 (ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 2013).

  7. Bernalillo County, New Mexico ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bernalillo County, New Mexico ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bernalillo County, New Mexico ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  8. Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  9. Adams County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Washington ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

  10. Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  11. Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  12. Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  13. Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alameda County, California ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  14. Anderson County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Tennessee ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  15. Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  16. Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  17. Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  18. Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  19. Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  20. Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  1. Berkeley County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Berkeley County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkeley County, West Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

  2. Atkinson County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atkinson County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Atkinson County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  3. Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  4. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Preliminary Qualitative Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2010-05-25

    A preliminary qualitative analysis of all addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 was conducted. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were evaluated by DOE for their impact on energy efficiency. DOE preliminarily determined whether that addenda would have a positive, neutral, or negative impact on overall building efficiency.

  5. Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ventilation Standards The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural...

  6. Model Validation and Testing: The Methodological Foundation of ASHRAE Standard 140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2006-01-01

    Ideally, whole-building energy simulation programs model all aspects of a building that influence energy use and thermal and visual comfort for the occupants. An essential component of the development of such computer simulation models is a rigorous program of validation and testing. This paper describes a methodology to evaluate the accuracy of whole-building energy simulation programs. The methodology is also used to identify and diagnose differences in simulation predictions that may be caused by algorithmic differences, modeling limitations, coding errors, or input errors. The methodology has been adopted by ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs (ASHRAE 2001a, 2004). A summary of the method is included in the 2005 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (ASHRAE 2005). This paper describes the ASHRAE Standard 140 method of test and its methodological basis. Also discussed are possible future enhancements to ASHRAE Standard 140 and related research recommendations.

  7. Analysis of Daylighting Requirements within ASHRAE Standard 90.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Liu, Bing; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2013-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), under the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) funded by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides support to the ASHRAE/IES/IESNA Standard 90.1(Standard 90.1) Standing Standards Project Committee (SSPC 90.1) and its subcommittees. In an effort to provide the ASHRAE SSPC 90.1 with data that will improve the daylighting and fenestration requirements in the Standard, PNNL collaborated with Heschong Mahone Group (HMG), now part of TRC Solutions. Combining EnergyPlus, a whole-building energy simulation software developed by DOE, with Radiance, a highly accurate illumination modeling software (Ward 1994), the daylighting requirements within Standard 90.1 were analyzed in greater detail. The initial scope of the study was to evaluate the impact of the fraction of window area compared to exterior wall area (window-to-wall ratio (WWR)) on energy consumption when daylighting controls are implemented. This scope was expanded to study the impact of fenestration visible transmittance (VT), electric lighting controls and daylighted area on building energy consumption.

  8. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010 Preliminary Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2010-11-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a preliminary quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, Standard 90.1-2010, or 2010 edition) would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007(ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, Standard 90.1-2007, or 2007 edition). The preliminary analysis considered each of the 109 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 that were included in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 16 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOEs preliminary determination. However, out of the 109 addenda, 34 were preliminarily determined to have measureable and quantifiable impact.

  9. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Preliminary Determination: Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Hart, Reid; Goel, Supriya

    2014-03-01

    This report provides a preliminary quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010.

  10. Derivation of Building Energy Use Intensity Targets for ASHRAE Standard 100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, Terry R

    2014-06-01

    The steps to develop the building energy use intensity targets for American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 100, Energy Efficiency in Existing Buildings are outlined in this report. The analyses were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with the ASHRAE Standard 100 committee and Dr. Alexander Zhivov, the subcommittee chair responsible for targets development.

  11. Enhancements to ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Prototype Building Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goel, Supriya; Athalye, Rahul A.; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Hart, Philip R.; Mendon, Vrushali V.

    2014-04-16

    This report focuses on enhancements to prototype building models used to determine the energy impact of various versions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1. Since the last publication of the prototype building models, PNNL has made numerous enhancements to the original prototype models compliant with the 2004, 2007, and 2010 editions of Standard 90.1. Those enhancements are described here and were made for several reasons: (1) to change or improve prototype design assumptions; (2) to improve the simulation accuracy; (3) to improve the simulation infrastructure; and (4) to add additional detail to the models needed to capture certain energy impacts from Standard 90.1 improvements. These enhancements impact simulated prototype energy use, and consequently impact the savings estimated from edition to edition of Standard 90.1.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Compared to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Halverson, Mark A.; Myer, Michael; Cho, Hee Jin; Loper, Susan A.; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2013-06-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed this project for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP). DOE’s BECP supports upgrading building energy codes and standards, and the states’ adoption, implementation, and enforcement of upgraded codes and standards. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, and impact energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for the life of buildings. Continuous improvement of building energy efficiency is achieved by periodically upgrading energy codes and standards. Ensuring that changes in the code that may alter costs (for building components, initial purchase and installation, replacement, maintenance and energy) are cost-effective encourages their acceptance and implementation. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 is the energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors.

  13. National Cost-effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Compared to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian; Halverson, Mark A.; Myer, Michael; Loper, Susan A.; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2013-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed this project for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP). DOE’s BECP supports upgrading building energy codes and standards, and the states’ adoption, implementation, and enforcement of upgraded codes and standards. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, and impact energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for the life of buildings. Continuous improvement of building energy efficiency is achieved by periodically upgrading energy codes and standards. Ensuring that changes in the code that may alter costs (for building components, initial purchase and installation, replacement, maintenance and energy) are cost-effective encourages their acceptance and implementation. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 is the energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors.

  14. Model Validation and Testing: The Methodological Foundation of ASHRAE Standard 140; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2006-07-01

    Ideally, whole-building energy simulation programs model all aspects of a building that influence energy use and thermal and visual comfort for the occupants. An essential component of the development of such computer simulation models is a rigorous program of validation and testing. This paper describes a methodology to evaluate the accuracy of whole-building energy simulation programs. The methodology is also used to identify and diagnose differences in simulation predictions that may be caused by algorithmic differences, modeling limitations, coding errors, or input errors. The methodology has been adopted by ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 (ANSI/ASHRAE 2001, 2004), Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs. A summary of the method is included in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals (ASHRAE 2005). This paper describes the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 method of test and its methodological basis. Also discussed are possible future enhancements to Standard 140 and related research recommendations.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A REFRIGERANT DISTRIBUTION SECTION FOR ASHRAE STANDARD 152.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2001-09-07

    In a recent draft report titled ''Impacts of Refrigerant Line Length on System Efficiency in Residential Heating and Cooling Systems Using Refrigerant Distribution,'' (Andrews 2000) some baseline calculations were performed to estimate various impacts on system efficiency of long refrigerant distribution lines. Refrigerant distribution refers to ''mini-splits'' and other types of space beating and cooling equipment that utilize refrigerant lines, rather than ducts or pipes, to transport heat and cooling effect from the outdoor unit to the building spaces where this heat or cooling is used. Five factors affecting efficiency were studied in each of the space conditioning modes (heating and cooling) for a total of ten factors in all. Temperature changes and pressure drops in each of the two refrigerant lines accounted for four of the factors, with the remaining one being elevation of the indoor unit relative to the outdoor unit. Of these factors, pressure drops in the suction line in cooling showed by far the largest effect. This report builds on these baseline calculations to develop a possible algorithm for a refrigerant distribution section of ASHRAE Standard 152. It is based on the approximate treatment of the previous report, and is therefore subject to error that might be corrected using a more detailed analysis, possibly including computer modeling and field testing. However, because the calculated efficiency impacts are generally small (a few percent being typical) it may be that the approximate treatment is sufficient. That question is left open for discussion. The purpose of this report is not to advocate the adoption of the methodology developed, but rather to present it as an option that could either be adopted as-is or used as a starting point for further analysis. It is assumed that the reader has available and is familiar with ASHRAE Standard 152P and with the previous analysis referred to above.

  16. Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Category Edit History Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Climate Zones defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standards. Pages in category "ASHRAE Climate Zones" The...

  17. Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  18. Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

  19. Baxter County, Arkansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baxter County, Arkansas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone...

  20. Anderson County, Kansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anderson County, Kansas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Kansas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Montana.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Alabama.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Utah.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Texas.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Colorado.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Georgia.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of New York.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Wisconsin.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Oklahoma.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of New Jersey.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Kentucky.

  12. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in teh State of Connecticut.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Delaware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Delaware.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the District of Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the District of Columbia.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Massachusetts.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-12-13

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Nebraska.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Virginia.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Iowa.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of South Carolina.

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Arkansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-26

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Arkansas.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Rhode Island.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of North Carolina.

  3. End-Use Opportunity Analysis from Progress Indicator Results for ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Xie, YuLong

    2015-02-05

    This report and an accompanying spreadsheet (PNNL 2014a) compile the end use building simulation results for prototype buildings throughout the United States. The results represent he energy use of each edition of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ASHRAE 2004, 2007, 2010, 2013). PNNL examined the simulation results to determine how the remaining energy was used.

  4. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation | Department of Energy ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation "Build tight, ventilate right" is a universal mantra of high performance home designers and scientists. Tight construction is

  5. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Final Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2011-05-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. The final analysis considered each of the 44 addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 15 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOEs final determination. However, out of the 44 addenda, 9 were preliminarily determined to have measureable and quantifiable impact.

  6. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Preliminary Determination: Qualitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Hart, Reid; Athalye, Rahul A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2014-03-01

    Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. When the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issues an affirmative determination on Standard 90.1, states are statutorily required to certify within two years that they have reviewed and updated the commercial provisions of their building energy code, with respect to energy efficiency, to meet or exceed the revised standard. This report provides a preliminary qualitative analysis of all addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 (referred to as Standard 90.1-2010 or 2010 edition) that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 (referred to as Standard 90.1-2013 or 2013 edition).

  7. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010 Preliminary Qualitative Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Liu, Bing; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Richman, Eric E.

    2010-11-01

    A preliminary qualitative analysis of all addenda to American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (Standard 90.1-2007 or 2007 edition) that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010 (Standard 90.1-2010 or 2010 edition) was conducted. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were evaluated by DOE for their impact on energy efficiency. DOE preliminarily determined whether that addenda would have a positive, neutral, or negative impact on overall building efficiency.

  8. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 Final Qualitative Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Richman, Eric E.; Liu, Bing

    2011-10-31

    A final qualitative analysis of all addenda to American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (Standard 90.1-2007 or 2007 edition) that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010 (Standard 90.1-2010 or 2010 edition) was conducted. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were evaluated by DOE for their impact on energy efficiency. DOE determined whether each addendum would have a positive, neutral, or negative impact on overall building efficiency.

  9. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Final Qualitative Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2011-01-01

    A final qualitative analysis of all addenda to American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 was conducted. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were evaluated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for their impact on energy efficiency. DOE preliminarily determined whether that addenda would have a positive, neutral, or negative impact on overall building efficiency. Table S.1 shows the number of positive and negative changes for each section of Standard 90.1.

  10. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Determination of Energy Savings: Qualitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Richman, Eric E.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Winiarski, David W.

    2014-09-04

    This report provides a final qualitative analysis of all addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 (referred to as Standard 90.1-2010 or 2010 edition) that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 (referred to as Standard 90.1-2013 or 2013 edition). All addenda in creating Standard 90.1-2013 were evaluated for their projected impact on energy efficiency. Each addendum was characterized as having a positive, neutral, or negative impact on overall building energy efficiency.

  11. Evaluation of ANSI/ASHRAE/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, N.; Bonnema, E.; Field, K.; Torcellini, P.

    2010-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated ANSI/ASHRAE/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1-2009, 'The Standard for High-Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings'. NREL performed this evaluation by examining the results of predictions for site energy use from a comprehensive set of EnergyPlus models. NREL has conducted an 'order-of-magnitude' analysis in this study to identify the likely overall impact of adopting Standard 189.1-2009 over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007.

  12. Comparison of the Energy Efficiency Prescribed by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 and ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2006-12-01

    This document presents the qualitative comparison of DOE’s formal determination of energy savings of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. The term “qualitative” is used in the sense of identifying whether or not changes have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on energy efficiency of the standard, with no attempt made to quantify that impact. A companion document will present the quantitative comparison of DOE’s determination. The quantitative comparison will be based on whole building simulation of selected building prototypes in selected climates. This document presents a comparison of the energy efficiency requirements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-1999 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-1999) and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-2004). The comparison was done through a thorough review of all addenda to Standard 90.1-1999 that were included in the published ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2001 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-2001) and also all addenda to Standard 90.1-2001 that were included in the published Standard 90.1-2004. A summary table showing the impact of each addendum is provided. Each addendum to both Standards 90.1-1999 and 90.1-2001 was evaluated as to its impact on the energy efficiency requirements of the standard (greater efficiency, lesser efficiency) and as to significance. The final section of this document summarizes the impacts of the various addenda and proposes which addenda should be included in the companion quantitative portion of DOE’s determination. Addenda are referred to with the nomenclature addendum 90.1-xxz, where “xx” is either “99” for 1999 or “01” for 2001, and z is the ASHRAE letter designation for the addendum. Addenda names are shown in bold face in text. DOE has chosen not to prepare a separate evaluation of Standard 90.1-2001 as that standard does not appear to improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. What this means for the determination of energy savings for Standard 90.1-2004 is that the baseline standard for comparison is Standard 90.1-1999 and all addenda to both Standards 90.1-1999 and 90.1-2001 must be considered to determine the overall change in efficiency between Standard 90.1-1999 and Standard 90.1-2004.

  13. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 Final Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2011-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, Standard 90.1-2010, or 2010 edition) would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007(ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, Standard 90.1-2007, or 2007 edition). The final analysis considered each of the 109 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 that were included in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 16 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE's final determination. However, out of the 109 addenda, 34 were preliminarily determined to have a measureable and quantifiable impact. A suite of 240 computer energy simulations for building prototypes complying with ASHRAE 90.1-2007 was developed. These prototypes were then modified in accordance with these 34 addenda to create a second suite of corresponding building simulations reflecting the same buildings compliant with Standard 90.1-2010. The building simulations were conducted using the DOE EnergyPlus building simulation software. The resulting energy use from the complete suite of 480 simulation runs was then converted to energy use intensity (EUI, or energy use per unit floor area) metrics (Site EUI, Primary EUI, and energy cost intensity [ECI]) results for each simulation. For each edition of the standard, these EUIs were then aggregated to a national basis for each prototype using weighting factors based on construction floor area developed for each of the 15 U.S. climate zones using commercial construction data. When compared, the resulting weighted EUIs indicated that each of the 16 building prototypes used less energy under Standard 90.1-2010 than under Standard 90.1-2007 on a national basis when considering site energy, primary energy, or energy cost. The EUIs were also aggregated across building types to a national commercial building basis using the same weighting data. On a national basis, the final quantitative analysis estimated a floor-space-weighted national average reduction in new building energy consumption of 18.2 percent for source energy and 18.5 percent when considering site energy. An 18.2 percent savings in energy cost, based on national average commercial energy costs for electricity and natural gas, was also estimated.

