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1

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by the Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines at Grand Coulee Dam. BPA will replace the existing underground transmission...

3

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Grand Coulee-Creston_FONSI_and_MAP_27May2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: GuidanceNotGrand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line

6

City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company) Jump to:Chicopee,Colman Place:Cornell,Coulee Dam,

7

EIS-0344: Grand Coulee-Bell 500 kV Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action for the construction and operation of the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project.

8

EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington.

9

Coulee Region Bio Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric633211°, -105.4247166°Open EnergyCoulee

10

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-OkanoganWP-AR-Landing_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Jim Semrau Robert Keudell Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Line Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Todd Wehner...

11

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-ChiefJoseph_ARandWood Poles_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Todd Wehner Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Robert Keudell Line Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Robert Zellar...

12

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Seasonal effects of volatile oils in ashe and redberry juniper on preference and digestibility by goats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(qnodon dactylon (L.) Pers.), ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei Buchholz) and live Oak [Quercus virginiana (Small) Sarg. var. fusiformis] during the spring and fall. Angora and Spanish goats were exposed to ashe female, ashe male, redberry female and redberry...

Riddle, Richard R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ash pelletization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ash pelletization is outlined under the following topics: projects with CSX involvement; US Generating (Cedar Bay), Jacksonville, FL; Hydra-Co (Salt City Project), Solvay, NY; Virginia Power, Yorktown Plant; US Generating; Indiantown, FL; Future Projects; Development of ash disposal site;s Reuse of ash product; and Utility Survey.

Woodall, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOEs Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interiors Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011.

17

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project began to address some of the identified data gaps, throughout the blocked area, with a variety of newly developed sampling projects, as well as, continuing with ongoing data collection of established projects.

Crossley, Brian (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA); Lockwood, Jr., Neil W. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fly ash carbon passivation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Acid mine drainage prevention, control and treatment technology development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee area. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was initiated to assist the State of Montana to develop a methodology to ameliorate acid mine drainage problems associated with the abandoned mines located in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area near Great Falls, Montana. Extremely acidic water is continuously discharging from abandoned coal mines in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area at an estimated rate of greater than 600 acre-feet per year (about 350 to 400 gallons per minute). Due to its extreme acidity, the water is unusable and is contaminating other water supplies. Most of the local alluvial aquifers have been contaminated, and nearly 5% of the private wells that were tested in the area during the mid-1980`s showed some degree of contamination. Significant government money has been spent replacing water supplies due to the magnitude of this problem. In addition, millions of dollars have been spent trying to remediate acid mine drainage occurring in this coal field. To date, the techniques used have focused on the management and containment of mine waters, rather than designing technologies that would prevent the formation of acid mine drainage.

Brown, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ashing properties of coal blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fusion properties of sulfur materials present in coals were investigated. The treatment of the samples of eleven different coals is described. Thermal treatment of low temperature ashing (LTA) concentrates of eight of the coals was performed, and raw and wash ashing curves were examined to determine what quantitative correlations, if any, exist between ashing parameters and rank of coal. The actual form of the function which describes the ashing curve is derived.

Biggs, D.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Utilization FLY ASH INFORMATION FROM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, quarries, and pits (34%), 6% for temporary stockpile, and 7% landfilled. Fly Ash In Europe, the utilization

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash bottom ash Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of bottom ash, 3 million tons of boiler slag, and 28 million tons of clean-coal ash materials) were produced... CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By...

30

Modeling volcanic ash dispersal  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ash deposit workshop: Class outline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ash deposits formed from the combustion of coal and other fuels have plagued the steam production industry from the start. The ash fusion test has been around for over eighty years. As steam plant size increased, so have the problems associated with ash deposits. This workshop is designed to cover: (1) The basic types of deposits. (2) Causes of deposits. (3) Analytical procedures for resolving, or at least providing information about deposits and fuels, and (4) Deposit removal and reduction techniques.

Hatt, R. [Commercial Testing & Engineering Co., Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

May 11, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N 4 Actual and Forecasted Flows Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 29-Apr 1-May 3-May 5-May...

35

May 4, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N 5 Actual and Forecasted Flows Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 23-Apr 25-Apr 27-Apr 29-Apr...

36

May 18, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N 4 Actual and Forecasted Flows Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 6-May 8-May 10-May 12-May...

37

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic to analyze MSW-derived ashes by use of CCSEM. Representative samples of 2nd -3rd pass and ESP/E-filter ashes

38

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cast-Concrete Products Made with FBC Ash and Wet-Collected Coal-Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0899-1561 2005 17:6 659 CE Database subject headings: Recycling; Ashes; Concrete et al. 1991 . Fluidized bed combustion FBC ash is the ash produced by an FBC boiler in which the coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

40

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy?s Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles? Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

McDonald, D.K.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ash dispersion utilizing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the USA for all coal ashes was approximately 34% in the year products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much...

44

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P < 0.001) were detected in front of the trash racks when the lights were on at night. On a count-per-hour basis, the difference between lights off and lights on was apparent in the early morning hours at depths between 25 m and 50 m from the transducers. The lights were approximately 34 m below the splitbeam transducers, and fish detected at night with lights on were found at a median depth of approximately 35 m, compared to a median depth of from 20.6 to 23.5 m when the lights were off. The differences in depth between lights on and off at night were also significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the increase in fish occurred only in front of the trash rack where the strobe lights were mounted; there was no increase in the number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. Howeve

Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes Preparatory thesis Randi Skytte Pedersen is to investigate Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes with respect to particle sizes, structures and composition with characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes from the Danish power plant M°abjergværket, Holstebro. MSW

46

Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low...

47

Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A. [University of Porto, Oporto (Portugal). Center of Geology

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

July 27, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January-July ESP volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Grand Coulee 81,463 74,201 8.9% Lower Granite 30,065 29,196 2.9% The Dalles 130,202 121,309 6.8% NWRFC Observed Percent...

50

July 20, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January-July ESP volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Grand Coulee 81,463 74,201 8.9% Lower Granite 30,065 29,196 2.9% The Dalles 130,202 121,309 6.8% NWRFC Observed Percent...

51

June 29, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January-July ESP volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Grand Coulee 80,092 58,516 26.9% Lower Granite 30,102 27,134 9.9% The Dalles 128,752 101,087 21.5% NWRFC Observed Percent...

52

July 13, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January-July ESP volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Grand Coulee 81,335 69,583 14.4% Lower Granite 30,058 28,687 4.6% The Dalles 129,999 115,396 11.2% NWRFC Observed Percent...

53

June 8, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January-July ESP volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Grand Coulee 75,140 39,590 44.7% Lower Granite 29,120 23,030 19.3% The Dalles 121,849 75,731 35.7% NWRFC Observed Percent...

54

June 22, 2012, Spring Operations Review Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

volcast Since 1-Jan Remaining Last week Grand Coulee 78,682 52,020 33.9% 39.5% Lower Granite 29,729 25,940 12.7% 15.1% The Dalles 126,922 92,636 27.0% 31.2% NWRFC Observed...

55

Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool III, Lawrence E.

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and...

58

Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission...

59

Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Poster presentation at the 2007...

60

The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash properties deer12kamp.pdf More Documents...

62

Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark-reviewed and popular articles to support the subject mat- ter. Enter wildlife professors Clark Adams, Sara Ash, and Kieran Lindsey. Together, they have brought to us the first comprehensive book on urban wildlife

64

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Thermal Springs of Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An updated list of Arizona springs judged to be carrying anomalous heat. Possible heat sources are briefly outlined. (MHR)

Witcher, J.C.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fly ash enhanced metal removal process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fly ashes from local thermal power plants in the removal of cadmium, nickel, chromium, lead, and copper from aqueous waste streams. Physical and chemical characteristics of fly ashes were determined, batch isotherm studies were conducted. A practical application of using fly ash in treating spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by modified conventional precipitation or solid enhanced metal removal process (SEMR) was investigated. In addition to nickel the EN baths also contains completing agents such as ammonium citrate and succinic acid reducing agents such as phosphate and hypophosphite. SEMR experiments were conducted at different pHs, fly ash type and concentrations, and settling times.

Nonavinakere, S. [Plexus Scientific Corp., Annapolis, MD (United States); Reed, B.E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fly ash system technology improves opacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

NONE

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

ART & LITERARY SPRING 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ART & LITERARY MAGAZINE VOL. --10 SPRING 2012 #12;2 AD LIBITUM SPRING 2012 3 Ad Libitum Staff Cover LIBITUM SPRING 2012 Today I was at the vending machine buying a soda to have with my lunch. I was put machine. The candies, chips and cookies were care- lessly stuffed on to a metal coil; with each dollar

Kenny, Paraic

72

Joshua Smith Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stormwater Utilities in Georgia Joshua Smith Spring 2006 #12;The UGA Land Use Clinic provides in Georgia Author: Joshua Smith Editor: Jamie Baker Roskie University of Georgia Land Use Clinic Spring 2006....................................................................................................10 #12;#12;1Stormwater Utilities in Georgia Stormwater Utilities in Georgia Joshua Smith Spring 2006

Rosemond, Amy Daum

73

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hydrothermal reactions of fly ash. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emphasis of the work done has been to determine the reactivities of two ashes believed to be representative of those generated. A bituminous ash and a lignitic ash have been investigated. The reactions of these ashes undergo when subjected to mild hydrothermal conditions were explored. The nature of the reactions which the ashes undergo when alkaline activators, calcium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are present was also investigated. It was determined that calcium silicate hydrate, calcium aluminate hydrate, and the calcium sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite form under these conditions. It appears 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}32H{sub 2}O (ettringite) formation needs to be considered in ashes which contain significant amounts of sulfate. Therefore the stability region for ettringite was established. It was also determined that calcium silicate hydrate, exhibiting a high internal surface area, will readily form with hydrothermal treatment between 50{degrees} and 100{degrees}C. This phase is likely to have a significant capacity to take up heavy metals and oxyanions and this ability is being explored.

Brown, P.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash technical progress Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and economic benefits. (1) Fly ash... of coal in conventional and or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom... ash, boiler slag, and flue...

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash blended cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CLSM mixture utilized... . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... investigation. Two additional ash ......

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash borer agrilus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: ash borer agrilus Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ecology and Movement of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)Ash Borer (Agrilus...

78

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Microsoft PowerPoint - SpringOpsCallHandout27June2013 [Compatibility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N Actual and Forecasted Flows 4 Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 615 617 619 621 623 625 627 629...

80

Microsoft PowerPoint - SpringOpsCallHandout09May13 [Compatibility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N 4 Actual and Forecasted Flows Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 426 428 430 52 54 56 58 510...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft PowerPoint - SpringOpsCallHandout13June13 [Compatibility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N Actual and Forecasted Flows 4 Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 61 63 65 67 69 611 613 615 617...

82

Microsoft PowerPoint - SpringOpsCallHandout23May13 [Compatibility...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N Actual and Forecasted Flows 4 Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 512 514 516 518 520 522...

83

Microsoft PowerPoint - SpringOpsCallHandout30May13.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I O N Actual and Forecasted Flows 4 Actual and Forecasted Inflows (Grand Coulee, Lower Granite and McNary Projects) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 518 520 522 524 526 528 530...

84

Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

Brown, P.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Approaches to the petrographic characterization of fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhanced understanding of fly ash properties provided by petrographic analysis, a level of detail chemical analysis cannot provide, will be essential in the upgrading and utilization of fly ash produced in boilers retrofitted to meet clean air standards. Howe et al estimated that over 25% of the fly ash produced in Kentucky in 1992 would not have met the Kentucky Department of Transportation limit of 3% loss-on-ignition (LOI) for class F fly ash used as a Portland cement admixture. The conversion of boilers to low-NO{sub x} emission units increases fly ash carbon, hence LOI, by 150-200% rendering the fly ash unsuitable for highway construction use in concrete. The preservation of fly ash`s market share will require increased attention to the removal of excess carbon from the fly ash. In this paper, we will discuss the basic components of fly ash. An example of the petrographic analysis of fly ash from a Kentucky power plant will be used to illustrate the partitioning of fly ash components by size, as well as within the fly ash collection system.

Hower, J.C.; Rathbone, R.F.; Graham, U.M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

ACCESS Magazine Spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Politics and the Golden Gate Bridge, Philadelphia:Regional Politics, and the Golden Gate Bridge University ofuse. This spring the Golden Gate Bridge celebrates its 75th

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 deg. C for 48 h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0 MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

Chindaprasirt, Prinya [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rattanasak, Ubolluk, E-mail: ubolluk@buu.ac.t [Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Burapha University, Chonburi 20131 (Thailand)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this study are to determine the market potential and the technical feasibility of using PFBC ash in high volume ash use applications. The information will be of direct use to the utility industry in assessing the economics of PFBC power generation in light of ash disposal avoidance through ash marketing. In addition, the research is expected to result in the generation of generic data on the use of PFBC ash that could lead to novel processing options and procedures. The specific objectives of the proposed research and demonstration effort are: Define resent and future market potential of PFBC ash for a range of applications (Phase I); assess the technical feasibility of PFBC ash use in construction, civil engineering and agricultural applications (Phase II); and demonstrate the most promising of the market and ash use options in full-scale field demonstrations (Phase III).

Smith, V.E.; Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Georgiou, D.N. [Jacques, Whitford and Associates Ltd., Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Wheeldon, J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

ash utilization symposium: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST Report No.CBU-1996-07 July 1996 Presented and Published at the...

93

POLYVINYLCHLORIDE WASTE WITH OIL SHALE ASH TO CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alkaline oil shale ash. Solid heat carrier (Galoter process)-type oil shale retorting units, where the

V. Oja; A. Elenurm; I. Rohtla; E. Tearo; E. Tali

94

CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009 Gautam Bhattacharyya, 363 Hunter Labs, phone: 656-1356 gautamb. This course does NOT have a separate laboratory meeting time. Course Goals CH 450 is the Chemistry Capstone to change. #12;CH 450 Spring, 2009 -2- Course Outline (Tentative) Journal due dates are designated each week

Stuart, Steven J.

95

Screening technology reduces ash in spiral circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, the James River Coal Co. selected the Stack Sizer to remove the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits at the McCoy-Elkhorn Bevins Branch prep plant and at the Blue Diamond Leatherwood prep plant in Kentucky. The Stack Sizer is a multi-deck, high-frequency vibrating screen capable of separations as fine as 75 microns when fitted with Derrick Corp.'s patented high open area urethane screen panels. Full-scale lab tests and more than 10 months of continuous production have confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 100 micron urethane screen panels consistently produces a clean coal fraction that ranges from 8 to 10% ash. Currently, each five-deck Stack Sizer operating at the Bevins Branch and Leatherwood prep plants is producing approximately 33 tons per hour of clean coal containing about 9% ash. This represents a clean coal yield of about 75% and an ash reduction of about 11% from the feed slurry. 3 figs. 2 tabs.

Brodzik, P. [Derrick Corp., Buffalo, NY (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

2007 world of coal ash conference proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theme of the conference was science, applications and sustainability. Papers are presented under the following topics: aggregates/geotechnology; agriculture; ash facility; management; CCT products; cement and concrete; chemistry and mineralogy; emerging technology; environmental; LOI/beneficiation/handling; mercury; mining and regulations and standards. The poster papers are included as well.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

Bohac, C.E.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Spring 2014 Controls -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 Controls - 1 A simple model for the electrical dynamics of a solenoid valve includes the coil resistance R in series with the coil inductance L, as indicated in the figure to the left

Virginia Tech

99

Spring bypass assembly. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pipe clamp comprises two substantially semicircular rim halves biased toward each other by spring assemblies. Adjustable stop means 5 limit separation of the rim halves when the pipe expands.