  14. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Determination of Energy Savings: Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Wang, Weimin; Hart, Philip R.; Zhang, Jian; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.

    2014-09-04

    This report provides a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would result in improved energy efficiency in commercial buildings. The final analysis considered each of the 110 addenda to Standard 90.1-2010 that were included in Standard 90.1-2013. PNNL reviewed all addenda included by ASHRAE in creating Standard 90.1-2013 from Standard 90.1-2010, and considered their combined impact on a suite of prototype building models across all U.S. climate zones. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s final determination. However, out of the 110 total addenda, 30 were identified as having a measureable and quantifiable impact.

  15. Baca County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Baca County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baca County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  16. Adams County, Indiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Adams County, Indiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Indiana ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  17. Adams County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Adams County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Idaho ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  18. Adams County, North Dakota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

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    Adams County, North Dakota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, North Dakota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  19. Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Illinois ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  20. Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Nebraska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  1. Adams County, Ohio ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Adams County, Ohio ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Ohio ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

  2. Bacon County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Bacon County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bacon County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  3. Bates County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Bates County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bates County, Missouri ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  4. Anderson County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Texas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate Zone Number...

  5. Ben Hill County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

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    Ben Hill County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ben Hill County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

  6. Anson County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

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    Anson County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anson County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  7. Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

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    Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  8. Aiken County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

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    Aiken County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Aiken County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  9. Barrow County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Barrow County, Georgia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barrow County, Georgia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  10. Apache County, Arizona ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Apache County, Arizona ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Apache County, Arizona ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

  11. Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2013-07-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

  12. ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The American ...

  13. Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2013-07-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

  14. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype B + Adams County,...

  15. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adams County,...

  16. ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Inc. (ASHRAE), founded in 1894, is an international organization of over 50,000 members. ASHRAE fulfills its mission of advancing heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration to serve humanity and promote a

  17. Trends in Data Center Design - ASHRAE Leads the Way to Large Energy Savings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Geet, O.

    2013-06-01

    Energy savings strategies for data centers are described, including best practices, ASHRAE standards, and examples of successful strategies for incorporating energy savings.

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovations profile describes Building America research and support in developing and gaining adoption of ASHRAE 62.2, a residential ventilation standard that is critical to transforming the U.S. housing industry to high-performance homes.

  19. Weighting Factors for the Commercial Building Prototypes Used in the Development of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Bandyopadhyay, Gopal K.

    2010-01-21

    Detailed construction data from the McGraw Hill Construction Database was used to develop construction weights by climate zones for use with DOE Benchmark Buildings and for the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 development. These construction weights were applied to energy savings estimates from simulation of the benchmark buildings to establish weighted national energy savings.

  20. Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County...

  1. Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

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    Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search...

  2. Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...

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    Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place...

  3. Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...

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    Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone...

  4. Building envelope thermal and daylighting analysis in support of recommendations to upgrade ASHRAE/IES Standard 90. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; Sullivan, R.; Nozaki, S.; Selkowitz, S.; Conner, C.; Arasteh, D.

    1983-09-01

    Fenestration design can greatly affect the energy requirements for space conditioning and electric lighting in buildings. The net annual effect greatly depends on the effectiveness of daylight utilization with specific results being a complex function of the interaction among building design features, building operating characteristics, and climate. The object of this study was to isolate the energy effects of fenestration and electric lighting design, quantify these effects, and develop simplified analysis tools for compliance use in the building envelopes section of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90. Envelope thermal conductivity, fenestration design, and electric lighting characteristics are parametrically varied through a wide range of values and in a diversity of climates. For these parametric variations, annual energy consumption is calculated with the DOE-2.1B energy analysis program. The numerical results are collected and stored on tape. From this data base statistical analysis is performed using multiple regression techniques leading to simplified correlation expressions characterize annual energy performance trends for cooling, heating, and cooling peak so that users can easily ascertain the energy implications of design options for fenestration, daylighting, and electric lighting.

  5. Passive-Solar-Heating Analysis: a new ASHRAE manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The forthcoming ASHRAE book, Passive Solar Heating Analysis, is described. ASHRAE approval procedures are discussed. An overview of the contents is given. The development of the solar load ratio correlations is described, and the applicability of the analysis method is discussed.

  6. 2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standard 90.1-2013; Preliminary Determination | Department of Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013; Preliminary Determination 2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013; Preliminary Determination This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of preliminary determination regarding energy savings for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2013, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on May 8,

  7. Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2004 for New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.

    2007-08-03

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and New York State Department of State (DOS) requested the help of DOEs Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) in estimating the annual building energy savings and cost impacts of adopting ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 (ASHRAE 2004) requirements. This report summarizes the analysis methodology and results of energy simulation in response to that request.

  8. Property:ASHRAE 169 Start Date | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Start Date Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Start Date" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next...

  9. Property:ASHRAE 169 End Date | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    End Date Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:ASHRAE169EndDate&oldid21585...

  10. NREL Engineer Named ASHRAE Vice President - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineer Named ASHRAE Vice President August 10, 2010 Sheila J. Hayter, a senior research supervisor for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was recently named a vice president for the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). As a vice president, Hayter is a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee and serves as chair of the Publishing and Education Council. At NREL, her work focuses on

  11. Adams County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Adams County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate...

  12. Aroostook County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...

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    Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Aroostook County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place...

  13. ASHRAE 169-2006 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Standard for Weather Data for Building Design Standards created by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc....

  14. Michigan State Code Adoption Analysis: Cost-Effectiveness of Lighting Requirements - ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2006-09-29

    This report documents PNNL's analysis of the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 if this energy code is adopted in the state of Michigan, instead of the current standard.

  15. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California. Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Apte, Mike G.

    2010-10-31

    This report considers the question of whether the California Energy Commission should incorporate the ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation standard into the Title 24 ventilation rate (VR) standards, thus allowing buildings to follow the Indoor Air Quality Procedure. This, in contrast to the current prescriptive standard, allows the option of using ventilation rate as one of several strategies, which might include source reduction and air cleaning, to meet specified targets of indoor air concentrations and occupant acceptability. The research findings reviewed in this report suggest that a revised approach to a ventilation standard for commercial buildings is necessary, because the current prescriptive ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP) apparently does not provide occupants with either sufficiently acceptable or sufficiently healthprotective air quality. One possible solution would be a dramatic increase in the minimum ventilation rates (VRs) prescribed by a VRP. This solution, however, is not feasible for at least three reasons: the current need to reduce energy use rather than increase it further, the problem of polluted outdoor air in many cities, and the apparent limited ability of increasing VRs to reduce all indoor airborne contaminants of concern (per Hodgson (2003)). Any feasible solution is thus likely to include methods of pollutant reduction other than increased outdoor air ventilation; e.g., source reduction or air cleaning. The alternative 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP) offers multiple possible benefits in this direction over the VRP, but seems too limited by insufficient specifications and inadequate available data to provide adequate protection for occupants. Ventilation system designers rarely choose to use it, finding it too arbitrary and requiring use of much non-engineering judgment and information that is not readily available. This report suggests strategies to revise the current ASHRAE IAQP to reduce its current limitations. These strategies, however, would make it more complex and more prescriptive, and would require substantial research. One practical intermediate strategy to save energy would be an alternate VRP, allowing VRs lower than currently prescribed, as long as indoor VOC concentrations were no higher than with VRs prescribed under the current VRP. This kind of hybrid, with source reduction and use of air cleaning optional but permitted, could eventually evolve, as data, materials, and air-cleaning technology allowed gradual lowering of allowable concentrations, into a fully developed IAQP. Ultimately, it seems that VR standards must evolve to resemble the IAQP, especially in California, where buildings must achieve zero net energy use within 20 years.

  16. Analysis of IECC (2003, 2006, 2009) and ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Commercial Energy Code Requirements for Mesa, AZ.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yunzhi; Gowri, Krishnan

    2011-02-28

    This report summarizes code requirements and energy savings of commercial buildings in Climate Zone 2B built to the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 when compared to the 2003 IECC and the 2006 IECC. In general, the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 have higher insulation requirements for exterior walls, roof, and windows and have higher efficiency requirements for HVAC equipment. HVAC equipment efficiency requirements are governed by National Appliance Conversion Act of 1987 (NAECA), and are applicable irrespective of the IECC version adopted. The energy analysis results show that commercial buildings meeting the 2009 IECC requirements save 4.4% to 9.5% site energy and 4.1% to 9.9% energy cost when compared to the 2006 IECC; and save 10.6% to 29.4% site energy and 10.3% to 29.3% energy cost when compared to the 2003 IECC. Similar analysis comparing ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 requirements to the 2006 IECC shows that the energy savings are in the 4.0% to 10.7% for multi-family and retail buildings, but less than 2% for office buildings. Further comparison of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 requirements to the 2003 IECC show site energy savings in the range of 7.7% to 30.6% and energy cost savings range from 7.9% to 30.3%. Both the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 have the potential to save energy by comparable levels for most building types.

  17. Labs21 Laboratory Modeling Guidelines using ASHRAE 90.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, Susan; Walsh, Michael; Graham, Carl; Maor, Itzhak; Mathew, Paul; Porter, Fred; Sartor, Dale; Van Geet, Otto

    2005-10-01

    The following is a guideline for energy modeling of laboratory spaces in a building in accordance with the Energy Cost Budget method described in ASHRAE 90.1-1999 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. For the purposes of this document, a laboratory is defined as any space requiring once through ventilation systems (recirculation of air to other spaces in a building is not allowed). To accomplish this, ventilation systems in laboratories typically provide 100% outside air to the occupied space. The guideline is structured similarly to the ASHRAE 90.1-99 standard. Only those sections being clarified or modified are discussed in the guideline; all other sections should be followed as defined in the standard. Specifically, those sections that are affected include the following: (1) 6.3.3.1 - Fan Power Limitation (modification); (2) 6.3.7.2 - Fume Hoods (modification); (3) 11.3.11 - Schedules (modification); (4) 11.4.3 - HVAC Systems (clarification); (5) 11.4.3 (h) Budget Supply-Air-to-Room Air Temperature Difference (modification); (6) 11.4.3(i) - Fan system efficiency (modification); and (7) Table 11.4.3A - Budget System Descriptions (modification). For energy efficiency measures that are not explicitly addressed by the standard, we recommend application of Section 11.5, Exceptional Calculation Methods. This guideline does not cover the details of such calculation methods.

  18. ASHRAE Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  19. About ASHRAE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weather Data Real- Time Energy Pricing Demand Response Energy Usage Info HVAC Lighting Security Facility Manage- ment Industrial Automa- tion FSGIM Device Energy Manager Load Meter ...

  20. Development of the design climatic data for the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook -- Fundamentals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colliver, D.G.; Burks, T.F.; Gates, R.S.; Zhang, H.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the process used to revise the design weather data tables in the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. Design conditions were determined for 509 US, 134 Canadian, 339 European, 293 Asian, and 169 other worldwide locations. Thirty-three years of hourly weather data were used for approximately half of the US and all of the Canadian locations. Twelve years of data were used for the other locations. The data went through quality checking and short-term linear interpolation filling processes. Months that had sufficient data were then used in the analysis. The data were analyzed to produce annual frequency-of-occurrence design dry-bulb (DB), wet-bulb (WB), and dew-point (DP) temperatures with mean coincident values at the design conditions. A comparison with the previous design values indicated that the new dry-bulb and wet-bulb design conditions are slightly less extreme than the values previously published. However, the new design dew-point values indicate the potential for significantly more extreme dehumidification design conditions than would be found by using the old extreme dry-bulb temperature with mean coincident wet-bulb temperature. Software was also developed so users could extract the design values, cumulative frequencies, and DB/DP, DB/WB, DB/H, and DB/WS coincident matrices for 1444 locations from a CD-ROM.

  1. Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 | Department of Energy Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 This document is Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation

  2. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: ASHRAE Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    To understand the importance of good indoor air quality, consider that people spend, on ... to fve times greater than in the outdoor air, ventilation is essential to maintaining ...

  3. Recommendations for Meeting ASHRAE Standard 62.2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question What are the best ventilation techniques?"

  4. Status of cool roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2007-06-01

    Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

  5. Status of cool roof standards in the United States (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE ... and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. ...

  6. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013. PUBLIC ...

  7. Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ...

  8. Building Energy Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Vermont Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) took effect on March 1, 2015. The code is based on the 2015 IECC, with amendments to incorporate ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The new guidelines ...

  9. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation "Build tight, ventilate right" is a universal mantra of high performance home designers and scientists. ...

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hart, Philip R. ; Rosenberg, Michael I. ; Xie, YuLong ; Richman, Eric E. ; Elliott, Douglas B. ; Loper, Susan A. ; Myer, Michael Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI ...

  11. Department of Energy Standards Index

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... ASHRAE American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers 1791 Tulie Circle, NE Atlanta, GA 30329 404-636-8400 http:www.ashrae.org ASME American Society of ...

  12. ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Subtype A Subtype B Subtype C Climate Zone Number 1 Zone 1A Zone 1B NA Climate Zone Number 2 Zone 2A Zone 2B NA Climate Zone Number 3 Zone 3A Zone 3B Zone...

  13. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-07-11

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

  14. Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pump

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) Wayne Reedy Oak Ridge National Laboratory wreedy2@comcast.net ... Residential Ground- Source Integrated Heat Pump", 2013 ASHRAE Winter Conference Paper, ...

  15. Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: -- ASHRAE - Atlanta, GA -- Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) - Arlington, VA

  16. ASHRAE transactions 1998. Volume 104, Part 1B: Symposium papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    This book covers the following topics; ground-source heat pumps; reflective roofs; heat transfer in special fenestration; space HVAC systems; thermal comfort; radiant heating and cooling; turbulent models for room airflow; durability of fenestration systems; seismic restraints for piping systems; new refrigerants and lubricants; thermal distributions systems; gas engine-driven heat pumps; European research on low-velocity measurements; absorption/sorption heat pumps and refrigeration systems; central heating plants with thermal energy storage; valves of hydronic pumping systems; air-to-air energy exchangers; fan/motor vibration problems in air-conditioning units; air cleaning in animal facilities; freezer entryways; heat gains and the new load calculation procedure; forced air-heating and cooling system performance in houses; and new water heating data, technologies and evaluation. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  17. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD39)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

  18. EA-1872: Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluated the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend the current rule for commercial and high-rise multi-family residential buildings, 10 CFR 433 “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings,” to replace ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 with the more stringent ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, incorporated by reference. This EA also evaluated the environmental impacts with regard to low-rise residential buildings; this rulemaking updated 10 CFR 435 Subpart A, “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings,” to replace the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2004 with the more stringent IECC 2009, incorporated by reference. This EA was completed as DOE/EA-1871.