Jablonski, H.; Roughgarden, J.D.

1982-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

Midterm Examination Spring, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expression with exclusive-OR and AND gates. (8 pt) DCBADCBADBCADCBAF +++= Fig. 1 Logic Diagram for BCD to Excess-3 Code Converter #12; (MEC520) Midterm Examination Spring, 2005 #12;

Ryu, Jee-Hwan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Market assessment of PFBC ash use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is undergoing demonstration in the United States, as well as throughout the world. American Electric Power`s (AEP`s) bubbling PFBC 70 MWe Tidd demonstration program in Ohio and pilot-scale development at Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MWth circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, have demonstrated the advantages of PFBC technology. Further technology development in the US is planned with the deployment of the technology at the MacIntosh Clean Coal project in Lakeland, Florida. Development of uses for solid wastes from PFBC coal-fired power systems is being actively pursued as part of the demonstration of PFBC technologies. Ashes collected from Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low sulfur subbituminous and (2) high sulfur bituminous coal; and ash from the AEP`s high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at Western Research Institute (WRI).

Bland, A. E.; Brown, T. H., Western Research Institute

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mercury capture by distinct fly ash carbon forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon was separated from the fly ash from a Kentucky power plant using density gradient centrifugation. Using a lithium heterolpolytungstate high-density media, relative concentrations of inertinite (up to 85% vol.), isotropic carbon (up to 79% vol.), and anisotropic carbon (up to 76% vol.) were isolated from the original fly ash. Mercury concentration was lowest in the parent fly ash (which contains non-carbon components); followed by inertinite, isotropic coke, mixed isotropic-anisotropic coke fraction, and, with the highest concentration, the anisotropic coke concentrate. The latter order corresponds to the increase in BET surface area of the fly ash carbons. Previous studies have demonstrated the capture of mercury by fly ash carbon. This study confirms prior work demonstrating the varying role of carbon types in the capture, implying that variability in the carbon content influences the amount of mercury retained on the fly ash.

Hower, J.C.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.; Taulbee, D.N.; Sakulpitakphon, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 WholesaleEnergy's 10

105

Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet AssistanceCatalytic SitesEmployee,Energy

106

Determination of Ash in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ash in Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 7172005 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, R. Ruiz, C. Scarlata, J. Sluiter, and D. Templeton Technical Report NREL...

107

Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

Sulloway, H. M.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Bruce G. Bunting and Todd J. Toops Oak Ridge National Laboratory Adam Youngquist and Ke Nguyen University of...

109

Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

alkaline coal ash: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from pulverized coal pulverized-coal-fired furnaces, cyclone furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology furnaces. The ash collected from pulverized-coal-fired furnaces is fly...

111

The variability of fly ash and its effects on selected properties of fresh Portland cement/fly ash mortars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the needed quality control of concrete . Another source of concern results from the recent development of lignite and sub-bituminous coal as fuel sources. The ash produced from these coals is of a different chemical composition than traditional bituminous... 50 percent to greater than 200 percent of a control test. An exhaustive literature review has revealed neglig1ble information concerning the PAI of sub- b1tuminous and lignite ashes. Research is greatly needed to determine the ash properties...

McKerall, William Carlton

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

113

Cell Ashing for Trace Element Analysis: A New Approach Based on Ultraviolet/Ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: synchrotron spectromicroscopy; micro- chemical analysis; MEPHISTO; ashing; incineration; trace element. Ashing ashing is based on high-temperature incineration or on the exposure to oxygen plasma (1­ 4). We adopted

Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum-fly ash metal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

extent, bottom ash, contain elevated amounts of heavy metals, and fly ash... . The dioxinsfurans on ash then don't seem to create an environmental problem. Heavy metals are...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash samples pressurized Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

group of seven fly ash samples, and have... of coal in conventional and or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom... ash, boiler slag, and flue...

116

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwaterusing iron?oxidecoatedcoalbottomash JohannaL. using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

for the brain SPRING 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plug-ins for the brain SPRING · 2012 NATURE'S SOLARCELLS Learning from diatoms · 28 HANNIBAL'S HEAD

Malinnikova, Eugenia

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash nasal lavage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the people of North America for thousands of years. Of the nine ash... species, white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) and green ... Source: USDA, Forestry Service, Northern Research...

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash disposal area Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 83 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: combustion 1. Fly ash is...

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash cenospheres composites Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composites Addition of fly ash cenospheres to polymer matrix influences all... , polyethylene, etc.). The effects of addition of fly ash cenospheres on polymer composites...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashe higher education Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

higher abrasion... Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash ahto lobjakas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash paving demonstration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND DEMONSTRATION... Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash based gepolymer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... large amounts of conventional or...

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash penurunan kadar Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quarterly technical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash confinement time Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. The ASH system for the MIPS bounds execution time using a framework inspired by Deutsch 12. Exceptions... Appears in SIGCOMM '96, August 1996. ASHs: ... Source:...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash slag silica Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 91 By-Products Utilization Summary: pozzolans include coal fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and other combustion ashes. When...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash deposition propensities Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ash, fouling, co-combustion 1... ;5 relative compositions of major ash species in coal, ... Source: Hawaii Natural Energy Institute Collection: Renewable Energy 51...

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash deposits part Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Reading Collection: Geosciences 24 Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation Summary: being used for coal ash deposits....

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash char deposits Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ash, fouling, co-combustion 1... ;5 relative compositions of major ash species in coal, ... Source: Hawaii Natural Energy Institute Collection: Renewable Energy 86...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash intranasal instillation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans...

135

Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

Murtha, M.J.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

Short, Daniel

137

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Air Pollution Spring 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS 555 Air Pollution Spring 2010 T Th 11:00 ­ 12:15, NESB 101 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis an understanding of types and sources of air pollution. 2. Examine concentrations of air pollutants and their effects on health and welfare. Review regulations governing air pollution. 3. Examine the meteorological

142

Spring 2014 Thermodynamics -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 Thermodynamics - 1 Consider an insulated (adiabatic) piston and cylinder arrangement. Confirm this statement using the second law of thermodynamics. (b) (20) She now wants to calculate the work done by the air on the piston by using the first law of thermodynamics. Do this. Draw a T

Virginia Tech

143

Project Year Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year Spring 2009 Project Title A Database of Film and Media History and Aesthetics Part 2 experience with colleagues, they were eager to participate in expanding the database to include clips or they simply don't have the time, or both. Solution: The development of a user-friendly database of clips would

Gray, Jeffrey J.

144

technologytoday Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologytoday Spring 2003 Volume 2 Issue 1 http://home.ray.com/rayeng HIGHLIGHTING RAYTHEON An essential element of every system RAYTHEON Processing Technology An essential element of every system RAYTHEON Processing Technology #12;In this issue of technology today, we are highlighting processing

Schmidt, Douglas C.

145

Philosophy Courses Spring 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philosophy Courses Spring 2015 All philosophy courses satisfy the Humanities requirement -- except 120, which counts as one of the two required courses in Math/Logic. Many philosophy courses (e.g., Business Ethics, Philosophy of Law) complement other major programs. For those with a sustained interest

Kasman, Alex

146

Philosophy Courses Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philosophy Courses Spring 2014 All philosophy courses satisfy the Humanities requirement -- except 120, which counts as one of the two required courses in Math/Logic. Many philosophy courses (e.g., Business Ethics, Philosophy of Law) complement other major programs. For those with a sustained interest

Young, Paul Thomas

147

Philosophy Courses Spring 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philosophy Courses Spring 2013 All philosophy courses satisfy the Humanities requirement -- except 120, which counts as one of the two required courses in Math/Logic. Many philosophy courses (e.g., Business Ethics, Philosophy of Law) complement other major programs. For those with a sustained interest

Kasman, Alex

148

Philosophy Courses Spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philosophy Courses Spring 2012 All philosophy courses satisfy the Humanities requirement -- except 120, which counts as one of the two required courses in Math/Logic. Many philosophy courses (e.g., Business Ethics, Philosophy of Law) complement other major programs. For those with a sustained interest

Young, Paul Thomas

149

President's Council Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, knowledge economy, globalization and funding University to prepare students and county for the world Academic Co-operation Industrial and Societal Application 2. Rising Economies and Changing Global Balance Spring 2008 Rising Economies and Changing Global Balance What Todai Should Do with Other Rising

Miyashita, Yasushi

150

ENERGY CONVERSION Spring 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on energy storage devices Course Webpage: http://www.sfu.ca/~mbahrami/ENSC 461.htm Tutorials for this course. Lab information is posted on the website. Laboratory report requirements, background and a lab1 ENSC 461 ENERGY CONVERSION Spring 2011 Instructor: Dr. Majid Bahrami 4372 Email

Bahrami, Majid

151

University Calendar Spring 2017  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10-18 Spring recess (Passover, Easter) Apr 18 Residence halls open 2 p.m. Apr 19 Classes resume TBD (Rosh Hashanah) Sept 25 Classes resume Sept 29 Classes recess 1 p.m. (Yom Kippur) Oct 2 Classes resume 26 Residence halls open 2 p.m. Nov 27 Classes resume Dec 13 Last day of classes Dec 14-20 Final

Suzuki, Masatsugu

152

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MGSC 395 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Spring 2008 Course Syllabus Instructor: Professor Anand Nair Class MATERIALS Required Text Books Textbook: Krajewski, Lee, Ritzman, Larry, and Malhotra, Manoj. Operations Management: Processes and Value Chains, 8 th edition, Prentice Hall, 2007. (ISBN: 0-13-187294-X). Novel

Almor, Amit

153

COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,53.County is

157

Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash kinetics mechanism Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Some of these ash particles may contribute to surface sealing if rainfall kinetic energy is sufficient... ......

160

Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols Leona incineration fly ash at 200 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Thermodynamic calculations have been carried out ash produced by municipal waste incineration (MWI) have clearly demonstrated that MWI fly ash can

Cirkva, Vladimir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................4 3 ­ Clean fill staged prior to grading over the Ash Pit area.............................................................5 4 ­ Clean fill being graded at the Ash Pit I to the early 1950's. The Ash Pits were also used for disposal of coal ash from various buildings

162

Effects of Cutting Time, Stump Height, and Herbicide Application on Ash (Fraxinus Spp.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or cutting heights. Keywords: Buprestidae, control, coppice, eradication, triclopyr E merald ash borer (EAB

163

Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

Hopkins, William A.

164

Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core

Escolano, Francisco

165

Syllabus Math 553, Spring 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Syllabus Math 553, Spring 2013. Meeting time and place : MWF 12.30-1.20, REC 113. Instructor: Saugata Basu. Office: Math 742 email: sbasu@math.purdue.

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from larger commercial sources such as wood-burning biomass plants which produce heat or electricity in the soil. Wood ash is more soluble and reactive than ground limestone, and brings about a Benefits Recycles

New Hampshire, University of

167

Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: December 2, 2013 S. Van Wychen and L. M. L. Laurens Technical Report NRELTP-5100-60956 December...

168

Studies of fly ash using thermal analysis techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved thermoanalytical methods have been developed that are capable of quantitative identification of various components of fly ash from a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustion system. The thermogravimetric procedure developed can determine quantities of H{sub 2}O, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4} and carbonaceous matter in fly ash with accuracy comparable to more time-consuming ASTM methods. This procedure is a modification of the Mikhail-Turcotte methods that can accurately analyze bed ash, with higher accuracy regarding the greater amount of carbonaceous matter in fly ash. In addition, in conjunction with FTIR and SEM/EDS analysis, the reduction mechanism of CaSO{sub 4} as CaSO{sub 4} + 4H{sub 2} = CaS + 4H{sub 2}O has been confirmed in this study. This mechanism is important in analyzing and evaluating sulfur capture in fluidized-bed combustion systems.

Li, Hanxu; Shen, Xiang-Zhong; Sisk, B. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

ash upptag av: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* Environmental Management and Restoration Websites...

170

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Enhancement of phosphogypsum with high lime fly ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENHANCEMENT OF PHOSPHOGYPSUM WITH HIGH LIME FLY ASH A Thesis by CHUCK ALAN GREGORY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering ENHANCEMENT OF PHOSPHOGYPSUM WITH HIGH'LIME FLY ASH A Thesis by CHUCK ALAN GREGORY Approved as to style and content by: Dr. ona d Saylak (Chairman f Committee) Dr. W. edbetter ( ember) (Member) r. Lloyd Deuel, 3...

Gregory, Chuck Alan

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Why Springs Are Valuable Natural springs are important aquatic resources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source of clean, high-quality groundwater that flows at a relatively constant rate and temperature hot weather and droughts. Spring streams and riparian lands provide critical water, food, refuge. Because springs are dependable, they are an increasingly valuable supply of water for people and wildlife

Liskiewicz, Maciej

176

Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. This first project period, experiments were carried out to better understand the fundamental nature of the ozonation effect on ash. Carbon surfaces were characterized by surfactant adsorption, and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation, both by air at 440 C and by ozone at room temperature. The results strongly suggest that the beneficial effect of ozonation is in large part due to chemical modification of the carbon surfaces.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth

2001-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project was to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific issues addressed included: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity based on pilot-plant studies; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This laboratory data has provided scientific and engineering support and underpinning for parallel process development activities. The development work on the ash ozonation process has now transitioned into a scale-up and commercialization project involving a multi-industry team and scheduled to begin in 2004. This report describes and documents the laboratory and pilot-scale work in the above three areas done at Brown University and the University of Utah during this three-year project.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen; Indrek Kulaots

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

179

Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico Save the Date The spring 2015 meeting...

180

SPRING ISD CATEE 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING ISD CATEE 2014 ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Benchmarking results ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Annual energy...,871,387 2011-2012 $8,088,599 savings $3,615,835 2012-2013 $7,418,636 savings $4,285,798 2013-2014 $7,393,010 savings $4,311,424 Total savings over last 5 years $16,855,588 ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas...

Windsor, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Spring Challenges | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus Tom Fletcher,FutureNanostructuredSPRING NEWS ROCKY

182

Spring Operations Call 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus Tom Fletcher,FutureNanostructuredSPRING NEWS ROCKY2 Sign In

183

Spring Operations Call 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus Tom Fletcher,FutureNanostructuredSPRING NEWS ROCKY2 Sign

184

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Spring loaded locator pin assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

Groll, Todd A. (Idaho Falls, ID); White, James P. (Pocatelo, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Spring loaded locator pin assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

Metal recovery from fly ash generated from vitrification process for MSW ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-bearing wastes have to be carefully treated because heavy metals could be leached out under uncontrolled conditions when disposed of in a landfill. Consequently, heavy metals should be principally recovered and recycled forever. From this standpoint, the author has been trying to develop a technology to recover heavy metals from toxic vitrification fly ash for recycling to smelters. After a number of laboratory-scale experiments, pilot plant tests were successfully carried out and the developed process has been proven to be commercially realized. The main features of the process are that it recovers almost 100% of the heavy metals, simultaneously separating the metals which are recovered in a lead smelter from those in a zinc smelter, and that the output of the process are only metallurgical products recyclable for smelters and the effluent water which can be released into the environment. The process is considered an ideal one for the treatment of toxic fly ash from the viewpoint of not only natural resources but also environmental conservation.