  19. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

  20. Energy Efficiency Standards for State Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HB 1266 (July 2013) requires that newly constructed state buildings meet or exceed ASHRAE 90.1-2010 requirements or any other more stringent efficient building requirements selected by the Bureau...

  1. EA-1918: Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and MultiFamily High-Rise Residential Buildings" RIN 1904-AC60

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of implementing provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This EA addresses Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2010. The Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on July 9, 2013, 78 FR 40945.

  2. About Building Energy Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy-efficiency codes and standards (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1) and performance-path compliance with those codes (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1 "Appendix G" Performance Rating Method), ...

  3. 2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document. PDF icon 2014-05-08 Energy Efficiency Improvements ...

  4. Climate Change, Energy Efficiency, and IEQ: Challenges and Opportunities for ASHRAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2009-01-01

    In the U.S, buildings consume approximately 39percent of primary energy, including 70percent of electricity [1]. Buildings are responsible for approximately 38percent of U. S. carbon dioxide emissions [1]. The process of HVAC, for maintaining acceptable indoor environmental quality (IEQ), consumes 37percent of the energy used in buildings [1].

  5. The Best Way to Meet ASHRAE 62.2 in Multifamily Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

  6. A history of the Building Energy Standards Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, D.L.; Merrick, J.A.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-02-01

    This report describes the history of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) work in development of energy standards for commercial and residential construction in the United States. PNL`s standards development efforts are concentrated in the Building Energy Standards Program (the Program), which PNL conducts for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards. The Program has worked with DOE, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), and other building codes and standards organizations to develop, evaluate, and promulgate energy standards in all sectors of the building industry. This report describes the recent history of U.S. code development and PNL`s contributions through the 1980s and early 1990s, up to the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Impacts to standards development resulting from the passage of this act will be described in other reports.

  7. EA-1871: Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, “EE Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings” and 10 CFR 435, “EE Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE‘s Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings‖ and 10 CFR 435, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings‖ Baseline Standards Update. The final rule updates the baseline standards in 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435 to the latest private sector standards based on the cost-effectiveness of the latest private sector standards and DOE‘s determination that energy efficiency has been improved in these codes as required by 42 U.S.C 6831 et seq. DOE is issuing its final determinations on American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE 2007) and the International Code Council‘s 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in the same edition of the Federal Register as this final rule.

  8. Healthy Efficient Homes Research & Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) – Berkeley, CA Partners: -- ASHRAE -- ASTM- West Conshohocken, PA -- RESNET -- Building Performance Institute (BPI) - Washington, D.C. -- ACCA – Arlington, VA -- International Code Council – Washington, D.C. -- Bonneville Power Administration – Portland, OR -- California Energy Commission – Sacramento, CA

  9. Comparison of Standard 90.1-2007 and the 2009 IECC with Respect to Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; Halverson, Mark A.

    2009-12-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) has been asked by some states and energy code stakeholders to address the comparability of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code® (IECC) as applied to commercial buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 (hereinafter referred to as Standard 90.1-07). An assessment of comparability will help states respond to and implement conditions specified in the State Energy Program (SEP) Formula Grants American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funding Opportunity, Number DE-FOA-0000052, and eliminate the need for the states individually or collectively to perform comparative studies of the 2009 IECC and Standard 90.1-07. The funding opportunity announcement contains the following conditions: (2) The State, or the applicable units of local government that have authority to adopt building codes, will implement the following: (A) A residential building energy code (or codes) that meets or exceeds the most recent International Energy Conservation Code, or achieves equivalent or greater energy savings. (B) A commercial building energy code (or codes) throughout the State that meets or exceeds the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007, or achieves equivalent or greater energy savings . (C) A plan to achieve 90 percent compliance with the above energy codes within eight years. This plan will include active training and enforcement programs and annual measurement of the rate of compliance. With respect to item (B) above, many more states, regardless of the edition date, directly adopt the IECC than Standard 90.1-07. This is predominately because the IECC is a model code and part of a coordinated set of model building codes that state and local government have historically adopted to regulate building design and construction. This report compares the 2009 IECC to Standard 90.1-07 with the intent of helping states address whether the adoption and application of the 2009 IECC for commercial buildings can be considered equivalent to the adoption and application of Standard 90.1-07. Based on this document, states adopting the 2009 IECC, which is the document cited in (A), above, for residential construction, can also determine if they are in compliance with the above provisions for commercial buildings in (B) above and if their code meets or exceeds the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-07.

  10. A Stable Whole Building Performance Method for Standard 90.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Eley, Charles

    2013-05-01

    Wouldnt it be great if a single energy model could be used to demonstrate minimum code compliance, green code compliance, establish a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating, and determine eligibility for federal tax and utility incentives? Even better, what if the basic rules for creating those models did not change every few years? This paper descibes a recently proposed addendum to ASHRAE/ANSI/IES Standard 90.1 aims to meet those goals. Addendum BM establishes the Performance Rating Method found in Appendix G of Standard 90.1 as a new method of compliance while maintaining its traditional use in gauging the efficiency of beyond code buildings. Furthermore, Addendum BM sets a common baseline building that does not change with each update to the standard.

  11. Building America 2014 Top Innovations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection ASSURED HEALTH AND SAFETY ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Indoor ...

  12. Building America Expert Meeting: Combustion Safety

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings. ANSIASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010. Atlanta, GA: ASHRAE. Accessed November 27, 2012: http:...

  13. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ventilation requirements in multifamily buildings that are also constructed to LEED compartmentalization requirements of the currently proposed ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2014 ...

  14. PNNL Energy Codes Portfolio

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Development ASHRAE Standard 90.1 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Analysis ... of DOE's Determinations on national model codes * Evaluate cost-effectiveness on newly ...

  15. DOE Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2010. technologically feasible, economically justified, and meet the energy efficiency levels in the applicable voluntary consensus energy codes specified ...

  16. Recommendations for energy conservation standards for new residential buildings - volume 3: Introduction and Background to the Standard Development Effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    The Energy Conservation for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, 42 U.S.C Section 6831 et. seq. requires the US Department of Energy to issue energy conservation standards for the design of new residential and commercial buildings. The standards will be mandatory only for the design of new federal buildings, and will serve as voluntary guidelines for the design of new non-federal buildings. This report documents the development and testing of a set of recommendations, from the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) Special Projects Committee No. 53, designed to provide the technical foundation for the Congressionally-mandated energy standard for new residential buildings. The recommendations have been developed over the past 25 months by a multidisciplinary project team, under the management of the US Department of Energy and its prime contractor, Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Volume III -- Introduction and Background to the Standard Development Effort is a description of the Standard development process and contains the rationale for the general approach and specific criteria contained within the recommendations.

  17. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  18. Impacts of alternative residential energy standards - Rural Housing Amendments Study, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balistocky, S.; Bohn, A.A.; Heidell, J.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lee, A.D.; Pratt, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1985-11-01

    This report has examined the role of manufactured housing in the housing market, the energy impacts of three manufactured housing standards and three site-built standards in 13 cities, and the economic impacts of those standards in 6 cities. The three standards applied to manufactured housing are the HUD Title VI standard (Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards, or MHCSS), the Hud Title II-E standard, and the existing FmHA Title V standard. Those applied to site-built homes are the HUD Minimum Property Standards (MPS), the ASHRAE 90A-80 standard, and the FmHA Title V standard. Based on energy consumption alone, these analyses show that the FmHA Title V standard is the most stringent standard for both housing types (a single-section menufactured home and a single-story detached ''ranch house''). The HUD Title VI standard is the least stringent for manufactured homes, while the HUD Minimum Property Standards are the least stringent for site-built homes. Cost-effectiveness comparisons required by the Act were made for the two prototypical homes. Results of this preliminary economic analysis indicate that none of the site-built standards reflect minimum life-cycle cost as a basic criterion of their development. For manufactured homes, both the FmHA standard and the HUD Title II-E standard reduce life-cycle cost and effect positive first-year cash flows in all cities analyzed when electric resistance heating is assumed. When natural gas heating is used, both standards pass the life-cycle cost test in all cities, but the FmHA standard fails the cash flow test in all but one city. However, in the worst case, net monthly expenditures in the first year are increased by less than $9.

  19. Property:Buildings/ModelTargetType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are: ASHRAE 90.1 2007 ASHRAE 90.1 2004 ASHRAE 189.1 LEED Pages using the property "BuildingsModelTargetType" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise...

  20. WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT ABSORPTION COOLING ANALYSIS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Appendix B: HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS FOR WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE ... 1979. ASHRAE, ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, American Society of Heating, R e f ...

  1. Southern Energy Efficiency Alliance Summary of Reported Data...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of Savings Prediction ASHRAE LEVEL 1, AUDITOR, AVERAGE OF ASHRAE LEVEL 2 FOR SELECTED ... Marketing & Outreach: Recipient outlays of BBNP award funds for communication activities ...

  2. EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise ... standards for commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings to ASHRAE ...

  3. Grocery Store 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Hale, E.; Hirsch, A.; Torcellini, P.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents technical analysis for grocery stores aimed at providing design guidance that achieves whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  4. General Merchandise 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E.; Leach, M.; Hirsch, A.; Torcellini, P.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents technical analysis for medium-box general merchandise stores aimed at providing design guidance that achieves whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  5. EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings Based on an DOEEA-1871, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and IECC 2009 would not...

  6. Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400...

  7. Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-09-04

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  8. Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  9. Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  10. CX-012121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notice of Preliminary Determination of Energy Savings for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 CX(s) Applied: A6 Date: 04/25/2014 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The performance of this standard unit is based on ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Thermal efficiency (Et) - Represents a boiler's energy output divided by energy input as defined by ANSI Z21.13. ...

  12. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Eric; Leach, Matt; Pless, Shanti

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 Schools -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2013-02-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-K12) (ASHRAE et al. 2011a). The AEDG-K12 provides recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in K-12 schools over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-K12 was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. A Retrospective Analysis of Commercial Building Energy Codes: 1990 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.; McDonald, Sean C.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2010-10-01

    Building Energy Codes Program's efforts are designed to result in increased stringency in national model energy codes, more rapid and broader adoption by states and localities of updated codes, and increased compliance and enforcement. Report estimates the historical impact of Building Energy Codes Program in terms of energy savings achieved that are based upon various editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1).

  16. Empirical Validation Workshop: Need and Theory

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    gov Empirical Validation Workshop: Need and Theory, Jan 28-29, 2015 Model vs Measured Pre-normative work by Labs, IEA, ASHRAE etc. becomes... Normative ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 Software Testing & Diagnostic Method: Finding needles in haystacks (BESTEST) 2 IRS & RESNET Qualified Software BESTESTed with Standard 140 EnerSim 179D Commercial Building Tax Credits (13 Simulation Tools) Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) RESNET (HERS, IECC, Tax Credits)(6 Tools) EnergyInsights(tm) TRANE/TRACE

  17. Update and Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Rulemakings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 431.96 54 Trillion Btu Primary (2010)* Waiting for ASHRAE Trigger p g ) (Incorporates ... 7.7 7 Trillion Btu Primary (2010)* Waiting for ASHRAE Trigger *Screening Analysis ...

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 18 15 13 HSPF 8.2 9 10 24 Geothermal Heat Pump ENERGY STAR EER and COP Criteria ASHRAE ... 62.2. This alternative will remain in effect while DOE works to develop an ASHRAE ...

  19. What is the New Paradigm?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    US Green Building Council Headquarters - Washington D.C. Open Offices Lighting Power Density ASHRAE 90.1 2007: 1.10 WSF Installed Lighting: 0.62 WSF (44% Below ASHRAE 90.1...

  20. Date | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Date" Showing 48 properties using this type. A Property:ASHRAE 169 End Date Property:ASHRAE 169 Start Date B Property:Building...

  1. Integrating Renewable Energy Systems in Buildings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayter, S. J.

    2011-08-01

    This presentation on integrating renewable energy systems into building was presented at the August, 2011 ASHRAE Region IX CRC meetings.

  2. Simulation and testing of pyramid and barrel vault skylights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.G.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Wright, J.L.

    1998-10-01

    The thermal performance of fenestration in commercial buildings can have a significant effect on building loads--yet there is little information on the performance of these products. With this in mind, ASHRAE TC 4.5, Fenestration, commissioned a research project involving test and simulation of commercial fenestration systems. The objectives of ASHRAE Research Project 877 were: to evaluate the thermal performance (U-factors) of commonly used commercial glazed roof and wall assemblies; to obtain a better fundamental understanding of the heat transfer processes that occur in these specialty fenestration products; to develop correlations for natural-convection heat transfer in complex glazing cavities; to develop a methodology for evaluating complex fenestration products, suitable for inclusion in ASHRAE Standard 142P (ASHRAE 1996); and to generate U-factors for common commercial fenestration products, suitable for inclusion in the ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. This paper describes testing and simulation of pyramid and barrel vault skylight specimens and provides guidelines for modeling these systems based on the validated results.

  3. American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Condition Engineers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (ASHRAE) 2016 Annual Conference | Department of Energy American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Condition Engineers (ASHRAE) 2016 Annual Conference American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Condition Engineers (ASHRAE) 2016 Annual Conference June 25, 2016 9:00AM EDT to June 29

  4. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  5. Building Technologies Office 2016 Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Emerging Technologies » Building Energy Modeling Building Energy Modeling About the portfolio Building energy modeling (BEM)-physics-based calculation of building energy consumption-is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency. Established use cases include design of new buildings and deep retrofits, development of whole-building energy efficiency codes and standards (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1) and performance-path compliance with those codes (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1 "Appendix G" Performance

  6. Building Energy Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » Building Energy Modeling Building Energy Modeling About the portfolio Building energy modeling (BEM)-physics-based calculation of building energy consumption-is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency. Established use cases include design of new buildings and deep retrofits, development of whole-building energy efficiency codes and standards (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1) and performance-path compliance with those codes (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1 "Appendix G" Performance

  7. Absocold: Order (2010-CE-1212) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Emerging Technologies » Building Energy Modeling » About Building Energy Modeling About Building Energy Modeling Building energy modeling (BEM)-physics-based calculation of building energy consumption-is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency. Established use cases include design of new buildings and deep retrofits, development of whole-building energy-efficiency codes and standards (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1) and performance-path compliance with those codes (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1 "Appendix

  8. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes Building America-funded research by teams and national laboratories that resulted in the development of an ASHRAE standard and a standardized testing method for testing the air leakage of HVAC air handlers and furnace cabinets and has spurred equipment manufacturers to tighten the cabinets they use for residential HVAC systems.

  9. Technical Support Document for Version 3.4.0 of the COMcheck Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Rosemarie; Connell, Linda M.; Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Lucas, Robert G.; Richman, Eric E.; Schultz, Robert W.; Winiarski, David W.

    2007-09-14

    COMcheck provides an optional way to demonstrate compliance with commercial and high-rise residential building energy codes. Commercial buildings include all use groups except single family and multifamily not over three stories in height. COMcheck was originally based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989) requirements and is intended for use with various codes based on Standard 90.1, including the Codification of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (90.1-1989 Code) (ASHRAE 1989a, 1993b) and ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 (Standard 90.1-1999). This includes jurisdictions that have adopted the 90.1-1989 Code, Standard 90.1-1989, Standard 90.1-1999, or their own code based on one of these. We view Standard 90.1-1989 and the 90.1-1989 Code as having equivalent technical content and have used both as source documents in developing COMcheck. This technical support document (TSD) is designed to explain the technical basis for the COMcheck software as originally developed based on the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989). Documentation for other national model codes and standards and specific state energy codes supported in COMcheck has been added to this report as appendices. These appendices are intended to provide technical documentation for features specific to the supported codes and for any changes made for state-specific codes that differ from the standard features that support compliance with the national model codes and standards.

  10. Technical Support Document for Version 3.9.1 of the COMcheck Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Rosemarie; Connell, Linda M.; Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Lucas, Robert G.; Richman, Eric E.; Schultz, Robert W.; Winiarski, David W.

    2012-09-01

    COMcheck provides an optional way to demonstrate compliance with commercial and high-rise residential building energy codes. Commercial buildings include all use groups except single family and multifamily not over three stories in height. COMcheck was originally based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989) requirements and is intended for use with various codes based on Standard 90.1, including the Codification of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (90.1-1989 Code) (ASHRAE 1989a, 1993b) and ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 (Standard 90.1-1999). This includes jurisdictions that have adopted the 90.1-1989 Code, Standard 90.1-1989, Standard 90.1-1999, or their own code based on one of these. We view Standard 90.1-1989 and the 90.1-1989 Code as having equivalent technical content and have used both as source documents in developing COMcheck. This technical support document (TSD) is designed to explain the technical basis for the COMcheck software as originally developed based on the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989). Documentation for other national model codes and standards and specific state energy codes supported in COMcheck has been added to this report as appendices. These appendices are intended to provide technical documentation for features specific to the supported codes and for any changes made for state-specific codes that differ from the standard features that support compliance with the national model codes and standards. Beginning with COMcheck version 3.8.0, support for 90.1-1989, 90.1-1999, and the 1998 IECC and version 3.9.0 support for 2000 and 2001 IECC are no longer included, but those sections remain in this document for reference purposes.

  11. Technical Support Document for Version 3.9.0 of the COMcheck Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Rosemarie; Connell, Linda M.; Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Lucas, R. G.; Richman, Eric E.; Schultz, Ralph W.; Winiarski, David W.

    2011-09-01

    COMcheck provides an optional way to demonstrate compliance with commercial and high-rise residential building energy codes. Commercial buildings include all use groups except single family and multifamily not over three stories in height. COMcheck was originally based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989) requirements and is intended for use with various codes based on Standard 90.1, including the Codification of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (90.1-1989 Code) (ASHRAE 1989a, 1993b) and ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 (Standard 90.1-1999). This includes jurisdictions that have adopted the 90.1-1989 Code, Standard 90.1-1989, Standard 90.1-1999, or their own code based on one of these. We view Standard 90.1-1989 and the 90.1-1989 Code as having equivalent technical content and have used both as source documents in developing COMcheck. This technical support document (TSD) is designed to explain the technical basis for the COMcheck software as originally developed based on the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989). Documentation for other national model codes and standards and specific state energy codes supported in COMcheck has been added to this report as appendices. These appendices are intended to provide technical documentation for features specific to the supported codes and for any changes made for state-specific codes that differ from the standard features that support compliance with the national model codes and standards. Beginning with COMcheck version 3.8.0, support for 90.1-1989, 90.1-1999, and the 1998 IECC are no longer included, but those sections remain in this document for reference purposes.

  12. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California. Predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Mendell, Mark J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Dutton, Spencer M.; Berkeley, Pam M.; Spears, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Through mass-balance modeling of various ventilation scenarios that might satisfy the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure, we estimate indoor concentrations of contaminants of concern (COCs) in California big box stores, compare estimates to available thresholds, and for selected scenarios estimate differences in energy consumption. Findings are intended to inform decisions on adding performance-based approaches to ventilation rate (VR) standards for commercial buildings. Using multi-zone mass-balance models and available contaminant source rates, we estimated concentrations of 34 COCs for multiple ventilation scenarios: VRmin (0.04 cfm/ft2 ), VRmax (0.24 cfm/ft2 ), and VRmid (0.14 cfm/ft2 ). We compared COC concentrations with available health, olfactory, and irritant thresholds. We estimated building energy consumption at different VRs using a previously developed EnergyPlus model. VRmax did control all contaminants adequately, but VRmin did not, and VRmid did so only marginally. Air cleaning and local ventilation near strong sources both showed promise. Higher VRs increased indoor concentrations of outdoor air pollutants. Lowering VRs in big box stores in California from VRmax to VRmid would reduce total energy use by an estimated 6.6% and energy costs by 2.5%. Reducing the required VRs in Californias big box stores could reduce energy use and costs, but poses challenges for health and comfort of occupants. Source removal, air cleaning, and local ventilation may be needed at reduced VRs, and even at current recommended VRs. Also, alternative ventilation strategies taking climate and season into account in ventilation schedules may provide greater energy cost savings than constant ventilation rates, while improving IAQ.

  13. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  14. Critical Question #2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation Specific to Multifamily Buildings?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What is the best practice to address ASHRAE 62.2 Addendum J (multifamily)? Why is exhaust only (with supply in hallway) the current standard practice? Are there options to avoid air exchange with neighbors? How do stack and wind pressures affect ventilation performance in multifamily homes? What systems actually function as intended and can be implemented by builders and contractors?

  15. Cost-Effective Integration of Efficient Low-Lift Baseload Cooling Equipment: FY08 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Armstrong, P. R.; Wang, Weimin; Fernandez, Nicholas; Cho, Heejin; Goetzler, W.; Burgos, J.; Radhakrishnan, R.; Ahlfeldt, C.

    2010-01-31

    Documentation of a study to investigate one heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system option, low-lift cooling, which offers potentially exemplary HVAC energy performance relative to American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004.

  16. Target Pilots Energy Efficiency Measures for Broad Rollout in Existing Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Target Corporation partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce annual energy consumption by at least 30% versus requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  17. Kohl's Aims for Energy Savings in Warm-Humid Climates (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Kohl's Department Stores partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new stores that consume at least 50% less than the requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOE's Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical expertise on the project.

  18. Squeezing more light out of tighter energy codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2010-04-01

    This article discusses what builders and contractors should know about the various code requirements and their intent, exemptions, and allowances to streamline compliance. In order to cover most code applications, this article will focus on the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1 Standard and the IECC code.

  19. Kohls Furthers Efforts to Maximize Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Kohls Department Stores partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce annual energy consumption by at least 30% versus requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  20. Whole Foods Market Improves Energy Efficiency in New Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Whole Foods Market partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to reduce annual energy consumption in new stores by at least 50% versus requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  1. Development of Design Guidance for K-12 Schools from 30% to 50% Energy Savings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Long, N.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the development of energy efficiency recommendations for achieving 30% whole-building energy savings in K-12 schools over levels achieved by following the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1. These design recommendations look at building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems (including electrical lights and daylighting), HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, and service water heating.

  2. Target Improves Efficiency in New Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Target Corporation partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to reduce annual energy consumption in new stores by at least 50% versus requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  3. Development of Design Guidance for K-12 Schools: From 30% to 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Long, N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of energy efficiency recommendations for achieving 30% whole-building energy savings in K-12 Schools over levels achieved by following the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (1999 and 2004 versions). Exhaustive simulations were run to create packages of energy design solutions available over a wide range of K-12 schools and climates. These design recommendations look at building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems (including electrical lights and daylighting), HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, and service water heating. We document and discuss the energy modeling performed to demonstrate that the recommendations will result in at least 30% energy savings over ASHRAE 90.1-1999 and ASHRAE 90.1-2004. Recommendations are evaluated based on the availability of daylighting for the school and by the type of HVAC system. Compared to the ASHRAE 90.1-1999 baseline, the recommendations result in more than 30% savings in all climate zones for both daylit and nondaylit elementary, middle, and high schools with a range of HVAC system types. These recommendations have been included in the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings. Compared to the more stringent ASHRAE 90.1-2004 baseline, the recommendations result in more than 30% savings in all climate zones, for only the daylit elementary, middle, and high schools, with a range of HVAC system types. To inform the future development of recommendations for higher level of energy savings, we analyzed a subset of recommendations to understand which energy efficiency technologies would be needed to achieve 50% energy savings.

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Community...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To that end, IBACOS analyzed pre-retrofit daily utility data to sort homes by energy consumption, allowing for better targeting of homes for physical audits. Following ASHRAE ...

  5. Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 2010a). "Building Sciences: Rubble Foundations." ASHRAE Journal (vol. 52); pp. 72-78. Atlanta, GA: American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air- Conditioning Engineers, Inc. ...

  6. American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Condition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Condition Engineers (ASHRAE) 2016 Annual Conference American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Condition Engineers ...

  7. HVAC Loads in High-Performance Homes (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.; Fang, X.; Winkler, J.

    2010-06-27

    This presentation was delivered at the ASHRAE 2010 Annual Summer Conference on June 27, 2010, and addresses humidity and AC loads in energy efficient houses.

  8. Update and Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Rulemakings for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASHRAE 90.1 Equipment Presentation, dated June 26, 2011 | Department of Energy Update and Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Rulemakings for ASHRAE 90.1 Equipment Presentation, dated June 26, 2011 Update and Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Rulemakings for ASHRAE 90.1 Equipment Presentation, dated June 26, 2011 This document is the U.S. Department of Energys presentation titled Update and Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Rulemakings for ASHRAE 90.1

  9. Natural Ventilation in California Offices: Estimated Health Effects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: ASHRAE IAQ 2013: Environmental Health in Low Energy Buildings, Vancouver, British Colombia, October 15-18, 2013 Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence ...

  10. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Florida Water Star University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ... Ventilation: Meets ASHRAE 62.2; fresh air intake; controller operated damper and air ...

  11. Post Secondary Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post Secondary Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) continued > We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services ...

  12. Miniaturized Air to Refrigerant Heat Exchangers | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... References: Westphalen, D., Roth, K. W. and Brodrick, J. (2006) 'Heat transfer enhancement', ASHRAE Journal, 48(4), 68-71. Contacts DOE Technology Manager: Tony Bouza Performer: ...

  13. Boone County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Boone County, Missouri AFuels Technologies LLC Renewable Alternatives...

  14. Murray County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Murray County, Minnesota Avoca, Minnesota Chandler, Minnesota Currie, Minnesota Dovray, Minnesota...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Loans The process involves several steps. First, the customer should have an ASHRAE Level II energy assessment conducted and...

  16. Preliminary Determination Regarding Energy Efficiency Improvements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... First, the ASHRAE process, in which DOE participates, ... hydronic system differential pressure reset by valve ... Section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, "Regulatory Planning ...

  17. 2016 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2016 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Winter Conference 2016 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning...

  18. Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as an ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 7. Places in Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska King Salmon, Alaska Naknek, Alaska South Naknek, Alaska Retrieved from "http:...

  19. Rooftop Unit Campaign

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... was completed, including components for financing, M&V, and marketing * Key industry partners reviewed the plan, including CEE, RILA, ASHRAE, BOMA International and other key ...

  20. DOE-STD-6005-2001; Industrial Hygiene Practices

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, ASHRAE Handbook and Product Directory, volume on "Fundamentals." 5. INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE PRACTICES ...

  1. Warren County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Warren County, Missouri Foristell, Missouri Innsbrook, Missouri Marthasville, Missouri...

  2. Designing Auction-Based PV Incentives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    27, 2012. PDF icon utilitydesignsepamahrer.pdf More Documents & Publications ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges ...

  3. Creating a Public Web Database about High Performance (Green) Buildings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D. B.; Torcellini, P.; Malin, N.

    2003-06-01

    Preprint of conference paper about the DOEs High Performance Buildings Database to be presented at the ASHRAE Conference in Scotland in September 2003.

  4. EA-2001: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2001: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD39) Based upon the EA, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards for commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings to ASHRAE 90.1-2013 would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human

  5. Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

    2010-06-01

    The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

  6. Grand Valley State University Checks Out Energy Savings at New Mary Idema Pew Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    Grand Valley State University (GVSU) partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  7. New Cordierite Diesel Particulate Filters for Catalyzed and Non-Catalyzed

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The files on this page contain commercial reference building models for new construction, organized by building type and location. These U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reference buildings are complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis. You can also return to a summary of building types and climate zones and information about other building vintages. These files are updated regularly and comply with ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. For more information about standards, visit

  8. Increasing Property Value with Energy Saving Practices: Hines Retrofit Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-13

    Hines partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% versus requirements set by Standard 90.1-2004 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  9. Jcpenney Buying into Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    Jcpenney partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2004 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air- Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  10. Jcpenney is Sold on Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    Jcpenney partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% versus requirements set by Standard 90.1-2004 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  11. Higher Education Pushes for Energy Education: GVSU Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    Grand Valley State University (GVSU) partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP).

  12. Fort Bragg Embraces Groundbreaking Heat Pump Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Armys Fort Bragg partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  13. The Home Depot Upgrades its Corporate Building Prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    The Home Depot partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  14. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Medium Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Lane, Michael D.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2009-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Offices (AEDG-MO or the Guide), a design guidance document which intends to provide recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings in medium office buildings that just meet the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

  15. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Highway Lodging Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Wei; Gowri, Krishnan; Lane, Michael D.; Thornton, Brian A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2009-09-28

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process, methodology and assumptions for development of the 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Highway Lodging Buildings, a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings in highway lodging properties over the energy-efficiency levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

  16. Regency Centers Develops Leadership in Energy-Efficient Renovations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    Regency Centers (Regency) partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% versus requirements set by Standard 90.1-2004 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  17. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Liu, Bing

    2013-08-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to assess the relative energy and energy cost performance of commercial buildings designed to meet the requirements found in the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. As many states have historically adopted the IECC for both residential and commercial buildings, PNNL has evaluated the impacts of the commercial provisions of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC. PNNL also compared energy performance with corresponding editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  18. Achieving Energy Savings in Municipal Construction in Long Beach California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Long Beach Gas and Oil (LBGO), the public gas utility in Long Beach, California, partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build a new, low-energy modular office building that is at least 50% below requirements set by Energy Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of America (IESNA) as part of DOEs Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) program. The LBGO building, which demonstrates that modular construction can be very energy efficient, is expected to exceed the ASHRAE baseline by about 45%.