Izumikawa, Chiaki [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)] [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Study on the Volatility of Cesium in Dry Ashing Pretreatment and Dissolution of Ash by Microwave Digestion System - 13331  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the regulation of the activity concentration of Cs-137, Co-58, Co-60, Fe-55, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Nb-94, and Tc-99, and the total alpha from the radioactive waste acceptance criteria, the measurement of the activity concentration of these nuclides in low and intermediate levels of radioactive waste such as in paper, cotton, vinyl and plastic samples was investigated. A dry ashing method was applied to obtain a concentration effect of the samples. Owing to the temperature dependence of the volatility for cesium, the temperature of 300 to 650 deg. C was examined. It was found that 450 deg. C is the optimum dry ashing temperature. After dry ashing, the produced ash was dissolved with HNO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system. The ash sample, for the most part, was completely dissolved with 10 mL of HNO{sub 3}, 4 mL of HCl, and 0.25 mL of HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system using a nova high temperature rotor at 250 deg. C for 90 min until reaching 0.2 g. To confirm the reliability of cesium loss after the performance of the dry ashing procedure, a cesium standard solution for AAS and a Cs-137 standard solution for gamma spectrometry were added to a paper towel or a planchet of stainless steel, respectively. Cesium was measured by AAS, ICP-MS, and gamma spectrometry. The volatility of cesium did not occur until 450 deg. C ashing. (authors)

Choi, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Chang Heon; Ahn, Hong-Joo; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyuseok [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Release of Ammonium and Mercury from NOx Controlled Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Department of Energy is to increase the reuse of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) to 50% by 2010. This will require both developing new markets and maintaining traditional ones such as the use of fly ash in concrete. However, the addition of pollution control devices can introduce side-effects that affect the marketability of the CUB. Such can be the case when NOx control is achieved using selective catalytic or non-catalytic reduction (SCR or SNCR). Depending on site-specific details, the ammonia slip can cause elevated levels of NH3 in the fly ash. Disposal of ammoniated fly ash can present environmental concerns related to the amount of ammonia that might be released, the amount of water that might become contaminated, and the extent to which metals might be mobilized by the presence of the ammonia. Ammonia retained in fly ash appears to be present as either an ammonium salt or as a chemisorbed species. Mercury in the leachates correlated to neither the amount of leachable ammonium nor to the total amount of Hg in the ash. The strongest correlation was between the decreases in the amount of Hg leached with increased LOI.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

MA 15400 ONLINE Spring 2015 Syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 15400 ONLINE Spring 2015 Syllabus. TEXTBOOK. COURSE WEBSITE. RECORDED LESSONS. HOMEWORK. QUIZZES. EXAMS. CALCULATORS.

Delworth, Timothy J

2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

Spring loaded thermocouple module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

McKelvey, Thomas E. (Solana Beach, CA); Guarnieri, Joseph J. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Spring loaded thermocouple module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Rotunda, John R. (Fairmont, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash yellows 16sr Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORANGE RED Eruption is imminent with significant emission of volcanic ash... that blast volcanic ash (tiny rock fragments) and gas more than 100,000 feet into the air....

195

Tephrochronology and Stratigraphy of Eocene and Oligocene Volcanic Ashes of East and Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using neutron activation analysis (NAA) of bulk ash and glass shards, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) of bulk ash, and electron microprobe analysis of both apatite phenocrysts and glass shards to characterize their geochemistry...

Heintz, Mindi

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Leaching and standing water characteristics of bottom ash and composted manure blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal burning electrical generating facilities produce roughly 91 million metric tons of ash byproducts annually. Typically, this ash is retained at the power plant sites, adding to the cost of managing wastes at the plants. Another waste material...

Mathis, James Gregory

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing wet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 4 By-Products Utilization Summary: A3, containing 20% clean coal ash and 5% wet collected Class F ash had compressive strengths... 0 Center for...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash material analisis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was used in this work. An ASTM Class F fly ash... , and N3) were proportioned with clean coal fly ash containing 22% ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department...

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes total contents Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fly ash content for normal concrete... contained fly ash up to a maximum of 35% of clean-coal ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali-activated fly ash Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 12 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated fly ash Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 9 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing dry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shrinkage of Non-Air Entrained HRWRA Concrete -0.05% 0.00% 0.05% 0... NS3, 33% Clean Coal Ash, 5% Class F Fly Ash Fig. 15 - ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of -...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash formation transformations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chlorinated phenols because their presence in the ash could result in the formation of dioxins and furans... THE USE OF MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR ASH AS A PARTIAL REPLACEMENT OF...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash aqueous carbonation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash Summary: Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash silica fume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association... 's Twelfth International Coal Ash Use Symposium,Orlando,FL,January...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash dosage du Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ash and iron-foundry baghouse dust in the manufacturing of economical self-compacting concrete... . CONCLUSIONS: The limestone-quarry fines and Class C fly ash showed...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash transportation distance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ash and iron-foundry baghouse dust in the manufacturing of economical self-compacting concrete... . CONCLUSIONS: The limestone-quarry fines and Class C fly ash showed...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quality characterization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ash and iron-foundry baghouse dust in the manufacturing of economical self-compacting concrete... . CONCLUSIONS: The limestone-quarry fines and Class C fly ash showed...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess ash related Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has been... Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST... Report No. CBU-1996-07 July 1996 Presented and Published at the...

210

Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and Regeneration Damage for DPFs Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and Regeneration Damage for DPFs New commercially...

211

MATH 265 Spring 2013 Syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH 265 Spring 2013 Syllabus. Instructor. Office Hour MWF 10:30-11:30 am at MATH 850. Sessions. MA 26500 141-UNIV 019 TR 13:30 14:45 (39/42)...

CHING-JUI LAI

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

212

MATH 262 Spring 2015 Syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH 262 Spring 2015 Syllabus. Instructor. Office Hour MW 16:30-18:00 am at MATH 850. Sessions MA 26200 081-UNIV 003 TR 15:00 16:15 (CRN=64359).

CHING-JUI LAI

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Policy Practice Spring 2014 SW 548-001 Instructor course that focuses on the theory and evidence-based skill sets of policy analysis, development, implementation, and change. The course focuses on policy

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

214

Ash reduction system using electrically heated particulate matter filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control system for reducing ash comprises a temperature estimator module that estimates a temperature of an electrically heated particulate matter (PM) filter. A temperature and position estimator module estimates a position and temperature of an oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter. An ash reduction control module adjusts at least one of exhaust flow, fuel and oxygen levels in the electrically heated PM filter to adjust a position of the oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter based on the oxidation wave temperature and position.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; He, Yongsheng [Sterling Heights, MI

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

NONE

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Coal-ash slag attack and corrosion of refractories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion characteristics of a variety of fused-cast refractories in contact with various coal-ash slags were investigated. A fused-cast chrome-spinel refractory exhibited excellent corrosion resistance to both acidic and basic coal-ash slags at 1500/sup 0/C, even in the absence of water cooling. The slag-refractory interaction was limited to the formation of a stable band of recrystallized hercynitic spinel. Alumina-chromia refractories were superior to alumina and magnesia-chrome refractories when exposed to acidic slags.

Bonar, J.A. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY); Kennedy, C.R.; Swaroop, R.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

area weldon spring: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: and Laplace transforms. Fundamentals of AC power, coupled inductors (transformers), and two-port networks Spring break Apr. 04 Spring breakApr. 04 Spring break...

219

adult male spring: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: and Laplace transforms. Fundamentals of AC power, coupled inductors (transformers), and two-port networks Spring break Apr. 04 Spring breakApr. 04 Spring break...

220

Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Agenda algaeworkshopagenda.pdf More Documents &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mt. Etna tropospheric ash retrieval and sensitivity analysis using Moderate Resolution Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In order to derive the ash plume optical thickness, the particle effective radius and the total mass, exploiting the distinct reflectivity of meteorological and volcanic clouds in the near infrared spectral as containing volcanic ash compared to the original method. The retrieved mean ash optical thick- ness at 0

Oxford, University of

222

MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH Waste Management (in source such as municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration ash, requires a knowledge of the so is proposed. Key words: Leaching, Waste, Incineration ash, Chromium, L/S ratio, Modelling. hal-00656672

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

224

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)] [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Correlation relations between mineralogical components in ash from Kaa-Khem coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regression analysis was used to study correlation relations between the mineral components of coals. Regularities in the variability of the concentrations of individual ash-forming elements with changing ash contents of coals and changing seam depth were found. The X-ray diffraction characteristics of coal ashes and the qualitative composition of their mineralogical components are presented.

N.N. Yanchat; L.Kh. Tas-ool [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kyzyl (Russia). Tuvinian Institute for Complex Exploration of Natural Resources

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

BEyond thE BAcklAsh: equity and participation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEyond thE BAcklAsh: equity and participation in bicycle planning. executive summary | May 2011 Camp Conor Clarke Joe Delia Jennifer Harris-Hernandez Sungbae Park Brian Paul Scott Richmond Sam Stein Jessame Hannus ValeriaTreves Bill DiPaola Kristen Jones Paul Steely White Katie Lyon-Hart We thank

Qiu, Weigang

229

Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ­ Scattering solar radiation. ­ Absorption in the infrared. For chemical reactions: ­ Particles become coatedMeasurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash Daniel M. Peters and R. G. Grainger@atm.ox.ac.uk http://www.atm.ox.ac.uk 1 Abstract We have just commenced a laboratory project, the "Optical Properties

Oxford, University of

230

Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces - with similar geometry and combusting similar coal. The method is potentially applicable to completely different boiler furnaces combusting different coal, and the authors recommend running the tests with new deposit samples. The data will then be applicable to the thermal design of a whole new class of furnaces, having similar geometry and combusting similar coal. This is expected to greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of thermal calculation as well as the efficiency of thermal design of steam boilers. (author)

Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan [Department of Thermomechanics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS); Vucicevic, Biljana [Laboratory for Thermal Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (RS); Goricanec, Darko [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, Maribor 2000 (Slovenia); Stevanovic, Zoran [Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Dusina 7, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Soil stabilization and pavement recycling with self-cementing coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual provides design information for self-cementing coal fly ash as the sole stabilizing agent for a wide range of engineering applications. As in any process, the application of sound engineering practices, appropriate testing, and evaluation of fly ash quality and characteristics will lend themselves to successful projects using the guidelines in this manual. Topics discussed include: self-cementing coal fly ash characteristics; laboratory mix design; stabilization of clay soils; stabilisation of granular materials; construction considerations; high sulfate ash; environmental considerations for fly ash stabilization; design considerations; state specification/guidelines/standards; and a sample of a typical stabilization specification.

NONE

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

ECOLOGY AND PRODUCTION OF JUVENILE SPRING CHINOOK SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS TSHAWYTSCHA,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), of the spring race in Happy :Valley Reservoir, a eutrophic impoundment located on the Warm Springs Indian

233

Process to eliminate production of fly ash by wet bottom boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the reduction of fly ash in a wet bottom boiler of the type having a primary and secondary furnace. It comprises collecting the fly ash from one of an electrostatic precipitator, a bag house, a cyclone collector, a multi- cyclone collector, a gravity separator and a sharply curved duct; removing the fly ash in a stream of carrier gas into the furnace; adding a fuel to the stream of carrier gas and fly ash; introducing the carrier gas and fly ash and fuel into one of the primary and secondary furnaces, wherein the fuel and the heat from at least one of the surrounding gas and molten slag provide energy to melt the fly ash; and discharging the melted fly ash with slag from the furnace bottom.

Breen, B.P.; Schrecengost, R.A.; Gabrielson, J.E.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, A.H.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mechanical energy storage in carbon nanotube springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy storage in mechanical springs made of carbon nanotubes is a promising new technology. Springs made of dense, ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes have the potential to surpass both the energy density of electrochemical ...

Hill, Frances Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and timeKresge 327, MWF 12;2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Spring 1998 participation in discussions (both in class

Karplus, Kevin

239

Spring 2006 CS 649 1 Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terzis http://hinrg.cs.jhu.edu/wsn06/ #12;Outline Spring 2006 CS 649 2 (Simple) Radio Power loss models Reality (More) Radio Power loss models #12;Motivation Spring 2006 CS 649 3 Communication between nodes

Amir, Yair

240

Motor gasoline assessment, Spring 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The springs of 1996 and 1997 provide an excellent example of contrasting gasoline market dynamics. In spring 1996, tightening crude oil markets pushed up gasoline prices sharply, adding to the normal seasonal gasoline price increases; however, in spring 1997, crude oil markets loosened and crude oil prices fell, bringing gasoline prices down. This pattern was followed throughout the country except in California. As a result of its unique reformulated gasoline, California prices began to vary significantly from the rest of the country in 1996 and continued to exhibit distinct variations in 1997. In addition to the price contrasts between 1996 and 1997, changes occurred in the way in which gasoline markets were supplied. Low stocks, high refinery utilizations, and high imports persisted through 1996 into summer 1997, but these factors seem to have had little impact on gasoline price spreads relative to average spread.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Spring 2014 Composite Data Products: Backup Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes 30 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2014 for fuel cell backup power systems.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Saur, G.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Spring Cleaning | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the AmericasDOE-STD-3020-2005 December 2005DepartmentSpringSpring

243

JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 2011 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation #12;1 Table of Contents: Page Project .................................................................................................................11-20 #12;2 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation, 2011 Project Leaders: Heather Mason Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation. SPONSOR VARIETY TYPE HERBICIDE RESISTANCE CONTACT

Dyer, Bill

245

EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using fly ash from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was from Blacksville coal. Elemental Hg was injected upstream from samples of fly ash loaded onto filters housed in an oven at 120 or 180 C. Concentrations of oxidized and elemental Hg downstream from the filters were determined using the Ontario Hydro method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables affecting Hg oxidation. The presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were all important with respect to Hg oxidation, with NO{sub 2} and HCl being the most important. The presence of NO suppressed Hg oxidation in these tests. Although the two fly ashes were chemically and mineralogically diverse, there were generally no large differences in catalytic potential (for oxidizing Hg) between them. Similarly, no ash fraction appeared to be highly catalytic relative to other ash fractions. This includes fractions enriched in unburned carbon and fractions enriched in iron oxides. Although some differences of lesser magnitude were observed in the amount of oxidized Hg formed, levels of oxidized Hg generally tracked well with the surface areas of the different ashes and ash fractions. Therefore, although the Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, this could be due to the relatively high surface area of that ash. Similarly, for Blacksville fly ash, using nonmagnetic ash resulted in more Hg oxidation than using magnetic ash, but this again tracked well with the relative surface areas of the two ash fractions. Test results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important in Hg oxidation chemistry than the fly ash composition. Combustion tests were performed in which Blacksville and PRB fly ashes were injected into filtered (via a baghouse with Teflon bags) flue gas obtained while firing PRB coal in a 35 kW combustor. The Ontario Hydro method was used to determine the Hg speciation after fly ash injection. Wall effects in the combustor complicated interpretation of testing data, although a number of observations could still be made. The amount of Hg collected in the Ontario Hydro impingers was lower than anticipated, and is probably due to sorption of Hg by the fly ash. While firing PRB coal without any ash injection, the percent oxidized Hg in the gas stream was fairly high (average of 63%). The high levels of vapor phase oxidized Hg in these base line tests may be due to catalytic effects from the refractory materials in the combustor. When PRB fly ash was injected into a filtered PRB flue gas stream, the percentage of oxidized Hg in the gas stream decreased dramatically. Decreases in the percentage of oxidized Hg were also observed while injecting Blacksville fly ash, but to a lesser extent. Injecting whole Blacksville fly ash into the filtered PRB flue gas appeared to result in greater concentrations of oxidized Hg relative to the tests where whole PRB fly ash was injected. However, because the Blacksville fly ash has a relatively high surface area, this may be only a surface area effect.