  19. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-04-30

    The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

  20. High-Efficiency Retrofit Lessons for Retail from a SuperTarget: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Deru, M.; Hirsch, A.; Williams, S.

    2013-02-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Target under the Commercial Building Program to design and implement a retrofit of a SuperTarget in Thornton, CO. The result was a retrofit design that predicted 37% energy savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 29% compared to existing (pre-retrofit) store consumption. The largest savings came from energy efficient lighting, energy efficient cooling systems, improved refrigeration, and better control of plug loads.

  1. Resources for Sustainable Federal Buildings and Campuses | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Facilities » Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Resources for Sustainable Federal Buildings and Campuses Resources for Sustainable Federal Buildings and Campuses Many helpful resources about sustainable federal buildings and campuses are available. Federal Programs Building Energy Codes Program: Website provides information about the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code and ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 for non-federal buildings. The Federal Energy Management Program

  2. 50% Advanced Energy Design Guides: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Liu, B.; Wang, W.; Thornton, B.; Williams, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the process, methodology, and assumptions for the development of the 50% Energy Savings Advanced Energy Design Guides (AEDGs), a design guidance document that provides specific recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings above the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 in four building types: (1) Small to medium office buildings, (2) K-12 school buildings, (3) Medium to big box retail buildings, (4) Large hospital buildings.

  3. EA-1880: Big Bend to Witten Transmission Line Project, South Dakota |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1871: Final Environmental Assessment Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of revising the Federal building energy efficiency standars to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and IECC 2009. PDF icon EA-1871-FEA-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications Environmental Assessment for Final Rule 10 CFR Parts 433

  4. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS performed field testing in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to evaluate heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. The team evaluated a market-available through-wall air transfer fan system that provides air to the bedrooms.The relative ability of this system was considered with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability.

  5. Development of High-Efficiency Low-Lift Vapor Compression System - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Armstrong, Peter; Wang, Weimin; Fernandez, Nicholas; Cho, Heejin; Goetzler, W.; Burgos, J.; Radhakrishnan, R.; Ahlfeldt, C.

    2010-03-31

    PNNL, with cofunding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Building Technologies Program, conducted a research and development activity targeted at addressing the energy efficiency goals targeted in the BPA roadmap. PNNL investigated an integrated heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system option referred to as the low-lift cooling system that potentially offers an increase in HVAC energy performance relative to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  6. ATOMISTIC MODELING OF ELECTRODE MATERIALS | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation | Department of Energy "Build tight, ventilate right" is a universal mantra of high performance home designers and scientists. Tight construction is one of the most important cornerstones of high-performance homes, but is only edited=BA_Top Innovations_ASHRAE 62 cover.jpg possible with ensured dilution of indoor contaminants. And, this ensured dilution is dependent on an effective base standard for whole-house and spot

  7. EERE's Building Technologies PowerPoint Presentation Template

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    08 1 Application of Building Energy Consumption Data in Low-Energy Building Research Drury B. Crawley U. S. Department of Energy April 2008 2 Key Areas of Interest * Energy Use Intensity * What is energy use per floor area? * Floor-area weighting * What is average square foot vs. average building? * End use * What equipment is using the energy? * Climate zone distributions * How are buildings distributed in climate zones per ASHRAE Standard 169-2006? April 2008 3 * Mechanical equipment detail *

  8. DOAS, Radiant Cooling Revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The article discusses dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) and radiant cooling technologies. Both of these topics were covered in previous ASHRAE Journal columns. This article reviews the technologies and their increasing acceptance. The two steps that ASHRAE is taking to disseminate DOAS information to the design community, available energy savings and the market potential of radiant cooling systems are addressed as well.

  9. Efficiency of a solar collector with internal boiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeper, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of a solar collector with a boiling fluid is analyzed to provide a simple algebraic model for future systems simulations, and to provide guidance for testing. The efficiency equation is developed in a form linear in the difference between inlet and saturation (boiling) temperatures, whereas the expression upon which ASHRAE Standard 109P is based utilizes the difference between inlet and ambient temperatures. The coefficient of the revised linear term is a weak function of collector parameters, weather, and subcooling of the working fluid. For a glazed flat-plate collector with metal absorber, the coefficient is effectively constant. Therefore, testing at multiple values of insolation and subcooling, as specified by ASHRAE 109P, should not be necessary for most collectors. The influences of collector properties and operating conditions on efficiency are examined.

  10. Real-time determination of lubricant concentrations dissolved in alternative refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavestri, R.C.; Schafer, W.R.

    1999-07-01

    A methodology was developed and used to measure both polyolester lubricant concentrations in solution with R-134a and R-407C and mineral oils in solution with R-123. This method is unaffected by changes in pressure, temperature, refrigerant type, and lubricant type. The concentration of dissolved lubricant was measured in three alternative refrigerants with two different synthetic polyolesters and two different mineral oils over a temperature range of 68 F (20 C) to 140 F (60 C) and a concentration range of 0 to 6% w/w. The evaluation methods included density, viscosity, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Measurements of viscosity and density were performed on an oscillating body viscometer. Lubricant concentrations determined by HPLC compared favorably with the ASHRAE Standard 41.1 method (ASHRAE 1984). Circulating lubricant, miscible and immiscible, concentration in identical R-407C operating systems was also measured to demonstrate the practical application of the test method.

  11. Reviewers required major changes, including rearranging the two articles, so the new title of the first paper is: HVAC and Refrigeration Experiments at Wal-Mart Experimental Supercenters in Texas and Colorado --- original title: ASHRAE Journal DRAFT article McKinney and Aurora Wal-Mart Stores, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, J Michael; Deru, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, Wal-Mart opened experimental stores in McKinney, Texas (hot climate), and Aurora, Colo. (cold climate). With these projects Wal-Mart can: * Learn how to achieve sustainability improvements; * Gain experience with the design, design process, and operations for some specific advanced technologies; * Understand energy use patterns in their stores more clearly; * Lay groundwork for better understanding of how to achieve major carbon footprint reductions; and * Measure the potential benefits of specific technologies tested.

  12. 100% DD Energy Model Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    The Miami Science Museum energy model has been used during DD to test the building’s potential for energy savings as measured by ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G. This standard compares the designed building’s yearly energy cost with that of a code-compliant building. The building is currently on track show 20% or better improvement over the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G baseline; this performance would ensure minimum compliance with both LEED 2.2 and current Florida Energy Code, which both reference a less strict version of ASHRAE 90.1. In addition to being an exercise in energy code compliance, the energy model has been used as a design tool to show the relative performance benefit of individual energy conservation measures (ECMs). These ECMs are areas where the design team has improved upon code-minimum design paths to improve the energy performance of the building. By adding ECMs one a time to a code-compliant baseline building, the current analysis identifies which ECMs are most effective in helping the building meet its energy performance goals.

  13. Technical Support Document for Version 3.6.1 of the COMcheck Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Rosemarie; Connell, Linda M.; Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Lucas, Robert G.; Richman, Eric E.; Schultz, Robert W.; Winiarski, David W.

    2009-09-29

    This technical support document (TSD) is designed to explain the technical basis for the COMcheck software as originally developed based on the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989). Documentation for other national model codes and standards and specific state energy codes supported in COMcheck has been added to this report as appendices. These appendices are intended to provide technical documentation for features specific to the supported codes and for any changes made for state-specific codes that differ from the standard features that support compliance with the national model codes and standards.

  14. NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update" (RIN 1904-AD39) (DOE/EA-2001) DOE's Golden Field Office has prepared the draft EA in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). DOE is proposing to adopt a final rule updating the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest current model industry standards (ASHRAE 90.1-2013), based on cost effectiveness

  15. Alternative Formats to Achieve More Efficient Energy Codes for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Halverson, Mark A.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Makela, Eric J.

    2013-01-26

    This paper identifies and examines several formats or structures that could be used to create the next generation of more efficient energy codes and standards for commercial buildings. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energys Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) to provide technical support to the development of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1. While the majority of PNNLs ASHRAE Standard 90.1 support focuses on developing and evaluating new requirements, a portion of its work involves consideration of the format of energy standards. In its current working plan, the ASHRAE 90.1 committee has approved an energy goal of 50% improvement in Standard 90.1-2013 relative to Standard 90.1-2004, and will likely be considering higher improvement targets for future versions of the standard. To cost-effectively achieve the 50% goal in manner that can gain stakeholder consensus, formats other than prescriptive must be considered. Alternative formats that include reducing the reliance on prescriptive requirements may make it easier to achieve these aggressive efficiency levels in new codes and standards. The focus on energy code and standard formats is meant to explore approaches to presenting the criteria that will foster compliance, enhance verification, and stimulate innovation while saving energy in buildings. New formats may also make it easier for building designers and owners to design and build the levels of efficiency called for in the new codes and standards. This paper examines a number of potential formats and structures, including prescriptive, performance-based (with sub-formats of performance equivalency and performance targets), capacity constraint-based, and outcome-based. The paper also discusses the pros and cons of each format from the viewpoint of code users and of code enforcers.

  16. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

    2007-03-06

    Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

  17. Crowne Plaza Renovation Retrofit Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) and its franchise partner B.F. Saul Company Hospitality Group (B.F. Saul Co.) partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% versus requirements set by Standard 90.1-2004 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  18. Whole Building Efficiency for Whole Foods: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.

    2013-02-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Whole Foods Market under the Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program to design and implement a new store in Raleigh, North Carolina. The result was a design with a predicted energy savings of 40% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 25% energy savings over their standard design. Measured performance of the as-built building showed that the building did not achieve the predicted performance. A detailed review of the project several months after opening revealed a series of several items in construction and controls items that were not implemented properly and were not fully corrected in the commissioning process.

  19. Expert Meeting: Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... ASHRAE Transactions (17, Dallas 2007). American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA. Shirey, D.B.; Henderson, H.I.; and Raustad, R. (2006). ...

  20. DOE-STD-1161-2003; Mechanical Systems Functional Area Qualification...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers 1791 Tullie Circle, NE Atlanta, GA 30329 http:www.ashrae.org DOE-STD-1161-2003 30 INTENTIONALLY BLANK ...

  1. Park County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Park County is a county in Montana. Its FIPS County Code is 067. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  2. Park County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Park County is a county in Wyoming. Its FIPS County Code is 029. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  3. Park County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Park County is a county in Colorado. Its FIPS County Code is 093. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  4. Logan County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Logan County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 091. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  5. Evans County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Evans County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 109. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  6. Johnson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Johnson County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 251. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  7. Johnson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Johnson County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 091. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  8. Advanced Rotating Heat Exchangers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D., Roth, K. W. and Brodrick,J. (2006) 'Heat transfer enhancement', ASHRAE Journal,48(4), 68-71.) Contacts DOE Technology Manager: Tony Bouza Performer: Ed Vineyard,...

  9. Adams County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Adams County is a county in Idaho. Its FIPS County Code is 003. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  10. Adams County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Adams County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 001. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  11. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... well as they would if the system designs were fully ... optimization, lubricant change, and flow control device ... Manufacturer ASHRAE safety class GWP AR4 a GWP AR5 a R-22 ...

  12. Mitchell County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Mitchell County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 335. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  13. Williams County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Williams County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 171. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  14. Scott County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Scott County is a county in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 143. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  15. Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that ...

  16. K…12 Schools Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K-12 Schools Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that ...

  17. Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that ...

  18. State/Local Government Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    StateLocal Government Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and ...

  19. DOE Meeting Memorandum: Ex Parte Communications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASHRAE profiled a recovered energy generation (REG) system on a 35,000 horsepower gas turbine and found that it improved the overall energy efficiency of the system by 28%, from ...

  20. White County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. White County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 311. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  1. White County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 181. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Utility Companies in White County, Indiana White County...

  2. Traill County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dakota. Its FIPS County Code is 097. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Traill County, North Dakota Buxton, North...

  3. Jefferson County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nebraska. Its FIPS County Code is 095. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Jefferson County, Nebraska Daykin, Nebraska...

  4. Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dakota. Its FIPS County Code is 035. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Grand Forks County, North...

  5. Reynolds County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Missouri. Its FIPS County Code is 179. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Reynolds County, Missouri Bunker, Missouri...

  6. Mercer County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Illinois. Its FIPS County Code is 131. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Mercer County, Illinois Aledo, Illinois Alexis,...

  7. Seneca County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Seneca County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 147. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  8. Webster County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Webster County is a county in Iowa. Its FIPS County Code is 187. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  9. Wells County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wells County is a county in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 179. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  10. Phillips County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Phillips County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 147. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  11. Anderson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Anderson County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 001. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  12. Miller County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Miller County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 201. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  13. Moore County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Moore County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 341. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  14. Wheeler County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wheeler County is a county in Oregon. Its FIPS County Code is 069. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  15. Wheeler County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wheeler County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 483. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  16. Fisher County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Fisher County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 151. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  17. Hill County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hill County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 217. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  18. Taylor County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor County is a county in Iowa. Its FIPS County Code is 173. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  19. Columbia County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Columbia County is a county in Arkansas. Its FIPS County Code is 027. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3...

  20. Taylor County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 269. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  1. Taylor County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor County is a county in Florida. Its FIPS County Code is 123. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  2. Beaufort County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Beaufort County is a county in North Carolina. Its FIPS County Code is 013. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  3. Avery County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Avery County is a county in North Carolina. Its FIPS County Code is 011. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  4. Bertie County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bertie County is a county in North Carolina. Its FIPS County Code is 015. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

  5. Potter County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Potter County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 375. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  6. Advanced Rotating Heat Exchangers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D., Roth, K. W. and Brodrick,J. (2006) 'Heat transfer enhancement', ASHRAE Journal,48(4), 68-71.) Contacts DOE Technology Manager: Tony Bouza Performer: Omar Abdelaziz, ...

  7. Gray County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gray County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 069. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  8. Gray County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gray County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 179. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  9. Brown County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Brown County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 015. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  10. Brown County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Brown County is a county in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 013. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  11. Brown County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Brown County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 013. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  12. Brown County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Brown County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 049. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  13. Hopkins County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hopkins County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 223. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  14. Jackson County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Jackson County is a county in Iowa. Its FIPS County Code is 097. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  15. Jackson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Jackson County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 085. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  16. Jackson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Jackson County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 239. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  17. Jackson County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Jackson County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 079. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  18. Edwards County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Edwards County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 137. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  19. Building America Update - April 5, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... water draw schedules (ASHRAE 90.1 and NRELBA). The most significant system change under the latest testing rotation comes from the evaluation of a new state-of-the-art electric ...

  20. Harrison County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Harrison County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 067. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  1. Harrison County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Harrison County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 203. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  2. Harrison County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Harrison County is a county in Iowa. Its FIPS County Code is 085. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  3. Sabine County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    help OpenEI by expanding it. Sabine County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 403. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A....

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 2014, Delaware updated its energy code to 2012 IECC with amendments for residential sector and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for the commercial sector. The Delaware specific amendments to...

  5. Brazos County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Brazos County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 041. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  6. Holmes County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Holmes County is a county in Florida. Its FIPS County Code is 059. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  7. Holmes County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Holmes County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 075. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  8. La Salle County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. La Salle County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 283. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  9. King County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. King County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 269. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  10. Marion County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Marion County is a county in Florida. Its FIPS County Code is 083. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  11. Marion County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Marion County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 101. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  12. Marion County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Marion County is a county in Iowa. Its FIPS County Code is 125. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  13. Marion County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Marion County is a county in Alabama. Its FIPS County Code is 093. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  14. Marion County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Marion County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 315. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  15. Midland County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Midland County, Michigan Dow Chemical Co Dow Kokam LXE Places in...

  16. Bay County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Bay County, Michigan Dow Chemical Co Dow Kokam Places in Bay County,...

  17. Grocery 2009 TSD Miami 50% Energy Savings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Savings Model Target Type ASHRAE 90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGrocery50percent.idf XML file...

  18. Grocery 2009 TSD Chicago 50% Energy Savings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Savings Model Target Type ASHRAE 90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsChicago2009TSDGrocery50percent.idf XML file...

  19. FY14 BEN FOA- ORNL - University - Industry Partnership to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    residential air conditioners in Phoenix, Arizona," ASHRAE Transactions, 103(1), 406-415, ... Variances: None Cost to Date: 730.9k Additional Funding: None Budget History October ...

  20. Critical Question #2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Question 2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation Specific to Multifamily Buildings? What is the best practice to address ASHRAE 62.2 Addendum J (multifamily)? Why ...

  1. Lee County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lee County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 177. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  2. Lee County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lee County is a county in Alabama. Its FIPS County Code is 081. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  3. Lee County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lee County is a county in Arkansas. Its FIPS County Code is 077. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  4. Lee County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lee County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 287. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  5. Lee County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lee County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 129. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  6. Grocery 2009 TSD Miami Baseline | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Model Name Grocery 2009 TSD Miami Baseline Building Type Food Sales Model Type Baseline Model Target Type ASHRAE 90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file...

  7. Grocery 2009 TSD Chicago Baseline | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Model Name Grocery 2009 TSD Chicago Baseline Building Type Food Sales Model Type Baseline Model Target Type ASHRAE 90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file...

  8. Green County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Green County, Wisconsin Badger State Ethanol LLC Places in Green...

  9. Smith County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Smith County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 183. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  10. Smith County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Smith County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 423. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  11. Perry County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Perry County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 127. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  12. Perry County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Perry County is a county in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 123. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  13. Ward County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ward County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 475. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  14. Carbon County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon County is a county in Utah. Its FIPS County Code is 007. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  15. Carbon County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon County is a county in Wyoming. Its FIPS County Code is 007. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  16. Butler County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Butler County is a county in Alabama. Its FIPS County Code is 013. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  17. Hall County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hall County is a county in Nebraska. Its FIPS County Code is 079. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  18. Building Materials Property Table

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  19. Henry County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Henry County is a county in Iowa. Its FIPS County Code is 087. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  20. Henry County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Henry County is a county in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 065. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  1. Henry County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Henry County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 151. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  2. Henry County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Henry County is a county in Alabama. Its FIPS County Code is 067. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  3. Henry County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Henry County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 069. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State Building Code Council revised the Washington State Energy Code (WESC) in February 2013, effective July 1, 2013. The WESC is a state-developed code based upon ASHRAE 90.1-2010 and the...

  5. Iron County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype B. Registered Energy Companies in Iron County, Utah Solar Unlimited USA Places in Iron County, Utah...

  6. Indian River County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Indian River County, Florida Climatic Solar Places in Indian River...

  7. Murray County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Murray County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 213. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  8. Tift County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Its FIPS County Code is 277. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Tift County, Georgia Biomass...

  9. Building Science: Getting Enclosures Right in Zero Energy Ready...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science ZERH Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com What is a Building? Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 A Building is an ...

  10. Floyd County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Floyd County is a county in Iowa. Its FIPS County Code is 067. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  11. Floyd County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Floyd County is a county in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 043. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  12. Floyd County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Floyd County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 115. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  13. Floyd County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Floyd County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 153. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  14. Columbia Water & Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The process involves several steps. First, the customer should have an ASHRAE Level II energy assessment conducted and complete a commercial loan application. Upon approval, the customer may proc...

  15. Montgomery County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Montgomery County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 113. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  16. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nEnergyPlus%2Bredirect%2B1 for discussion of simulation issues. 17 http:rredc.nrel.govsolarolddatansrdb1991-2005tmy3. 18 See ASHRAE Guideline 14-2015 and Section 4.2.2...

  17. Pike County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Georgia. Its FIPS County Code is 231. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  18. Pike County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 131. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  19. Pike County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Alabama. Its FIPS County Code is 109. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  20. Pike County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Missouri. Its FIPS County Code is 163. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  1. Pike County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Kentucky. Its FIPS County Code is 195. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  2. Pike County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Arkansas. Its FIPS County Code is 109. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  3. Pike County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pike County is a county in Indiana. Its FIPS County Code is 125. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  4. Dawson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Dawson County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 115. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  5. Dawson County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Dawson County is a county in Montana. Its FIPS County Code is 021. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  6. Wood County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wood County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 499. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  7. Edwards County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Edwards County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 047. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4...

  8. Lewis County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lewis County is a county in Idaho. Its FIPS County Code is 061. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  9. Lewis County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is 041. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype C. Utility Companies in Lewis County, Washington City of Centralia, Washington (Utility...

  10. Delaware County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a county in New York. Its FIPS County Code is 025. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Delaware County, New York...

  11. Issue #9: What are the Best Ventilation Techniques? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: What are the Best Ventilation Techniques? Issue #9: What are the Best Ventilation Techniques? How do we address ventilation in all climates? What is the best compromise between occupant health and safety and energy efficiency? PDF icon issue9_recommend_ashrae.pdf PDF icon issue9_ashrae622_vent.pdf More Documents & Publications Building Science - Ventilation Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements - Joe Lstiburek ZERH Webinar:

  12. Walmart - Saving Energy, Saving Money Through Comprehensive Retrofits, Commercial Building Energy Efficiency (Fact Sheet); Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    Walmart partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 2009 to develop and demonstrate energy retrofits for existing buildings. The goal was to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% versus ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, as part of DOE's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program. The project presented here, the retrofit of a 213,000 square foot store in Centennial, Colorado, withefficiency measures across multiple building systems, is part of Walmart's ongoing environmental sustainability program, which originated in 2005.

  13. Simplified Space Conditioning in Low-Load Homes: Results from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, New Construction Unoccupied Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poerschke, Andrew; Stecher, Dave

    2014-06-01

    Field testing was performed in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, PA. Four air-based heating, ventilation, and air conditioning distribution systemsa typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a system with transfer fans to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedroomswere evaluated during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. The relative ability of each system was assessed with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively.

  14. Simplified Space Conditioning in Low-Load Homes: Results from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, New Construction Unoccupied Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poerschke, A.; Stecher, D.

    2014-06-01

    Field testing was performed in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Four air-based heating, ventilation, and air conditioning distribution systems--a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a system with transfer fans to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms--were evaluated during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. The relative ability of each system was assessed with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively.

  15. Building America Case Study: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer Fans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    In this project, Building America team IBACOS performed field testing in a new construction unoccupied test house in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to evaluate heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. Four air-based HVAC distribution systems were assessed:-a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a system with transfer fans to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms. The relative ability of each system was considered with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively.

  16. Ammonia Sensor for SCR NOX Reduction | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (ASHRAE) 2016 Annual Conference | Department of Energy June 25, 2016 9:00AM EDT to June 29 (ASME/SRNL) Materials and Components for Hydrogen Infrastructure Codes and Standards Workshop and the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Summary | Department of Energy

    The Pipeline Working Group (PWG) workshop served as a detailed review of the progress and results of pipeline research and development projects sponsored by DOE PDF icon pipeline_group_summary_ms.pdf More Documents &

  17. New York State Code Adoption Analysis: Lighting Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2004-10-20

    The adoption of the IECC 2003 Energy code will include a set of Lighting Power Density (LPD) values that are effectively a subset of the values in Addendum g to the ASHRAE/IESNA/ANSI 90.1-2001 Standard which will soon be printed as part of the 90.1-2004 version. An analysis of the effectiveness of this adoption for New York State can be provided by a direct comparison of these values with existing LPD levels represented in the current IECC 2000 code, which are themselves a subset of the current ASHRAE/IESNA/ANSI 90.1-2001 Standard (without addenda). Because the complete ASHRAE 2001 and 2004 sets of LPDs are supported by a set of detailed models, they are best suited to provide the basis for an analysis comparison of the two code levels of lighting power density stringency. It is important to note that this kind of analysis is a point-to-point comparison where a fixed level of real world activity is assumed. It is understood that buildings are not built precisely to code levels and that actual percentage of compliance above and below codes will vary among individual buildings and building types. However, without specific knowledge of this real world activity for all buildings in existence and in the future (post-code adoption) it is not possible to analyze actual effects of code adoption. However, it is possible to compare code levels and determine the potential effect of changes from one code requirement level to another. This is the comparison and effectiveness assessment

  18. Screening Analysis for EPACT-Covered Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, Sriram; Armstrong, Peter R.; Belzer, David B.; Gaines, Suzanne C.; Hadley, Donald L.; Katipumula, S.; Smith, David L.; Winiarski, David W.

    2000-04-25

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) establishes that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulate efficiency levels of certain categories of commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equip-ment. EPACT establishes the initial minimum efficiency levels for products falling under these categories, based on ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 requirements. EPCA states that, if ASHRAE amends Standard 90.1-1989 efficiency levels, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in the amended Standard 90.1 and that it can establish higher efficiency levels if they would result in significant additional energy savings. Standard 90.1-1999 increases minimum efficiency levels for some of the equipment categories covered by EPCA 92. DOE conducted a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential for EPACT-covered products meet and exceeding these levels. This paper describes the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis.

  19. Find Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards Find Standards1354608000000Find StandardsIn IHS, please free up a standard for another person: downloadprint the PDF, then Log Out.NoQuestion? 667-5809library@lanl.go...

  20. Technical Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review for Technical Standards of Interest Legend: Red = Technical Standards Program Activities and Responsibilities Blue = Directives Program Activities and Responsibilities

  1. Technical Support Document: Strategies for 50% Energy Savings in Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Lobato, C.; Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2010-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) documents technical analysis that informs design guidance for designing and constructing large office buildings that achieve 50% net site energy savings over baseline buildings defined by minimal compliance with respect to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. This report also represents a step toward developing a methodology for using energy modeling in the design process to achieve aggressive energy savings targets. This report documents the modeling and analysis methods used to identify design recommendations for six climate zones that capture the range of U.S. climate variability; demonstrates how energy savings change between ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and Standard 90.1-2004 to determine baseline energy use; uses a four-story 'low-rise' prototype to analyze the effect of building aspect ratio on energy use intensity; explores comparisons between baseline and low-energy building energy use for alternate energy metrics (net source energy, energy emissions, and energy cost); and examines the extent to which glass curtain construction limits achieve energy savings by using a 12-story 'high-rise' prototype.

  2. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  3. BEPS redesign of 168 commercial buildings: summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoops, J.L.; Deringer, J.J.; Moreno, S.; Misuriello, H.P.

    1984-05-01

    The objective of this report is to present, in usable form, summary data from the Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS) Phase II commercial buildings energy research conducted in 1978-1979. Summary data presented were obtained from two major research efforts: the BEPS Phase II Redesign experiment; and the related research on ASHRAE Standard 90-75R. The bulk of this report consists of data tabulations of key energy parameters for the 168 sample buildings, which were tabulated from computer-stored files of the 1978-1979 data. Two kinds of tabulations are included: numerical tabulations that extracted information from the computer-stored data base for the 168 sample buildings; and graphic presentations of the computer-generated data, plus data extracted from other sources. The intent is to provide a single data compendium of key energy-related factors from the 1978 redesign experiment and the associated 1978-1979 ASHRAE Standard 90-75R research. This report also supplements the information for which there was not space in the magazine articles. Thus, for some building types, additional analysis, comments, and data tabulations are included that could not be included in the articles because space was limited. These additional analysis items are not consistent across building types because both the energy conservation opportunities and the design strategies applied by the building designers varied considerably by building type. The chapters have been entered individually into EDB and ERA.

  4. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  5. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The North Carolina Utilities Commission approved revised interconnection standards in May 2015. The new standards used the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's most recent Small Generator...

  6. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut's interconnection guidelines, like FERC's standards, include provisions for three levels of systems:

  7. Standards, Ethics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards, Ethics Ombuds Standards and Ethics We are committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the Laboratory. Contact Ombuds Office Appointments (505) 665-2837 Email Help Line (505) 667-9370 Fax (505) 667-3119 Map & Hours Standards & best practices Ombuds follows International Ombudsman Association Code of Ethics (pdf) International Ombudsman Association Standards of Practice (pdf) American Bar Association's Standards

  8. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginia's interconnection standards include two levels of review. The qualifications and application fees for each level are as follows:...

  9. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical screens have been established for each level, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 technical standard is used for all interconnections. Reasonable time frames ...

  10. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The interconnection standards approved by the PUC also updated Nevada's net-metering policy, originally enacted in 1997. Previously, Nevada Revised Statute 704.774 addressed basic interconnection...

  11. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In response to state legislation enacted in 2001, in September 2004 the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (MPUC) adopted an order establishing generic standards for utility tariffs for...

  12. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia has two interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems and one for systems that are not net-metered.

  13. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts' interconnection standards apply to all forms of distributed generation (DG), including renewables, and to all customers of the state's three investor-owned utilities (Unitil,...