Glenn A. Norton; Hongqun Yang; Robert C. Brown; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John Erjavec; Joseph M. Okoh

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions using whole fly ash samples as well as magnetic and nonmagnetic concentrates from sized fly ash. Only the Blacksville ash contained magnetic phases. The whole and fractionated fly ash samples were analyzed for morphology, chemical composition, mineralogical composition, total organic carbon, porosity, and surface area. Mineralogically, the Blacksville ash was composed predominantly of magnetite, hematite, quartz, and mullite, while the PRB ash contained mostly quartz with lesser amounts of lime, periclase, and calcium aluminum oxide. The iron oxides in the Blacksville ash were concentrated almost entirely in the largest size fraction. As anticipated, there was not a clean separation of magnetic (Fe-rich) and nonmagnetic (aluminosilicate-rich) phases for the Blacksville ash. The Blacksville ash had a significantly higher surface area and a much higher unburned carbon content than the PRB ash. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. Concentrations of total, oxidized, and elemental Hg downstream from the ash samples were determined by the Ontario Hydro Method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables. Based on the statistical analyses, the presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} and all two-way gas interactions were significant. In addition, it appears that even four-factor interactions between those gases are significant. The HCl, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were critical gases resulting in Hg oxidation, while the presence of NO appeared to suppress oxidation. The Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, but this could be largely due to the higher surface area of the Blacksville ash. Temperature was not a statistically important factor. The magnetic (Fe-rich) phases did not appear to be more catalytically active than the nonmagnetic phases, and unburned carbon did not appear to play a critical role in oxidation chemistry.

Unknown

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

14 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 SILVICS AND SILVICULTURE OF ASH IN MIXED HARDWOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN MIXED HARDWOOD FORESTS OF THE SOUTHERN BOTTOMLANDS AND LOESSIAL HILLS Steve Meadows U.S. Forest Service wet bottomland sites. White ash is the primary ash species in the loessial hills and on other upland sites across the South. The natural range, distribution across site types, and associated forest cover

248

Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

Sinha, A.S.K. [SLIET, Longowal (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility`s processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

Langenwalter, T.; Pettet, M.; Ochoa, R.; Jensen, S.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ash reduction in clean coal spiral product circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article describes the Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer{trademark} technology for high capacity fine wet cleaning with long-lasting high open-area urethane screen panels. After field trials, a Stack Sizer fitted with a 100-micron urethane panel is currently processing approximately 40 stph of clean coal spiral product having about 20% ash at McCoy-Elkhorn's Bevin Branch coal preparation plant in Kentucky, USA. Product yield is about 32.5 short tons per hour with 10% ash. The material is then fed to screen bowl centrifuges for further processing. At Blue Diamond Coal's Leatherwood preparation plant similar Stacker Sizers are achieving the same results. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 2 photo.

Brodzik, P.

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh {times} 0, 200 mesh {times} 0, and 325 mesh {times} 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df and the tube at a rate m , and the outer surface of the tube is well insulated. Heat generation occurs within. The specific heat of water pc , and the thermal conductivity of the fuel rod fk are constants. The system

Virginia Tech

253

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING SPRING Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mentorship and guidance for students and professors with creative ideas, The Macdonald Engineering BuildingFACULTY OF ENGINEERING SPRING 2012 Dean's Faculty of Engineering Innovation and entrepreneurship get major boost M cGill Engineering has long recognized the value of entrepreneurship in building

Fabry, Frederic

254

DEAN'S LIST Spring Semester 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Campbell, Eric B. Cascketta, Eric C. Grantham, Jack D. Gross, Glendon Marston Grusenmeyer, Christopher RDEAN'S LIST Spring Semester 2010 Chai, Jun Christopher, Joseph Thomas Chu, Clayton N. Chu, Wesley D. Bloom, John Tyler Bond-Choquette, Claire Marie Bradford, Jonathan W. Brown, Thomas C. Bruns, Jared M

Wong, Pak Kin

255

SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact on birds, bats......... 2-3 school news........... 4-5 alumni news measurable benefits reaped by the use of wind energy. But, it is a fact: all energy sources, alternative Interactions with Offshore Wind Energy Facilities," involves the design, deployment and testing

Tullos, Desiree

256

Annual Report CMS Spring Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2007-2008 CMS Spring Assembly & Length of Service Awards March 9, 2012 #12;Annual Report 2007-2008 News & Events: Alumni David Mearns (CMS MS `86) Selected as co-recipient of USF's Distinguished Alumni Award, Fall 2011 #12;Annual Report 2007-2008 News & Events: Faculty Dr. Robert Byrne

Meyers, Steven D.

257

Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012 Friday, March 16; 3:30 Seminar Hall (room 1315 Chemistry) Lost in Translation: How Regulators Use Science and How Scientists Can Help Bridge Gaps Stephanie to combine her Chemistry background with a legal education to improve the use of science in environmental

Sheridan, Jennifer

258

Mesoscale Dynamics Spring Semester 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS 735 Mesoscale Dynamics (3 cr) Spring Semester 2014 Instructor: Richard H. Johnson, Room ATS 305, certain topics in mesoscale dynamics may be emphasized more than others. Although basic concepts lectures on some of the topics. Several books that are relevant to the course are: Cloud Dynamics, 1993 (R

259

Ecology of Ecotourism Spring, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR 4934: Ecology of Ecotourism Spring, 2014 Room 106 Rogers Hall Monday Periods 6-8 (12:50 to 3 with an understanding of the management and planning of ecotourism opportunities. Specific learning outcomes include recreation and tourism development; · understand ecological impacts and ecotourism management approaches

Watson, Craig A.

260

The reactions and ashes of thermonuclear explosions on neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports on the detailed rp-process reaction flow on an accreting neutron star and the resulting ashes of a type I X-ray burst. It is obtained by coupling a 298 isotope reaction network to a self-consistent one-dimensional model calculation with a constant accretion rate of dM/dt=1.0e17g/s (0.09 Eddington).

J. L. Fisker; E. Brown; M. Liebendoerfer; F. -K. Thielemann; M. Wiescher

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effects of Sediment Containing Coal Ash from the Kingston Ash Release on Embryo-Larval Development in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The largest environmental release of coal ash in U.S. history occurred in December 2008 with the failure of a retention structure at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee. A byproduct of coal-burning power plants, coal ash is enriched in metals and metalloids such as selenium and arsenic with known toxicity to fish including embryonic and larval stages. The effects of contact exposure to sediments containing up to 78 % coal ash from the Kingston spill on the early development of fish embryos and larvae were examined in 7-day laboratory tests with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). No significant effects were observed on hatching success, incidences of gross developmental abnormalities, or embryo-larval survival. Results suggest that direct exposures to sediment containing residual coal ash from the Kingston ash release may not present significant risks to fish eggs and larvae in waterways affected by the spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL] [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL] [ORNL; Sherrard, Rick [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)] [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Unique method of ash disposal can benefit marine life  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As more communities turn to waste-to-energy facilities to help solve their solid waste disposal problems, the amount of ash created by these facilities increases. Incineration of solid waste produces particulate residues which are often rich in lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc because of the concentration which occurs as a result of reduction. It has been shown that such metals can sometimes be leached from ash residues, giving rise to special concerns that incineration ashes be disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner. In urban coastal areas where landfills are few and increasingly distant, ocean disposal of stabilized incineration residues (SIR) may provide an acceptable alternative to current landfill practices. In May 1985, a research program was initiated at the Marine Sciences Research Center to examine the feasibility of utilizing SIR for artificial reef construction in the ocean. Results of these studies showed that particulate incineration residues could be combined with cement to form a solid block possessing physical properties necessary for ocean disposal. The stabilized residues were subjected to regulatory extraction protocols, and in no instance did the metal concentrations in the leachates exceed the regulatory limits for toxicity. Bioassays revealed no adverse effects on the phytoplankton communities exposed to elutriate concentrations higher than could be encountered under normal disposal conditions. The success of the laboratory studies resulted in securing the necessary permits for the placement of an artificial habitat constructed using SIR in coastal wasters. Results from this program are described.

Roethel, F.J.; Breslin, V.T. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modeling the formation and size distribution of fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of mathematical models has been developed to predict the size distribution of fly ash particles formed in pulverized coal combustion. The large particle mode of the size distribution, typically centered about 10 to 20 ..mu..m, is predicted by a simple breakup model that is based on the complete coalescence of molten mineral inclusions within fragments of the devolatilized coal char. The ultrafine particle mode, that is typically centered about 0.1 to 0.2 ..mu..m, is modeled in terms of ash volatilization, nucleation, and coagulation. Silica and alumina are reduced to volatile suboxides through reactions at the char surface. The volatile suboxides are transported from the char surface where they are oxidized back to the stable oxides in the bulk gas, and then nucleated in accordance with homogeneous nucleation theory. The ultrafine nuclei coagulate in accordance with Brownian coagulation theory. The predicted particle size spectra have been compared to measured size distributions from a pilot-scale combustor and a full-scale utility boiler. Considering the disproportionate loss of coarse particles in the pilot-scale unit, the agreement between the predicted and measured size distributions was considered reasonably good. Both the predicted ultrafine and large particle modes agreed reasonably well with the measured particle size distribution for the full scale boiler. The validated computer models were used to study the effect of changes in the coal ash content, coal particle size, and the combustion flame temperature.

Dahlin, R.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Disposal of Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash in an Underground Mine to Control Acid Mine Drainage and Subsidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. YO void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase Ill the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the spring of 1998 and monitored for following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during the winter of 1997. This document will report on progress made during Phase Ill. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase Ill tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis will be covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase Ill (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

NONE

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

Kruse, C.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Investigation of the potential of fly ash as an adsorbent for removal of priority pollutants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

billion. Application of the full complement of hazardous waste rules would increase the cost to over $3. 4 billion (EPRI, 1982). It is clear that the handling and disposal of fly ash will be increasingly costly. This cost increase will be compounded.... Several different applications are possible if fly ash shows reasonable adsorption for priority pollutants. For example, fly ash can be used for lining landfills to retard transport of contaminants mto the soil until more permanent disposal solutions...

Zardkoohi, Minoo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

269

INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash corrosion resistant Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 48 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: in improved resistance to...

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash cement matrixes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 13 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: to a construc- tion material...

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - agglomerating ash process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 8 Assembly and Testing of an On-Farm Manure to Energy Conversion BMP for Animal Waste Pollution Control Summary: index for animal manure ash...

273

MARKET ASSESSMENT AND TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH USE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler International, Inc. and the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC ashes. Ashes from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot-scale circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, combusting (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coal, and ash from the AEP's high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at WR1. The technical feasibility study examined the use of PFBC ash in construction-related applications, including its use as a cementing material in concrete and use in cement manufacturing, fill and embankment materials, soil stabilization agent, and use in synthetic aggregate production. Testing was also conducted to determine the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as a soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following conclusions. PFBC ash does not meet the chemical requirements as a pozzolan for cement replacement. However, it does appear that potential may exist for its use in cement production as a pozzolan and/or as a set retardant. PFBC ash shows relatively high strength development, low expansion, and low permeability properties that make its use in fills and embankments promising. Testing has also indicated that PFBC ash, when mixed with low amounts of lime, develops high strengths, suitable for soil stabilization applications and synthetic aggregate production. Synthetic aggregate produced from PFBC ash is capable of meeting ASTM/AASHTO specifications for many construction applications. The residual calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in the PFE3C ash has been shown to be of value in making PFBC ash a suitable soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and mine spoils. In conclusion, PFBC ash represents a viable material for use in currently established applications for conventional coal combustion ashes. As such, PFBC ash should be viewed as a valuable resource, and commercial opportunities for these materials should be explored for planned PFBC installations.

A.E. Bland; T.H. Brown

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash fraxinus excelsior Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

we planted green ash trees... Identification of a Biomarker Gene for Fraxinus spp. Darla French and ... Source: Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources,...

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quality recycling Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... CANMET Conference on Quality of Concrete Structures and...

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash related problems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the environment is an environmental problem created. It is generally conceded... . The dioxinsfurans on ash then don't seem to create an ... Source: Columbia University -...

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash inhalation exposure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in England and Summary: tests on blocks containing mixed ash. 1 See page 17, Dioxins, what they are, their sources, our exposure... into the potential exposure to dioxins...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash impact sorbent Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for By-Products Utilization Collection: Engineering ; Materials Science 23 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: , and baghouses) including fly ash,...

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash metal matrix Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This list included inorganic metals, since they are known to occur in all ashes, and dioxins... of the best available tools for evaluating whether ... Source: Columbia University...

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash management regulations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air and Waste Management Division U.S. Environmental... unacceptable levels of dioxins and furans. Thus they argue for cradle to grave ash management under Subtitle C......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash particle deposition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RDF ASH GEORGE M. SAVAGE AND LUIS F. DIAZ Cal Recovery ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 36...

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash ozonation technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ozonation technology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ash ozonation technology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fine volcanic Predicting...

283

Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density/Ash Relationship . APPLICATION OF THE GAMMA-GAMMA DENSITY/PERCENT DRY ASH RELATIONSHIPS The Density/Ash Relationship of a South Texas Lignite Deposit Characterization of a South Texas Lignite Deposit CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES. 52 53 53 53... 58 64 67 6g 80 87 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I Coal Classification by Rank. 2 Common Minerals in Coal. 3 Results of Linear Regression Analyses for a South Texas Lignite Deposit. 4 Variability of Geophysica11y-Derived Percent Dry Ash Values...

Wright, David Scott

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash forming acid-resistant Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

European Summer Fly Ash Workshop," Warsaw, Poland, June 2005. Department... combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include fly...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash financial aspects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference on Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag, and Natural Pozzolans in Concrete, Bangkok, Thailand Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash separators Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference on Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag, and Natural Pozzolans in Concrete, Bangkok, Thailand Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash flowable fill Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: ash as filler. A highly flowable concrete is not necessarily self-compacting because SCC should... ;4. Kurita, M., and Nomura, T., "High-Flowable Steel...

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash sekitanbai wo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-sulfurcoal combustionby-products generated by using both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department...

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes analisis espectroquimico Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-sulfurcoal combustionby-products generated by using both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes oral biotillgaenglighet Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-sulfurcoal combustionby-products generated by using both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash projekt vaendoera Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

generated by using both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

292

CAS Alumni & Development Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding Cell Structure in the Doe Lab Four Stars Alumni Tech Talk Search Class Notes Online 1245://cas.uoregon.edu/alumnidev/cascade/2006spring/comix.html (1 of 6)6/19/2007 9:45:45 AM #12;CAS Alumni & Development "This was deep stuff of the Comparative Literature Reading Project. Spiegelman's work shows us that comics can be "a form capacious enough

Oregon, University of

293

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer - 2 A thin electronic chip is in the shape of a square wafer, b = 1 cm surface of the chip with a heat transfer coefficient of h = 100 W/m2 -K. Assume the chip has a uniform per side with a mass of m = 0.3 grams and specific heat of C = 103 J/kg-K. The chip is mounted

Virginia Tech

294

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.

Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

High Carbon Fly Ash Treatment | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon Fly Ash Treatment

297

Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey:form ViewBlackBloomfield,710541°,Ash, Ohio: Energy

298

Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA Crump Geyser: High Precision...

299

Colorado Springs Utilities- Energy Efficient Builder Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) Energy Efficient Builder Program offers an incentive to builders who construct ENERGY STAR qualified homes within the CSU service area. The incentive range...

300

Athletic Training Coordinator Hometown: Colorado Springs, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHO WE ARE Gaby Bell Athletic Training Coordinator Hometown: Colorado Springs, CO Certifications Athletic Training Graduate Assistant Jonathan Hodapp Student Athletic Trainer Mike Carlson Student Athletic

Van Stryland, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrological property measurements of Topopah Spring Tuff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the progress made during FY 1994 on hydrological property measurements of samples from Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These measurements were performed in the laboratory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This report contains descriptions of experimental designs and procedures, data, observations, and preliminary analyses, and also describes planned future work. The report is organized into three sections: (1) permeability of fractured Topopah Spring tuff as a function of temperature and confining pressure; (2) electrical properties of Topopah Spring tuff as a function of temperature and of saturation; and (3) moisture retention measurements of Topopah Spring tuff as a function of temperature.

Roberts, J.J.; Lin, W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A study of spring rates of dynamically loaded helical springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

95. 0 95. 0 95. 0 41 Table 9. Dimensionless Values Run Numbers Inclusive F2/F. l Y2/YI Key for Figure 14 1 ? 12 13 -24 25 ? 36 3. 48 2. 63 3. 39 3. 72 2. 74 3. 39 37 - 48 49 ? 60 61- 72 12. 00 8. 98 5. 81 12. 00 8. 72 5. 58... Y2 Yl FIGURE 14. GRAPH Of VALUES FROM TABLE 9 FOR ALL SPRINGS EXCEPT NO. 6 44 55 54 / / / t 52 51 50 49 48 F2 Ibf 47 45 44 43 / / I / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / q/ G / Q&l qP/ / / / / i...

Whitwell, Franklin Carroll

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure describes the methods used to determine the amount of moisture or total solids present in a freeze-dried algal biomass sample, as well as the ash content. A traditional convection oven drying procedure is covered for total solids content, and a dry oxidation method at 575?C is covered for ash content.

Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the results of research performed in developing high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete incorporating ASTM Type I cement and ASTM Class F fly ash from Big Brown Power Plant of TU Electric, Texas. In HVFA concrete, the proportion...

Li, Wei Tung

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).

Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status. Daniel M. Peters and R. G is to allow further assessment of the role of volcanic ash in atmospheric chem- istry, and radiative transfer. Applications of the measurements include: · Radiative transfer from: ­ Scattering solar radiation. ­ Absorption

Oxford, University of

307

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore sampled in the continental margins offshore India (Fig 1). A volcanic ash layer was recovered below seafloor Surrounding Sediments: Grey sediment in A is a nannofossil and plant debris bearing clay

New Hampshire, University of

308

FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The Class F fly ashes are normally generated due to combustion of anthracite or bituminous coal. The Class CFLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION - AN OVERVIEW* By Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E. Director, Center GENERATION AND UTILIZATION - AN OVERVIEW By Tarun R. Naik, and Shiw S. Singh ABSTRACT This chapter describes

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

309

Emission Control Technology, Performance/Durability -POSTER Effect of Accelerated Ash Loading on Performance of Diesel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Performance of Diesel Particulate Filters and Morphology of Ash Layers Bruce G. Bunting and Todd J. Toops using a single-cylinder diesel engine has been developed for accelerated ash loading in catalyzed and non- catalyzed diesel particular filters (DPF) made of cordierite, SiC and mullite substrate

Pennycook, Steve

310

California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S. [Indian Institute for Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. for Civil Engineering

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial fly ash-clay Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fly ash-clay Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Summary: studied. Context SiO2 CaO Al2O3 OPC BFS Class C fly ash Clays Metakaolin...

312

Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

313

Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* , L. S. Fisher1 , J of the potential for carbon sequestration in degraded mine lands, we have found that based on laboratory and field and its influence on carbon sequestration. Also, addition of fly ash to soil, while generally considered

Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

314

Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted vadose zone. ? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Over 100 million tons of fly ash

Aydilek, Ahmet

315

Ash, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the metacarpus of hereford cows under different nutritional and physiological conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASH, CALCIUM, PHOSPHORUS AND MAGNESIUM CONTENT OF THE METACARPUS OF HEREFORD COWS UNDER DIFFERENT NUTRITIONAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CONDITIONS A Thesis By MOZAMMEL HAQUE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... centages of Calcium, Phosphorus snd Magnesium in Bone Ash for Cows Gi;en Different Treatments During Pre- And Post-Partum Periods 22 10 Analysis of Variance oi Calcium in Bone Ash Dun an's )tultiple tvange Test 1'or Calcium in Bone Ash. Analy...

Haque, Mozammel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety)

Fernandes, M. R. S., E-mail: monica.fernandes@lanxess.com [Lanxess Elastmeros do Brasil S.A., Brasil and Instituto de Qumica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) (Brazil); Furtado, C. R. G., E-mail: russi@globo.com, E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com; Sousa, A. M. F. de, E-mail: russi@globo.com, E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com [Instituto de Qumica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) (Brazil)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Influence of curing temperature on cement hydration and mechanical strength development of fly ash mortars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of fly ash and curing temperature on cement hydration and compressive strength development of mortars was investigated. Test parameters included type of fly ash (two different Class F fly ashes were tested), the level of cement replacement (10, 20 and 30% by mass), and curing temperature (20 C and 40 C). The mortar physical and microstructural properties were determined by means of thermal analyses, compressive strength measurements and SEM observations. Test results confirm that fly ash tends to increase significantly the rate of cement hydration at early age. Data also demonstrate that an elevation of the curing temperature reduces the long-term compressive strength of the reference mortar mixture. In contrast, an increase of the curing temperature seems to have no detrimental effect on the long-term compressive strength of the fly ash mixtures.

Maltais, Y.; Marchand, J. [Univ. Laval, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Recherche Interuniversitaire sur le Beton] [Univ. Laval, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Recherche Interuniversitaire sur le Beton

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

pH-dependent leaching of dump coal ash - retrospective environmental analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace and major elements in coal ash particles from dump of 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant in Obrenovac near Belgrade (Serbia) can cause pollution, due to leaching by atmospheric and surface waters. In order to assess this leaching potential, dump ash samples were subjected to extraction with solutions of decreasing pH values (8.50, 7.00, 5.50, and 4.00), imitating the reactions of the alkaline ash particles with the possible alkaline, neutral, and acidic (e.g., acid rain) waters. The most recently deposited ash represents the greatest environmental threat, while 'aged' ash, because of permanent leaching on the dump, was shown to have already lost this pollution potential. On the basis of the determined leachability, it was possible to perform an estimation of the acidity of the regional rainfalls in the last decades.

Popovic, A.; Djordjevic, D. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

322

Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

323

Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...

324

Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

325

Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute...

326

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study reports chemical analyses of fluids sampled from the Sulphur Springs within the caldera and from several hotcold springs...

327

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

328

Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

329

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and...

330

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

331

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

332

Aeromagnetic Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

literature review of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area. Notes Aeromagnetic intensity residual map compiled for Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area, providing...

333

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique...

334

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

335

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

336

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lake City Hot Springs Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity...

337

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs District Heating District Heating Low...

338

Geologic map of the Sulphur Springs Area, Valles Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area are described. Geologic faults, sheared or brecciated rock, volcanic vents, geothermal wells, hydrothermal alteration, springs, thermal springs, fumaroles, and geologic...

339

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Abstract Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft...

340

Metal Bioavailability and Speciation in a Wetland Tailings Repository Amended with Biosolids Compost, Wood Ash, and Sulfate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compost, Wood Ash, and Sulfate Pam S. DeVolder, Sally L. Brown,* Dean Hesterberg, and Kumi Pandya ABSTRACT tundra swans surface amendments: (i) biosolids compost plus wood ash, (ii) and other animals found in the area have tested positive compost wood ash a low SO2 4 addition as K2SO4, and (iii) for Pb poisoning

Brown, Sally

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung The use of fly ash as an admixture results in enhancement of the electromagnetic interference (EMI of fly ash as an admixture for enhancing the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. EMI shielding

Chung, Deborah D.L.

343

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low 2005 Available online 4 November 2005 Abstract Paper sludge ash was partially converted into zeolites by reaction with 3 M NaOH solution at 90 C for 24 h. The paper sludge ash had a low abundance of Si

Downs, Robert T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb., 1990), p. 571.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Erratum J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb, February 1990 ERRATUM J. MARSHALL ASH The paper "A new proof of uniqueness for multiple trigonometric series" by J. Marshall Ash, which appeared in 107(2) October 1989, should have been entitled "A new proof

Ash, J. Marshall

345

Spring Already? | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the AmericasDOE-STD-3020-2005 December 2005DepartmentSpring

346

Spring is here | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I. Tudosa,Spreading an Idea From9Spring

347

Hot Springs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIII Wind Farm FacilityPotSprings Jump to:

348

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the benefication of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7-2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash benefication have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550-750{degrees}C. The P{sub O{sub 2}} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

BPA and partners surmount unique obstacles on Grand Coulee project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Articles (by tag) Lineman shares life-saving skills with electrical workers in Suriname Thursday, January 08, 2015 NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors, energy-saving competition...

350

Microsoft Word - GrandCouleeFiber_CX_2014.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

it into compliance. The fiber would be moved underground through a new conduit of 4-foot PVC pipe that would be installed as part of this project. The conduit would be 130 feet...

351

Spring Semester 2013 Courses, Independent Studio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring Semester 2013 Courses, Independent Studio and Workshops 13 week term: January 28 - April 27.fas.harvard.edu/ceramics #12;Ceramics Program Spring 2013 Course Offerings January 28 - April 27, 2013 Beginning - Advanced and hard slabs, plaster molds and coil building. Collective Perspective Instructor: Delanie Wise

352

ENGINEERING 12 SPRING 2008 PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the primary and secondary coils. #12;ENGINEERING 12, SPRING 2008 2/3 LABORATORY 1 One of the most commonENGINEERING 12 SPRING 2008 PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS LABORATORY 1: TRANSFORMERS Objectives or counterclockwise). In the following discussion the subscript 1 will be used for the primary coil and the subscript

Moreshet, Tali

353

Spring Semester 2015 Courses, Independent Studio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring Semester 2015 Courses, Independent Studio and Workshops 14 week term: January 26 ­ May 2 Brandl #12;Ceramics Program Spring 2015 Course Offerings 14 week term: January 26 ­ May 2 Beginning) Augment your hand building skills in this fun yet challenging course. Coil and slab building as well

Chou, James

354

Spring 2013 International Peer Advisor Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2013 International Peer Advisor Application Are you interested in being a part of the Spring 2013 New International Student Orientations as an International Peer Advisor? Complete the attached Arrival Orientation Duties of an International Peer Advisor: · Meet new international students · Help

Texas at Arlington, University of

355

0 INNOVATE> SPRING 2007 Innovating Healing,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stem cells along engineered pathways; polymer-based systems for vaccine delivery with the potential, then, are the stories of three young chemical engineers--and three innovations that can give hope0 INNOVATE> SPRING 2007 Innovating Healing, #12;SPRING 2007>INNOVATE Engineering Hope N THE SUMMER

Lin, Zhiqun

356

Spring 2006 CS 649 1 Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency Scalability & Self- configuration Fairness not important Message-level Latency Trade for energy Adaptivity Adaptivity #12;MAC and Its Classification Spring 2006 CS 649 4 · Medium Access Control Attributes Spring 2006 CS 649 5 · Collision avoidance · Basic task of a MAC protocol · Energy efficiency

Amir, Yair

357

PAID INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES SPRING AND SUMMER 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAID INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES SPRING AND SUMMER 2014 ABOUT THE PROGRAM: The Virginia Space Grant colleges are offering the Commonwealth STEM Industry Internship Program (CSIIP). CSIIP is a free resource for finding paid spring, summer, and fall internships. CSIIP provides an online system where undergraduate

Buehrer, R. Michael

358

Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial #12;Table of Contents: Page Project personnel ..........................................................................................................10-17 #12;2 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial, 2013 Project Leader: Brooke Bohannon Canola Variety Evaluation. #12;4 Montana State University, College of Agriculture, Montana Agricultural

Dyer, Bill

359

Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2012 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial #12;1 Table of Contents: Page Project ..........................................................................................................12-29 #12;2 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial, 2012 Project Leader: Brooke Bohannon@landolakes.com Bayer CropScience InVigor L120 H LL Mr. Jordan Varberg InVigor L130 H LL Hybrid Canola Marketing

Dyer, Bill

360

JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Oxonation Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the fifth quarterly report and it refers to the time period from April-July 2005. (An additional month is included in this quarterly report as we have been in a data analyses mode and wanted to provide new data relative to the previous report). During this period, the project team has been reviewing and analyzing data from the onsite ozonation tests, as well as conducting additional laboratory ash and concrete tests. This report summarizes these activities including some preliminary results. No significant issues or concerns are identified.

Larry LaBuz; Rui Afonso

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Petrography and chemistry of sized fly ash from low-sulfur and high-sulfur coal sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fly ash samples were collected in November and December, 1994, from two units representing high- and low-sulfur feed coals at a Kentucky power station. The ashes were wet screened at 100, 200, 325, and 500 mesh. The dried ({approximately}40 C) fractions were then weighed, split for petrographic and chemical analysis, mounted in epoxy and prepared as polished pellets, and analyzed for ash yield and carbon content. The November ashes had a similar size distribution in the +325 mesh fractions. The low-sulfur hot side and cool side ashes had a similar size distribution in the November ashes. In contrast, the December fly ashes showed the typical trend, the cool-side ash being finer (over 20% more ash in the {minus}500 mesh fraction) than the hot-side ash. Carbon tends to be relatively concentrated in the coarse fractions. The dominance of the {minus}325 mesh fractions in the overall size analysis implies, though, that carbon in the fine sizes is an important consideration in the utilization potential of the fly ash.

Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Trimble, A.S. [Franklin County High School, Frankfort, KY (United States); Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Palmer, C. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Conversion of Fly Ash into Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Hsiao-Lan Chang, Chang-Min Chun, Ilhan A. Aksay, and Wei-Heng Shih*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and aluminum sources. Fly ash, which is a byproduct of coal burning, contains mostly aluminosilicates. Recently, several authors have studied the conversion of fly ash into zeolites.5-7 Shige- moto et al.8 increased the yield of zeolites by first fusing the fly ash with NaOH. The reaction of fly ash with NaOH produced

Aksay, Ilhan A.