  14. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: On March 2016, the NY Public Service Commission (PSC) modified the Standard Interconnection Requirements (SIR) increasing the maximum threshold for interconnection capacity of distributed...

  15. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  16. Dilution calculations for determining laboratory exhaust stack heights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliff, M.A.; Sandru, E.

    1999-07-01

    Laboratory exhaust stacks should be designed with sufficient height and exit momentum to avoid re-entry of exhaust and possible air quality problems, and the design should be evaluated before construction. One evaluation method is presented in this paper that combines dilution prediction equations from the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (1997) and a dilution criteria of Halitsky (1988). This method is less conservative than a geometric method in the ASHRAE Handbook and is less costly than wind-tunnel modeling. The method should only be applied to relatively simple building geometries with no larger buildings adjacent to them. A planned change to the ASHRAE equations, which would result in larger stacks being necessary, is discussed. Further investigation of this change is recommended using comparisons to wind tunnel data.

  17. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PUC standards generally apply to investor-owned utilities (IOUs) with 40,000 or more customers and all electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities with 5,000 customers or more are required to ...

  18. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The revised standards provide for three separate levels of interconnection based on system capacity and other requirements. The first level, Tier 1 systems, applies generally to systems up to 25...

  19. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  20. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah’s interconnection rules are based on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) interconnection standards for small generators, adopted in May 2005 by FERC Order 2006. Utah's rules fo...

  1. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PSC has published two sets of standard forms for interconnection, available on the program web site. One set pertains to systems smaller than 20 kW while the second set applies to larger syst...

  2. Simplified air change effectiveness modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rock, B.A.; Anderson, R.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes recent progress in developing practical air change effectiveness modeling techniques for the design and analysis of air diffusion in occupied rooms. The ultimate goal of this continuing work is to develop a simple and reliable method for determining heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system compliance with ventilation standards. In the current work, simplified two-region models of rooms are used with six occupancy patterns to find the air change effectiveness. A new measure, the apparent ACH effectiveness, yields the relative ventilation performance of an air diffusion system. This measure can be used for the prediction or evaluation of outside air delivery to the occupants. The required outside air can be greater or less than that specified by ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62-89.

  3. Influence of architectural screens on rooftop concentrations due to effluent from short stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, R.L.; Carter, J.J.; Ratcliff, M.A.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the wind tunnel study conducted on behalf of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) to evaluate and quantify the effect of architectural screens on rooftop concentration levels due to effluent from short stacks. An equivalent stack height (ESH) concept is introduced, which is used to develop a stack height reduction (SHR) factor that may be used in conjunction with existing stack design procedures found in the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals to account for the presence of architectural screens.

  4. Sobeys, Centre de distribution de Trois Rivieres

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Trois Rivieres, QC The warehouse consists of three distinct sections for an overall area of 147,000 square feet. The main section is the refrigerated warehouse with 120,000 square feet. The second section is the office space with 5,300 square feet. The last 20,700 square feet section includes common spaces such as the cafeteria, multiuse space, locker room, workshop and mechanical room. [Source: Roy, Martin. "ASHRAE's Best technology Award Case Studies: Green Warehouse" ASHRAE Journal (March 2010)

  5. Screening analysis for EPACT-covered commercial HVAC and water-heating equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Somasundaram; PR Armstrong; DB Belzer; SC Gaines; DL Hadley; S Katipumula; DL Smith; DW Winiarski

    2000-05-25

    EPCA requirements state that if the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) amends efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90.1-1989, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in amended Standard 90.1. However, DOE can establish higher efficiency levels if it can show through clear and convincing evidence that a higher efficiency level, that is technologically feasible and economically justified, would produce significant additional energy savings. On October 29, 1999, ASHRAE approved the amended Standard 90.1, which increases the minimum efficiency levels for some of the commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment covered by EPCA 92. DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential of the efficiency levels listed in Standard 90.1-1999. The analysis estimates the annual national energy consumption and the potential for energy savings that would result if the EPACT-covered products were required to meet these efficiency levels. The analysis also estimates additional energy-savings potential for the EPACT-covered products if they were to exceed the efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90-1-1999. In addition, a simple life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was performed for some alternative efficiency levels. This paper will describe the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis. The magnitude of HVAC and SWH loads imposed on equipment depends on the building's physical and operational characteristics and prevailing climatic conditions. To address this variation in energy use, coil loads for 7 representative building types at 11 climate locations were estimated based on a whole-building simulation.

  6. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-LH) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-LH is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in large hospitals over levels achieved by following Standard 90.1-2004. The AEDG-LH was created for a 'standard' mid- to large-size hospital, typically at least 100,000 ft2, but the strategies apply to all sizes and classifications of new construction hospital buildings. Its primary focus is new construction, but recommendations may be applicable to facilities undergoing total renovation, and in part to many other hospital renovation, addition, remodeling, and modernization projects (including changes to one or more systems in existing buildings).

  7. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  8. Methodology for Evaluating Cost-effectiveness of Commercial Energy Code Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-01-31

    This document lays out the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) method for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of energy code proposals and editions. The evaluation is applied to provisions or editions of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The method follows standard life-cycle cost (LCC) economic analysis procedures. Cost-effectiveness evaluation requires three steps: 1) evaluating the energy and energy cost savings of code changes, 2) evaluating the incremental and replacement costs related to the changes, and 3) determining the cost-effectiveness of energy code changes based on those costs and savings over time.

  9. Mechanical ventilation in HUD-code manufactured housing in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubliner, M.; Stevens, D.T.; Davis, B.

    1997-12-31

    Electric utilities in the Pacific Northwest have spent more than $100 million to support energy-efficiency improvements in the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) code manufactured housing industry in the Pacific Northwest over the past several years. More than 65,000 manufactured housing units have been built since 1991 that exceed the new HUD standards for both thermal performance and mechanical ventilation that became effective in October 1994. All of these units included mechanical ventilation systems that were designed to meet or exceed the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62-1989. This paper addresses the ventilation solutions that were developed and compares the comfort and energy considerations of the various strategies that have evolved in the Pacific Northwest and nationally. The use and location of a variety of outside air inlets will be addressed, as will the acceptance by the occupants of the ventilation strategy.

  10. Technical Standards Style Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Style Guide for the Preparation of DOE Technical Standards (Standards, Handbooks, and Technical Standards Lists) May 13, 2015

  11. Documenting the Effectiveness of Cosorption of Airborne Contaminants by a Field-Installed Active Desiccant System: Final Report - Phase 2D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J

    2003-01-23

    The final report for Phase 1 of this research effort (ORNL/SUB/94-SV004/1) concluded that a significant market opportunity would exist for active desiccant systems if it could be demonstrated that they can remove a significant proportion of common airborne contaminants while simultaneously performing the primary function of dehumidifying a stream of outdoor air or recirculated building air. If the engineering community begins to follow the intent of ASHRAE Standard 62, now part of all major building codes, the outdoor air in many major cities may need to be pre-cleaned before it is introduced into occupied spaces. Common air contaminant cosorption capability would provide a solution to three important aspects of the ASHRAE 62-89 standard that have yet to be effectively addressed by heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment manufacturers: (1) The ASHRAE standard defines acceptable outdoor air quality. If the outdoor air contains unacceptable levels of certain common outdoor air contaminants (e.g., sulfur dioxide, ozone), then the standard requires that these contaminants be removed from the outdoor air stream to reach compliance with the acceptable outdoor air quality guidelines. (2) Some engineers prefer to apply a filtration or prescriptive approach rather than a ventilation approach to solving indoor air quality problems. The ASHRAE standard recognizes this approach provided that the filtration technology exists to remove the gaseous contaminants encountered. The performance of current gaseous filtration technologies is not well documented, and they can be costly to maintain because the life of the filter is limited and the cost is high. Moreover, it is not easy to determine when the filters need changing. In such applications, an additional advantage provided by the active desiccant system would be that the same piece of equipment could control space humidity and provide filtration, even during unoccupied periods, if the active desiccant system were operated in a recirculation mode. (3) Almost all major medical, university, and research facilities face the dilemma that the air exhausted from a building exits near the intake of another building. As a result, contaminants exhausted outdoors are pulled back into the same or an adjacent building. The removal of contaminants from outdoor air that an active desiccant system offers would be attractive to applications in such cases. The primary objective of this research project was to quantify the ability of the SEMCO composite desiccant dehumidification wheel to purify outdoor and recirculated air streams by removing gaseous contaminants commonly encountered in actual applications. This contaminant removal is provided simultaneously with dehumidification (removing the latent load) of these air streams at conditions encountered in HVAC applications. This research builds upon initial seed work completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) during 1993 (Bayer and Downing 1993).

  12. Improving Gas Furnace Performance: A Field and Laboratory Study at End of Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.; Yee, S.; Baker, J.

    2015-02-01

    In 2010, natural gas provided 54% of total residential space heating energy the U.S. on a source basis, or 3.5 Quadrillion Btu. Natural gas burned in furnaces accounted for 92% of that total, and boilers and other equipment made up the remainder. A better understanding of installed furnace performance is a key to energy savings for this significant energy usage. Natural gas furnace performance can be measured in many ways. The annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) rating provides a fixed value under specified conditions, akin to the EPA miles per gallon rating for new vehicles. The AFUE rating is provided by the manufacturer to the consumer and is a way to choose between models tested on the same basis. This value is commonly used in energy modeling calculations. ASHRAE 103 is a consensus furnace testing standard developed by the engineering community. The procedure provided in the standard covers heat-up, cool down, condensate heat loss, and steady-state conditions and an imposed oversize factor. The procedure can be used to evaluate furnace performance with specified conditions or with some variation chosen by the tester. In this report the ASHRAE 103 test result will be referred to as Annualized Efficiency (AE) to avoid confusion, and any non-standard test conditions will be noted. Aside from these two laboratory tests, steady state or flue loss efficiency can be measured in the field under many conditions; typically as found or tuned to the manufacturers recommended settings. In this report, AE and steady-state efficiency will be used as measures of furnace performance.

  13. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2009-06-30

    The objectives of this scoping study were to develop and test control software and wireless hardware that could enable closed-loop, zone-temperature-based demand response in buildings that have either pneumatic controls or legacy digital controls that cannot be used as part of a demand response automation system. We designed a SOAP client that is compatible with the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) being used by the IOUs in California for their CPP program, design the DR control software, investigated the use of cellular routers for connecting to the DRAS, and tested the wireless DR system with an emulator running a calibrated model of a working building. The results show that the wireless DR system can shed approximately 1.5 Watts per design CFM on the design day in a hot, inland climate in California while keeping temperatures within the limits of ASHRAE Standard 55: Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy.

  14. Simplified Space Conditioning in Low-Load Homes: Results from the Fresno, California, Retrofit Unoccupied Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, Dave; Poerschke, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the Building America team, IBACOS, sought to determine cost-effective, energy-efficient solutions for heating and cooling houses. To this end, the team performed field testing in a retrofit unoccupied test house in Fresno, California, to evaluate three air-based heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. These included a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms. The relative ability of each of the three systems was assessed with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics modeling also was performed and refined based on comparison to field test results to determine the air flow rate into the bedrooms of over-door and bottom-of-door air transfer grilles.

  15. Simplified Space Conditioning in Low-Load Homes: Results from the Fresno, California, Retrofit Unoccupied Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Poerschke, A.

    2014-02-01

    Field testing was performed in a retrofit unoccupied test house in Fresno, California. Three air-based heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems -- a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms -- were evaluated during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. The relative ability of each of the three systems was assessed with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling also was performed and refined based on comparison to field test results to determine the air flow rate into the bedrooms of over-door and bottom-of-door air transfer grilles.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the 2009 and 2012 IECC Residential Provisions – Technical Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Lucas, Robert G.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-12-04

    This analysis was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP). DOE supports the development and adoption of efficient residential and commercial building energy codes. These codes set the minimum requirements for energy efficient building design and construction and ensure energy savings on a national level. This analysis focuses on one and two family dwellings, townhomes, and low-rise multifamily residential buildings. For these buildings, the basis of the energy codes is the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). This report does not address commercial and high-rise residential buildings, which reference ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1.

  17. Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    Field testing was performed in a retrofit unoccupied test house in Fresno, California. Three air-based heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) distribution systems - a typical airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, a low airflow ducted system to the bedrooms, and a system with no ductwork to the bedrooms - were evaluated during heating, cooling, and midseason conditions. The relative ability of each of the three systems was assessed with respect to relevant Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) and ASHRAE standards for house temperature uniformity and stability, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling also was performed and refined based on comparison to field test results to determine the air flow rate into the bedrooms of over-door and bottom-of-door air transfer grilles.

  18. Building America Case Study: Community-Scale Energy Modeling (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS analyzed pre-retrofit daily utility data to sort homes by energy consumption, allowing for better targeting of homes for physical audits. Following ASHRAE Guideline 14 normalization procedures, electricity consumption of 1,166 all electric production-built homes' was modeled. The homes were in two communities--one built in the 1970s and the other in the mid-2000s.

  19. Analysis of Pre-Retrofit Building and Utility Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Beach, R.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS analyzed pre-retrofit daily utility data to sort homes by energy consumption, allowing for better targeting of homes for physical audits. Following ASHRAE Guideline 14 normalization procedures, electricity consumption of 1,166 all electric production-built homes' was modeled. The homes were in two communities -- one built in the 1970s and the other in the mid-2000s.

  20. Centrifugal Compressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-02-06

    The article discusses small high speed centrifugal compressors. This topic was covered in a previous ASHRAE Journal column (2003). This article reviews another configuration which has become an established product. The operation, energy savings and market potential of this offering are addressed as well.

  1. Test Procedures for Building Energy Simulation Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Procedures for Building Energy Simulation Tools Test Procedures for Building Energy Simulation Tools Lead Performer: -- National Renewable Energy Laboratory - Golden, CO -- J. Neymark & Associates - Golden, CO -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) - Berkeley, CA Partners: -- ASHRAE Standing Special Projects Committee 140 -- Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) -- International Energy Agency (IEA) - Paris, France -- Trane Inc. - Piscataway, NJ -- Carrier Corp. -

  2. Analysis of Pre-Retrofit Building and Utility Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Beach, R.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS analyzed pre-retrofit daily utility data to sort homes by energy consumption, allowing for better targeting of homes for physical audits. Following ASHRAE Guideline 14 normalization procedures, electricity consumption of 1,166 all electric production-built homes was modeled. The homes were in two communities—one built in the 1970s and the other in the mid-2000s.

  3. Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  4. PNC Financial Services - Net-Zero Energy Bank Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    PNC has opened a zero-energy building that is 57% more efficient than ASHRAE 90.1-2004. Exterior features include shading to control glare from sunlight and photovoltaic solar panels to produce as much electricity as the building consumes annually.