368

Behavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gravity based sys- tems suspension mechanisms or linear spring based systems coil springs or rubber unitsBehavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems Shenlei Cui, M.ASCE1 ; Michel of bidirectional spring units used as isolators in a kind of isolated floor system, three types of characterization

Bruneau, Michel

369

Comparison of photosynthetic responses of Ashe juniper and live oak on the Edwards Plateau, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei Bucholz) has encroached into the historical grasslands of the Edwards Plateau. This area is environmentally sensitive as it serves as the recharge zone for the Edwards aquifer, providing large municipalities...

Bendevis, Mira Arpe

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

Soil stabilization using optimum quantity of calcium chloride with Class F fly ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-going research at Texas A&M University indicated that soil stabilization using calcium chloride filter cake along with Class F fly ash generates high strength. Previous studies were conducted with samples containing calcium chloride filter cake...

Choi, Hyung Jun

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Heterogeneous Surface-Based Freezing of Atmospheric Aerosols Containing Ash, Soot, and Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nucleation will occur through one of several mechanisms including the contact and immersion freezing mechanisms. Through a series of contact freezing experiments, we have characterized the ability of aerosols composed of volcanic ash, soot, and peat soil...

Fornea, Adam P.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ashe juniper seed production and germination, seedling dynamics and response of live oak/juniper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Germination of Ashe juniper seed were compared in a controlled environment at different levels of fruit maturation, lengths of storage, and seed stratification to determine potential germination. Annual mean germination varied by an order...

Reinecke, Rudolph Klaus

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash belite cement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 77 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: to a construc- tion material...

374

Leaching of Metals from Fly ash-Amended Permeable Reactive Barriers Doina L. Morar 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Petzrick 2001). Unfortunately, this HCC fly ash cannot be beneficially reused in the construction industry organic and inorganic pollutants. Specific reactive materials such as wood chips, limestone, manure (USEPA

Aydilek, Ahmet

375

2007 American Coal Ash Association membership directory as of June 21, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A listing of names, addresses, contact numbers and websites is given for 101 members of the American Coal Ash Association. Honorary members are also named. Included are power generation companies, combustion by-product manufacturers and university departments.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash dump leachate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Volume 28, no. 1, Jan.-Feb. 1999.Copyright0 1999,ASA, CSSA, SSSA Summary: ). Leachate Analysis PH The pH values for all leachates from the ash- and sludge-amended soil columns...

377

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash cements stabilized Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 6 By-Products Utilization Summary: OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE 12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu... as setting time...

378

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash 25mi ja Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coal-fired power plants that may be applied at WTE facilities combusting... proved solution for dry bottom ash collection and handling. Up to now the MAC system has been...

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash-flow tuff yucca Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ash-flow tuff yucca Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 27 (1986)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Lubricant-derived ash : in-engine sources and opportunities for reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent emissions regulations that limit particulate matter. Over time, ash primarily derived from metallic additives in the engine oil ...

Watson, Simon A. G. (Simon Andrew Glean)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Iron distribution among phases in high- and low-sulfur coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moessbauer spectroscopy, reflected-light optical microscopy, scanning-electron microscopy, wet chemical, and X-ray diffraction studies were conducted on six fly ash samples. The fly ashes, representing the combustion by-products of coals with total sulfur contents of less than 2% to greater than 4%, ranged from 17.6 to 32.0% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by XRF analysis. Wet chemical analysis was used to determine the Fe{sup 3+}/{summation}Fe content of the ashes, which ranged from 72% to 83%. Optical analysis of the ashes indicated that the spinel, encompassing iron oxides of various compositions, ranges from 4.0 to 12.6% (vol.). Moessbauer analyses confirmed the presence of three Fe-bearing phases: magnetite, hematite (possibly of two different compositions), and glass. The variation in the Fe-oxidation state follows the variation in the sulfur, consequently pyrite, content of the feed coal.

Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M.; Rathbone, R.F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Dyar, M.D.; Taylor, M.E. [West Chester Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Astronomy

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash fiber fundamental Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Composite Interfaces 18 (2011) 169184 brill.nlci Summary: Fiber-Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete with Fly Ash Osman Gencel a,b , Witold Brostow b, , Tea... . Important for...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash-silica fume pastes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Engineering 100 By-Products Utilization Summary: of Recycled Aggregates in Self-Compacting4 Concrete", Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag and Natural Pozzolans... (0.00028 in.). For...

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash washing experiments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Std. Dev. type prep . calc.b "out" (m%,d) (m... of the total chlorine in the ash, condensate (from collector ... Source: Columbia University - Waste-to-Energy Research and...

387

Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekmann, James M. (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and Regeneration Damage for DPFs Charles E.A. Finney, Todd J. Toops, C. Stuart Daw Oak Ridge National Laboratory Jan...

389

CMSC 412101 (Spring 1996) Professor: TA: TA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMSC 412­101 (Spring 1996) Professor: TA: TA: Dr. Jeff Hollingsworth Charles Lin Alex Kaplunovich 4161 AV Williams 1109 A V Williams 1109 A V Williams (40) 5­2708 hollings@cs.umd.edu clin

Hollingsworth, Jeffrey K.

390

CMSC 412 (Spring 2002) Professor: TA: TA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMSC 412 (Spring 2002) Professor: TA: TA: Dr. Jeff Hollingsworth Abdel-Hameed Badawy Cemal Yilmaz 4161 AV Williams 1151 A V Williams 1151 A V Williams (40) 5-2708 hollings@cs.umd.edu absalam

Hollingsworth, Jeffrey K.

391

Insights into Spring 2008 Gasoline Prices  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Gasoline prices rose rapidly in spring 2007 due a variety of factors, including refinery outages and lower than expected imports. This report explores those factors and looks at the implications for 2008.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Colorado Springs Utilities- Renewable Energy Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Through its Renewable Energy Rebate Program, Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) offers a rebate to customers who install grid-connected solar-electric (PV) systems, wind systems, and solar water...

393

Spring into Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of spring with unbridled glee. At the first glimpse of a cherry blossom, the winter boots are banished to the back of the closet and the sandals are put to work in earnest. But...

394

Advisor's name: ______________________________________ SPRING 2014 SOJ ADVISING SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advisor's name: ______________________________________ SPRING 2014 SOJ ADVISING SURVEY appointments to see your advisor? _________Current online scheduler _________A new online scheduling system would you like to meet with your advisor? _________Once per month _________Once per semester

Mohaghegh, Shahab

395

amagazineforalumniandfriendsoftheinstituteoftechnology|spring/summer2008 ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amagazineforalumniandfriendsoftheinstituteoftechnology|spring/summer2008 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTErmit PAttison Environmental Impact · 16 Institute of Technology faculty are working to solve today've made it a priority. The University has a long history of environmental research that dates back several

Minnesota, University of

396

The Cultivar, Spring/Summer 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

awareness of foods carbon footprint, or a desire to knowabout, such as their carbon footprint and global warm-part of a campuss carbon footprint. With the Spring 2008

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 230 Spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycles Refrigeration and heat pump systems Final Exam (Date and time TBA) Suggested Reading Chapter 1Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 230 Spring 2012 Thermodynamics Course Syllabus Date Week 1 (1

Rothstein, Jonathan

398

Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fiscal Year 1997 (Summer 1996-Spring 1997) A total of 517 students studied abroad; an additional 62) N Am: 36 (10) #12;Oceania: 39 (1) S Am: 100 (2) July, 1997 #12;

Willson, Stephen J.

399

Optical spring effect in nanoelectromechanical systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, we report a hybrid system consisting of nano-optical and nano-mechanical springs, in which the optical spring effect works to adjust the mechanical frequency of a nanoelectromechanical systems resonator. Nano-scale folded beams are fabricated as the mechanical springs and double-coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities are used to pump the optical spring. The dynamic characteristics of this hybrid system are measured and analyzed at both low and high input optical powers. This study leads the physical phenomenon of optomechanics in complex nano-opto-electro-mechanical systems (NOEMS) and could benefit the future applications of NOEMS in chip-level communication and sensing.

Tian, Feng; Zhou, Guangya, E-mail: mpezgy@nus.edu.sg; Du, Yu; Chau, Fook Siong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Deng, Jie [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

400

2009 CAPS Spring Forecast Program Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

package. · Two 18 UTC update forecasts on demand basis, with the same domain and configuration, running2009 CAPS Spring Forecast Experiment Program Plan April 20, 2009 #12;2 Table of Content 1. Overview .......................................................................................................4 3. Forecast System Configuration

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Spring 2013 Composite Data Products - Backup Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes 21 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2013 for fuel cell backup power systems.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Term: Spring 2013 University of Pittsburgh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Term: Spring 2013 1 University of Pittsburgh HOUSING/DINING SERVICES CONTRACT This Housing/Dining Services Contract (this "Contract") is made by and between the University of Pittsburgh

Sibille, Etienne

403

Term: Spring 2012 University of Pittsburgh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Term: Spring 2012 1 University of Pittsburgh HOUSING/DINING SERVICES CONTRACT This Housing/Dining Services Contract (this "Contract") is made by and between the University of Pittsburgh

Sibille, Etienne

404

SpringSummer 2007 1 Hello Again!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring­Summer 2007 1 Hello Again! 1 Director's Message 2 In Other News: Special Announcement applications. The continued on page 2 Hello Again! We hope you have had an opportunity to read our first two e

Rau, Don C.

405

Math 373 Quiz 6 Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 373. Quiz 6. Spring 2014. April 17, 2014. 1. Zijing is buying 100 shares of Sun Corporation. Zijing will pay commissions of 0.50 per share. At the same time,

jeffb_000

2014-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

SP.778 Toy Product Design, Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toy Product Design is a MIT Public Service Center learning design course offered in the Spring semester. This course is an introduction to the product design process with a focus on designing for play and entertainment. ...

Kudrowitz, Barry M. (Barry Matthew)

407

STAT 479 Spring 2013 Test 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STAT 479. Spring 2013. Test 1. February 12, 2013. 1. (10 points) The random variable X is the loss under a medical insurance policy and is distributed as a 2...

Owner

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

MATH 373 Spring 2014 Test 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH 373. Spring 2014. Test 1. February 18, 2013. 1. Amar wants to accumulate 1 million (1,000,000) by the time that he is 50 years old. Amar is currently 20...

jeffb_000

2014-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Influence of age/size and grazing history on understory relationships of Ashe juniper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF AGE/SIZE AND GRAZING HISTORY ON UNDERSTORY RELATIONSHIPS OF ASHE JUNIPER A Thesis by SAMUEL DEAN FUHLENDORF Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Rangeland Ecology and Management INFLUENCE OF AGE/SIZE AND GRAZING HISTORY ON UNDERSTORY RELATIONSHIPS OF ASHE JUNIPER A Thesis by SAMUEL DEAN FUHLENDORF Approved as to style and content by...

Fuhlendorf, Samuel Dean

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Selected life history and synecological characteristics of ashe juniper on the Edwards Plateau of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELECTED LIFE HISTORY AND SYNECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ASHE JUNIPER ON THE EDWARDS PLATEAU OF TEXAS A Thesis by KEVIN WAYNE BLOMQUIST Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Range Science SELECTED LIFE HISTORY AND SYNECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ASHE JUNIPER QN THE EDWARDS PLATEAU OF TEXAS A Thesis by KEVIN WAYNE BLOMQUIST Approved as to style...

Blomquist, Kevin Wayne

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Canopy, litter and allelopathic effects of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei, Buchholz) on understory vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANOPY, ~ AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fufillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Range Science CANOPY, LIITER AND ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF ASHE JUNIPER (JUNIPERUS ASHEI, BUCHHOLZ) ON UNDERSTORY VEGETATION A Thesis by LISA YVONNE YAGER Submitted to Texas A...

Yager, Lisa Yvonne

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evaluation of lime-fly ash stabilized bases and subgrades using static and dynamic deflection systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF LIME-FLY ASH STABILIZED BASFS AND SUBGRADES USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC DEFLECTION SYSTEMS A Thesis GARY W. RABA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF LIME-FLY ASH STABILIZED BASES AND SUBGRADES USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC DEFLECTION SYSTEMS A Thesis by Gary Nl. Raba Approved as to style and content by: !Chairman...

Raba, Gary W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Factors influencing plant succession following fire in Ashe juniper woodland types in Real County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS INFLUENCING PLANT SUCCESSION FOLLOWING FIRE IN ASHE JUHIPER WOODLAND TYPES IN REAL COUNTY& TEXAS By DONAID L. RUSS Approved as to style end content by: ~c-". '~ Z). 4:-. = Chairman of Committee Bead of Depantme Nay l954. LIBgARV A... A M GOLLEGL OF TEXAS FACTORS INFLUENCING PLANT SUCCESSION FOLLOWING FIRE IN ASHE JUNIPER WO(NILAND TIPES IN REAL COUNTI, TEUIS Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment oi...

Huss, Donald Lee

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Industrial properties of lignitic and lignocellulosic fly ashes from Turkish sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fly ash is an inorganic matter from combustion of the carbonaceous solid fuels. More than half the electricity in Turkey is produced from lignite-fired power plants. This energy production has resulted in the formation of more than 13 million tons of fly ash waste annually. The presence of carbon in fly ash inducing common faults include adding unwanted black color and adsorbing process or product materials such as water and chemicals. One of the reasons for not using fly ash directly is its carbon content. For some uses carbon must be lower than 3%. Fly ash has been used for partial replacement of cement, aggregate, or both for nearly 70 years, and it is still used on a very limited scale in Turkey. The heavy metal content of industrial wastewaters is an important source of environmental pollution. Each of the three major oxides (SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in fly ash can be ideal as a metal adsorbent.

Demirbas, A.; Cetin, S. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

2006-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. The Ontario Hydro method was used to determine the total amount of Hg passing through the filter as well as the percentages of elemental and oxidized Hg collected. Results indicated that substantial amounts of Hg oxidation did not occur with either fly ash, regardless of the temperature used for testing. When oxidation was observed, the magnitude of the oxidation was comparable between the two fly ashes. These results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important than the ash components with respect to the distribution of Hg species observed in gaseous effluents at coal-fired power plants.

Glenn A. Norton

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Investigation of fly ash carbon by thermal analysis and optical microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previous study investigated various fly ashes that had comparable loss on ignition values, but significant differences with respect to air entrainment performance. Thermal analysis data suggested that a poorly performing fly ash, with respect to air entrainment, contained a higher proportion of carbon that gasifies (oxidizes) at comparatively low temperatures. A relatively high abundance of isotropic carbon was identified in the poor-performing ash using optical microscopy. The present investigation examined a larger collection of fly ash samples to determine if thermal analysis could be used as a prognostic tool for fly ash performance. An attempt was made to correlate mortar air and foam index values for each sample with differential thermal analysis (DTA) data. Optical microscopy and BET surface area analysis were used as supportive techniques. No clear relationship could be established with the thermal or optical methods, although fly ash performance did correlate well with BET surface area. A low temperature component of the DTA exotherms was considered to be a function of inorganic catalytic species that reside on the carbon surface and lower the ignition temperature.