  5. Designing Forced-Air HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-31

    This guide explains proper calculation of heating and cooling design loads for homes.used to calculated for the home using the protocols set forth in the latest edition of the Air Conditioning Contractors of America’s (ACCA) Manual J (currently the 8th edition), ASHRAE 2009 Handbook of Fundamentals, or an equivalent computation procedure.

  6. Current methods to handle wall conduction and room internal heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, M.G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper reviews methods of handling wall conduction and room internal heat exchange adopted by ASHRAE (1993 Handbook of Fundamentals and later developments), CIBSE (1986 Guide and current proposals), and the CEN/TC89/WG6 proposals to calculate heating and cooling loads and related topics.

  7. The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD The broader goal of the RPS is to achieve various benefits associated with renewable energy. These benefits relate to the environment, resource diversity, technology advancement, and in-state economic development. PDF icon THE THE RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD More Documents & Publications Reference Manual and

  8. Chemical Processing Qualification Standard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6-2010 February 2010 DOE STANDARD CHEMICAL PROCESSING QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense ... River Operations Office is the sponsor for the Chemical Processing Qualification Standard. ...

  9. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

  10. ASEAM2.1. Simplified Building Energy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firevoid, J.A.; Willman, A.J.

    1987-10-01

    ASEAM2.1 is a modified bin temperature program for calculating the energy consumption of residential and simple commercial buildings. It can be used to evaluate the individual or combined effects of various energy design strategies. Algorithms include heating and cooling load calculations based on a methodology documented by the ASHRAE Technical Committee on Energy Calculation (TC4.7) and HVAC system and plant calculation routines with options to size heating and cooling equipment and air flows. HVAC systems are configured by selecting among the various available system types, control options, heating plants, and cooling plants. ASEAM2.1 primarily employs ASHRAE (WYEC) bin weather data; however, it is capable of alternatively using the DOD (AF88) or Battelle (TRY) bin weather data. The user can also supply as input bin weather data from other sources, if desired. Basic system types included are: a double duct or multizone unit, a terminal reheat unit, a variable air volume (VAV) system, a ceiling bypass VAV system, a variable temperature single zone system, a 2 pipe or 4 pipe fan coil system, a water/air heat pump system, and a packaged terminal air conditioner unit. In addition, ASEAM2.1 contains: baseboard heaters, a furnace system, unitary heater, and a heating and ventilation unit. Available cooling plant types are: direct expansion, centrifugal chiller, absorption chiller, district chilled water, double bundle chiller, cooling tower and reciprocating chiller. Five heating plant types are available: electric resistance, hot water or steam boiler, district steam or hot water from a central plant system, forced hot air furnace, and an air to air heat pump or double bundle chiller. Two life cycle cost programs, FBLCC and NBSLCC, developed by the National Bureau of Standards, are integrated into ASEAM2.1.

  11. February 2007 Standards Actions

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 01-26-2007 Activity

  12. August 2006 Standards Actions

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 07-26-2006 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In

  13. Regional Standards Enforcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central air conditioners are now subject to a base national standard in the North and different, regional standards in the Southeast and Southwest. This page provides information about those standards and how DOE enforces them.

  14. Energy Efficiency Product Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, which were preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. Future standards, if...

  15. IHS Standards Expert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards » IHS IHS Standards Expert 1354608000000 IHS Standards Expert LANL researchers can access IHS Standards from offsite via Remote Access. / / No / Question? 667-5809 library@lanl.gov IHS Standards Expert LANL researchers can access IHS Standards from offsite via Remote Access. Login For each collection (society), one person may access pdfs at a time, per the Library's subscription license. Please free up the collection for another user when finished: download or print your pdf, then Log

  16. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington voters passed Initiative 937 in 2006, creating a renewable energy standard and an energy efficiency resource standard for the state's electric utilities. Initiative 937, enacted as th...

  17. Materials, Reliability, & Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials, Reliability, & Standards - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Materials, Reliability, & Standards Home...

  18. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of a proposed determination for computer servers standards o Notice of proposed ... the initial report, DOE documented the history of the Appliance Standards Program, which ...

  19. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23

    The Order promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. Admin Chg 1 dated 3-12-13.

  20. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-19

    The Technical Standards Program (TSP) promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards by the Department of Energy (DOE), provides DOE with the means to develop needed technical standards, and manages overall technical standards information, activities, issues, and interactions. Cancels DOE O 1300.2A. Canceled by DOE O 252.1A

  1. NETL Focused Standards List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1/6/14 Contact: Janet Lambert Reviewed: 3/5/14 Page 1 of 17 The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Focused Standards List is primarily derived from standard references contained in the requirements section of NETL's environment, safety, security, and health (ESS&H) and cyber security directives. All standards shall reference the most current edition/version of that standard. 1. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) AND OTHER GOVERNMENT STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENTS a. DOE Directives The

  2. USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ...

  3. Federal Appliance Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: HR 6582 of 2012 made some modifications to the efficiency standards previously adopted for some appliance types. The bill did not adopt new standards for previously unregulated appliances,...

  4. Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2004 the Energy Efficiency Standards Act (EESA of 2004) became law in the State of Maryland. The General Assembly passed the EESA to establish minimum energy efficiency standards on nine...

  5. Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 2015, the NY PSC issued an order extending the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) and Customer-Sited Tier (CST) of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) till Feb 29, 2016...

  6. Standards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards Standards FOREWARD This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) standard supersedes DOE-STD-3020-97 and is approved for use by DOE and its contractors. This standard was developed primarily for application in DOE programs. It provides guidance to DOE contractors for procurement and required testing of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters used in DOE nuclear facilities. Required testing is performed by the filter manufacturer and by DOE at a designated Filter Test Facility (FTF). This

  7. NETL Focused Standards List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4/4/12 Contact: Janet Lambert Reviewed: 4/4/12 Page 1 of 17 This Focused Standards List has been primarily derived from selected standard references contained in NETL issued directives. All standards shall reference the most current edition/ version of that standard. DOE and other Government Standards and Requirements DOE DIRECTIVES Note: The following DOE directives can be found at http://www.directives.doe.gov: DOE Policy 141.1, DOE Management of Cultural Resources DOE Order 142.1, Classified

  8. NETL Focused Standards List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/12 Contact: Janet Lambert Reviewed: 10/4/12 Page 1 of 17 This Focused Standards List has been primarily derived from selected standard references contained in NETL issued directives. All standards shall reference the most current edition/ version of that standard. DOE and other Government Standards and Requirements DOE DIRECTIVES Note: The following DOE directives can be found at http://www.directives.doe.gov: DOE Policy 141.1, DOE Management of Cultural Resources DOE Order 142.1, Classified

  9. Title Standards 2001

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards 2001 A guide for the preparation of title evidence in land acquisitions by the United States of America. Quick links to Contents: Table of Contents / Why Title Standards 2001, and who uses it? / Evidence of title / Abstract of Title Supplemental and Supporting Title Evidence / Title Insurance Policies and Certificates of Title / Final Title Evidence Title Evidence for Condemnations / The Deed to the United States / Special Standards for Texas / Sample Forms U.S. Department of Justice

  10. SSL Standards and Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet that reviews the key performance and safety standards applicable to SSL-based lighting products.

  11. NETL Focused Standards List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Facilities 40 CFR 270, Hazardous Waste Permit Program 40 CFR 279, Standards for the ... and Contract Clauses 49 CFR 105-177, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety ...

  12. The Standard Model

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12

    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the Standard Model of particle physics, covering both the particles that make up the subatomic realm and the forces that govern them.

  13. Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Maryland's Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard, enacted in May 2004 and revised numerous times since, requires electricity suppliers (all utilities and competitive retail suppliers) to use renewa...

  14. Puerto Rico- Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customer-generators seeking to interconnect first submit a standardized "Evaluation Request" to PREPA to determine whether or not the system will qualify for the "Simple Interconnection Process...

  15. Renewable Energy Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: H.B. 40, enacted in June 2015, created Vermont's Renewable Energy Standard and repeals the Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development program's renewable energy goals. The Renewable...

  16. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts' 1997 electric-utility restructuring legislation created the framework for a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). In April 2002, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER)...

  17. Renewable Energy Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, Minnesota legislation modified the state's 2001 voluntary renewable energy objective to create a mandatory renewable portfolio standard (RPS). Public utilities (i.e., investor-owned...

  18. Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NOTE: On February 2016, the PA Public Service Commission (PUC) issued a final rulemaking order amending and clarifying several provisions of PA Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), net...

  19. TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure describes the responsibilities of persons who are charged with implementing the DOE Technical Standards Program. 

  20. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23

    The order establishes the DOE Technical Standards Program. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-13 supersedes DOE O 252.1A.

  1. TECHNICAL STANDARDS COMMENT RESOLUTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure provides guidance for resolving comments on DOE Technical Standards that are received during the coordination process. 

  2. Standard Subject Classification System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1979-08-14

    The order establishes the DOE Standard Subject Classification System for classifying documents and records by subject, including correspondence, directives, and forms.Cancels DOE O 0000.1.

  3. National Emission Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999 June 2000 June 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office ...

  4. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  5. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the 2015 IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Xie, YuLong; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhuge, Jing Wei; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-09-01

    As required by statute (42 USC 6833), DOE recently issued a determination that ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code compared to the 2010 edition of the standard. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2013 in support of its determination . While Standard 90.1 is the model energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors (42 USC 6833), many states have historically adopted the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial buildings. This report provides an assessment as to whether buildings constructed to the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the 2015 IECC would save energy and energy costs as compared to the 2012 IECC. PNNL also compared the energy performance of the 2015 IECC with the corresponding Standard 90.1-2013. The goal of this analysis is to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  6. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the 2015 IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Xie, YuLong; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhuge, Jing Wei; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-06-01

    As required by statute (42 USC 6833), DOE recently issued a determination that ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code compared to the 2010 edition of the standard. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2013 in support of its determination . While Standard 90.1 is the model energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors (42 USC 6833), many states have historically adopted the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial buildings. This report provides an assessment as to whether buildings constructed to the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the 2015 IECC would save energy and energy costs as compared to the 2012 IECC. PNNL also compared the energy performance of the 2015 IECC with the corresponding Standard 90.1-2013. The goal of this analysis is to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  7. Standard Agent Framework 1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4)more » Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.« less

  8. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Standards Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards Development NREL's Photovoltaic (PV) Engineering group supports the development of national and international standards for PV engineering. Current standards lack...

  9. Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    February 2, 2002 | Department of Energy DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 February 2, 2002 DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk table PDF icon Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable

  10. USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS | Department of Energy USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS Purpose This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs). PDF icon Use of Voluntary

  11. Psychrometric Bin Analysis for Alternative Cooling Strategies in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; VanGeet, O.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Dean, J.; Kurnik, C.

    2011-01-01

    Data centers are significant energy users and require continuous cooling to maintain high levels of computing performance. The majority of data centers have direct-expansion cooling which typically accounts for approximately 50% of the energy usage of data centers. However, using typical meteorological year 3 (TMY3) weather data and a simple psychometric bin analysis, alternative cooling strategies using a combination of economizer, evaporative, and supplemental DX cooling have been shown to be applicable in all climate zones in the United States. Average data center cooling energy savings across the U.S. was approximately 80%. Analysis of cooling energy savings is presented for various ASHRAE climate zones. The psychometric bin analysis is conducted for the ASHRAE recommended and allowable operating environment zones, as well as, a modified allowable operating environment. Control strategies are discussed. Finally, examples of energy efficient data centers using alternative cooling strategies are presented.

  12. Achieving 50% Energy Savings in Office Buildings, Advanced Energy Design Guides: Office Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This fact sheet summarizes recommendations for designing new office buildings that result in 50% less energy use than conventional designs meeting minimum code requirements. The recommendations are drawn from the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings, an ASHRAE publication that provides comprehensive recommendations for designing low-energy-use office buildings with gross floor areas up to 100,000 ft2 (see sidebar). Designed as a stand-alone document, this fact sheet provides key principles and a set of prescriptive design recommendations appropriate for smaller office buildings with insufficient budgets to fully implement best practices for integrated design and optimized performance. The recommendations have undergone a thorough analysis and review process through ASHRAE, and have been deemed the best combination of measures to achieve 50% savings in the greatest number of office buildings.

  13. Performance investigation of finned tube condensers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, G.D.

    1996-12-31

    A computer program has been developed to optimize the performance of finned tube condensers. The developed program is used to predict the thermal and hydrodynamic performance of finned tube condensers. The model is based on a steady-state finite difference model. The correlations for predicting the heat transfer and pressure drop are used from the literature. In this paper, the performance of a condenser of a 2-1/2 ton residential air conditioning system (split type) is optimized. The working fluid used in this investigation is R-22. ASHRAE`s condition A [Outside 95 F DBT/75 F WBT; Inside 80 F/67 F WBT] is used in this investigation. The predicted performance of the condenser is within {+-}5% of the experimental data.

  14. Achieving 50% Energy Savings in New Schools, Advanced Energy Design Guides: K-12 Schools (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This fact sheet summarizes recommendations for designing elementary, middle, and high school buildings that will result in 50% less energy use than conventional new schools built to minimum code requirements. The recommendations are drawn from the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings, an ASHRAE publication that provides comprehensive recommendations for designing low-energy-use school buildings (see sidebar). Designed as a stand-alone document, this fact sheet provides key principles and a set of prescriptive design recommendations appropriate for smaller schools with insufficient budgets to fully implement best practices for integrated design and optimized performance. The recommendations have undergone a thorough analysis and review process through ASHRAE, and have been deemed the best combination of measures to achieve 50% savings in the greatest number of schools.

  15. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony; Hollen, Robert M.; Erkkila, Tracy H.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.; Roybal, Jeffrey E.; Clark, Michael Leon

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  16. Clear Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standards Place: Sterling, Virginia Product: Clear Standards provides enterprise software solutions to help global organizations accurately measure, mitigate, and monetize...

  17. Renewables Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) was first adopted in 1999 and has been updated several times. The total RPS requirement in New Jersey including solar carve out is 24.39% by EY 2028....

  18. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2005, the District of Columbia Council enacted a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In October 2008 the RPS was amended by...

  19. Standard Subject Classification System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1978-07-19

    The order establishes the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard Subject Classification System for classifying documents and records by subject, including correspondence, directives, and forms. Canceled by DOE O 0000.1A.

  20. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008, New Mexico enacted H.B. 305, the Efficient Use of Energy Act, which created an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS) for New Mexico’s electric utilities, and a requirement that all ...