Hill, R. [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States); Rathbone, R.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research] [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effect of environment atmosphere on the sintering of Thai lignite fly ashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sintering of ash particles, related to deposit formation in a pulverized coal-fired boiler, was investigated for two lignite fly ashes obtained from Mae Moh and Bangpudum coal seams. The tests involved measuring the compressive strength of cold sintered pellets at varying sintering temperature, both under oxidizing (air) and non-oxidizing atmospheres (CO{sub 2}). Under ambient air condition, Mae Moh fly ash which contained higher amount of glassy phase gave significantly higher sinter strength than Bangpudum fly ash. The role of glassy phase was confirmed by the lowering of sinter strength when HF-extracted fly ash was tested. Sintering under CO{sub 2} environment resulted in larger strength development than sintering in air. Under this non-oxidizing condition, the pellet color turned black, indicating that most of the iron was in the reduced state and could form additional low melting-point glassy phase, hence facilitated sintering rate. In addition, blending of the two ashes yielded intermediate maximum strength, under both air and CO{sub 2} environments. This observation substantiates the important role of glassy phase in the sintering process and indicates the possibility of lowering deposit strength by judicious mixing of different raw coal feeds.

Tangsathitkulchai, C.; Tangsathitkulchai, M. [Suranaree Univ. of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the CSH and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the CSH. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the CSH and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: The reaction of quartz powder at 80 C strongly enhances the compressive strength. Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 C was found after 2 days. Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 C correlates with sulphate content of CSH.

Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, berlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dbendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, berlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dbendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, berlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dbendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, berlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dbendorf (Switzerland); Neubauer, Jrgen [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cross-shaped torsional spring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

Williamson, M.M.; Pratt, G.A.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

Weldon Spring historical dose estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Spring Fever Alfalfa The Pitfalls of Spring Seeding Alfalfa in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring Fever Alfalfa­ The Pitfalls of Spring Seeding Alfalfa in West Texas Calvin Trostle received quite a few questions on alfalfa during January, and this is probably not a good sign as it means reasons. With alfalfa selling at good prices and the word that many new dairies are planned

Mukhtar, Saqib

424

Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 2 and 72 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

Garca-Mat, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Qumica Inorgnica, Cristalografa y Mineraloga, Universidad de Mlaga, 29071 Mlaga (Spain)] [Departamento de Qumica Inorgnica, Cristalografa y Mineraloga, Universidad de Mlaga, 29071 Mlaga (Spain); Len-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigacin, Universidad de Mlaga, 29071 Mlaga (Spain)] [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigacin, Universidad de Mlaga, 29071 Mlaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Qumica Inorgnica, Cristalografa y Mineraloga, Universidad de Mlaga, 29071 Mlaga (Spain) [Departamento de Qumica Inorgnica, Cristalografa y Mineraloga, Universidad de Mlaga, 29071 Mlaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Qumica Inorgnica, Cristalografa y Mineraloga, Universidad de Mlaga, 29071 Mlaga (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

488-4D ASH LANDFILL CLOSURE CAP HELP MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP) in support of the 488-4D Landfill closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) modeling of the planned 488-4D Ash Landfill closure cap to ensure that the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) limit of no more than 12 inches of head on top of the barrier layer (saturated hydraulic conductivity of no more than 1.0E-05 cm/s) in association with a 25-year, 24-hour storm event is not projected to be exceeded. Based upon Weber 1998 a 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches. The results of the HELP modeling indicate that the greatest peak daily head on top of the barrier layer (i.e. geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) or high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane) for any of the runs made was 0.079 inches associated with a peak daily precipitation of 6.16 inches. This is well below the SCDHEC limit of 12 inches.

Phifer, M.

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul; Prasert Pavasant [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand). Department of Chemical Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Predicting the Operating Behavior of Ceramic Filters from Thermo-Mechanical Ash Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stable operation, in other words the achievement of a succession of uniform filtration cycles of reasonable length is a key issue in high-temperature gas filtration with ceramic media. Its importance has rather grown in recent years, as these media gain in acceptance due to their excellent particle retention capabilities. Ash properties have been known for some time to affect the maximum operating temperature of filters. However, softening and consequently ''stickiness'' of the ash particles generally depend on composition in a complex way. Simple and accurate prediction of critical temperature ranges from ash analysis--and even more so from coal analysis--is still difficult without practical and costly trials. In general, our understanding of what exactly happens during break-down of filtration stability is still rather crude and general. Early work was based on the concept that ash particles begin to soften and sinter near the melting temperatures of low-melting, often alkaline components. This softening coincides with a fairly abrupt increase of stickiness, that can be detected with powder mechanical methods in a Jenicke shear cell as first shown by Pilz (1996) and recently confirmed by others (Kamiya et al. 2001 and 2002, Kanaoka et al. 2001). However, recording {sigma}-{tau}-diagrams is very time consuming and not the only off-line method of analyzing or predicting changes in thermo-mechanical ash behavior. Pilz found that the increase in ash stickiness near melting was accompanied by shrinkage attributed to sintering. Recent work at the University of Karlsruhe has expanded the use of such thermo-analytical methods for predicting filtration behavior (Hemmer 2001). Demonstrating their effectiveness is one objective of this paper. Finally, our intent is to show that ash softening at near melting temperatures is apparently not the only phenomenon causing problems with filtration, although its impact is certainly the ''final catastrophe''. There are other significant changes in regeneration at intermediate temperatures, which may lead to long-term deterioration.

Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

Melting behavior of ashes from the co-combustion of coal and straw  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Straw may be used today as a substitute fuel to lower the greenhouse gas emissions from traditional coal-fired power plants and provide green-based electricity. It may also provide an alternative source of income to the local farmers helping the developed countries to support sustainable development. The use of straw as a co-firing feedstock in traditional coal-fired plants is associated with operational problems, such as deposition, agglomeration, and/or corrosion, mainly because of the higher amounts of alkali metals and chlorine in straw compared to coal. This may lead to unscheduled shutdowns and costly repairs, increasing the operational costs and the cost of the produced power. In this paper, the melting characteristics of several ash fractions sampled from different parts of a pilot-scale pulverized fuel (PF) boiler operating with different coal/straw mixtures is determined by measuring the ash viscosity using a high-temperature rotational viscometer. The produced data provide information on the melting of the ash material, its flow characteristics, and the rates of crystallization and recrystallization, as a function of the temperature. This information may be used to modify the temperature profile in the different parts of the boiler to reduce the deposition of the ash material. The results show that the straw in the co-combustion mixture changes the viscosity characteristics of the produced ash fractions. The viscosity of the different ash fractions is lowered, as the percentage of straw in the co-combustion mixture increases, and leads to higher stickiness of the produced ash particles at lower temperatures. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

S. Arvelakis; F.J. Frandsen [Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Lyngby (Denmark). CHEC Research Centre

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF of the quarter, and 10% on in­class work, Karplus & Larrabee Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Spring 1998

Karplus, Kevin

433

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN | Spring 2012Undergraduate Recruitment Magazine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN | Spring 2012Undergraduate Recruitment Magazine Adventuresin Australia of Saskatchewan Undergraduate Recruitment Magazine SPRING 2012 MANAGER OF UNDERGRADUATE RECRUITMENT Dan Seneker: Student and Enrolment Services Division University of Saskatchewan 38 College Building Saskatoon, SK S7N 5

Peak, Derek

434

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN | Spring 2014Undergraduate Recruitment Magazine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN | Spring 2014Undergraduate Recruitment Magazine Starting on page 8 University of Saskatchewan Undergraduate Recruitment Magazine US is published annually and reaches more than 4,000 prospective University of Saskatchewan students. Spring 2014 Manager of Undergraduate

Saskatchewan, University of

435

BIOSC 871-02 Spring 2004 Dr. Margaret Ptacek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOSC 871-02 Spring 2004 SPECIATION Dr. Margaret Ptacek Week of Topic Thurs. Discussion Leader 1 VERSION OF PAPER DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 23 #12;2 BIOSC 871-02 Spring 2004 SPECIATION INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Margaret

Ptacek, Margaret B.

436

Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for eight springs along the Corral Creek drainage. The springs along Corral Creek have Na-K-Ca temperatures that average 354C, a direct result of high potassium concentrations in...

438

Nonlinear springs with applications to flow regulation valves and mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the application of nonlinear springs for fluid flow control valves where geometric constraints, or fabrication technologies, limit the use of available solutions. Types of existing nonlinear springs ...

Freeman, David Calvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Forensic Management Academy Spring 2011 Tentative Schedule Forensic Management Academy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forensic Management Academy ­ Spring 2011 Tentative Schedule Forensic Management Academy Spring:00 Tour Forensic Program Facilities 4:30 ­ 7:30 Session VIII Conflict Management Joyce Heames7:00 Free

Mohaghegh, Shahab

440

Investigation of MSWI fly ash melting characteristic by DSC-DTA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The melting process of MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) fly ash has been studied by high-temperature DSC-DTA experiments. The experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-1450 deg. C, and the considerable variables included atmosphere (O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), heating rates (5 deg. C/min, 10 deg. C/min, 20 deg. C/min) and CaO addition. Three main transitions were observed during the melting process of fly ash: dehydration, polymorphic transition and fusion, occurring in the temperature range of 100-200 deg. C, 480-670 deg. C and 1101-1244 deg. C, respectively. The apparent heat capacity and heat requirement for melting of MSWI fly ash were obtained by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). A thermodynamic modeling to predict the heat requirements for melting process has been presented, and it agrees well with the experimental data. Finally, a zero-order kinetic model of fly ash melting transition was established. The apparent activation energy of MSWI fly ash melting transition was obtained.

Li, Rundong [Institute of Clean Energy and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Key Laboratory of Clean Energy, Shenyang Institute of Aeronautical Engineering, Shenyang 110136 (China)], E-mail: leerd@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tianhua; Raninger, Bernhard [Institute of Clean Energy and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Key Laboratory of Clean Energy, Shenyang Institute of Aeronautical Engineering, Shenyang 110136 (China)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Manchester Spring Chinook Broodstock Project, 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This yearly report concerned facilities upgrade and endangered Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon captive broodstock rearing.

McAuley, W.Carlin; Wastel, Michael R.; Flagg, Thomas A. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Trainer, 1974)...

446

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004)...

447

Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity...

448

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995)...

449

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

450

Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Gardner, 2010) Exploration...

451

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Final technical report, September 30, 1992--January 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal ash, and particularly fine fly ash, remain one of the principal practical and environmental problems in coal-based power generation. In particular, submicron aerosols are identified with direct inhalation risk. Submicron ash is thought to arise from mineral vaporization during char combustion, followed by nucleation, condensation and coagulation to yield an aerosol. While aerosols are predominantly made out of volatile alkali minerals, they also can include refractory oxides that are chemically reduced to more volatile forms within the char particle and vaporized. Most of the ash of size greater than 1 {mu}m is generated by agglomeration of mineral as the char particle bums out. These two principal mechanisms are thought to account for most of the ash generated in coal combustion. Previous research has shown that various forms of coal treatment can influence the yields of fine ash from combustion. The research reported here investigates various forms of treatment, including physical coal cleaning, aerodynamic sizing, degree of grinding, and combinations of these on both aerosol yields and on yields of fine residual ash (1-4 {mu}m). The work also includes results from the combustion of artificial chars that include individual mineral elements. This research shows that these various forms of coal treatment can significantly change ash characteristics. While none of the treatments affected the bulk of the residual ash size distribution significantly, the yield of the ash aerosol mode (d<0.5 {mu}m) and fine residual ash mode (1-4 {mu}m) are changed by the treatments.

Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, Jungsung; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical DepthgovCampaignsSpring 1994 Single Column ModelgovCampaignsSpring

453

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring UAV Campaign  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical DepthgovCampaignsSpring 1994 Single ColumngovCampaignsSpring

454

MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 1 Electrical measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

position between coil windings. Circuit designed to have zero output at equilibrium. MTSC735, Spring 20081 MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 1 Electrical measurements Critical to all/reducing noise from measurements MTSC735, Spring 2008 Electrical measurements 2 Measurements Believe nothing

Plaisted, David A.

455

Design of FePd spring actuators Taishi Wada*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The coil spring made by a FSMA is activated by the attractive magnetic force produced by electromagnets on the above principle by using polycrystalline FePd alloy. Since the stiffness of the FePd coil spring become actuation. Keywords: actuator, coil spring, FePd, wire, ferromagnetic shape memory alloy, superelasticity

Taya, Minoru

456

Assessment of the eel stock in Sweden, spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of the eel stock in Sweden, spring 2012 Aqua reports 2012:9 First post-evaluation of the Swedish Eel Management Plan Willem Dekker #12;Assessment of the eel stock in Sweden, spring 2012 First: Dekker, W. (2012). Assessment of the eel stock in Sweden, spring 2012. First post

457

Hot Springs Metropolitan Planning Organization 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hot Springs Area Metropolitan Planning Organization 100 Broadway Terrace Hot Springs, Arkansas 71901 Adopted November 3, 2005 HSA-MPO 2030 LRTPii Participating Agencies Garland County Hot... Federal Highway Administration Federal Transit Administration 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan for the Hot Springs Area Metropolitan Planning Organization This LRTP has been funded with federal Metropolitan Planning (PL) funds through...

Hot Springs Metropolitan Planning Organization

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

West Virginia Business & Economic Review, Spring 2010 1 West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia Business & Economic Review, Spring 2010 1 West Virginia Business & Economic Bureau 18 Spring 2010 #12;West Virginia Business & Economic Review, Spring 2010 West Virginia Economy Hits Bottom In 2010 Excerpt From the West Virginia Economic Outlook 2010 by George W. Hammond, Associate

Mohaghegh, Shahab

459

Fluorination of incinerator ash by hydrofluorination or ammonium bifluoride fusion for plutonium recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incinerator ash containing small quantities of plutonium has been accumulating across the defense complex for many years. Although the total Pu inventory is small, the ash is a nondiscardable residue which presents storage and accountability difficulties. The work discussed here is the result of a joint exploratory effort between members of Savannah River Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory to compare two proposed pyrochemical pretreatments of incinerator ash prior to aqueous processing. These experiments attempted to determine the relative effectiveness of hydrofluorination and ammonium bifluoride fusion as head-end operations for a two step aqueous recovery method. The two pretreatments are being considered as possible second generation enhancements for the New Special Recovery Facility nearing operation at Savannah River Plant. Experimental results and potential engineering concerns are discussed. 3 figs.

Fink, S.D.; Gray, J.H.; Kent, S.J.; Apgar, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Petrography and chemistry of high-carbon fly ash from the Shawnee Power Station, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Shawnee power station in western Kentucky consists of ten 150-MW units, eight of which burn low-sulfur (< 1 wt %) eastern Kentucky and central West Virginia coal. The other units burn medium- and high-sulfur (> 1 wt %) coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion unit and in a research unit. The eight low-sulfur coal units were sampled in a 1992 survey of Kentucky utilities. Little between-unit variation is seen in the ash-basis major oxide and minor element chemistry. The carbon content of the fly ashes varies from 5 to 25 wt %. Similarly, the isotropic and anisotropic coke in the fly ash varies from 6% to 42% (volume basis). Much of the anisotropic coke is a thin-walled macroporous variety, but there is a portion that is a thick-walled variety similar to a petroleum coke.

Hower, J.C.; Thomas, G.A.; Robertson, J.D.; Wong, A.S. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Clifford, D.S.; Eady, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Petrography and chemistry of fly ash from the Shawnee Power Station, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Shawnee Power Station in western Kentucky consists of ten 150 MW units, eight of which burn low-sulfur eastern Kentucky and central West Virginia coal. The other units bum medium and high-sulfur coal in an AFBC unit and in a research unit. The eight low-sulfur coal units were sampled in a 1992 survey of Kentucky utilities. Little between-unit variation is seen in the ash-basis major oxide and minor element chemistry. The carbon content of the fly ashes varies from 5 to 25%. Similarly, the isotropic and anisotropic coke in the fly ash varies from 6 to 42% (volume basis). Much of the anisotropic coke is a thin-walled macroporous variety but there is a portion which is a thick-walled variety similar to a petroleum coke.

Hower, J.C.; Thomas, G.A.; Wild, G.D. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Clifford, D.S.; Eady, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Analysis and correlation of volcanic ash in marine sediments from the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201: explosive volcanic cycles of the north-central Andes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed investigation of cores from three Peru Margin sites drilled during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 201 has been conducted to determine the occurrence of volcanic ash layers and ash accumulations within marine sediments along the Peru...

Hart, Shirley Dawn

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

463

Slonakar carried out research to manufacture forty percent core area fly ash bricks using sodium silicate as the binder, and bottom as the coarse aggregate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia fly ash in manufacture of fly ash bricks. The mix proportion for the bricks was composed silicate as the binder, and bottom as the coarse aggregate [4,5,6,13]. Slonakar [4] utilized a Southern

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

464

ASHE PDC: The Quality and Patient Safety Movement Posted on: 3.15.2011 11:50:52 AM Posted by Jennifer Kovacs, Managing Editor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASHE PDC: The Quality and Patient Safety Movement Posted on: 3.15.2011 11:50:52 AM Posted for Patient Care and Hospital Facilities?" at the ASHE PDC Summit in Tampa, Florida. Benneyan is director

Vaziri, Ashkan

465

Use of Ekibastuzsk coal ash as a filler for acid resistant plaster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acid resistant plasters are used extensively at thermal power plants for protection of gas conduits, ash traps with spouts and hydraulic valves, and the internal surfaces of smoke pump housings. The surface being protected is preliminarily cleaned and a No. 16-20 steel grid attached to the surface by electrial welding. In producing the acid resistant plaster, 14-17 parts by weight of sodium silicofluoride are added to 100 parts by weight of sodium water glass; the remainder consists of andesite or diabase meal to the required consistency. The water glass fulfills the role of a binder; the sodium silicofluoride accelerates solidification of the water glass and the andesite and diabase meal serve as fillers. We found, tested in the laboratory and used successfully (under experimental-industrial conditions) a substitute for andesite and diabase meal. This substitute was ash of Ekibastuzsk coal, which was not only comparable to the meal in regard to quality of the acid resistant plaster, but even exceeded andesite and diabase meal in regard to several qualitative indicators. At the present time, a formula is being developed for an acid resistant plaster produced on the basis of water glass, sodium silicofluoride and ash of Ekibastuzsk coal. In order to verify the possibility of using other ashes instead of andesite and diabase meal, we also tested, under laboratory conditions, acid resistant plasters using ash from thermal power plants (TPP's) also burning Karagandinsk, Kuuchekinsk, Kuznetsk and Kansko-Achinsk coals. In compositions produced with polymer binders, Kansko-Achinsk coal ash was one of the best fillers, providing the most favorable physico-mechanical properties of the composition.

Korsakov, F.F.; Isichenko, I.I.; Kabanov, G.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 1416 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sulfur capture by oil shale ashes under atmospheric and pressurized FBC conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When oil shale contains large quantities of limestone, a significant auto-absorption of sulfur is possible under suitable conditions. The sulfur capture by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. The Ca/S molar ratios in the two oil shales studied were 8 (Estonian) and 10 (Israeli). The samples were first burned in a gas atmosphere containing O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2} if pressurized). After the combustion step, SO{sub 2} was added and sulfation started. The results with the oil shales were compared to those obtained with an oil shale cyclone ash from the Narva power plant in Estonia. In general, the results from the sulfur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized conditions showed that the oil shale cannot only capture its own sulfur but also significant amounts of additional sulfur of another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. For example from the runs at atmospheric pressure, the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} was about 70% for Israeli oil shale and about 55% for Estonian oil shale (850 C). For the cyclone ash the corresponding conversion was about 20%. In comparison it could be mentioned that under the same conditions the conversions of natural limestones are about 30%. The reason the cyclone ash was a poor sulfur absorbent was probably due to its temperature history. In Narva the oil shale was burned at a significantly higher temperature (1,400 C) than was used in the experiments (750 C and 850 C). This caused the ash to sinter and the reactive surface area of the cyclone ash was therefore decreased.

Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kuelaots, I.; Ots, A. [Tallinn Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Geochemistry and mineralogy of fly-ash from the Mae Moh lignite deposit, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concentration of 21 elements in fly ash from three boilers (75 MW, 150 MW, and 300 MW) at the EGAT power plant, Mae Moh, Thailand, were determined by INAA. The concentration of 10 major elements was determined by XRF. As, Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, and Sb generally increase in concentration going from bottom ash (BA) through the sequence of electrostatic precipitator ashes (ESPA) and reach maxima of As (352 ppm), Co (45 ppm), Cr (105 ppm), Mo (32 ppm), Ni (106 ppm), and Sb (15 ppm) in the ESPA. Ce, Cs, Fe, Hf, La, Sc, Ta, Tb, and Yb did not exhibit concentration trends or are variable except in the case of one boiler, which showed an increase going from BA to ESPA. Only Br decreased in composition going from BA to ESPA. Rb, Sm, U, and Th showed marked variation in trends. The major elements identified by EDS were Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Fe, and Ba, with minor amounts of Mg, Na, Ti, Mn, and Sr. Al, Si, K, and Ca occur together and are present in most of the fly-ash particles. Ba was found as a major component with Ca, Al, and Si. Fe and Ca are usually associated with sulfur. Some small spheres (< 5 {mu}m) are comprised almost entirely of Fe (probably as oxide). Symplectite textures are noted in high-Fe phases. All elements except Br are significantly enriched in the fly ash relative to the coal, which contains 35% ash. Particle chemistry is consistent with the major mineral phases identified by XRD, which include: quartz, magnetite, mullite, gehlenite, anorthite, hematite, anhydrite, and clinopyroxene.

Hart, B.R.; Powell, M.A.; Fyfe, W.S. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Ratanasthien, B. [Univ. of Chaing Mai (Thailand). Dept. of Geology

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The influence of high quantity of fly ash on reducing the expansion due to ASR in the presence of alkalis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A testing program was devised to study the role of high volume fly ash (HVFA) in reducing the expansion caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). A series of modified ASTM C 1260 tests were performed, where the replacement of cement by Class F fly ash...

Mohidekar, Saleel D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Comparative analysis of methods for determination of arsenic in coal and coal ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the comparative analysis of different methods for the preparation and analysis of arsenic content in coal and coal ash have been presented. The suggested method is coal digestion method, i.e., coal ash digestion using the mixture of acids: nitric and sulphuric in presence of vanadium-pentoxide as catalyzer. The comparative analysis of different recording techniques (AAS-GH, AAS-GF and ICP-AES) has also been presented. For arsenic recording the suggested technique is AAS-GF technique. The obtained results show that the method of high precision, high sensitivity and high reproductivity has been obtained.

Vukasinovic-Pesic, V.L.; Blagojevic, N.Z.; Rajakovic, L.V. [University of Montenegro, Podgorica (Montenegro)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle 24 Dr. Longley gone to NPS Workshop 26 Surface H20 Environments . 31 Water Treatment Feb 2Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006 Jan. 17 Introduction 19 Water Characteristics & Water Wastewater Treatment 7 Chlorination & other Treatment methods 9 San Marcos Treatment Plants tours 14 Species

Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

473

CHEM /8853 1 CHEM 8853, Spring,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

semester biochemistry, one semester organic chemistry (CHEM 1315 or 2312) T-SQUARE PAGE (COURSE WEBSITECHEM /8853 1 CHEM 8853, Spring, Bioconjugate and Bioorthogonal Chemistry Syllabus COURSE MEETING expensive. You will be able to get through the course without purchasing either book. PREREQUISITES: one

Sherrill, David

474

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Device - Global Overview Tyco Fire Protection Products produces an air maintenance device (AMD-1) for dryPENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Design of a Competitive Air Maintenance products and established team goals to be competitive with these products Generated multiple concepts

Demirel, Melik C.

475

Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Spring 2006 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 113 Foundations of Computer Science I CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 213 Foundations of Computer Science II CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 219 Computer Science

Zadok, Erez

476

OkanoganRiver SpringChinookSalmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: NOTE Chinook Above Wells Dam Table 3. Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 44 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table 4. Tribal & Recreational Incidental Take Thresholds 45 for Unmarked Spring Chinook Table 5

477

SPRING 2013 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING 2013 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) and the OU School will spend between 8-10 hrs per week at the SPC working on a research project related to U.S. severe weather through this program. The student will also have the opportunity to spend time in the SPC operations area

478

SPRING 2012 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING 2012 OU/SPC CAREER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) and the OU School will spend between 8-10 hrs per week at the SPC working on a research project related to U.S. severe weather through this program. The student will also will have the opportunity to spend several days in the SPC

479

Astronomy 142: Spring 2008 The Evolving Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomy 142: Spring 2008 The Evolving Universe: Recent Theories and Observations in Modern Astronomy INSTRUCTOR: Diane Friend E-MAIL: diane.friend@umontana.edu PHONE: 243-4299 (Phys./Astr. dept. office: 243-2073) OFFICE: CHCB 129 (inside the Physics/Astronomy dept. office) OFFICE HOURS: M 10-11 & 1

Vonessen, Nikolaus

480

GIS Analysis GIS 6116 -Spring 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Geospatial Analysis (4th ed.). Leicester: Matador. Available online at httpGIS Analysis GIS 6116 - Spring 2015 School of Forest Resources and Conservation Geomatics Program _______________________________________________________________________________________ 1 GIS 6116 (GIS Analysis) INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Hartwig Henry Hochmair (FLREC Fort Lauderdale) Dr. Amr

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash spring coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Air Chemistry and Pollution Spring 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATOC 3500 Air Chemistry and Pollution Spring 2014 Meeting: T/Th, 12:30 ­ 1:45 am; Duane G1B25 in the news; for example, the quality of the air we breathe directly affects our health. In addition to mitigate the effects of air pollution. Finally, we examine some recent examples of atmospheric chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

482

Geothermal Energy in Iceland Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Energy in Iceland Kaeo Ahu CEE 491 Spring 2009 Final Presentation #12;HISTORY Iceland has five major geothermal power plants (GPP) Two produce electric and thermal energy Three produce Creating the availability of geothermal resources #12;HISTORY & BACKGROUND Iceland's first settlers used

Prevedouros, Panos D.

483

DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2014 Congratulations to these students for earning Joseph Ding, Yawei Dow, Luz M. Dzul Karnain, Ahmad Ariff Eddy, Steven Kyle Edwards, Corey Taylor Ellis Emelien Hailwood, Michael Dean Hall, Peter W. Hatch, Brent Lane Haubert, Ian A. Hernandez, Luis Leonardo

Wong, Pak Kin

484

Cloud Microphysics Spring 2013 **odd years?**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS724 Cloud Microphysics (2-0-0) Spring 2013 **odd years?** Prerequisites: ATS620, ATS621; Ph, as the class will involve designing and building a simple cloud microphysical model. Course Description: **Sue and observations of nucleation, mechanisms of cloud droplet-spectra broadening, precipitation particle growth

485

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FALL 2010 Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 MATH 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B 4 MATH 243 Analytic Geometry & Calculus C 4 Critical Reading and Writing 3 Breadth Requirement Elective 1 3 15 17 CHEG 231 Chemical Engineering

Lee, Kelvin H.

486

DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEAN'S LIST HONORABLE MENTION Spring Semester 2010 Brown, Skyler Joseph Budinoff, Hannah D. Buzimkic, Ena Campbell, Jesse Alexander Campbell, Jonathan A. Carlotto, Colleen R. Carvallo, Francisco Cureton, David Wayne Davis, Trent Wilford Davis, Wyatt Joseph DeRosa, Sean Edward Dettmer, Lance D. Dixit

Wong, Pak Kin

487

Current Issues at NIH Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERA Current Issues at NIH Spring 2009 Pam Gilden and David Curren Office of Policy for Extramural Research Administration #12;OPERA NIH Budget News and Priorities #12;3 Final NIH Appropriations FY 2009 · NIH received a total of $30.4 billion in new budget authority. · Increase of 3.2% from FY 2008

Grishok, Alla

488

Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy Notice Number: NOT-OD-08-033 - (See Notice NOT-OD-08-161 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008), the NIH voluntary Public Access Policy (NOT-OD-05-022) is now mandatory funded by the NIH submit or have submitted for them to the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central

489

Neutrinoless Double Phys 135c Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Phys 135c Spring 2007 Michael Mendenhall #12;Theory Overview #12 beta decays #12;neutrinoless double beta decays n e- p beta decay e #12;neutrinoless double beta decays n e- p beta decay e n e- p n e- p double beta decay e e #12;neutrinoless double beta decays n e- p

Golwala, Sunil

490

ECOLOGY LIFE 320 Spring Semester 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGY LIFE 320 Spring Semester 2011 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Liba Pejchar Office: 234 Wagar E-mail: liba to the fundamental principles of ecology. You will learn about the mechanisms that generate ecological patterns the distribution and abundance of organisms in nature. We will spend most of the semester studying ecology

491

Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Spring 2009 Future of Forestry in the Pacific Northwest May, College of Forest Resources Session 1: The Future of Forestry in the Pacific Northwest "The Future of Forestry in the Pacific Northwest" Bruce Bare "Markets Happen: The value of diversifying markets" Ivan

Borenstein, Elhanan

492

Chemistry 106X -Spring 2011 General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 106X - Spring 2011 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 1 and can be purchased in the UAF bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1 or 2 semester) · TurningPoint Technologies ResponseCard RF

Wagner, Diane

493

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Spring 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

494

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEG 332 Chemical Engineering Kinetics 3 CHEG 342 Heat and Mass Transfer 3 CHEG 341 Fluid Mechanics 3CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Engineering (FYE) 2 CHEG 112 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 CHEM 111 General Chemistry 3 CHEM 112 General Chemistry

Lee, Kelvin H.

495

Internship Administration (Policy effective Spring 2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship Administration (Policy effective Spring 2013) The purpose of this policy is to provide or repository for both non-credit and credit bearing internships. Employers and organizations wishing to post an internship opportunity have the option to contact the Career Center and indicate their interest in a Siena

496

University of Colorado Boulder Colorado Springs Denver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Colorado Boulder · Colorado Springs · Denver Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research 1800 Grant Street, Suite 800 35 UCA Denver, Colorado 80203-1185 (303) 860 Diversity Report Prepared by the University of Colorado System Office of Institutional Research April 2009

Stowell, Michael

497

Spring 05 - Department of Mathematics, Purdue University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description: This spring I will be teaching MA 572 (Introduction to Algebraic ... of scales; examples include blood flow in animal tissue, groundwater flow, heat ... We will illustrate why and how different tools are used for different types of hierarchies, ... mixed finite element method for the solution of second order elliptic and...

1910-41-11T23:59:59.000Z

498

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-3897) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

499

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

500

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-2635) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew